Tag Archives: Library Kiosk

Apply for the Library Student Advisory Group

Mansueto and Regenstein

Mansueto and Regenstein libraries (photo by Tom Rossiter)

The Library Student Advisory Group serves as a formal channel of communication between students and the Library administration. The group discusses matters related to all six campus libraries, including collections, spaces, and services, along with issues relating to the present and future needs of the student community.

The Library Student Advisory Group meets once a quarter and representatives serve for two-year terms with an option to renew.

We are looking for student representatives from the following schools and divisions:

  • College (Class of 2022)
  • Biological Sciences Division
  • Booth School of Business
  • Harris School of Public Policy Studies
  • Physical Sciences Division
  • Pritzker School of Medicine
  • Social Sciences Division
  • School of Social Service Administration.

Please complete our online application by October 26, 2018.

For more information about the Library Student Advisory Group, or the application process, please contact:

Rebecca Starkey
Librarian for College Instruction & Outreach
773-702-4484
rstarkey@uchicago.edu

Place of Protest: Chicago’s Legacy of Dissent, Declaration, and Disruption

How have protesters in Chicago occupied space with their bodies, voices, and possessions? What do their strategies reveal about a protest’s purpose and message?

A large group of people with signs protesting

Strikers and sympathizers gather at Republic Steel rally, Chicago, Illinois, June 2, 1937. Source: Chicago History Museum.

Explore fifteen case studies of protest in Chicago spanning nearly 150 years of the city’s history in the Chicago Collections Consortium’s new digital exhibit, Place of Protest: Chicago’s Legacy of Dissent, Declaration, and Disruption, curated by Rachel Boyle, PhD.

From a makeshift bomb hurled into a crowd of police officers and laborers in Haymarket Square to a city-wide boycott of Chicago Public Schools in protest of continued segregation, the exhibit tells the stories of dissent among labor, civil rights, and antiwar protesters through archival images, documents, and oral histories curated from libraries and cultural institutions around Chicago. The interactive exhibit encourages navigation though a timeline of events as well as an interactive map that reveals how local declarations uniquely expressed national tensions and the ways in which memories of protest shape Chicagoans’ responses to urban conflict.

The University of Chicago Library contributed scans of items in its ACT UP Chicago collection to the Chicago Hilton and Towers, 1991 page of the web exhibit, which explores the ways the LGBTQ community asserted its needs outside a convention of medical professionals.

Protesters at Chicago HIlton and Towers, 1991

Nightlines Weekly, July 3, 1991. Source: ACT UP Chicago Records 1969 – 1996, University of Chicago.

About Chicago Collections and the University of Chicago Library

Chicago Collections is a consortium of libraries, museums, and other institutions with archives that collaborate to preserve and share the history and culture of the Chicago region.  The University of Chicago is a governing member of the consortium, and the University of Chicago Library’s Special Collections Research Center has contributed 356 archival finding aids describing collections that document Chicago urban history and 1078 digital images from its collections that depict Chicago urban settings and events in the city.

D’Angelo librarians honored for leadership and service in ‘Celebrating Diversity’ publication

Two D’Angelo librarians, Todd Ito and Lyonette Louis-Jacques, along with retired D’Angelo librarian Lorna Tang, have been honored for their leadership in the American Association of Law Libraries. Each was profiled in an organization publication, “Celebrating Diversity: A Legacy of Minority Leadership in the American Association of Law Libraries.”

