Tag Archives: Library Kiosk

Apply now for a 2019 Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowship

The University of Chicago Library invites applications for short-term research fellowships for the summer of 2019. Any visiting researcher, writer, or artist residing more than 100 miles from Chicago, and whose project requires on-site consultation of University of Chicago Library collections, primarily archives, manuscripts, rare books, or other materials in the Special Collections Research Center, is eligible. Support for beginning scholars is a priority of the program. Applications in the fields of late nineteenth- or early twentieth-century physics or physical chemistry, or nineteenth-century classical opera, will receive special consideration.

Awards will be made based on the applicant’s ability to complete the proposed on-site research successfully within the timeframe of the fellowship.  Applicants should explain why the project cannot be conducted without on-site access to the original materials and the extent to which University of Chicago Library collections are central to the research.  Up to $3,000 of support will be awarded to help cover estimated travel, living, and research expenses.  Applications from women, minorities, and persons with disabilities are encouraged.

The deadline for applications is March 4, 2019.  Notice of awards will be made by March 29, 2019 for use between June 10, 2019 and September 27, 2019.

Applicants must provide the following information:

  • A cover letter (not to exceed one page) including the project title; a brief summary; estimated dates of on-site research; and a budget for travel, living, and research expenses during the period of on-site research
  • A research proposal not to exceed three double-spaced pages. Applicants should include references to specific archival finding aids and catalog records of particular relevance to their proposed project whenever possible.
  • A curriculum vitae of no longer than two pages
  • Two letters of support from academic or other scholars. References may be sent with the application or separately.

Submit application in one electronic file to: scrcfellowship@lib.uchicago.edu

Letters of reference in electronic form are preferred; print letters of reference can be sent to:

Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships
Special Collections Research Center
The University of Chicago Library
1100 E. 57th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

For additional information contact:
Daniel Meyer, Director, Special Collections Research Center

For additional background on the Platzman Fellowship, and to see a list of last year’s recipients please see our website: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/scrc/about/platzmanfellowships/

 

New marketing databases available

The Library has added access to three databases that cover consumer demographics.

The first database is a new segment of Statista, the Statista Global Consumer Survey. This covers 28 countries and has data on consumer demographics, brand share and consumer preferences. It has a built-in cross-tabulation tool, which lets users build their own reports using a wide range of demographic and market variables.
Access the Statista Global Consumer Survey here.  Click “Browse the Consumer Global Survey” to access the database

The second database is Consumer Brand Analytics, which covers brands and consumers in the U.S. It includes 19 major product categories and has detailed consumer demographics. It also features many different ways to analyze data and will soon include data on consumers switching brands within a category.
Access Consumer Brand Analytics here

The third database is Sports Market Analytics, which aggregates news and data on professional, college and recreational sports. It includes attendance figures and overall television viewership for spectator sports. It also covers participation, market and brand share for recreational sports.
Access Sports Market Analytics here.

 

Global law resources at D’Angelo Law Library

The Law School’s Global Chicago Law Wine Mess is a good time to explore the diverse foreign, comparative, and international law (FCIL) resources we have at the University. Here is Lyonette “Lyo” Louis-Jacques (’86), Foreign and International Law Librarian, on FCIL databases and websites that you can access via the D’Angelo Law Library.

To start your FCIL research, consult “people” and print resources, but also check out the “Foreign and International Law” section of the D’Angelo Law Library Law Databases page.

Are you looking for non-U.S. constitutions? We have Constitute, Constitutions of the Countries of the World, and World Constitutions Illustrated.

Don’t know where to begin to look for sources on the law of a particular foreign jurisdiction? You can use tools such as the Foreign Law Guide, GlobaLex, and Guide to Law Online.

Want to locate statutes, codes, cases, and other primary law of foreign jurisdictions? We have ChinaLawInfo (aka LawInfoChina aka PKULaw), Manupatra and SCC Online (India), Israel Law Reports and Nevo, vLex (over 130 countries – strong for Spain and Latin American jurisdictions), WorldLII (multiple countries), and many other foreign law research tools.

Looking for treaties and other international agreements? Check out HeinOnline.

