Tag Archives: Law Kiosk

Bloomberg BNA content merged into Bloomberg Law platform

Bloomberg BNA’s newsletters and resource centers have moved to the Bloomberg Law platform. The BNA resource centers, which brought together news, case law, legal analysis, primary sources, and practice tools, have been consolidated with existing Bloomberg Law practice centers. Some sixty Bloomberg BNA daily and weekly newsletters have been consolidated into twenty-two news pages on Bloomberg Law.

For the remainder of the academic year, we will have campus-wide access to the Bloomberg Law platform. Law School users with individual accounts will need to sign in to utilitize the full Bloomberg Law platform, including setting up alerts and accessing court filings from dockets.

Screenshot of Bloomberg Law interface

Global law resources at D’Angelo Law Library

The Law School’s Global Chicago Law Wine Mess is a good time to explore the diverse foreign, comparative, and international law (FCIL) resources we have at the University. Here is Lyonette “Lyo” Louis-Jacques (’86), Foreign and International Law Librarian, on FCIL databases and websites that you can access via the D’Angelo Law Library.

To start your FCIL research, consult “people” and print resources, but also check out the “Foreign and International Law” section of the D’Angelo Law Library Law Databases page.

Are you looking for non-U.S. constitutions? We have Constitute, Constitutions of the Countries of the World, and World Constitutions Illustrated.

Don’t know where to begin to look for sources on the law of a particular foreign jurisdiction? You can use tools such as the Foreign Law Guide, GlobaLex, and Guide to Law Online.

Want to locate statutes, codes, cases, and other primary law of foreign jurisdictions? We have ChinaLawInfo (aka LawInfoChina aka PKULaw), Manupatra and SCC Online (India), Israel Law Reports and Nevo, vLex (over 130 countries – strong for Spain and Latin American jurisdictions), WorldLII (multiple countries), and many other foreign law research tools.

Looking for treaties and other international agreements? Check out HeinOnline.

Maybe someone has written about the comparative law topic you’re researching? You can look for commentary in secondary sources such as encyclopedias, handbooks, books, journals articles, and news stories. Favorite databases for foreign corporate law research are Practical Law (global guides and cross-border resources), Getting the Deal Through (GTDT via Bloomberg Law), International Comparative Legal Guides (ICLG), and the International Encyclopaedia of Laws (IEL).

Don’t find what you’re looking for? Or have follow-up questions? Or want to arrange a library research consultation? Ask a Law Librarian!

Wright Fellowship for promising new academic law librarians

The D’Angelo Law Library at the University of Chicago is accepting applications through March 8 for the 2019 Judith M. Wright Fellowship.  Established on the occasion of Ms. Wright’s retirement as the director of the D’Angelo Law Library in 2013, the Fellowship recognizes her 40 years of service to the University of Chicago Law School and her legacy as a mentor to generations of law librarians.

Judith Wright

Judith Wright

The Wright Fellowship will develop promising new professionals in academic law librarianship by supporting a career training program at the D’Angelo Law Library. It provides $4,000 to a law school or library science student or recent graduate for a minimum of six consecutive weeks of temporary, full-time work to occur between June 10 and September 13, 2019.

The Fellowship is intended to give candidates interested in law librarianship as a career an opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge in an academic law library setting. Fellows will work in the D’Angelo Law Library under the guidance and supervision of the Law Library Director and other librarians and will learn about the overall functions, policies, and practices of the D’Angelo Law Library in both collection services and user services departments.

The primary focus of the Fellow’s work will be determined by the interests and prior experience of the Fellow and the needs of the D’Angelo Law Library. In addition to participating in the daily work of a premier academic law library, Fellows will undertake and complete a project based on the needs and capabilities of the D’Angelo Law Library.

The project for Summer 2019 will be one of the following:

