Author Archives: The University of Chicago Library

War, Trauma, Memory

Soldier in front of flag on cover of the Anzac Book

Cover, The Anzac Book. 1916. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Exhibition Dates: April 30 – August 31, 2018
Location: Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

It seems an understatement to note that war is traumatic to those who experience it in any way, shape or form. The pieces in this exhibition reflect their creators’ experiences in wars from the 16th century through the present day. Each was published or made public by their creators; by that action the creator invites us into the captured moment. We see, not a moment of trauma itself but a time after that moment, whether that be seconds or years. In this exhibition, the trauma of war is represented by that very absence of trauma, through the experience creators share with viewers, listeners or readers.

Here, photographs by soldiers or journalists at the scene share space with expressions of the effect of war created at a greater remove. Events are recounted at a personal, intimate level as in portraits of families or on a grand scale: the destruction of Dresden. Over time, images retain their power but may no longer serve the purpose for which they were made. For example, some of the items were created to be propaganda and here are displayed as art or as a curiosity. At times an overt intent of the creator or bias of the image is evident, and at others we need to remind ourselves that creators may have emotions hidden even from themselves. With images of war, in particular, the observer’s relationships to the conflict will affect the ways in which the object is understood. How many recall the stakes of the 30 Years War?

Drawing of soldiers

Jean Louis Forain. Le Poilu psychologue, [1918]. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Anchoring the exhibition is Francisco Goya’s Los desastres de la guerra, a book of prints etched in the early 19th century, left unpublished until 1863 for fear of censorship. The suite of plates Goya created in response to suffering he witnessed during the Napoleonic wars is considered to contain the first eyewitness images of war reporting. The book is opened to Plate 44 “Yo lo vi” (I saw it).

Indeed “Yo lo vi”: the images, sculpture, poetry, and music here are haunted by the very absence of violence and the persistence of memory.

Hours: Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m., and, when University of Chicago classes are in session, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Free and open to the public.

Yo lo vi

Francisco Goya. Plate 44, “Yo lo vi,” Los desastres de la guerra, 1893. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Related Event

In the Wake of the Bombs: Germany, 1945

May 14, 5 p.m.
Regenstein Library, Room 122

Professor Françoise Meltzer will speak about the book she is currently completing on the bombing of Germany in World War II: Through a Lens, Darkly. The talk is based on a series of photographs of the ruins taken by her mother in 1945.

Meltzer is the Edward Carson Waller Distinguished Service Professor in the Humanities, Professor in the Divinity School and the College, and Chair of Comparative Literature.

Cost: Free

Use of Images and Media Contact

Images from the exhibition included on this page are available for download by members of the media and are reserved for editorial use in connection with University of Chicago Library exhibitions, programs, or related news.

For more information, contact Rachel Rosenberg at ra-rosenberg@uchicago.edu or 773-834-1519.

A poetry reading featuring Rosa Alcalá

When: Friday, May 4, 2018, 6:007:30 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: Rosa AlcaláPoet and translator Rosa Alcalá will read new work and poems from her acclaimed third collection MyOTHER TONGUE (2017), which Stephanie Burt described in the New York Times as “pellucid, as well as laconic, and [it] might make you cry.” Alcalá is the author of three collections of poetry: Undocumentaries (2010), The Lust of Unsentimental Waters (2012), and MyOTHER TONGUE. Her chapbooks include Some Maritime Disasters This Century (2003) and Undocumentary (2008). A highly regarded translator, she has translated the poetry of Cecilia Vicuña, Lourdes Vázquez, and Lila Zemborain, among others. She earned her MFA from Brown University and PhD from SUNY-Buffalo, and she currently teaches in the department of creative writing and bilingual MFA program at the University of Texas, El Paso.

The reading is sponsored by the Joseph Regenstein Library and Chicago Review.

Cost: Free
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685

Streamlined Interlibrary Loan request process combines UBorrow, BorrowDirect and Recall in one service

The Library is now offering an improved Interlibrary Loan service that provides a streamlined way for UChicago faculty, students, and staff to request materials from a wide range of other libraries.

Previously, Library users had to decide among several services to obtain needed material:

  • BorrowDirect for obtaining material from the Ivy Plus libraries;
  • UBorrow for obtaining material from the Big Ten Academic Alliance libraries;
  • Traditional Interlibrary Loan for material held in other libraries; or,
  • Recall for University of Chicago Library copies already on loan.

Click the “Request via Interlibrary Loan” link on the FindIt! page to use the streamlined service.

Now you will use a single Interlibrary Loan service that automatically gets you what you want in the best and fastest way. Big Ten and Ivy Plus partners will continue to provide expedited delivery in roughly 4-5 days. Items will usually be obtained from other libraries, but local copies will still be recalled if needed material is not rapidly available via interlibrary loan.