Maybe someone has written about the comparative law topic you’re researching? You can look for commentary in secondary sources such as encyclopedias, handbooks, books, journals articles, and news stories. Favorite databases for foreign corporate law research are Practical Law (global guides and cross-border resources), Getting the Deal Through (GTDT via Bloomberg Law), International Comparative Legal Guides (ICLG), and the International Encyclopaedia of Laws (IEL).

Don’t find what you’re looking for? Or have follow-up questions? Or want to arrange a library research consultation? Ask a Law Librarian!

The Fetus in Utero: From Mystery to Social Media

Exhibition Dates: January 2–April 12, 2019
Location: Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

Diagram of fetus in utero

Du Coudray uses diagrams of the fetus in utero to help midwives-in-training see both the anatomical and emotional factors at play during pregnancy. Detail from Du Coudray, Abrégé de l’art des accouchements dans lequel on donne les préceptes nécessaires pour le mettre heureusement en pratique, 1777. RG93.L45 Rare. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Once restricted to the privacy of the doctor’s office, ultrasound images of the fetus are now immediately recognizable in the public arena through advertisements and social media, where posts tagged “baby’s first pic” are commonplace. Such depictions of the fetus in utero have become iconic and are arguably the most easily recognized medical image. How and why did this happen?

To answer this question, viewers are invited to embark on a 500-year visual journey, from Renaissance woodcuts to modern medical images. Along the way, they will encounter three major shifts in graphic representation. First, from 1450 to 1700, the fetus transformed from divine mystery to a topic deemed worthy of study. Second, from 1700 to 1965, the fetus achieved status as a medicalized subject whose visual ‘home’ was the obstetrical textbook. Third, from 1965 to the present, the fetus has achieved status in popular culture while maintaining its traditional medical role.

Through this rich visual culture, images of the fetus in utero have been used in the service of education, research, political agendas, patient-empowered medicine, and finally, entertainment. The images on view offer historical insights and a sweeping look at how the visual culture of the fetus in utero developed.

Hours: Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m., and, when University of Chicago classes are in session, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Curators

Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, The University of Chicago; and Margaret Carlyle, Postdoctoral Researcher and Instructor, Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge, The University of Chicago

Life-size female manikin with fetus

This life-size female manikin served as a pedagogical tool for turn-of-the-20th-century medical students. Pilz anatomical manikin [female], [19–?]. New York: American Thermo-Ware Co. ffQM25.P545 19— RCASR. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Related Events

Curators’ Tours

Friday, January 4, 4:30–5 pm
Wednesday, January 23, 1:30–2 pm
Friday, February 8, 4-4:30 pm

1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

Free 30-minute tours by the curators. Please meet in the front lobby of the Regenstein Library at the start time.

Opening Event

Thursday, January 24, 5–7 p.m.
5737 South University Avenue, Chicago, IL
This wine-and-cheese opening reception is hosted by the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge (SIFK).
RSVP required

Use of Images and Media Contact

Images from the exhibition included on this page are available for download to members of the media and are reserved for editorial use in connection with University of Chicago Library exhibitions, programs, or related news. For more information and images, contact Rachel Rosenberg at ra-rosenberg@uchicago.edu or 773-834-1519.

New guide to papers of demographer Donald Bogue

The Donald J. Bogue Papers are now open for research. Donald Bogue (1918-2014) was a demographer and longtime University of Chicago Professor of Sociology. Upon earning his PhD from the University of Michigan in 1949, he joined the faculty at Miami University and then joined the University of Chicago in 1954. He remained at UChicago for the rest of his career. He was affiliated with the National Opinion Research Center and was responsible for founding and leading several population research centers at the University.

Bogue founded Demography, the Journal of the Population Association of America in 1964 and served as its first editor from 1964 to 1969. His interest in family planning made him a major force in the worldwide movement for population control. He directed USAID and Ford Foundation-funded contracts to improve the evaluation of family planning programs’ impact on fertility in low-income countries and also trained demographers and clinicians through international workshops on the use of mass communications in family planning programs. The Donald J. Bogue Papers document his life in Chicago and his international work in Latin American, Asian, and African countries.

