Author Archives: The University of Chicago Library

“Deemed Inadvisable”: The University’s Wartime Japanese American Ban and the South Side Nikkei Community

Presentation Time: March 7, 2019, 3 p.m.

Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Room 122A, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

Presenter: Eric Langowski, Japanese American Citizens League; Harris School of Public Policy student, CAPP ’20

Panelists: Hannah Hogan, former Woodlawn/Hyde Park resident; Mariko Ventura, former Hyde Park resident; Ross Harano, Hyde Park High School alumnus

Cost: Free. RSVP is required at deemedinadvisable.eventbrite.com.

A Japanese language instructor sits and talks with soldiers

A Japanese-American language instructor at the University of Chicago talks with soldiers. February 12, 1944. University of Chicago Photographic Archive, apf3-02838, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Description from event organizers: In June 1942, University of Chicago President Robert M. Hutchins found that it was “deemed inadvisable” to admit Japanese Americans as it might threaten the university’s war contracts. Over the protests of faculty and community members such as Professor McKeon, the university denied admission to dozens of Japanese Americans throughout the war, just as thousands of Japanese American refugees moved to Chicago, many to Hyde Park and the South Side. These refugees, neither white or black, confounded Chicago’s institutionalized segregation creating semi-integrated communities.

Presenting this forgotten history of exclusion alongside a panel of South Side Japanese Americans sharing their lived experiences, this event explores the legacy of the university’s exclusion utilizing the Library’s archival collections and cultivates the Chicago Japanese American story.

This event is sponsored by the University of Chicago Library and the Committee on Japanese Studies at the Center for East Asian Studies; and is partially funded by a community engagement grant from the Office of the Provost, the Office of Civic Engagement, the Mansueto Institute, and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture.

Love Data Week workshops explore data in everyday life, Feb. 11-14

The University of Chicago Library is offering workshops and programs in honor of Love Data Week, February 11-14. An annual global event that highlights data-related topics and trends, Love Data Week’s theme this year is “data in everyday life,” with a special focus on open data and data justice. UChicago students, faculty and staff are invited to join us for workshops, events, and a chance to learn more about data services at the University of Chicago Library. Unable to attend the events? Visit our Love Data Week guide.

Love Data Week, Feb. 11-14, Ongoing events at the Reg and Crerar LibraryIntroduction to Census Data
February 11, 11:00 a.m. – noon
Regenstein Library Room 523
Register: https://rooms.lib.uchicago.edu/event/4920072
The Census Bureau collects and disseminates demographic and socioeconomic data for the United States. Join us to learn about core data surveys, hear about upcoming changes that will be introduced in the 2020 Census, and find how to locate and download census data using ICPSR and Social Explorer.

Citizen Science Snack Break
February 12, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
TechBar, Regenstein Library Room 160
Citizen science is a movement that encourages the general public to participate in data collection for scientific research. Join us for a fun citizen science activity and a snack. No registration required.

Data Privacy Tips and Tricks
February 13, 11:00 a.m. – noon.
Regenstein Library Room 523
Register: https://rooms.lib.uchicago.edu/event/4921164
Data breaches and online tracking scandals are now common occurrences. Are you interested in protecting your personal data but don’t know where to start? Join us for an overview of easy-to-use tools that can help safeguard your privacy.

A Date with Data
February 13, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Regenstein Library Room 122
Do you love data? Join us for cake, button making, demonstrations of open data resources and projects, and a chance to learn about data services offered at the University of Chicago Library. Enter the Census Data Knowledge Challenge for a chance to win a gift card! No registration required.

Open Geospatial Data
February 14, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Crerar Library, Computer Classroom
Explore open data sources for your mapping, visualization, and research projects in this session. We’ll review free data sources ranging from the local to the global. We will also cover available resources for supporting your geospatial projects. No registration required.

March 8 deadline to apply for a Brooker Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting

Three people view case of books

Anna Wood (left) and Clare Kemmerer (right) view selections from their collections with Mr. Brooker (center). Photo by Klehr + Churchill

Second- and fourth-year College students at the University of Chicago with a theme-focused book collection are invited to apply for the T. Kimball Brooker Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting. The University of Chicago Library is pleased to sponsor this prize, which was established by Mr. Brooker, PhD’96, to foster a love of the book and to encourage book collecting among undergraduates. Applications are due on March 8, 2019.

Prizes include $1,000 for a second-year student and $2,000 for a fourth-year student.

Applicants for the prize are not expected to have collections that are large, valuable in monetary terms, or complete. Rather, the competition emphasizes thoughtfulness and intent in building a collection around the collector’s interests. Collections may focus on a topic, the work of one or more authors, or physical features such as illustrations and bindings. In addition to books, collections of musical scores and printed maps may be entered into the prize competition.

Past winners have collections focused on subjects that range from mathematical treatises to feminist zines, from cover art to Latin American poetry. A selection of books from prize recipients’ collections is highlighted in the annual Brooker Prize Web Exhibit.

