Tag Archives: Law Kiosk

Streamlined Interlibrary Loan request process combines UBorrow, BorrowDirect and Recall in one service

The Library is now offering an improved Interlibrary Loan service that provides a streamlined way for UChicago faculty, students, and staff to request materials from a wide range of other libraries.

Previously, Library users had to decide among several services to obtain needed material:

  • BorrowDirect for obtaining material from the Ivy Plus libraries;
  • UBorrow for obtaining material from the Big Ten Academic Alliance libraries;
  • Traditional Interlibrary Loan for material held in other libraries; or,
  • Recall for University of Chicago Library copies already on loan.

Click the “Request via Interlibrary Loan” link on the FindIt! page to use the streamlined service.

Now you will use a single Interlibrary Loan service that automatically gets you what you want in the best and fastest way. Big Ten and Ivy Plus partners will continue to provide expedited delivery in roughly 4-5 days. Items will usually be obtained from other libraries, but local copies will still be recalled if needed material is not rapidly available via interlibrary loan.

To use the new Interlibrary Loan service:

There is no need to search UBorrow and BorrowDirect individually anymore to make a request, as the improved Interlibrary Loan service will do that for you. However, the UBorrow and BorrowDirect search pages are still available from the Library’s home page if you want to use them.

Handing a student a book at Eckhart Library

New Library Guide: Data Sources for Empirical Legal Research

Do you have a research hypothesis or question you’d like to test, but aren’t sure about which data to use or even where to begin looking? Thinking about including some empirical analysis in your substantial paper requirement or journal comment, but don’t know where to find the right dataset? Mastering linear regressions or the Monte Carlo method and need more sample data to crunch?

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library’s “Empirical Legal Research: Data Sources & Repositories” guide to help discover the right data for your next empirical project. This periodically-updated research guide compiles and describes a vast array of data sources (available through Library databases or on the open web) on a wide variety of legal and law-related topics, including U.S. and global economics, law enforcement and criminal justice, litigation, intellectual property, civil and criminal case filings/dispositions, bankruptcy, finance, securities filings and enforcement, and U.S. government agency data.

Check back soon for D’Angelo Law Library’s upcoming research guides, “Empirical Legal Research: Tools and Methodologies” and “Empirical Legal Research: Getting Started.

Politico Pro Trial

Our trial of Politico Pro has been extended. Politico Pro’s reporters cover federal government activity in these areas: Agriculture, Budget & Appropriations, Campaigns, Cybersecurity, Defence, Education, Employment & Immigration, Energy, Financial Services, Health Care, Tax, Trade, Technology, and Transportation with very timely stories and daily newsletters. The Politico Pro trial now continues through April 30, 2018.

 

Online Examples & Explanations…and more

 

Wolters Kluwer Titles

Members of the University of Chicago academic community now have online access to many of the most popular legal study guides and exam preparation tools through the Wolters Kluwer Online Study Aid Library.

This collection includes titles such as the ever-popular Examples & Explanations series, Emanuel Law Outlines, Glannon Guides, and more!  Materials in this collection can be sorted by course, topic, or series, and are viewable as PDFs or online eBooks.  Users can also download entire titles for offline viewing.

Topic coverage ranges from core 1L courses like Torts and Contracts to upper level topics like Environmental Law and Business Organizations.

If you have any questions about access or use of the Wolters Kluwer Online Study Aid Library, feel free to stop by the reference desk or use the Ask a Law Librarian feature.

 

vLex for Global Legal Research

Re-discover vLex Global this year! The Library subscribes to this major platform for researching the laws of 134 jurisdictions in 13 languages.  The publisher describes its coverage as follows:

Comprehensive case law & legislation for the United States, Canada, Spain, Mexico, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, Panama, Ecuador, Uruguay, Puerto Rico and India. Extensive collections of primary materials for the European Union and other jurisdictions.  Extensive secondary materials for up to 100 countries including Federal Register, official gazettes, peer-reviewed law journals, doctrine, magazines and books. All available in up to 13 languages with automatic parallel translation! Create your personal account to customize your settings, set up alerts, follow documents, highlight, take notes, download and save documents.

You can use vLex to locate the texts of foreign constitutions, codes, statutes, regulations, court cases, and administrative decisions, as well as documents of regional organizations such as the EU, Mercosur, and the Andean Community. Besides the countries listed above, vLex is also strong for Venezuela, Portugal, Italy, the UK, Belgium, and France. vLex Global is great for human rights, immigration law, and comparative legal research generally.

 

Papers of political theorist Jean Bethke Elshtain now open to researchers

The personal papers of political theorist, ethicist, author, and professor, Jean Bethke Elshtain are now available for research in the Special Collections Research Center. The papers primarily document Elshtain’s career in academia and her activities as a public intellectual called upon to address issues related to feminism, war, and political ethics. They reveal the remarkable breadth and depth of her work on subjects as wide-ranging as bioethics and Jane Addams.