  1. Chicago Unbound, the University of Chicago Law School’s institutional repository, contains the scholarship of the Law School community, providing full-text access to decades of Chicago Law faculty scholarship and the archives of many Law School journals and publications. The 2019 Wright Fellow will help develop a new Chicago Unbound collection highlighting the scholarship and service of the Law School’s deans throughout its history. The Fellow will create a space for this historical collection in Chicago Unbound and complete materials for three to five former deans. Creating the new collection will involve reviewing and selecting materials (e.g. articles, speeches, manuscripts, photographs) as well as organizing and describing the selected materials in Chicago Unbound.
  2. As part of its rare books holdings, the D’Angelo Law Library has a unique manuscript collection of portraits of justices of the United States Supreme Court and documents by and/or about them with their signatures. The manuscript materials date from the eighteenth century, beginning with the first chief justice, John Jay, and continue through Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. The collection has been digitized but not yet described or organized optimally for online research. The 2019 Wright Fellow will create a web exhibit of the United States Supreme Court Portraits and Autographs collection, including background on the justices, metadata descriptions for individual items, and references to related material.
  3. The D’Angelo Law Library has an extensive orientation and training program for University of Chicago Law School students that includes in-person tours and learning sessions, online research guides, and customized training and research support for courses and programs. The D’Angelo librarians also maintain a resource guide to the many digital tutorials created and maintained by law database vendors, including Westlaw, Lexis, Bloomberg Law and HeinOnline. The 2019 Wright Fellow will expand the learning opportunities available to UChicago law students by creating digital tutorials specific to D’Angelo services and collections.

For detailed information on eligibility, requirements, and how to apply, visit the Library website.

Get to know Connie Fleischer, Research Services Librarian

As a continuation of the D’Angelo Interview Series that we began last year, Scott Vanderlin took a moment to catch up with our Research Services Librarian, Connie Fleischer. Connie shares highlights of her career to this point at the University of Chicago, her day-to-day life, and her interests outside of law librarianship.

How long have you been at the D’Angelo Law Library? 

I began working at the D’Angelo Law Library in 1992 as the Reference/Government Documents Librarian. My title now is Research Services Librarian. Obviously, the information landscape has changed dramatically. The work I do (helping our patrons) is basically the same, just using different tools. It is an extremely exciting and interesting time to be a law librarian. While keeping up with technology is a huge challenge, I have found it fascinating to see how legal research platforms continue to evolve.

In the time you’ve worked in the law library, what is the most memorable event you’ve attended?

In general, working with our amazing students and faculty over the years has been a privilege. They go on to do remarkable things! One example is the time I was pregnant with my oldest son at the same time Michelle Obama was pregnant with Malia. I would run into Barack Obama, then a Senior Lecturer at the Law School, in the Law School Café. We would exchange pleasantries about the excitement of expecting a new baby. Now those babies are in college! I was sorry to miss his most recent visit to the Law School but am looking forward to the opening of the new Obama Presidential Library.

What activities consume most of your time as a law librarian?

In addition to staffing the reference desk, I spend considerable time working with law students (as well as students in other divisions/departments on campus) on their research (for an SRP, faculty RA, or clinic work, etc.). I serve as member of the HathiTrust User Support team, which has been an amazing opportunity to learn about digital libraries.

What new services or changes to the D’Angelo Law Library are you most excited about?

The new scanner that the Library just acquired is straight out of The Jetsons! Located in the Reserve Room, it is free to UChicago patrons. Also, I couldn’t be more excited about all of the outreach (ie. Café D’Angelo/ this newsletter) that my colleague, Scott Vanderlin,  is doing to promote the vast services/people resources that the D’Angelo Law Library has to offer.

[editor’s note: duh.]

What is your favorite aspect of working with students?

Our students are so incredibly bright and intellectually curious. I love introducing them to new resources or tools that help them do their work more efficiently

What are some of your interests outside of law libraries?

I enjoy spending time with my family, playing tennis with friends, and attending estate sales.

Cert Denied Cases Now on ProQuest Supreme Court Insight

ProQuest Supreme Court Insight now includes petitions for writ of certiorari for cert denied cases, as well as for argued cases. Dockets and petition-stage briefs are also included for these cases. Coverage is from 1975 to the2017-18 term. Petitions for cert denied cases filed in forma pauperis are not present.

Cert petitions from the Supreme Court’s current term are available from the Supreme Court web site, through their Docket Search.

New developments for Knowledge@UChicago, the University’s institutional repository

The University of Chicago Library is enhancing Knowledge@UChicagothe University’s institutional repository for faculty and student research, in order to better meet growing needs and interests around data sharing and preservation, open access, and reproducible research results. In mid-December, visitors to Knowledge@UChicago will encounter a new, user-friendly interface for sharing and accessing research. Improved capabilities for data and software preservation will follow over the winter quarter.