Learn more about the Prize and how to apply at www.lib.uchicago.edu/brooker.

Books on display

Books that were part of winning Brooker Prize collections in 2018. Photo by Klehr + Churchill

Apply now for 7 new graduate student fellowships at UChicago Library

The University of Chicago Library is offering seven fellowships as part of a new program for UChicago graduate students. The fellowships are designed to give graduate students opportunities to explore alternative scholarly careers and to build skills and knowledge in new areas of scholarship.

Interested graduate students are encouraged to apply by January 15, 2019, for currently posted fellowships. Additional fellowships will be posted as they become available.

Graduate student points to image on screen

A graduate student examines an image that will be added to the Digital South Asia Library. (Photo by John Zich)

Winter Quarter 2019 fellowships include:

  • Digital Scholarship Fellowship (Digital Archival Collections): The fellow will conduct background and biographical research, evaluate and select specific items for scholarly importance, write descriptions and contextual material for items in the collections, and create a digital scholarship project around one or more of the existing digital archival collections.
  • Digital Scholarship Fellowship (Digital Humanities): The fellow will collaborate with Library staff and faculty in the Humanities to develop resources and workshops, and to identify other strategies to support the new MA program and undergraduate concentration in Digital Studies of Language, Culture, and History. The fellow will learn about and use textual and visual corpora, digital humanities platforms and research methods, and analytic techniques.
  • GIS Fellowship for Historical Chicago Data: The fellow will conduct an environmental scan to identify existing geospatial data of Chicago in the 19th and 20th centuries. Based on the scan, the fellow will georeference important sheet map collections before digitizing data layers and creating metadata. These data layers will be made available via the Big Ten Academic Alliance Geoportal and locally at the university. The fellow will develop content that contextualizes the digitized data within existing resources.
  • Library Research Support Services Fellowship: This fellowship will provide graduate students with hands-on experience supporting researchers in an academic library through in-person and virtual reference services.
  • Metadata Fellowship for the Digital Media Archive (DMA): This fellow will be responsible for enhancing the metadata for the Mesoamerican holdings within the University of Chicago’s Digital Media Archive (DMA).
  • University Archives Fellow: Archives today are a rapidly expanding field with increasingly broad responsibility for preserving and making accessible unique materials in all formats—traditional paper documents, photographs, and analog recordings, as well as a growing array of digital content: email, databases, digital images, audio and video media, and web sites. This fellow will develop skills and expertise in all these areas while contributing to the programs and services of the University of Chicago Archives.
  • Web Exhibits Fellowship: This fellow will use existing digital resources from the Library Digital Repository to develop web exhibits, highlighting significant items from large digitized collections, and providing contextual information about the items and their collections and creators. The fellow will develop skills in conducting original archival research, and in presenting the results of their research to a broad audience in clear, concise, visually-engaging ways.

Winter 2019 fellowships come with a stipend of $3300 per academic quarter.  Fellowships typically involve approximately 15 hours of work per week.

For more information about individual opportunities and how to apply, visit the Library website or contact Andrea Twiss-Brooks at atbrooks@uchicago.edu.

The Fetus in Utero: From Mystery to Social Media

Exhibition Dates: January 2–April 12, 2019
Location: Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

Diagram of fetus in utero

Du Coudray uses diagrams of the fetus in utero to help midwives-in-training see both the anatomical and emotional factors at play during pregnancy. Detail from Du Coudray, Abrégé de l’art des accouchements dans lequel on donne les préceptes nécessaires pour le mettre heureusement en pratique, 1777. RG93.L45 Rare. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Once restricted to the privacy of the doctor’s office, ultrasound images of the fetus are now immediately recognizable in the public arena through advertisements and social media, where posts tagged “baby’s first pic” are commonplace. Such depictions of the fetus in utero have become iconic and are arguably the most easily recognized medical image. How and why did this happen?

To answer this question, viewers are invited to embark on a 500-year visual journey, from Renaissance woodcuts to modern medical images. Along the way, they will encounter three major shifts in graphic representation. First, from 1450 to 1700, the fetus transformed from divine mystery to a topic deemed worthy of study. Second, from 1700 to 1965, the fetus achieved status as a medicalized subject whose visual ‘home’ was the obstetrical textbook. Third, from 1965 to the present, the fetus has achieved status in popular culture while maintaining its traditional medical role.

Through this rich visual culture, images of the fetus in utero have been used in the service of education, research, political agendas, patient-empowered medicine, and finally, entertainment. The images on view offer historical insights and a sweeping look at how the visual culture of the fetus in utero developed.

