Author Archives: Deb Werner

Webinar: Create, Link, and Share Your Bibliography – PubMed Tools and ORCID Identifiers for Authors

In this 30-minute webinar, NCBI staff will discuss author disambiguation and the advantages of using an ORCID ID–a free, unique identifier that will remain constant, even if your name changes.  Also learn how to find your citations in PubMed, create a bibliography, and share your publication list with others.

Date & time: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 11:00 PM – 11:30 PM CDT

Register

After the live presentation, the webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. Learn about future NCBI webinars on the Webinars and Courses page.

Free ebook on the Cassini mission and Saturn

To celebrate the conclusion of the Cassini spacecraft’s mission to Saturn, IOP Publishing is making its ebook on the topic, The Ringed Planet: Cassini’s Voyage of Discovery at Saturn, free now through Oct. 15, 2017.

Download your free copy here!

Saturn and its rings

Saturn and its rings; image taken by Cassini.  Image Credit: NASA/JPL/SSI.

Online tutorials in the sciences and medicine

Looking to do some online training over the summer?  Check out one of these options:

Study carrels on first floor of Crerar

Some study carrels have been relocated from the upper floors of the Crerar Library to the first floor to provide additional study space.

Crerar Library 1st floor study carrels

Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, “Open Data: Science, Health, Community”

The 5th Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, Open Data: Science, Health, Community, will be held on Friday, April 28, 2017, at the University of Chicago’s John Crerar Library.

Open data is data that can be freely used, re-used and redistributed.   Some examples of open data resources include the Human Genome Project, the United Nations UNdata, and the City of Chicago data portal.  Open data can spur business innovation, help patients and families make better decisions about their health, or accelerate the pace of scientific discovery.

This symposium will provide participants–researchers and librarians–with an understanding of what open data is, how it gets created and shared, and examples of how open data might contribute to progress in our communities.

Registration and full schedule at: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/conferences/zar-symposium/

The symposium is a biennial event held at the John Crerar Library of the University of Chicago and made possible through the support of the Kathleen and Howard Zar Science Library Fund.

Call for proposals – Zar Symposium 2017

Open Data: Science, Health, Community
5th Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium
April 28, 2017
The John Crerar Library
The University of Chicago

Web Page: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/conferences/zar-symposium/
Email: zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu
#zarsymposium
@CrerarLibrary

Call for proposals

The organizers of the 5th biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, Open Data: Science, Health, Community, to be held Friday, April 28, invite proposals for presentations that provide insight into open data projects and initiatives, whether established or newly created, which have an impact on science, health, or community.  The focus may be, but is not limited to, opportunities for libraries and information professionals to contribute to or play an active role in projects or initiatives.

The organizers are interested in presentations that provide examples of collaborative efforts between institutions, groups, or individuals, with a focus on practical, real use cases of using open data.  Proposals selected for full oral presentations will be eligible for travel stipend.

Proposals should be submitted online at: http://bit.do/zar2017. Proposals must include a title, author(s), and abstract (maximum 600 words).  Presentations will be 30-45 minutes. The deadline for submission is Wednesday, March 8th.

Please consider the following questions when preparing proposals:

* How has your institution or community engaged with open data?
* If you led an open data project or initiative, how and why was it initiated, and what were the results?
* What are the opportunities and challenges of using or collecting open data?
* How are responsibilities determined and distributed?
* What kinds of tools and techniques may be used?

The symposium organizers will also consider interactive alternatives to a traditional oral presentations.

The intended audience of the symposium includes all who are involved or interested in open data, with a focus on, but not limited to, academic institutions.

About the Symposium:

Open data is data that can be freely used, re-used and redistributed.   Some examples of open data resources include the Human Genome Project, the United Nations UNdata, and the City of Chicago data portal.  Open data can spur business innovation, help patients and families make better decisions about their health, or accelerate the pace of scientific discovery.  This symposium will provide participants with an understanding of what open data is, how it gets created and shared, and examples of how open data might contribute to progress in our communities.

For more information, contact the symposium organizers at: zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu

 

Visible Body now available

Visible Body image of skull

Visible Body is a suite of 5 anatomy applications with interactive 3D models and animations:

  • Human Anatomy Atlas
  • Muscle Premium
  • Skeleton Premium
  • Heart & Circulatory Premium
  • Physiology Animations

It is available online and via mobile apps for iOS and Android devices.  App download instructions are here: http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/medicine/mobile

 

Top 100 articles of 2016 according to Altmetric

Altmetric has released its list of the top 100 articles of 2016, and the #1 article was written by a former UChicago faculty member (and soon-to-be former POTUS): Altmetric donut

Obama B. United States Health Care Reform: Progress to Date and Next Steps. JAMA. 2016;316(5):525-532. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.9797

The list is based on each article’s Attention Score, which is calculated by the conversations about the article that occur in places like news outlets, blogs, Twitter, Facebook and more.  The article above had a score of 8063; it is the number inside an Altmetric “donut” pictured here.

Read more about various research metrics on the Research Impact guide: http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/researchimpact

New Human Genome Resources site now available

The new Human Genome Resources site offers access to visualization and analysis tools available for the human genome, as well as other relevant tools like BLAST, the NCBI remapping service and databases that provide human molecular data. The resources are sorted into categories like Find, View, Download and Learn, making it easier to find what you need.

With the new site, you can:

In addition, the portal includes an extensive listing of learning resources that may help you have a better understanding of the wealth of information associated with the human genome.

Publishers require ORCID iDs for submitting authors

ORCID logoWiley, the Royal Society of Chemistry, and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) have each signed ORCID’s Open Letter and announced their new requirement of an ORCID iD for all submitting authors as part of the manuscript submission process.

An ORCID id (Open Researcher and Contributor iD), is a persistent, unique, numeric identifier for individual researchers and creators. It distinguishes individual researchers with the same (or very similar) name and supports automated linkages between a researcher and their research activities. A researcher’s ORCID record, which includes their ORCiD identifier, holds non-sensitive information such as name, organization, and research activities.

Learn more about ORCID and how to create your
own ORCID iD at http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/ORCID