Tag Archives: Law Kiosk

New Indian Database: SCC Online

The D’Angelo Law Library has subscribed to SCC Online. SCC Online has Indian Supreme Court and state High Court case law, pre-independence case law, central and state statutes, bills in Parliament, government policy documents, and reports of committees and commissions.

SCC Online is available to the entire University of Chicago community. Access is by IP address, but not anonymous–you must register and sign in with your uchicago email address, in the blank below the IP Access tab.

We welcome comments on SCC Online, how useful and user friendly you find it, and how it compares with our other Indian law database, Manupatra.

Library summer quarter hours, June 18 – August 25

Beginning Monday, June 18, the Library will operate on summer quarter building hours at all of its locations. Summer quarter hours will end on August 25.

All libraries will be closed Wednesday, July 4 in observance of Independence Day.

Crerar
Sunday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 12 a.m.
Friday – Saturday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

D’Angelo Law
Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Eckhart
Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Mansueto
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 9:45 p.m.
Friday 8 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday noon – 7:45 p.m.

Regenstein
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Friday  – Saturday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sunday noon – 8 p.m.

Regenstein All-Night Study
Closed until Monday, October 1.

SSA Library
Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Third Edition of the New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics brings changes to access

Palgrave Macmillan published a new edition of the New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics late last year. This updated version features new articles as well as articles from the two  previous editions. It is now on the SpringerLink platform and offers easy downloading of articles as Adobe PDF documents.

The Library has access to two versions. First is the Living Edition, which is updated with new articles on a regular basis. Our links in the Library Catalog and on the Business & Economics guide point to this version. The second version is the text of the Third Edition as it was printed. The two versions are almost identical at this time, but the Living Edition will have new content added regularly.

Access the Living Edition

Access the Third Edition

 

 

This new edition has eliminated the ability to compare current and previous editions online. The first and second editions are available to use in Regenstein Library, shelved in the second floor reference collection at call number HB61 .N49

Library receives medals, papers of Nobel laureate James Cronin

The University of Chicago Library has received the medals and academic papers of Nobel-winning physicist James Cronin, SM’53, PhD’55, the late UChicago scientist who made defining contributions to physics and astronomical observation.

James Cronin at chalkboard

James Cronin at the chalkboard. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Cronin’s children, Emily Cronin Grothe and Daniel Cronin, donated six medals that recognize his extraordinary achievements, including the 1980 Nobel Prize Medal for Physics and the 1999 National Medal of Science. His widow, Carol Cronin, donated his professional papers, including lab reports, articles, lectures, speeches, teaching materials, correspondence and other items.

The two gifts join archival collections at the Library’s Special Collections Research Center containing the papers or medals of 20 other Nobel laureates, including UChicago-associated physicists Niels Bohr, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, Arthur H. Compton, Enrico Fermi, James Franck, Albert A. Michelson, Yoichiro Nambu and Eugene Wigner.

Nobel Prize medal in a gloved hand

James Cronin’s Nobel Prize Medal. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library. The Nobel Prize medal design mark is the registered trademark of the Nobel Foundation. (Photo by Jean Lachat)

“I am deeply grateful to the Cronin family for their invaluable gifts to the Library,” said Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian. “Making James Cronin’s papers and medals available to researchers and students not only helps us to understand the achievements of the past—it also fuels the rigorous inquiry of faculty and the transformative education we provide students. That is why the University of Chicago Library is committed to being the home of Nobel Prize winners’ research.”

Cronin earned his master’s degree and PhD in physics from UChicago in the 1950s. While conducting research in the 1960s at Brookhaven National Laboratory, he and colleague Val Fitch studied subatomic particles coming off collisions between protons and atom nuclei and found the first example of nature’s preference for matter over antimatter. It was the first observation of a mystery that had baffled scientists for decades, and the breakthrough would earn them the Nobel Prize in 1980.

This finding was later used to provide support for the Big Bang theory, explaining why the explosion would produce more matter than antimatter—leaving remnants that would eventually became stars, planets and human life.

Studying the origin of cosmic rays

Cronin joined the UChicago faculty in 1971 as University Professor of Physics. He soon shifted course to study the origin of cosmic rays: mysterious, highly energetic particles that strike the Earth from elsewhere in the cosmos. To search for them, he co-founded the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina—a massive international collaboration to build a system of giant water tanks spread over an area ten times the size of Paris. It took its first readings in 2005, and just last year discovered extragalactic origins for some of the cosmic rays that strike Earth.