Headshot of Jean Bethke Elshtain

Jean Bethke Elshtain

Jean Bethke Elshtain (1941-2013) grew up in Tinmath, Colorado, a small farming community outside of Fort Collins. At the age of 10, Jean contracted polio and was moved to Denver for treatment. Her mother obtained a job at the hospital in order to be near to her daughter, and eventually Jean was brought home to recuperate and learn to walk again.

Jean went on to earn an A.B. in history at Colorado State University, an M.A. in history at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, a second M.A. in history at the University of Colorado, and a Ph.D. in Political Science at Brandeis University. Elshtain held teaching positions at Colorado State University, the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Chicago where she was the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Professor of Social and Political Ethics in the Divinity School, Political Science, and the Committee on International Relations for 18 years.

In addition to her active teaching career, Elshtain was a prolific writer and public speaker. She authored more than 500 scholarly articles, occasional and opinion pieces, and reviews in a wide range of publications. Elshtain authored more than a dozen books.

She maintained a rigorous public speaking schedule and was invited to lecture or comment upon topics related to feminism, bioethics, political ethics, the place of religion in modern society and in democracy, and war. A devout Christian, Elshtain was unafraid to incorporate theology and the history of religion into her discussions of contemporary events and politics.

Following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, her writings on St. Augustine and the Just War doctrine prompted the George W. Bush administration to include her among a group of scholars and religious figures invited to the White House to meet with the President. The Just War doctrine was later used to support the U.S. invasion of Iraq, and Elshtain was a public supporter of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Additionally, Elshtain was appointed to the Council of the National Endowment for the Humanities (2006-2013) and to the President’s Council on Bioethics (2008). She also served on the board of the National Humanities Center (1996-2013), the board of the National Endowment for Democracy (2003-2011), and the Scholars Council of the Library of Congress (2001-2013).

Elshtain received many prestigious appointments, fellowships, and awards throughout her lifetime, including nine honorary degrees. She co-directed the PEW Forum on Religious and Public Life (2001-2004), and was on the boards of the Institute for Advanced Study (1994-1996) and the Institute for American Values (1994-2008). She was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1996), and a Guggenheim Fellow (1991-1992). She held the Cary and Ann Maguire Chair in Ethics and American History at the Library of Congress (2003), and was a Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar (1997-1998). In 2002 Elshtain was given the Frank J. Goodnow Award by the American Political Science Association, the highest honor bestowed by that organization. She delivered the esteemed Gifford Lectures at the University of Edinburgh in 2005-2006, which led to her final major work, Sovereignty: God, State, and Self.

Jean Bethke Elshtain died in Nashville, Tennessee on August 11, 2013.

The Jean Bethke Elshtain Papers were processed and preserved with generous support from the McDonald Agape Foundation.

New database trial: Oxford International Organizations (OXIO)

We have received trial access to the following database:

Oxford International Organizations (OXIO)

This resource has been created with “the aim of providing practitioners, scholars, legal advisers, policy-makers, and observers of international relations with the most precise, holistic and up-to-date picture of the acts of international organizations possible, and with an increased understanding of the contribution of these organizations.” OXIO is available via the Oxford Public International Law platform.

Access this resource via the Database Trials page.

This trial is available through July 31, 2018.

Please direct your feedback to Lyonette Louis-Jacques.

New features for Constitute, the free online resource for comparing constitutions, now LIVE

Constitute 4.0 is here! New features added to Constitute of particular interest are draft and historical constitutions. Constitute has draft texts for Iceland (2011), Lybia (2016), the Syrian Arab Republic (2017), and Yemen (2015). The collection of historical constitutions, while small presently (there are 10 historical texts), will surely grow as old constitutions are superseded by new ones. Learn more about the changes on Constitute’s What’s New page and in Zachary Elkins’ Medium post, “Introducing Constitute 4.0: Democratic Deepening” (Nov. 28, 2017).

Snippet of Arabic Constitute

Constitute’s tagline is “The World’s Constitutions to Read, Search, and Compare”. It has English and Arabic versions, and a Spanish Constitute is coming soon. As of today, English Constitute has the texts of 192 constitutions in force in English and English translation. Arabic Constitute has 54 constitutions. Constitute was developed by the Comparative Constitutions Project (“Informing Constitutional Design”). Law School Professor Tom Ginsburg is one of the directors of the CCP along with Zachary Elkins and James Melton.

Constitute is great for comparative constitutional law research. Check it out!