Black and white Donald Bogue portrait, undated. Bogue, Donald J. Papers, Box 24, Folder 8, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

Front cover of “Relevant Posters for Family Planning,” by B. Berndtson, D.J. Bogue, and G. McVicker, 1975. Bogue, Donald J. Papers, Box 7, Folder 8, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

Donald Bogue and Indonesian delegation at a summer workshop at the University of Chicago, 1970. Bogue, Donald J. Papers, Box 23, Folder 3, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

Issues of ‘Medicine on the Midway’ available on UChicago Campus Publications

Medicine on the Midway, Vol. 1, No. 1, December 1944 (previously titled Bulletin of the Medical Alumni Association, University of Chicago)

Issues of Medicine on the Midway from 1944 to 1981 have been digitized and are now available on The University of Chicago Campus Publications website. Formerly titled Bulletin of the Medical Alumni Association, this periodical was published by the School of Medicine at the University of Chicago.

University of Chicago Campus Publications is a digital collection of publications documenting the history of the University of Chicago and the work of its faculty, students, and alumni; read more about its launch.

New issues of Medicine on the Midway are available at UChicago Medicine.

New developments for Knowledge@UChicago, the University’s institutional repository

The University of Chicago Library is enhancing Knowledge@UChicagothe University’s institutional repository for faculty and student research, in order to better meet growing needs and interests around data sharing and preservation, open access, and reproducible research results. In mid-December, visitors to Knowledge@UChicago will encounter a new, user-friendly interface for sharing and accessing research. Improved capabilities for data and software preservation will follow over the winter quarter.

Launched in 2016, Knowledge@UChicago is an open access repository for sharing and preserving scholarly work created by faculty, students, and staff. It currently serves as a home for UChicago faculty and students’ digital research publications such as articles, book chapters, conference materials, and a small number of datasets, and for dissertations and theses by students who choose to make them open to the public. UChicago faculty and students in divisions and departments that range from the Physical Sciences Division to the School of Social Service Administration to the Humanities Division have already contributed publications and datasets to Knowledge@UChicago.

With the support of capital funding, the Library is migrating the repository to the TIND digital platform. TIND is based on the open source software Invenio, originally developed at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, to manage its own digital outputs.

This new system will offer more features for handling research data in addition to traditional research publications, and will provide greater flexibility for future customization and integration with researchers’ workflows. The first phase of the project will migrate existing content to the new system by the end of December 2018. The second phase, beginning in January, will add new features that better support research data and software preservation, including richer metadata for data deposits and integration with GitHub.

This move will improve the infrastructure available to our University community to make their data available for reuse, new discoveries, and replication. It will also support researchers as they meet requirements for data sharing from funders and publishers, The new developments to the institutional repository are accompanied by additional library data services, including assistance with data acquisition and transformation, data analysis, and data management. We encourage UChicago faculty, students, and staff to contact the Library at knowledge@lib.uchicago.edu to discuss your data management and sharing requirements and to begin depositing scholarly works. Librarians are available for consultations and instructional sessions on the repository for departments and groups on campus.

Knowledge@UChicago is managed and supported by the Library, in collaboration with IT Services at the University of Chicago.

New database trials: Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports and 20th Century Global Perspectives collections

This University of Chicago Library trial is available from November 21, 2018January 12, 2019. It consists of ten different databases:

Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports

The FBIS Daily Reports are U.S. government publications that include translations of news from around the world (Africa, Asia, Australia/Oceania, Caribbean, Europe, Middle East/Near East, North America, South America). The FBIS Daily Reports also include translations of foreign law in English translation if included in the news sources covered.

The Readex FBIS database covers 1941-1996.

From the Readex description of the database:

“As the United States’ principal historical record of political open source intelligence for more than half a century, the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Report is an indispensable source for insights into decades of turbulent world history. The original mission of the FBIS was to monitor, record, transcribe and translate intercepted radio broadcasts from foreign governments, official news services, and clandestine broadcasts from occupied territories. Accordingly, it provides a wealth of information from all countries outside of the U.S.—from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe….

…FBIS Daily Reports, 1941-1996 constitutes a one-of-a-kind archive of transcripts of foreign broadcasts and news that provides fascinating insight into the second half of the 20th century. Many of these materials are firsthand reports of events as they occurred. Digitized from original paper copy and high-quality microfilm, this definitive online collection features full-text transcripts from Africa, Asia and the Pacific, China, Eastern and Western Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and the Soviet Union. Fully searchable for the first time, this unique digital collection features individual bibliographic records for each report and highlighted events to assist researchers.