To use the new Interlibrary Loan service:

There is no need to search UBorrow and BorrowDirect individually anymore to make a request, as the improved Interlibrary Loan service will do that for you. However, the UBorrow and BorrowDirect search pages are still available from the Library’s home page if you want to use them.

Handing a student a book at Eckhart Library

Chicago Tribune: Ray Gadke’s ‘true calling was helping other people’

Ray Gadke, oversaw microforms and periodicals at University of Chicago library, dies
Chicago Tribune — March 18, 2018

Maroon: Ray Gadke ‘turned the Library into a home’

Remembering Ray Gadke, the ‘Unsung Hero’ of the Reg
Chicago Maroon — March 6, 2018

Apply for the Brooker Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting

Second- and fourth-year College students at the University of Chicago with a theme-focused book collection are invited to apply for the T. Kimball Brooker Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting. The University of Chicago Library is pleased to sponsor this prize, which was established by Mr. Brooker, PhD’96, to foster a love of the book and to encourage book collecting among undergraduates.

Tell Us About Your Book CollectionPrizes include $1,000 for a second-year student and $2,000 for a fourth-year student.

Applications and instructions for how to apply are available on the Library website. Evaluation of applications is based on the thoughtfulness and intent by which the student has shaped the collection. Collections may focus on a specific topic or the work of a particular author, or they may relate to special interests within a field. Bibliographical and physical features such as editions, illustrations, or bindings may also be the basis upon which a collection is developed. Whatever its defining quality may be, the organizing principle should be apparent in every item of the collection.

Past winners have collections focusing on subjects ranging from Religion in Late Antique Egypt to Zines, Punk Rock, and Empowerment.

Applications are due on Friday, March 16, 2018.  Learn more about the Prize and how to apply at www.lib.uchicago.edu/brooker.

Brooker Prize 2017 winners and Mr. Brooker

Left to right: 2017 Brooker Prize winner Jackson Bierfeldt (4th year), Billie Males (2nd-year co-winner), Mr. Brooker and Bryan McGuiggin (2nd-year co-winner) with selections from the winners’ collections. (Photo by Alan Klehr)

Extended All Night Study hours Mar. 9 – 11

Regenstein Libary 1st Floor Reading Room

Regenstein Libary 1st Floor Reading Room (Photo by Jason Smith)

To support students preparing for finals, the Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will remain open Friday, March 9 and Saturday, March 10 after the building closes at 11 p.m.

The all-night study space will thus be open 24 hours from Monday, March 5 until the end of finals on Friday, March 16.

For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Raymond Gadke, AM’66, Reading Room Manager, 1943-2018

Raymond Gadke provided scholarly resources to four decades of researchers and mentorship to generations of College students at the University of Chicago. He died this week at age 74.

Raymond Gadke, 1943-2018. Inspired by a fondness for Elvis Presley’s garb in “Blue Hawaii,” Ray made Hawaiian shirts his regular uniform, and librarians directed patrons needing help with microfilms to find him based on his signature look. (Photo by John Zich)

Ray came to the University of Chicago as a master’s student in the Division of the Humanities with a strong interest in history, conducting research on the Catholic Church, completing his AM in 1966 and joining the Library staff in 1969. His early interests, wide-ranging intellectual curiosity, giving nature, and close relationships with researchers and students were the hallmarks of his life and career at the University of Chicago.

Anyone who has frequented the microforms department in Regenstein Library since it opened in 1971 would recognize Ray, who began by overseeing this collection. Over the years, his responsibilities expanded to include the management of periodicals and, ultimately, all of the Regenstein reading room collections.

“He was an unfailingly friendly, unfailingly helpful face in the Library, known to thousands of people who walked through the doors—a bit of constancy in a sea of change,” said David Bottorff, Head of Collection Management and Circulation.  “He had an encyclopedic knowledge of the microfilm collection that is not replaceable.”

Ray used that knowledge to help researchers find the particular piece of microfilm they were looking for, getting to know the visitors who returned regularly, where they came from, and what they needed. He also became a mentor to scores of students who worked for him over more than 40 years at the Library.  In recognition of the important role he played in their lives, more than 50 UChicago alumni raised $75,000 in 2015 to create the Ray Gadke Internship Fund Established by Friends of Ray to Endow Undergraduate Internships.

Outside the Library, Ray frequently gave tours on campus, sharing his knowledge of the architecture, and he was widely known for his personal collection of religious statues, which started in the 1980s when Catholic priests who knew him from his graduate school research began giving him items from churches that were closing.  The collection rotated, as he gave items from his collection to other Catholic churches and schools as new ones came in.

Within the Library, Ray was known for organizing staff donations to the Hyde Park and Kenwood Hunger Programs, collected at the annual holiday party in December.

He also donated rarely held religious studies materials and funds to the Library.  David Larsen, Director of Access Services and Assessment, recalls a period when Ray would regularly come to the Library with liturgical works relating to obscure monastic communities in the Midwest.