Launched in 2016, Knowledge@UChicago is an open access repository for sharing and preserving scholarly work created by faculty, students, and staff. It currently serves as a home for UChicago faculty and students’ digital research publications such as articles, book chapters, conference materials, and a small number of datasets, and for dissertations and theses by students who choose to make them open to the public. UChicago faculty and students in divisions and departments that range from the Physical Sciences Division to the School of Social Service Administration to the Humanities Division have already contributed publications and datasets to Knowledge@UChicago.

With the support of capital funding, the Library is migrating the repository to the TIND digital platform. TIND is based on the open source software Invenio, originally developed at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, to manage its own digital outputs.

This new system will offer more features for handling research data in addition to traditional research publications, and will provide greater flexibility for future customization and integration with researchers’ workflows. The first phase of the project will migrate existing content to the new system by the end of December 2018. The second phase, beginning in January, will add new features that better support research data and software preservation, including richer metadata for data deposits and integration with GitHub.

This move will improve the infrastructure available to our University community to make their data available for reuse, new discoveries, and replication. It will also support researchers as they meet requirements for data sharing from funders and publishers, The new developments to the institutional repository are accompanied by additional library data services, including assistance with data acquisition and transformation, data analysis, and data management. We encourage UChicago faculty, students, and staff to contact the Library at knowledge@lib.uchicago.edu to discuss your data management and sharing requirements and to begin depositing scholarly works. Librarians are available for consultations and instructional sessions on the repository for departments and groups on campus.

Knowledge@UChicago is managed and supported by the Library, in collaboration with IT Services at the University of Chicago.

New database trials: Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports and 20th Century Global Perspectives collections

This University of Chicago Library trial is available from November 21, 2018January 12, 2019. It consists of ten different databases:

Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports

The FBIS Daily Reports are U.S. government publications that include translations of news from around the world (Africa, Asia, Australia/Oceania, Caribbean, Europe, Middle East/Near East, North America, South America). The FBIS Daily Reports also include translations of foreign law in English translation if included in the news sources covered.

The Readex FBIS database covers 1941-1996.

From the Readex description of the database:

“As the United States’ principal historical record of political open source intelligence for more than half a century, the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Report is an indispensable source for insights into decades of turbulent world history. The original mission of the FBIS was to monitor, record, transcribe and translate intercepted radio broadcasts from foreign governments, official news services, and clandestine broadcasts from occupied territories. Accordingly, it provides a wealth of information from all countries outside of the U.S.—from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe….

…FBIS Daily Reports, 1941-1996 constitutes a one-of-a-kind archive of transcripts of foreign broadcasts and news that provides fascinating insight into the second half of the 20th century. Many of these materials are firsthand reports of events as they occurred. Digitized from original paper copy and high-quality microfilm, this definitive online collection features full-text transcripts from Africa, Asia and the Pacific, China, Eastern and Western Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and the Soviet Union. Fully searchable for the first time, this unique digital collection features individual bibliographic records for each report and highlighted events to assist researchers.

Continue reading x

Meet new Social Sciences Data Librarian and Sociology Librarian Elizabeth Foster

Elizabeth Foster joined the Library as the Social Sciences Data Librarian and Sociology Librarian.  Elizabeth comes to Chicago from Georgetown University Library where she was the Public Policy and Social Sciences Librarian, providing reference, research and outreach services, workshops and orientations, as well as developing collections in several subject areas.  Elizabeth has a Masters of Information Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science with a minor in Sociology from Kenyon College in Gambier, OH.

Elizabeth Foster

Elizabeth Foster (Photo by John Zich)

Barbara Kern interviewed Elizabeth to find out how she plans to work with faculty and students.

Elizabeth can be reached at ehfoster@uchicago.edu, 773-702-8699, and Regenstein Library Room 261.

Q: How did you become interested in social sciences data?

A: I’ve always been someone who wants to know the details. Data allows you to see information at a really granular level. Throughout my career, I’ve worked with a lot of library users who want to research contemporary social problems. Data lets them take a look behind the scenes and develop their own conclusions.

Q: What are the greatest opportunities and challenges in working with research data?

A: Research data is available in a variety of formats—print, online, and disks—and none of it is consolidated in one place; it is easy to miss something valuable if you don’t know where to look. There’s an opportunity to make data discovery more seamless. In addition, the process of organizing, preserving, and sharing data and research workflows can be complicated. There are a lot of great tools that can help researchers open up their data, methods, and findings to new audiences.

Q:  What are some of the highlights of your work with the sociology faculty and students at Georgetown University?

