Author Archives: The University of Chicago Library

Extended All Night Study hours June 1-3

Regenstein Libary 1st Floor Reading Room

Regenstein Libary 1st Floor Reading Room (Photo by Jason Smith)

To support students preparing for finals, the Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will remain open Friday, June 1 and Saturday, June 2 after the building closes at 11 p.m.

The all-night study space will thus be open 24 hours until the end of finals on Friday, June 8.

For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Alumni Weekend at the Library

UChicago Alumni Weekend logoThe University of Chicago Library welcomes alumni back to campus with two special programs.

 


Library Resources for Alumni

A librarian and a student look at the Library Catalog

Rebecca Starkey, right, will explain how alumni can access Library resources and services.

Learn about Library resources and services for University of Chicago alumni, including how to visit our libraries, establish borrowing privileges, access online resources licensed for alumni, and obtain research assistance from librarians.

Join Rebecca Starkey, AB’95, Librarian for College Instruction & Outreach, on Friday, June 1, from 11:15–11:45 a.m., at the TechBar in the Joseph Regenstein Library, 1100 E. 57th Street, Room 160.


Joe and Rika Mansueto Library Tour: Discover the Dome

The Library remains at the center of research, learning, and campus life at UChicago. Tour the Joe and Rika Mansueto Library designed by renowned architect Helmut Jahn. Admire the striking glass-domed Grand Reading Room, and see the robotic storage and retrieval system.

Tours are being offered on these dates and times:

  • Friday, June 1, beginning at 3 p.m., 3:15 p.m., 3:30 p.m., and 3:45 p.m.
  • Saturday, June 2, beginning at 11 a.m., 11:15 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 2 p.m., 2:15 p.m., 2:30 p.m., and 2:45 p.m.

Meet in the Lobby of the Joseph Regenstein Library, 1100 E. 57th Street.

For more information, visit the Alumni Weekend Events page and the Registration page.

Mansueto and Regenstein

Mansueto and Regenstein libraries. (Photo by Tom Rossiter)

Tableau: ‘Vivian Maier’s photographs become a resource for scholars’

Sights now seen: Vivian Maier’s photographs become a resource for scholars
Tableau — Spring 2018

UChicago Magazine: ‘A sense of witnessing history’ at center of exhibition

Bearing witness: A Special Collections exhibit examines the trauma of war
University of Chicago Magazine — Spring 2018

Prayer Room opens in Regenstein B-60

On Monday, May 14, a new Prayer Room opened in the Regenstein Library.  The Prayer Room was made possible by the support of the Office of the Provost, Spiritual Life and the Library.  The Prayer Room is located on the B-Level in Room B-60.

Requests for access may be sent to spirit@uchicago.edu.  Requests need to include name, ChicagoID number (printed on the back of the UChicago Card) and department or year in the College.  Once access is granted, your ID card will unlock the room, which may be used during Regenstein building hours.

In addition to the new space, the Nursing Mother’s Room in B-51 is available for women’s prayer.   See Nursing Mother’s and Women’s Prayer Room for instructions regarding access.

Maroon: Exhibition shifts focus away from war itself

“War, Trauma, Memory” exhibition opens in the Reg
Chicago Maroon — May 11, 2018

Play on Surfaces & Surfing: New Sculpture by Jessica Stockholder

Installation dates:  May 17 – June 7, 2018
Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, 1100 E. 57th Street, First Floor, Chicago, IL 
Hours
: Mondays to Thursdays, 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Fridays, 8:30a.m.–5 p.m.; and Saturdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Opening reception and book signing:  May 17, 4:30–6:30 p.m., Regenstein Library Room 122 – RSVP

Jessica Stockholder, “Ceded,” 2017, Scanner, seed pods, paper maché, oil and acrylic paint, plastic part, table.

Artist statement about the installation

Artwork of CPU, oil paint, silk fabric, vinyl, table, hardware

Jessica Stockholder, “Sorrow,” 2017, CPU, oil paint, silk fabric, vinyl, table, hardware.

Three works are installed in the library where they exist in and amongst other objects that they are similar to.  Each of the works, Sorrow, Keeping Abreast, and Ceded takes as its staring point a generic desktop electronic device. These devices are all produced in multiple; in this way they are part of a grid of production and distribution that is much bigger than they are, and each one is greeted with an expectation that it will be the same as many others. These sculptures surf the wave of that expectation, and though each work takes a generic electronic box as its point of origin, the work is in the end unique.

All surfaces present an opportunity for illusion and storytelling. The surfaces of these boxes are replete with meaning before I get near them. They ask to be taken for granted. They present some small allure for the new owner, but the colors are neutral, the two-toned color scheme they often sport is quiet, and allows for stylistic change from year to year. Their exterior bears little relation to their interior function; the exterior surface of the box is designed to insinuate itself into our lives, to sit amongst the designs of interior home, office and library spaces.

My interventions in these surfaces propose variation, eccentricity, drama, humor, beauty and discomfort; new possibilities, and the suggestion that individual affect matters, are injected into the flow of the grid that these machines are a part of.