“Ray was a wonderful University and Library citizen,” said Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian. “In memory of his parents, Ray generously established the Elden and Ruth Lauffenburger Gadke Endowment Fund to acquire, preserve, and provide access to books and other scholarly resources in religious studies. The fund will now become a lasting symbol of Ray’s kindness and of his deep commitment to religious studies. His good cheer, deep institutional knowledge, and longstanding commitment to students, researchers, library colleagues, and the greater community will be greatly missed.”

Donations in Ray’s memory may be made to the Annual Fund at the University of Chicago Library, the Hyde Park and Kenwood Hunger Programs, PAWS Chicago, or the Ray Gadke Internship Fund (choose “College: Jeff Metcalf Internships” in the “Area of Support” drop-down and note “in memory of Ray Gadke” in the comment field).

A memorial service will be held at Hyde Park Union Church on Wednesday, March 14 at 4:30 p.m.

James Nye travels to Nepal as a Fulbright Fellow

James Nye

James Nye

James Nye, Bibliographer for Southern Asia at the University of Chicago Library, has received a 2018 fellowship under the Fulbright Specialist Program. He was matched with the Madan Puraskar Pustakalaya in Lalitpur, Nepal for developing library and archive resources in the Nepali language. Madan Puraskar Pustakalaya, founded in 1955, is the world’s largest collection of Nepali books and periodicals.

During his fellowship, Nye will join in a survey of Nepali collections in the Kathmandu Valley, Palpa, and Lumbini, many of which were severely damaged in the 2015 earthquakes and are still out of service. He will also deliver a public lecture on the history of the book in Nepal, conduct a workshop for professionals on metadata for libraries and archives, engage in an academic roundtable discussion on archives in North America and Europe with holdings on Nepali, and assist colleagues at the Madan Puraskar Pustakalaya as they develop a collection development statement and plan for their collection.

The University of Chicago Library holds one of the largest collections of Nepali publications in North America with special strengths in publications from 1960 through the present.

Rhythm and Bombast: In Memory of Willie Pickens (1931-2017)

Willie Pickens at Pritzker Pavilion at Millennium Park

Willie Pickens at Pritzker Pavilion at Millennium Park, July 2011 (Viewminder, CC BY-NC-ND)

Exhibit Dates: February 19 – April 29, 2018
Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Fourth Floor

“I don’t have big paws like Oscar [Peterson] or a nice, big stretch like Benny Green’s. . . . I have to create illusions, make it sound like I’m doing something I’m not.”
— Willie Pickens (Lloyd Sachs, “Willie Pickens Rides Jazz Machine to Glory,” Chicago Sun Times, March 13, 1994)

Internationally known Jazz pianist and Hyde Park resident, Willie Pickens, passed away on Tuesday, December 12, after practicing for a “Jazz at Lincoln Center” show at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola in New York. Pickens was known for his bombastic style and thunderous sound, paired with a melodic and harmonic ingenuity and versatility. He was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on April 18, 1931. One of six children, his mother, Minny Hall, was a pianist who exposed him to music at an early age. Young Willie took to the piano early, practicing for hours at a time as a boy.

He graduated from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1955, with a BA in music education, and soon after moved to Chicago. In Chicago, Pickens found his place among the jazz community, in which he would excel as a musician, a teacher, and a mentor. Pickens achieved international acclaim with his piano work on Eddie Harris’ hit recording “Exodus,” from the gold record “Exodus to Jazz,” released by Chicago-based VeeJay records in 1961. He released his recording debut as a trio leader with his 1998 album “It’s About Time” on Southport Records. During his career, he toured with Joe Henderson, Clark Terry, Wynton Marsalis, Quincy Jones, Louis Bellson, Bunky Green, and Red Holloway. He appeared regularly at the Chicago Jazz Festival and the Hyde Park Jazz Festival.

Willie Pickens’ debut album, “It’s About Time”

Willie Pickens’ debut album as a trio leader, “It’s About Time” (Southport Records, 1998)

Willie Pickens was a devoted teacher and mentor, including to his daughter, jazz pianist Bethany Pickens. He taught in Chicago high schools from 1966-1997. He launched the music program at Hyde Park’s Kenwood Academy in the 1960s. Bethany Pickens currently teaches in this program. In 1995, he became a founding member of the Ravinia Jazz Mentor Program, and in 1997 joined the faculty of Northern Illinois University’s School of Music.

This exhibit in two cases displays examples of Pickens’ work from the University of Chicago Library’s general collection, as well as materials from the Chicago Jazz Archive.

An online exhibit is available as well.

The social media post announcing the passing of Willie Pickens

The social media post announcing the passing of Willie Pickens, from his daughter, Bethany Pickens (reproduced with permission)