James Cronin (left) with apparatus and colleagues

Photo of James Cronin (left) with apparatus and colleagues. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Cronin saw himself as part of a long lineage of UChicago physicists. In 2001, he organized a symposium marking the 100th anniversary of Fermi’s birth and edited the book Fermi Remembered. Published by the University of Chicago Press in 2004, it explored the enduring significance of Fermi’s work.

“In his first year as a graduate student at the University of Chicago, Cronin studied with Enrico Fermi and developed a great respect for him,” said Daniel Meyer, director of the Special Collections Research Center. “When he was working on the Fermi centennial and publication, Cronin came to Special Collections frequently to do his own research in the Fermi papers. He examined all of Fermi’s original laboratory notebooks and located key letters and documents from Fermi’s career.”

Emily Cronin Grothe, LAB’78, said the University of Chicago Library was the right home for her father’s medals and papers.

“Our family has a long history with the University of Chicago, with my grandfather, father, mother, uncle and daughter all receiving advanced degrees from the institution,” she said. “Given that, and how proud my father was to be associated with the University and its remarkable approach and achievements in science, my brother Dan and I never wavered in our commitment to house my father’s papers and medals with The Library.”

Selected medals, awards and honors of James W. Cronin, including (left to right) the 1976 Franklin Institute John Price Wetherill Medal, the 1977 United States Department of Energy Ernest Orlando Lawrence Memorial Award Medal, the 1999 National Medal of Science, the 1999 Collège de France Service Medal, the 1980 Nobel Prize Medal for Physics, and the 1999 French Légion d’Honneur Chevalier Medal. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library. Photo by Jean Lachat. The Nobel Prize medal design mark is the registered trademark of the Nobel Foundation.

Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law access over the summer

Your law student accounts for Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law can all be used over the summer, though under different terms for each service.

Westlaw

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls:

You can use Thomson Reuters products, including Westlaw and Practical Law, over the summer for non-commercial research. You can turn to these resources to gain understanding and build confidence in your research skills, but you cannot use them in situations where you are billing a client. Examples of permissible uses for your academic password include the following:

  • Summer coursework
  • Research assistant assignments
  • Law Review or Journal research
  • Moot Court research
  • Non-Profit work
  • Clinical work
  • Externship sponsored by the school

Graduating 3Ls:

Graduating students have access to Thomson Reuters products, including Westlaw and Practical Law, for six-months after graduation. Your “Grad Elite” access gives you 60-hours of usage on these products per month to gain understanding and build confidence in your research skills. While you cannot use it in situations where you are billing a client, Thomson Reuters encourages you to use these tools to build your knowledge of the law and prepare for your bar exam. In addition, you get access to job searching databases on Westlaw and TWEN for 18-months after graduation for 1-hour a month. Extend access by logging into www.lawschool.westlaw.com or at https://lawschool.westlaw.com/authentication/gradelite.

For help or more information, contact the Law School’s Westlaw Account Manager Tami Carson at Tami.Carson@thomsonreuters.com.

Lexis

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls:

Continuing students are welcome to use their Lexis Advance ID for academic or employment purposes during May – August.

Graduating 3Ls:

Graduating students will have their Lexis Advance IDs automatically transitioned to Graduate IDs on July 1, with access through December 31, 2018. Those graduates going to work for a 501(c)(3) can apply for an ASPIRE ID for a full year of access following graduation. Qualifying graduates can apply from this site: https://www.lexisnexis.com/grad-access/

For help or more information, contact our LexisNexis Account Executive, Carter Isham at carter.isham@lexisnexis.com.

Bloomberg Law

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls:

Bloomberg Law provides unlimited and unrestricted access over the summer. There is no need to register, as your student account will remain active and available all summer.

Graduating 3Ls:

Students graduating this spring have unlimited and unrestricted access to Bloomberg Law for six months after graduation.

For help or more information, contact our Bloomberg Law Account Manager, Chrishantha Vedhanayagam at cvedhanayagam@bna.com.

Streamlined Interlibrary Loan request process combines UBorrow, BorrowDirect and Recall in one service

The Library is now offering an improved Interlibrary Loan service that provides a streamlined way for UChicago faculty, students, and staff to request materials from a wide range of other libraries.