An early taste of legal research launches careers

D’Angelo Law librarians give College and graduate students their first exposure to legal research

For almost 15 years, librarians from the D’Angelo Law Library have been teaching a seminar on legal research for undergraduates and graduate students who are interested in using legal resources or considering law school or other legal careers. D’Angelo Law Library runs the seminar in coordination with the UChicago Careers in Law (UCIL) program and has expanded the course in recent years to include a legal writing component. This past Spring Quarter, 29 students signed up for the six-week seminar, which included units on case law research, statutory and administrative law research, and using secondary sources, in addition to legal writing and oral communication. The research segments were taught by librarians Thomas Drueke and Todd Ito, and legal writing was taught by Bill Chamberlain, Program Director of UCIL.

Students who have participated in the seminar have reported that the classes provided a good preview of what legal research is like in law school and in practice. Kyle Panton, AB’14, JD’17, took part in the seminar in 2013 and said it helped him decide whether to go to law school: “As an undergrad, quality opportunities to learn about what lawyers experience on a day to day basis can be hard to come by.” Panton went on to graduate from the University of Chicago Law School earlier this year and will be starting work at a law firm in New York City this fall. “I would highly recommend the seminar to any students who think that they may be interested in practicing law, or who think they may want to pursue a career where knowledge of how to conduct legal research may be a boon,” Panton added.

Seferina Berch, AB’14, said that, in addition to helping her decide whether to attend law school, “the seminar helped guide research for my BA thesis, which had a historical legal focus, and helped me get a 1L internship on the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.” Berch graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Law School this May and starts work as an associate at the law firm Sidley Austin, LLP in New York City this fall.

UChicago students interested in taking this course in Spring 2018 can sign up through the Career Advancement Office.

Through the eyes of a Nobel laureate’s wife

Ronald H. Coase and his wife, Marian, had just buckled themselves into their seats on the last leg of a journey from Chicago to Stockholm when an unusually loud and clear voice came over the in-cabin announcement system, jolting them to attention.

It was early December 1991, and their flights so far had been mercifully calm and relaxed. Less than two months earlier, the couple had been visiting Tunisia when a Reuters reporter approached them and became the first to tell the 80-year-old economist—a University of Chicago Law School professor well regarded as a founder and leader in the field of law and economics—that he’d won the Alfred Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. (“I didn’t know a thing,” Coase later recounted. “I’m really pretty fortunate to be in a place where it’s so difficult to reach me. It’s a good place to learn about it—a place so ancient.”)

Now, as the plane prepared for takeoff, someone on the cabin crew wanted everyone to know that a new Nobel laureate was on board—and that champagne would be served in his honor.

The first page of Marian Coase’s account. Source: Coase, Ronald H. Papers, [Box 1, Folder 22], SCRC, UChicago Library.

“And it was, immediately, the trays of glasses having already been prepared,” Marian recalled in a 15-and-a-half page handwritten account of their visit to Sweden for the Nobel Prize ceremonies. “We were grateful that there was no spotlight on the plane to shine on us.”

So began the trip of a lifetime: one documented not just in news stories extolling Coase’s work on transaction costs and the nature of firms—but one chronicled in about a dozen Nobel-focused folders that are part of Ronald Coase Papers, which became publicly available earlier this year at the University of Chicago Library’s Special Collections Research Center. The collection, a 186-box treasure trove of research files, drafts, lectures, personal and professional correspondence, notes, reports, photographs, clippings, artifacts, and more, offers insight into both the mind and the man, a Law School legend who died in 2013 at age 102. Marian Coase died in 2012.

The materials documenting Coase’s 1991 Nobel Prize are just a small part of the 112.5-linear-feet collection. But they paint a picture of an extraordinary experience that only 923 global leaders in chemistry, physics, medicine, literature, economics, and peace have shared. When Coase won the economics prize—which wasn’t established until 1969 and is technically the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel—it was a distinction he shared with only 30 others, nearly half of them associated with the University of Chicago.

This year, University of Chicago Professor Richard H. Thaler, the Charles R. Walgreen Distinguished Service Professor of Behavioral Science and Economics at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, was honored “for his contributions to behavioural economics”—becoming the 49th Nobel laureate in economics, and the 29th associated with the University of Chicago. Although Coase won his prize more than a quarter century ago—in a year of particularly elaborate festivities designed to mark the Nobel Prizes’ 90th anniversary—the artifacts in the Coase Papers offer a hint of what Thaler, and his wife, might expect when they travel to Sweden in December for the awards banquet and other events.

A congratulatory drawing from a young friend. Source: Coase, Ronald H. Papers, [Box 1, Folder 24], SCRC, UChicago Library.

