Tag Archives: Crerar Kiosk

Science Writing Prize for College Students

science writing prizeThe Science Writing Prize for College Students accepting submissions for 2017 First Prize is $1500 Second Prize is $500 Third Prize is $300.

Deadline for submission is: APRIL 10, 2017

This competitive award for excellence and clarity in science writing acknowledges the ability of a University of Chicago College student to produce a paper, on a scientific topic, which is thorough in its arguments but accessible to a broad readership.

For more information please visit: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/crerar/about-crerar-library/crerar-prize/

Call for proposals – Zar Symposium 2017

Open Data: Science, Health, Community
5th Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium
April 28, 2017
The John Crerar Library
The University of Chicago

Web Page: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/conferences/zar-symposium/
Email: zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu
#zarsymposium
@CrerarLibrary

Call for proposals

The organizers of the 5th biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, Open Data: Science, Health, Community, to be held Friday, April 28, invite proposals for presentations that provide insight into open data projects and initiatives, whether established or newly created, which have an impact on science, health, or community.  The focus may be, but is not limited to, opportunities for libraries and information professionals to contribute to or play an active role in projects or initiatives.

The organizers are interested in presentations that provide examples of collaborative efforts between institutions, groups, or individuals, with a focus on practical, real use cases of using open data.  Proposals selected for full oral presentations will be eligible for travel stipend.

Proposals should be submitted online at: http://bit.do/zar2017. Proposals must include a title, author(s), and abstract (maximum 600 words).  Presentations will be 30-45 minutes. The deadline for submission is Wednesday, March 8th.

Please consider the following questions when preparing proposals:

* How has your institution or community engaged with open data?
* If you led an open data project or initiative, how and why was it initiated, and what were the results?
* What are the opportunities and challenges of using or collecting open data?
* How are responsibilities determined and distributed?
* What kinds of tools and techniques may be used?

The symposium organizers will also consider interactive alternatives to a traditional oral presentations.

The intended audience of the symposium includes all who are involved or interested in open data, with a focus on, but not limited to, academic institutions.

About the Symposium:

Open data is data that can be freely used, re-used and redistributed.   Some examples of open data resources include the Human Genome Project, the United Nations UNdata, and the City of Chicago data portal.  Open data can spur business innovation, help patients and families make better decisions about their health, or accelerate the pace of scientific discovery.  This symposium will provide participants with an understanding of what open data is, how it gets created and shared, and examples of how open data might contribute to progress in our communities.

For more information, contact the symposium organizers at: zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu

 

Help the Library improve services for College students: Take our survey

Complete our undergraduate survey by March 3The University of Chicago Library is conducting a survey of currently enrolled undergraduates. The survey explores many facets of students’ experience at the University, with specific focus on the ways the Library’s collections, services, spaces, and staff contribute to students’ higher education and career goals.

Previous surveys conducted by the Library resulted in the implementation of the Library’s Scan and Deliver service, as well as the creation of new group study spaces in Regenstein Library. Results gathered from the Library’s last survey of undergraduates, conducted in February 2011, are available online.

The survey was distributed by email on February 7. Undergraduates, please check your email for a message from the University of Chicago Library with your individualized link to the survey.

For more information or to report problems with the survey, please contact the project team by email at ithaka@lib.uchicago.edu.

Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic and Medicine

Illustration of an alchemy workshopJanuary 23 – March 4, 2017
Location: Crerar Library First Floor

The magic in J. K. Rowling’s series of Harry Potter novels is partially based on Renaissance traditions that played an important role in the development of Western science, including alchemy, astrology, and natural philosophy.  This traveling exhibit, Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine explores the intersection of these worlds, featuring highlights from the collections of the History of Medicine Division at the National Library of Medicine.