Ito, a lecturer in law and the D’Angelo’s head of instruction and outreach, has been involved in numerous AALL committees, including as chair of the AALL Placement Committee. He also has been a leader in AALL’s regional chapter, the Chicago Association of Law Libraries (CALL) and has served on that organization’s executive board as an at-large director and as its president. Ito has also worked as the coordinator of the Illinois State Working Group for AALL’s National Inventory of Primary Legal Materials. He first became interested in working as a law librarian when he was a student reference assistant while in law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Louis-Jacques, a lecturer in law and the D’Angelo’s foreign and international law librarian, has been frequently recognized as one of the most respected foreign, comparative, and international law (FCIL) librarians in the country. In 2014, she received the Dan Wade Outstanding Service Award, which honors contributions in the FCIL area, and in 2015 she received an award for co-authoring the book International Law Legal Research. She is a prolific author and speaker, and has been active in numerous organizations, including the International Association of Law Libraries, the Chicago Association of Law Libraries, the Chinese and American Forum on Legal Information and Law Libraries, the American Society of International Law, and AALL. She served on AALL’s executive board for three years, and has been a mentor to other FCIL librarians.

Tang, the D’Angelo’s former associate law librarian for technical services, has been active in both AALL and CALL, serving on nearly two dozen committees over the past five decades. Tang, who retired in 2015, guided the D’Angelo’s technical services department through two major building renovations. She has published numerous articles on technical services, cataloguing, electronic resources acquisition, and vendor relations and received CALL’s Outstanding Lifetime Achievement in Law Librarianship Award.

“The service to our profession from these three librarians has been extraordinary,” said Sheri Lewis, director of the D’Angelo Law Library. “Involvement in associations is not only personally fulfilling but contributes to our library’s success supporting the University of Chicago community.”

“Pro svobodu a samostatnost”: The Struggle for Czechoslovak Independence, 1914-1918

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Second Floor
Exhibit Dates: September 26, 2018 – January 7, 2019

Plaque of the Bohemian National Alliance in America, 1918

Plaque of the Bohemian National Alliance in America, 1918

On October 28, 1918, the National Committee (Národní výbor) in Prague formally proclaimed the formation of an independent Czechoslovak state and enacted its first laws. This proclamation was the culmination of a four-year political and military struggle to liberate the Czech and Slovak peoples from Austro-Hungarian rule and to give them scope for their own political and cultural self-determination.

The creation of the Czechoslovak Republic brought together two distinct but closely-related ethnic groups – the Czechs and the Slovaks. Although speaking closely related West Slavic languages, these two groups had historically belonged to political spheres: under the dual monarchy of Austria-Hungary, the Czech lands lay in the northwestern part of Cisleithania, the part of the empire ruled by Austria, while Slovak territory formed part of Transleithania, the section of the empire ruled by Hungary. Inasmuch as the Hapsburg rulers of Austro-Hungary favored German language and culture in Austria and Hungarian language and culture in Hungary, both Czechs and Slovaks, deeply affected by movements of national revival in the early 19th century, considered their respective nations to be treated as second-class citizens within Austria-Hungary and sought greater autonomy for themselves.

With the coming of the First World War, Czech and Slovak efforts for autonomy became efforts for independence from Austro-Hungarian rule. Much of this activity took place outside of the Czech and Slovak homelands. After Czech and Slovak leaders in America agreed to join forces to fight for a single shared state, the Czechoslovak National Council in Paris, led by Czech philosopher and future Czechoslovak president Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, became the organizational center for the Czechoslovak struggle for independence. Volunteer military forces of Czech and Slovak soldiers – the Czechoslovak Legions – sprang up in France, Russia, and Italy, and fought alongside the Allied Forces, winning recognition for their exploits in the field. Czech and Slovak communities abroad, such as the Bohemian National Alliance and the Slovak League in the United States offered vital political, economic, and material support to the cause of independence. The efforts of all these different Czech, Slovak, and Czechoslovak organizations led to recognition of Czechoslovak national sovereignty by the Allied nations and the formation of the Czechoslovak Republic. This two-case exhibit includes publications, pictures, maps, and artifacts that document and celebrate these varied efforts towards Czechoslovak independence.

The exhibit is dedicated to the memory of June Pachuta Farris, former Slavic Librarian and a passionate advocate of the Archives of Czechs and Slovaks Abroad (ACASA).

Czech-American poster published by the Bohemian National Alliance and Union of Czech Catholics, celebrating the official recognition of the Czechoslovak nation by the United States.