Hours: Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m., and, when University of Chicago classes are in session, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Curators

Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, The University of Chicago; and Margaret Carlyle, Postdoctoral Researcher and Instructor, Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge, The University of Chicago

Life-size female manikin with fetus

This life-size female manikin served as a pedagogical tool for turn-of-the-20th-century medical students. Pilz anatomical manikin [female], [19–?]. New York: American Thermo-Ware Co. ffQM25.P545 19— RCASR. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Related Events

Curators’ Tours

Friday, January 4, 4:30–5 pm
Wednesday, January 23, 1:30–2 pm
Friday, February 8, 4-4:30 pm

1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

Free 30-minute tours by the curators. Please meet in the front lobby of the Regenstein Library at the start time.

Opening Event

Thursday, January 24, 5–7 p.m.
5737 South University Avenue, Chicago, IL
This wine-and-cheese opening reception is hosted by the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge (SIFK).
RSVP required

Use of Images and Media Contact

Images from the exhibition included on this page are available for download to members of the media and are reserved for editorial use in connection with University of Chicago Library exhibitions, programs, or related news. For more information and images, contact Rachel Rosenberg at ra-rosenberg@uchicago.edu or 773-834-1519.

UChicago News: Palmer traces censorship of radical ideas in UChicago Library exhibition

Historian Ada Palmer traces censorship of radical ideas across centuries
UChicago News — December 6, 2018

Learn about turkeys with Library research guide

Image of a wild turkey (male)

First American West: The Ohio River Valley, 1750-1820 Library of Congress, American Memory. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award99/icuhtml//fawhome.html

In celebration of Thanksgiving, the University of Chicago Library once again brings you its research guide to turkeys.  From turkey recipes to turkey economics to turkey history, the guide highlights a rich range of resources that will help you bring good food and informed conversation to your holiday table.

Find more University of Chicago Library research guides.

 

UChicago Magazine: Exhibit helps viewers think about censorship

Smear tactic
The University of Chicago Magazine — Fall 2018

Celebrate GIS Day at the Library

Join us in celebrating GIS Day on Wednesday, November 14:

GIS Day at the Library
2-4 p.m.
Wednesday, November 14, 2018
All events held in Regenstein Library

Browse maps and atlases from Special Collections
Special Collections Research Center classroom

Discover CARTO and ArcGIS tools
RCC Walk-in Lab, Room 216

Bring your laptop and participate in a Map-a-thon using OpenStreetMap
Map Collection, Room 370

All UChicago faculty, students and staff are welcome. Stay for a short time or for the whole event.  No previous GIS experience is needed. Light snacks will be provided.

Meet new Social Sciences Data Librarian and Sociology Librarian Elizabeth Foster

Elizabeth Foster joined the Library as the Social Sciences Data Librarian and Sociology Librarian.  Elizabeth comes to Chicago from Georgetown University Library where she was the Public Policy and Social Sciences Librarian, providing reference, research and outreach services, workshops and orientations, as well as developing collections in several subject areas.  Elizabeth has a Masters of Information Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science with a minor in Sociology from Kenyon College in Gambier, OH.

Elizabeth Foster

Elizabeth Foster (Photo by John Zich)

Barbara Kern interviewed Elizabeth to find out how she plans to work with faculty and students.

Elizabeth can be reached at ehfoster@uchicago.edu, 773-702-8699, and Regenstein Library Room 261.

Q: How did you become interested in social sciences data?

A: I’ve always been someone who wants to know the details. Data allows you to see information at a really granular level. Throughout my career, I’ve worked with a lot of library users who want to research contemporary social problems. Data lets them take a look behind the scenes and develop their own conclusions.

Q: What are the greatest opportunities and challenges in working with research data?

A: Research data is available in a variety of formats—print, online, and disks—and none of it is consolidated in one place; it is easy to miss something valuable if you don’t know where to look. There’s an opportunity to make data discovery more seamless. In addition, the process of organizing, preserving, and sharing data and research workflows can be complicated. There are a lot of great tools that can help researchers open up their data, methods, and findings to new audiences.

Q:  What are some of the highlights of your work with the sociology faculty and students at Georgetown University?

A: I worked closely with two sociology faculty members to provide instruction to their students. In their sophomore year, they would come to the library and get an introduction to social sciences literature. In their senior year, they would return to learn more about research skills and subsequently apply them to their thesis projects. It was a great chance to work with students throughout multiple courses and help them produce original research.

Q: How will you work with social sciences faculty and students at University of Chicago in your new role?

A: I will help social sciences faculty and students discover, evaluate, and use datasets and other information resources. I will also help researchers manage and share their original data using various tools and technologies, such as the DMPTool and Knowledge@UChicago. I plan to offer consultations and workshops on data topics and social sciences resources.

Q: What was a particularly interesting project you have worked on with social sciences data?

A: I helped a student find information in Factiva to update a World Bank dataset on food price riots. We followed the authors’ methodology and found sources so she could tag them with prescribed codes and add them to the dataset.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the city of Chicago so far?

A: I love the lakefront. I grew up near Lake Erie and it is great to have access to a lakefront again. I also enjoy the museums, the food scene, and the architecture.