Related Event: Lecture and Reception

February 22, 2017
4:00-5:30pm
Crerar Library – Zar Room
In celebration of Crerar Library’s exhibit Harry Potter’s World, Professor Ada Palmer will offer an overview of ideas about science and magic in 16th century Europe and give a show and tell of rare books from the period.
Reception to follow.
RSVP: 773-702-7569

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact Barbara Kern at 773-702-8717 for assistance.

Visible Body now available

Visible Body image of skull

Visible Body is a suite of 5 anatomy applications with interactive 3D models and animations:

  • Human Anatomy Atlas
  • Muscle Premium
  • Skeleton Premium
  • Heart & Circulatory Premium
  • Physiology Animations

It is available online and via mobile apps for iOS and Android devices.  App download instructions are here: http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/medicine/mobile

 

Shared Past, Shared Future: The Marine Biological Laboratory and the University of Chicago – new web exhibit

Shared Past, Shared Future – web exhibit

whitman and MBL investigatorsThe recent affiliation between UChicago and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) is the latest chapter in the long, intertwined history of the two institutions. Charles Otis Whitman, the first director of the MBL, also established biology at the University. Frank Lillie, Zoology chair, became the second director and remained president of the MBL corporation until 1942. Today, as the institutions draw closer, we highlight and celebrate our shared history.

Top 100 articles of 2016 according to Altmetric

Altmetric has released its list of the top 100 articles of 2016, and the #1 article was written by a former UChicago faculty member (and soon-to-be former POTUS): Altmetric donut

Obama B. United States Health Care Reform: Progress to Date and Next Steps. JAMA. 2016;316(5):525-532. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.9797

The list is based on each article’s Attention Score, which is calculated by the conversations about the article that occur in places like news outlets, blogs, Twitter, Facebook and more.  The article above had a score of 8063; it is the number inside an Altmetric “donut” pictured here.

Read more about various research metrics on the Research Impact guide: http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/researchimpact

New Human Genome Resources site now available

The new Human Genome Resources site offers access to visualization and analysis tools available for the human genome, as well as other relevant tools like BLAST, the NCBI remapping service and databases that provide human molecular data. The resources are sorted into categories like Find, View, Download and Learn, making it easier to find what you need.

With the new site, you can:

In addition, the portal includes an extensive listing of learning resources that may help you have a better understanding of the wealth of information associated with the human genome.

Publishers require ORCID iDs for submitting authors

ORCID logoWiley, the Royal Society of Chemistry, and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) have each signed ORCID’s Open Letter and announced their new requirement of an ORCID iD for all submitting authors as part of the manuscript submission process.

An ORCID id (Open Researcher and Contributor iD), is a persistent, unique, numeric identifier for individual researchers and creators. It distinguishes individual researchers with the same (or very similar) name and supports automated linkages between a researcher and their research activities. A researcher’s ORCID record, which includes their ORCiD identifier, holds non-sensitive information such as name, organization, and research activities.

Learn more about ORCID and how to create your
own ORCID iD at http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/ORCID

Map Collection extends hours, GIS assistance

The Regenstein Library Map Collection has extended its hours Monday through Thursday: now opening at 10 a.m.

In addition to regular Map Collection use, between 10 a.m. and 12 p.m. Monday through Thursday during the academic quarter, GIS Resident Librarian Taylor Hixson will offer walk-in GIS assistance to patrons.

Taylor can assist walk-in patrons by:

  • identifying spatial data resources
  • helping organize, format, and join spatial datasets
  • finding journal articles, books, and other research about GIS
  • providing basic instruction for desktop GIS and web mapping tools
  • consulting with patrons about planning and managing spatial data research
  • linking patrons with advanced spatial analysis and computing centers at the university

Taylor is also available for scheduled GIS consultations in Crerar Library. To schedule a GIS consultation, e-mail her at taylorhixson@uchicago.edu.

The Map Collection is located on the third floor of Regenstein Library, and during the academic quarters its hours of operation are Monday-Thursday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday 12 -5 p.m.  Hours during interims are Monday-Friday 12-5 p.m.