Czech-American poster published by the Bohemian National Alliance and Union of Czech Catholics, celebrating the official recognition of the Czechoslovak nation by the United States.

T.G. Masaryk (1850-1937) in Chicago with Czech-American leaders, May 1918

T.G. Masaryk (1850-1937) in Chicago with Czech-American leaders, May 1918

The Scholarly Environment at the University of Chicago Library

Welcoming, Comfortable, Respectful to All

Welcome to the University of Chicago Library.  As the new academic year begins, we would like to greet all new and returning faculty, students, and staff.

The Library’s mission is to provide comprehensive resources and services in support of the research, teaching, and learning needs of the University community.  We hope that you will get to know some of the many librarians who are here to help you and to take full advantage of our offerings.

The University of Chicago Library is the heart of a University that seeks to enrich human life through the growth of knowledge. For the pursuit of knowledge to flourish, the Library is committed to maintaining an environment for users that is supportive of study, research, reflection, and scholarly collaboration; welcoming; safe; respectful of all; and comfortable, with spaces for quiet individual study, research, and reflection and designated areas for collaborative work.

In the past year, there has been graffiti found on Library walls that has been drawn to our attention and has disturbed some members of our community.  We ask that you join us in creating and sustaining a scholarly environment at the Library by notifying Library staff when you find such graffiti so that it can be removed and by reading and acting upon our complete statement of User Rights and Responsibilities for Creating and Sustaining a Scholarly Environment, and our policy on Maintaining a Scholarly Environment below.

Please contact us at scholarly-environment@lib.uchicago.edu if you have any questions about these policies or our scholarly environment.

Creating and Sustaining a Scholarly Environment

Library users and staff share responsibility for creating and sustaining an environment supportive of scholarship. To ensure this environment,

  • You have the responsibility to treat others with dignity and respect.
  • You have the responsibility to refrain from engaging in behavior that creates a disturbance, interferes with the right of others to use the Library for research and study, or otherwise detracts from a scholarly environment.
  • You have the responsibility to learn about and comply with Library policies for maintaining this environment.

These responsibilities come with the following rights:

  • You have a right to ask others to end conversations, lower their voices, or maintain an environment supportive of scholarship.
  • You have a right to request and receive assistance from a Library staff member in maintaining an environment supportive of scholarship.
  • You have a right to expect that in addressing problems, Library staff will take measured steps to restore a scholarly environment.

Maintaining a Scholarly Environment

All Library users and staff share in the responsibility for maintaining an environment supportive of scholarship. These responsibilities include the following:

  1. Exhibiting conduct appropriate to research and study by
    • maintaining quiet in all individual study areas and in the stacks
    • conducting group study and quiet conversations only in Library-designated areas
    • refraining from loud or boisterous behavior
    • silencing cell phones, laptops, and electronic devices when in Library spaces
    • restricting cell phone conversations, with care taken to avoid disturbing others, to Library designated spaces

2. Helping to preserve library collections by

    • following the Library’s Food & Drink Policy
    • not writing in, underlining, highlighting or otherwise damaging library materials

3. Helping to sustain the library’s physical spaces by

    • not smoking inside, or within 15 feet of entrances of, Library buildings (in accordance with University policy and City of Chicago ordinance); including not using electronic cigarettes or other such delivery systems
    • not bringing animals into the Library, except service animals assisting those with disabilities (in accordance with University policies for Service Animals and Assistance Animals)
    • securing bicycles only to official racks outside of the Library
    • not using scooters, skateboards, rollerblades, skates or other conveyances (except those assisting persons with disabilities), within the Library or near Library entrances
    • not posting signs, notices, or other material except in designated locations or with special permission, in accordance with the Library’s Policy on Promotional Activities

4. Creating a comfortable and supportive environment for other Library users and staff by

    • wearing clothing, including shirts and shoes
    • not exposing others to pornographic or obscene images
    • using Library spaces only for the purposes for which they are intended

