New guide to papers of demographer Donald Bogue

The Donald J. Bogue Papers are now open for research. Donald Bogue (1918-2014) was a demographer and longtime University of Chicago Professor of Sociology. Upon earning his PhD from the University of Michigan in 1949, he joined the faculty at Miami University and then joined the University of Chicago in 1954. He remained at UChicago for the rest of his career. He was affiliated with the National Opinion Research Center and was responsible for founding and leading several population research centers at the University.

Bogue founded Demography, the Journal of the Population Association of America in 1964 and served as its first editor from 1964 to 1969. His interest in family planning made him a major force in the worldwide movement for population control. He directed USAID and Ford Foundation-funded contracts to improve the evaluation of family planning programs’ impact on fertility in low-income countries and also trained demographers and clinicians through international workshops on the use of mass communications in family planning programs. The Donald J. Bogue Papers document his life in Chicago and his international work in Latin American, Asian, and African countries.

Black and white Donald Bogue portrait, undated. Bogue, Donald J. Papers, Box 24, Folder 8, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

Front cover of “Relevant Posters for Family Planning,” by B. Berndtson, D.J. Bogue, and G. McVicker, 1975. Bogue, Donald J. Papers, Box 7, Folder 8, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

Donald Bogue and Indonesian delegation at a summer workshop at the University of Chicago, 1970. Bogue, Donald J. Papers, Box 23, Folder 3, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

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