Continue reading x

Riccardo Levi-Setti, physicist and paleontologist

Levi Setti

Levi-Setti with some of his trilobites: https://bit.ly/2DRi4sK

Riccardo Levi-Setti, emeritus professor, died earlier this month.  He began his career as a physicist but also went on to research and publish in paleontology.  Born into a Jewish family in Italy, he survived the Holocaust in hiding.  He earned a PhD in physics in 1947 and started his career at the University of Chicago in 1956 as a researcher in particle physics.  He later developed an interest in the extinct sea creatures trilobites and published multiple books on the subject.

 

 

 

 

His books in physics include:

Elementary Particles, Chicago: University of Chicago Press [1965]. Crerar: QC721.L561

Strongly Interacting Particles, Chicago: University of Chicago Press [1973].  Mansueto: QC793.3.H5L6

 

Some of his books in paleontology:

Trilobites: a Photographic Atlas, Chicago: University of Chicago Press [1975]. Crerar: QE821.L65

Trilobites, Chicago: University of Chicago Press c1993.  Crerar: QE821.L460 1993.

More of his books in the Library: https://catalog.lib.uchicago.edu/vufind/Search/Results?type=AuthorBrowse&lookfor=%22Levi-Setti,%20Riccardo%22

His papers are also held in the Library’s Archival Collections: http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/8448151

University of Chicago News obituary

Setti-Levi in the university’s Cyclotron pit. https://bit.ly/2SbRjlV

Food cultures of the Middle East and Asia

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Fifth Floor
Exhibit Dates: October 1 – December 31, 2018

For their second joint exhibit, five area-studies librarians on the fifth floor of the Joseph Regenstein Library celebrate the diversity of food cultures from across their areas of expertise.

Collage of paintings with food being served

Jee-Young Park on Korean cuisine

With a rich and long history, Korean cuisine has evolved through centuries of social and cultural change. From royal court cuisine to the food of commoners and regional specialties, the main ingredients of Korean food are constant: rice, meat, seafood and vegetables. Today, an everyday meal typically includes one or two main dishes, short-grain rice and a number of side dishes (panch’an) including kimchi. For many, food is inseparable from cultural and historical identity. As methods of harvest and preservation gradually took shape over centuries, seasonal customs spread across the peninsula and dining etiquette grew more elaborate. Korean scholars have turned to food as a medium through which to interpret history and culture and likewise has played an important part in the works of artists and writers across time.

Laura A. Ring on historical foodways in South Asia

The Library makes available a wealth of primary resources for the study of historical foodways in South Asia. Shown are verses in praise of food in the Rigveda, a collection of ancient Hindu hymns in early Sanskrit (circa 1500 to 1200 BCE.); food and diet therapy in the Suśruta Saṃhitā, the earliest known treatise on Ayurvedic medicine (circa mid first millennium B.C.E.); and pictorial representations of food in the Niʻmatnāma, a 15th-century manuscript of recipes, remedies, and aphrodisiacs of the Sultans of Mandu (Madhya Pradesh, India).

Marlis J. Saleh on coffee in the Middle East

From the time of its first cultivation in the fifteenth century, coffee has played an important role in the culture of the Middle East. Shown are a sixteenth-century text discussing religious controversies relating to the permissibility of coffee; a seventeenth-century report (and translation) on the social upheaval caused by the appearance of coffeehouses in Istanbul; a nineteenth-century Englishman’s description of coffee as the center of Bedouin hospitality; and a modern scholarly work on the history of coffee and coffeehouses in the Middle East.

Jiaxun Wu on Chinese cuisine

Chinese cuisine is not only renowned by its taste, but also is part of culture. The history of Chinese cuisine can be traced back to pre-Qin period. Through the thousands of years, it has continuously developed. In the meantime, it is marked by both variety and change, including cooking styles, methods, ingredients, and recipes. It also shows continuous absorption of diverse foreign influences. The book, Encyclopedia of Chinese Cooking, first discusses the beginning and development of cooking on Chinese food, and imperial cuisine through the ages. The book further introduces the different schools of Chinese cuisines, and cooking and cuisine of minorities.

Ayako Yoshimura on condiments in Japanese culture

Selected from the Japanese collection are books that introduce the effect of condiments in Japanese cuisine, and that feature the culture of railway dining cars (one often-overlooked area in which to trace how Japan adopted “Western” cultural elements).