The Coase Papers include dinner invitations from ambassadors, printed University of Chicago Law School thank you notes (“I would have liked to reply individually but the numbers made this impossible”), news clippings, congratulatory notes, laureate information, letters nominating Coase for the Nobel in the 1970s and 1980s, and an official program emblazoned with a gold Nobel Prize seal. And then there’s Marian Coase’s neatly written account, assigned to its own folder. It is relayed with an attention to detail, as if she hoped to keep the particulars of their visit from being lost to history. She describes moments of splendor, from listening to Georg Solti conduct Johannes Brahms’ Symphony No. 1 at Stockholm Concert Hall (“Fortunately, we sat near enough to hear the machinery at work … I understood, from the sound of the first chord, why Solti … commands such high praise. It wasn’t just satisfying Brahms, it was great Brahms”) to dining at the Royal Palace at a dinner given by the King and Queen of Sweden.

“The meal was chosen with the skillful restraint of a grand gourmet who was, I was informed, the King himself,” she wrote. “He was also responsible for hunting the deer whose meat, exceptional in both flavor & in texture, was the star offering of the main course.”

Dinner invitations from ambassadors. Source: Coase, Ronald H. Papers, [Box 1, Folder 23], SCRC, UChicago Library.

Marian marvels again and again at the efficiency, organization, and planning expertise displayed by the Nobel Foundation, and she tells of the “intricate maze of events” that were at once spectacular and exhausting.

The couple, who had been traveling until mid-November that year, had only two and a half weeks in Chicago before leaving for Stockholm. Preparations had been intense, with Ronald fielding congratulatory notes and interview requests while writing his 45-minute Nobel lecture and three-minute banquet remarks and Marian assembling appropriate “special events” wardrobes, something she’d never troubled about in previous travels. Garment alterations stretched to the last minute; in fact, she’d set down her needle and thread “only moments before rushing off to O’Hare Airport.”

Coase’s name tag and lecture from the Nobel events. Source: Coase, Ronald H. Papers, [Box 1, Folder 17], SCRC, UChicago Library.

In addition to the time pressure, there had been the sudden shock of sad news: Ronald Coase’s friend and colleague George Stigler, the 1982 Nobel laureate in economics and a member of the University’s economics faculty, had died suddenly on December 1, just days before Coase left for Stockholm. The grieving Coase offered a tribute as a prologue to his prize lecture, Marian wrote, adding that his words “seemed to lead his friend into the auditorium to acknowledge all the allusions to him in the Lecture.” Afterward, numerous people came by to tell Ronald that he’d given a fine eulogy. (Stigler actually formulated and named the Coase Theorem based on an argument Coase made in his well-known 1960 paper on transaction costs, “The Problem of Social Cost.” In his lecture, Coase made this distinction.)

The action-packed week hit its crescendo the next day when 1,300 people gathered for the much-anticipated Nobel Prize ceremony and banquet.

“One was warned not to make too many demands on one’s energy the day before as the day itself would be long & arduous & it all was going to be televised,” Marian wrote. “Everyone was counted on to be punctual and not to make mistakes. The Laureates were taken to the auditorium & rehearsed—& no doubt the King and Queen went through their paces as well.”

The demanding pace ultimately took its toll, and Coase fell ill with a cold and fever on the flight home. On Christmas Day, Ronald and Marian Coase finally “abandoned ourselves to sleep & awoke, unbelievably, 18 hours later,” Marian reported. “It was no longer Christmas but late in the morning of the 26th.”

Thank you cards. Source: Coase, Ronald H. Papers, [Box 1, Folder 19], SCRC, UChicago Library.

Despite the physical impact, the week had included various thrilling extras. The day after the banquet, Ronald, who had explored the economics of lighthouse management in some of his work, was taken for a private visit to the Swedish Lighthouse Authority. Two days before the banquet at Stockholm City Hall, the Coases were able to make a private visit to the building to admire the “bold design that had made a strong impression on us when we saw it forty-five years ago,” Marian wrote. And on the way back to the States, they had a nice stop in Paris.

Afterward, as Ronald settled into life as a Nobel laureate, someone compiled an album, pages of which are preserved in the collection. Affixed to the sticky pages with clear plastic overlay are yellowing news clippings, including a Chicago Tribune story featuring a photo of Marian and Ronald locked in a tender kiss, and a hand-drawn note of congratulations with multiple signatures. There’s a picture, too, of a blue ribbon labeled “Nobel Prize Economics” drawn in marker by a 12-year-old who appears to be a family friend.

The same child wrote him a poem that also relays the magnitude of the experience:

There once was a scholar named Coase,
Whom for the Nobel Prize they chose.
He was surprised at a prize of this size,
And now for pictures he does pose.
Hats off to Dr. Ronald Coase!

Poems by a young friend. Coase, Ronald H. Papers, [Box 1, Folder 24], Special Collections Research Center, UChicago Library.