A: I worked closely with two sociology faculty members to provide instruction to their students. In their sophomore year, they would come to the library and get an introduction to social sciences literature. In their senior year, they would return to learn more about research skills and subsequently apply them to their thesis projects. It was a great chance to work with students throughout multiple courses and help them produce original research.

Q: How will you work with social sciences faculty and students at University of Chicago in your new role?

A: I will help social sciences faculty and students discover, evaluate, and use datasets and other information resources. I will also help researchers manage and share their original data using various tools and technologies, such as the DMPTool and Knowledge@UChicago. I plan to offer consultations and workshops on data topics and social sciences resources.

Q: What was a particularly interesting project you have worked on with social sciences data?

A: I helped a student find information in Factiva to update a World Bank dataset on food price riots. We followed the authors’ methodology and found sources so she could tag them with prescribed codes and add them to the dataset.

Q: What is your favorite thing about the city of Chicago so far?

A: I love the lakefront. I grew up near Lake Erie and it is great to have access to a lakefront again. I also enjoy the museums, the food scene, and the architecture.

Expanding services for faculty in a changing environment

Brenda L. Johnson

Brenda L. Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian (Photo by John Zich)

Today’s scholarly environment presents an increasing array of challenges and opportunities for faculty and graduate students. New funding agency requirements call on researchers to present advance plans for openly sharing and preserving their data.  Researchers are seeking ways to obtain data in new formats, to visualize information in new ways, and to rescue and share data for new purposes.  Across disciplines, researchers are constantly challenged to find and adopt new tools and techniques. The Library is meeting this challenge by launching new initiatives, developing cutting-edge skills among our librarians, and bringing on new staff members who can assist researchers in this changing scholarly environment.

Stacie Williams

Stacie Williams, Center for Digital Scholarship Director

The Library’s new Center for Digital Scholarship (CDS) will be an umbrella for many of these services, facilitating the analysis of complex data, the visualization of theoretical relationships, the preservation of core research, and the sharing of research results. Stacie Williams, who joined the Library in August as the inaugural CDS Director, brings experience working with researchers in her previous position managing the Freedman Center for Digital Scholarship at Case Western Reserve University. Williams is working with subject librarians and faculty to identify priorities for establishing new spaces, technical infrastructure, and services that meet research and teaching needs.  Following are some of the key areas in which initiatives are already underway.

Data preservation and sharing

Nora Mattern

Nora Mattern, Scholarly Communications Librarian

The Library is expanding Knowledge@UChicago, the University’s digital institutional research repository, to better support the needs of data preservation. Led by new Scholarly Communications Librarian Nora Mattern, the Library is migrating Knowledge@UChicago to a new platform that was initially developed at CERN to support high energy physics. The new Knowledge@UChicago will launch in January and will provide funder-compliant solutions for researchers to share and preserve their code, data, and research results.  Mattern also provides consultations on good data management practices, writing data management plans, and copyright.

The Library is also partnering with the Energy Policy Institute at Chicago (EPIC) to host a Council on Library and Information Resources Postdoctoral Fellow in Energy Economics Data Curation, Ana Trisovic. Trisovic is focusing on the particular challenges EPIC faculty face in collecting and preserving energy data, which is often available only from private industry or difficult-to-use government websites. She will be building a clearinghouse for EPIC’s data to facilitate discovery and reuse, as well as developing solutions for preserving and sharing the code that researchers use to analyze their data. Trisovic will use the skills she gained earning a PhD in Computer Science and her experience developing similar preservation solutions at CERN, applying them to the field of energy economics.

Data acquisition and use

Kristin Martin

Kristin Martin, Director of Technical Services

The challenge of acquiring data for research is shared by many disciplines. For example, the Library subscribes to thousands of electronic books and journals, but researchers interested in data mining these texts cannot easily do so using the vendor’s PDFs, which are intended for individual reading. Kristin Martin, the Library’s Director of Technical Services, excels at working with publishers to provide alternative access that is optimized for data mining.  The Library’s subject specialists can work with faculty across the disciplines and with Martin to seek such alternative access.

Elizabeth Foster

Elizabeth Foster, Social Sciences Data Librarian

Elizabeth Foster, the Library’s new Social Sciences Data Librarian, can take this one step further, not only helping researchers find and acquire relevant data, but also helping them transform that data, for example, by formatting it to match the requirements of a particular tool.  Foster will offer workshops and will be developing data analysis consultation services, with a focus on using R and Stata.