5. Complying with Library and University policies, which ensure a safe and respectful community for all by

    • presenting appropriate identification when asked to do so by Library staff or University officials who have also identified themselves
    • leaving Library spaces at closing
    • not entering Library staff areas without permission
    • closely supervising children brought with you to the Library
    • not taking photographs of others for personal use without permission of the individual(s); not filming or taking photographs of Library spaces and users for publication or commercial purposes without permission of Library administration
    • not soliciting or conducting surveys without advance Library approval
    • not using Library space for political fundraising or any other partisan political campaign activities, in accordance with University policies regarding political activity

Prohibited actions that are illegal, endanger safety or are considered serious violations include:

  1. Engaging in criminal activity, including theft, battery, or assault
  2. Vandalizing or defacing of Library material, equipment, collections, furniture, or facilities (including creating graffiti)
  3. Stalking, harassing, or making unwanted sexual advances
  4. Engaging in sexual activities or indecently exposing oneself
  5. Violating the University’s Policy on Harassment, Discrimination, and Sexual Misconduct (including but not limited to sexual harassment, sexual abuse, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking) or denigrating individuals on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, veteran status, or any protected classes under the law
  6. Bringing firearms of any kind, explosives, or other dangerous objects or materials into the Library
  7. Violating the University’s Drug and Alcohol Policies
  8. Violating the University’s Policy on Information Technology Use and Access or the Library’s Policy on Acceptable Use of Electronic Resources

The above lists of responsibilities and prohibited actions are not to be taken as exhaustive.

Crerar renovation update

The John Crerar Library’s Access and Circulation Desk has reopened in its newly renovated home on the Lower Level, next to the bookstacks.  The new space houses staff and services such as circulation, Scan and Deliver, search requests, and course reserves.

Crerar Library exterior including entry area

The John Crerar Library (Photo by Kathy Zadrozny)

Also located on the Lower Level is a new study space that is open for University of Chicago-affiliated users, as well as approved visitors, researchers, and guests. The main quiet study space features new furniture with seating for 100 people in a beautifully lit space, with a glass wall on the east side and a window on the west side providing natural light during the day. Additionally, two group study rooms will be available for University of Chicago students, faculty, and staff to reserve via Book a Room. Each group study seats up to 8 people and features a whiteboard wall.  Just outside the quiet study space, PCs will be available for use. The PCs provide standard Library software, as well as Geographic Information System (GIS) tools. Copy/print/scan stations will be in a room just north of the quiet study space.

As we move into our new space, the area of the first floor where these services were previously located will be closed for renovation as we partner with our colleagues in Computer Science, the Humanities Division, and UChicago Arts to create additional space to support design, GIS, gaming and media arts.

Thank you for your patience as this part of the construction nears its end, and we look forward to seeing you in our new location.

 

Censorship and Information Control

Censorship and Information Control: A Global History from the Inquisition to the Internet

The cover of the "Complete Unabridged" edition of George Orwell's "Nineteen Eighty-Four" with the title and author's name blacked out

In 2002 Penguin released this commemorative edition of “Nineteen Eighty-Four,” with the title and Orwell’s name blacked out as if censored, as a tribute to the book’s unique contributions to discourse about censorship. George Orwell. “Nineteen Eighty-Four.” New York: Penguin, 2002. On loan from Ada Palmer.

Exhibition Dates: September 17 – December 14, 2018
Location: Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Associated website: voices.uchicago.edu/censorship

Why do people censor? For ambition? Religion? Profit? Power? Fear? This global history of attempts to control or silence information, from antiquity’s earliest written records to our new digital world, examines how censorship has worked, thrived, or failed in different times and places, and shows how real censorship movements tend to be very different from the centralized, methodical, top-down censorship depicted in Orwell’s 1984, which so dominates how we imagine censorship today. From indexes of forbidden books, to manuscripts with passages inked out by Church Inquisitors, to comics and pornography, to self-censorship and the subtle censorship of manipulating translations or teaching biased histories, the banned and challenged materials in this exhibit will challenge you to answer: how do you define what is and isn’t censorship?