Previously, Library users had to decide among several services to obtain needed material:

  • BorrowDirect for obtaining material from the Ivy Plus libraries;
  • UBorrow for obtaining material from the Big Ten Academic Alliance libraries;
  • Traditional Interlibrary Loan for material held in other libraries; or,
  • Recall for University of Chicago Library copies already on loan.

Click the “Request via Interlibrary Loan” link on the FindIt! page to use the streamlined service.

Now you will use a single Interlibrary Loan service that automatically gets you what you want in the best and fastest way. Big Ten and Ivy Plus partners will continue to provide expedited delivery in roughly 4-5 days. Items will usually be obtained from other libraries, but local copies will still be recalled if needed material is not rapidly available via interlibrary loan.

To use the new Interlibrary Loan service:

There is no need to search UBorrow and BorrowDirect individually anymore to make a request, as the improved Interlibrary Loan service will do that for you. However, the UBorrow and BorrowDirect search pages are still available from the Library’s home page if you want to use them.

Handing a student a book at Eckhart Library

New Library Guide: Data Sources for Empirical Legal Research

Do you have a research hypothesis or question you’d like to test, but aren’t sure about which data to use or even where to begin looking? Thinking about including some empirical analysis in your substantial paper requirement or journal comment, but don’t know where to find the right dataset? Mastering linear regressions or the Monte Carlo method and need more sample data to crunch?

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library’s “Empirical Legal Research: Data Sources & Repositories” guide to help discover the right data for your next empirical project. This periodically-updated research guide compiles and describes a vast array of data sources (available through Library databases or on the open web) on a wide variety of legal and law-related topics, including U.S. and global economics, law enforcement and criminal justice, litigation, intellectual property, civil and criminal case filings/dispositions, bankruptcy, finance, securities filings and enforcement, and U.S. government agency data.

Check back soon for D’Angelo Law Library’s upcoming research guides, “Empirical Legal Research: Tools and Methodologies” and “Empirical Legal Research: Getting Started.

Politico Pro Trial

Our trial of Politico Pro has been extended. Politico Pro’s reporters cover federal government activity in these areas: Agriculture, Budget & Appropriations, Campaigns, Cybersecurity, Defence, Education, Employment & Immigration, Energy, Financial Services, Health Care, Tax, Trade, Technology, and Transportation with very timely stories and daily newsletters. The Politico Pro trial now continues through April 30, 2018.

 

Online Examples & Explanations…and more

 

Wolters Kluwer Titles

Members of the University of Chicago academic community now have online access to many of the most popular legal study guides and exam preparation tools through the Wolters Kluwer Online Study Aid Library.

This collection includes titles such as the ever-popular Examples & Explanations series, Emanuel Law Outlines, Glannon Guides, and more!  Materials in this collection can be sorted by course, topic, or series, and are viewable as PDFs or online eBooks.  Users can also download entire titles for offline viewing.

Topic coverage ranges from core 1L courses like Torts and Contracts to upper level topics like Environmental Law and Business Organizations.

If you have any questions about access or use of the Wolters Kluwer Online Study Aid Library, feel free to stop by the reference desk or use the Ask a Law Librarian feature.

 

vLex for Global Legal Research

Re-discover vLex Global this year! The Library subscribes to this major platform for researching the laws of 134 jurisdictions in 13 languages.  The publisher describes its coverage as follows:

Comprehensive case law & legislation for the United States, Canada, Spain, Mexico, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, Panama, Ecuador, Uruguay, Puerto Rico and India. Extensive collections of primary materials for the European Union and other jurisdictions.  Extensive secondary materials for up to 100 countries including Federal Register, official gazettes, peer-reviewed law journals, doctrine, magazines and books. All available in up to 13 languages with automatic parallel translation! Create your personal account to customize your settings, set up alerts, follow documents, highlight, take notes, download and save documents.

You can use vLex to locate the texts of foreign constitutions, codes, statutes, regulations, court cases, and administrative decisions, as well as documents of regional organizations such as the EU, Mercosur, and the Andean Community. Besides the countries listed above, vLex is also strong for Venezuela, Portugal, Italy, the UK, Belgium, and France. vLex Global is great for human rights, immigration law, and comparative legal research generally.