—Jessica Stockholder, April 2018


Organized by Laura Steward, Curator of Public Art, Smart Museum of Art

Library receives medals, papers of Nobel laureate James Cronin

The University of Chicago Library has received the medals and academic papers of Nobel-winning physicist James Cronin, SM’53, PhD’55, the late UChicago scientist who made defining contributions to physics and astronomical observation.

James Cronin at chalkboard

James Cronin at the chalkboard. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Cronin’s children, Emily Cronin Grothe and Daniel Cronin, donated six medals that recognize his extraordinary achievements, including the 1980 Nobel Prize Medal for Physics and the 1999 National Medal of Science. His widow, Carol Cronin, donated his professional papers, including lab reports, articles, lectures, speeches, teaching materials, correspondence and other items.

The two gifts join archival collections at the Library’s Special Collections Research Center containing the papers or medals of 20 other Nobel laureates, including UChicago-associated physicists Niels Bohr, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, Arthur H. Compton, Enrico Fermi, James Franck, Albert A. Michelson, Yoichiro Nambu and Eugene Wigner.

Nobel Prize medal in a gloved hand

James Cronin’s Nobel Prize Medal. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library. The Nobel Prize medal design mark is the registered trademark of the Nobel Foundation. (Photo by Jean Lachat)

“I am deeply grateful to the Cronin family for their invaluable gifts to the Library,” said Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian. “Making James Cronin’s papers and medals available to researchers and students not only helps us to understand the achievements of the past—it also fuels the rigorous inquiry of faculty and the transformative education we provide students. That is why the University of Chicago Library is committed to being the home of Nobel Prize winners’ research.”

Cronin earned his master’s degree and PhD in physics from UChicago in the 1950s. While conducting research in the 1960s at Brookhaven National Laboratory, he and colleague Val Fitch studied subatomic particles coming off collisions between protons and atom nuclei and found the first example of nature’s preference for matter over antimatter. It was the first observation of a mystery that had baffled scientists for decades, and the breakthrough would earn them the Nobel Prize in 1980.

This finding was later used to provide support for the Big Bang theory, explaining why the explosion would produce more matter than antimatter—leaving remnants that would eventually became stars, planets and human life.

Studying the origin of cosmic rays

Cronin joined the UChicago faculty in 1971 as University Professor of Physics. He soon shifted course to study the origin of cosmic rays: mysterious, highly energetic particles that strike the Earth from elsewhere in the cosmos. To search for them, he co-founded the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina—a massive international collaboration to build a system of giant water tanks spread over an area ten times the size of Paris. It took its first readings in 2005, and just last year discovered extragalactic origins for some of the cosmic rays that strike Earth.

James Cronin (left) with apparatus and colleagues

Photo of James Cronin (left) with apparatus and colleagues. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Cronin saw himself as part of a long lineage of UChicago physicists. In 2001, he organized a symposium marking the 100th anniversary of Fermi’s birth and edited the book Fermi Remembered. Published by the University of Chicago Press in 2004, it explored the enduring significance of Fermi’s work.

“In his first year as a graduate student at the University of Chicago, Cronin studied with Enrico Fermi and developed a great respect for him,” said Daniel Meyer, director of the Special Collections Research Center. “When he was working on the Fermi centennial and publication, Cronin came to Special Collections frequently to do his own research in the Fermi papers. He examined all of Fermi’s original laboratory notebooks and located key letters and documents from Fermi’s career.”

Emily Cronin Grothe, LAB’78, said the University of Chicago Library was the right home for her father’s medals and papers.

“Our family has a long history with the University of Chicago, with my grandfather, father, mother, uncle and daughter all receiving advanced degrees from the institution,” she said. “Given that, and how proud my father was to be associated with the University and its remarkable approach and achievements in science, my brother Dan and I never wavered in our commitment to house my father’s papers and medals with The Library.”

Selected medals, awards and honors of James W. Cronin, including (left to right) the 1976 Franklin Institute John Price Wetherill Medal, the 1977 United States Department of Energy Ernest Orlando Lawrence Memorial Award Medal, the 1999 National Medal of Science, the 1999 Collège de France Service Medal, the 1980 Nobel Prize Medal for Physics, and the 1999 French Légion d’Honneur Chevalier Medal. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library. Photo by Jean Lachat. The Nobel Prize medal design mark is the registered trademark of the Nobel Foundation.

In the Wake of the Bombs: Germany, 1945

When: Monday, May 14, 2018 5:006:00 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description:
Bombed bridge and rubble

Photo by Jeanne Dumilieu

Professor Françoise Meltzer will speak about the book she is completing on the bombing of Germany in World War II: “Through a Lens, Darkly.” The talk is based on a series of photographs of the ruins taken by her mother in 1945.

Meltzer is the Edward Carson Waller Distinguished Service Professor in the Humanities, Professor in the Divinity School and the College, and Chair of Comparative Literature.

This lecture is presented in connection with the exhibition War, Trauma, Memory at the Special Collections Research Center in Regenstein Library.

Cost: Free
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
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Washington Post cites Ida B. Wells Papers

‘Fearless’ Ida B. Wells honored by new lynching museum for fighting racial terrorism
Washington Post — April 26, 2018