Geospatial analysis

Cecilia Smith

Cecilia Smith, GIS and Maps Librarian

Faculty in many disciplines are exploring the ways spatial and temporal analysis and visualization can be used to gain new insights into their data. Cecilia Smith, the Library’s new GIS and Maps Librarian, can consult on the use of GIS information and geospatial tools to analyze and visualize trends in data from mapping the shifts in the border of the Roman Empire over time, to plotting the incidence of traffic accidents in relation to red light cameras, to mapping the impact of environmental factors on health outcomes, and more.  Read “Opening a GIS Hub at Crerar Library” for more information.

At-risk data and data rescue

Sarah G. Wenzel

Sarah G. Wenzel, Bibliographer for the Literatures of Europe and the Americas

Researchers interested in documenting historical trends are often stymied when early data are in analog formats not conducive to data analysis.  Heritage data–such as weather data and astronomical observations–are often the only evidence remaining of ephemeral or disappearing phenomena.  The Library is currently partnering with the Humanities Division to ensure that the UChicago Digital Media Archive’s linguistic and ethnomusicology recordings made by former faculty are converted from fragile magnetic tape to a digital form that can be used by researchers today. We are also working with the Ivy Plus Libraries on a web archiving project. Sarah G. Wenzel, Bibliographer for the Literatures of Europe and the Americas, co-developed a proposal with a colleague at Columbia University to create a digital archive of comics and artists’ websites.  Currently, more than 150 websites are being actively archived by this project and can be found at archive-it.org/collections/10181.

The expert and talented staff members of the Library are committed to expanding services that meet faculty needs in this changing environment. We look forward to working with you and encourage you to visit our Center for Digital Scholarship web page and to contact your subject specialist, Stacie Williams, or Elisabeth Long, Associate University Librarian for Information Technology and Digital Scholarship, to discuss your research needs.

Opening a GIS Hub at Crerar Library

Location is important. Tracking the movement of contagious disease helps contain its spread. Demographic geography influences access to financial and retail services. Virtualized medieval cities provide opportunities to explore the contexts of historical events. Each of these phenomena can be studied with GIS.

GIS and Maps Librarian and students with map of Chicago on monitor

GIS and Maps Librarian Cecilia Smith (center) discusses mapping tools and resources with (from left) students Paul Gilbert, II, College ’20, and Emil Sohlberg, College ’20. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

Geographic information systems, or GIS, is used to analyze locational information across disciplines such as public health, environmental science, sociology, economics, policy, history, and many more. Faculty and students are increasingly integrating GIS into their research, and opportunities to learn the technology are growing at the University of Chicago.

Thanks to a generous gift from the Kathleen and Howard Zar Science Library Fund and support from the Library Council, the University of Chicago Library is developing a GIS Hub at the John Crerar Library to enable geospatial research and learning activities on campus. The Hub will be located in Crerar’s Kathleen A. Zar Room, named in honor of the late director of the science libraries. Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian, sees the new Hub as critical to supporting research on campus. “The GIS Hub at the Library will provide faculty, students and staff from every discipline at UChicago with access to important technology and resources and, very importantly, the ability to consult with a GIS Librarian with expert knowledge,” she said.

Eight workstations in the Hub will offer GIS software, including QGIS, GeoDa, and ArcGIS. Large, high-resolution monitors will allow detailed visualization work. The GIS Hub will facilitate individual and collaborative work. Instructional technology will also provide a venue for geospatial workshops and demonstrations.

As the new GIS and Maps Librarian, I will support faculty and students through consultations on gathering and exploring geospatial data, spatial literacy, and visualizing geographic information.  I will also offer workshops on working with GIS data and getting started with the software. At Chicago, I will build on my recent experience as a Clinical Assistant Professor and the Geospatial Librarian at Texas A&M University Libraries, where I collaborated on research projects with faculty from geography, sociology, anthropology, history, urban planning, and ecosystem science. The Early Modern Shipwreck project at modernshipwrecks.com is a good example of one of my collaborations with faculty where I provided geospatial expertise.

The GIS Hub opens to the campus community in Fall 2018, located with the new Media Arts, Data, and Design Center on the first floor of the newly renovated Crerar Library. The Media Arts, Data and Design Center will open in early Winter Quarter.  This co-location is an exciting opportunity for faculty and students to access technological and maker resources for interdisciplinary research and learning.

For questions regarding GIS resources at the Library, please contact me at ceciliasmith@uchicago.edu.