Hours: Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m., and, when University of Chicago classes are in session, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Free and open to the public.

Curator

Ada Palmer, Associate Professor History, The University of Chicago

Ada Palmer is a historian and novelist, who works on transmission of radical ideas in hostile intellectual environments. She specializes in the Renaissance and Enlightenment, but also looks from antiquity to modernity for patterns in the ways societies respond to unwelcome ideas.  Her publications include work on Lucretius and atomism in the Renaissance, on revivals of Platonism, Pythagoreanism, stoicism, and heterodox ideas about the soul and afterlife, and censorship of comic books in Japan after World War II.  She is also the author of the science fiction series Terra Ignota, which imagines censorship’s evolution into the 25th century.

Related Events

A public dialogue series brings together scholars of print revolutions past and present with practitioners working on the frontiers of today’s information revolution.  Eight dialogues will unite historians, editors, novelists, poets, and activists, and will be filmed and shared online, to let the public enjoy and continue the discussions.

Sessions are open to the public, and will take place Fridays from 1:30 to 4:20 pm on the University of Chicago Campus, in Kent Room 107, on October 5, 12, 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, and 30.

Visit voices.uchicago.edu/censorship/dialogueseries/ for more information.

 

Use of Images and Media Contact

Images from the exhibition included on this page are available for download to members of the media and are reserved for editorial use in connection with University of Chicago Library exhibitions, programs, or related news.

For more information, contact Rachel Rosenberg at ra-rosenberg@uchicago.edu or 773-834-1519.

New Elgar online law databases

Cover of Elgar Encyclopedia of Law and Economics bookUniversity researchers now have access to the following new Elgar online resources via the D’Angelo Law Library’s subscription:


Campus users can also search full texts of recent handbooks, monographs, commentaries, and research reviews via the Elgaronline Law-Academic platform. Individual books can also be located via the library catalog. Great ways to find ebooks on all types of topics, including foreign, comparative, and international law.

Elgaronline complements our other law ebook collections: Oxford Scholarship Online: Law, Oxford Handbooks Online in Law, Oxford Scholarly Authorities in International Law (OSAIL), PLI Plus, SpringerLink, Recueil des cours = Collected Courses (Hague Academy of International Law), and various The Making of Modern Law and HeinOnline modules.

 

New guide to papers of Quincy Wright, pioneer in international law and international relations

A new guide to the personal papers of Quincy Wright (1890-1970) is now available online. Wright was a political scientist and University of Chicago professor known for his work on war, international relations, and international law.

Wright joined the political science faculty at the University of Chicago in 1923, and was a professor of international law at the University from 1931 to 1956. He guest lectured at universities all over the world, and consulted for the government of the United States, including the U.S. Navy Department and the Department of State. He was also a technical advisor to the International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg in 1945, and a consultant to the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization in 1949. In addition to his teaching and consulting responsibilities, Wright authored dozens of books and hundreds of articles, among them A Study of War (1942) and The Study of International Relations (1955).

The papers document Wright’s interests in war, international law, world organization, and international cooperation, as well as the numerous organizations with which he was associated.

Parker Solar Probe named after UChicago physicist

space probe

Rendering of Parker Solar Probe. Credits: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

NASA has named its latest mission, the Parker Solar Probe, after UChicago physicist Eugene Parker, the S. Chandrasekhar Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in Physics.

According to the NASA website, the probe is “about the size of a small car and will travel directly into the Sun’s atmosphere about 4 million miles from the star’s surface. The primary science goals for the mission are to trace how energy and heat move through the solar corona and to explore what accelerates the solar wind as well as solar energetic particles. The mission will revolutionize our understanding of the Sun, where changing conditions can spread out into the solar system, affecting Earth and other worlds.”

Read one of Parker’s books or articles to learn more about his work.  Learn more about Parker and listen to him discuss his research on solar wind on the UChicago News site.

And on a related note, a large addition to the papers of Nobel laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar are now available for research in the Special Collections Research Center.