Attend business and economics research training sessions

Booth Information Technology is hosting several research vendors to conduct training on statistical software and data in October and November.  Emily Treptow, the Business & Economics Librarian for Instruction & Outreach, will also be offering training sessions on business and economics resources.

University of Chicago researchers have access to top business news and company, industry and market research information.  Emily will be discussing and demonstrating library services and resources, including Mintel, Statista, IBISWorld and Factiva.  Some resources may be discussed that are only available to Booth students and faculty, including OneSource and Capital IQ.

Please register to attend any of the Booth training sessions.  All University of Chicago affiliates are welcome.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services

Attend economics orientation programs

The Business and Economics Librarians at University of Chicago will be offering an orientation for new economics PhD students and an orientation for students in the College planning on studying economics this week.

The orientation for economics PhD students will be held at 4:30pm on Thursday, September 22 in room A-11.  After an overview of library resources relevant to the field of economics, a tour will be held.

Econ 101, the orientation for students in the College, will be held at 11am on Friday, September 23 in room A-11.   If you are majoring in economics, this is a can’t miss 60-minute session.  Learn about all the services the Library can provide to aid your research, from accessing the major relevant newspapers and journals (think The Economist and The Wall Street Journal) to finding economics articles and papers.  An introduction to some of the best sources for economics data will also be provided.  The session will begin promptly on the hour.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services


Trial access to PitchBook available for Booth students

Booth students have trial access to PitchBook, a private equity and venture capital database covering a wide range of firms as well as startups.  With the PitchBook platform, researchers can track entire PE and VC lifecycles from fund initiation to company exits, PitchBook-logo-web-2public and private M&A transactions, and the limited partners, fund managers, advisors and other key players involved.  In addition to viewing firm and contact profiles, custom lists of buyers, targets, advisors, and more can be created using the advanced search function.  Researchers can also save custom searches and set up email alerts to come daily, weekly, or monthly.

For Evening, Weekend, and Full-Time students, please fill out this form to request access to PitchBook by June 26th.  PitchBook will send you an email directly once your account is activated.  Your account will remain active through 8/30/16.  You can also access this tool onsite at the Career Resource Centers at the Harper Center and the Gleacher Center.

Questions about leveraging this powerful tool?  Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

New Library website launches July 5

Update: The Library will be launching the new website described below starting at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 5. Site visitors should expect service interruptions throughout the evening, and, because the changes will take time to propagate over the internet, some users may be unable to reach the site through July 6.

Access to resources outside of the main Library website should continue uninterrupted during this time. These include:

Thank you for your patience as we roll out these changes.


The University of Chicago Library will launch a new website over the summer.  The new site’s improved navigation and mobile-friendly design will provide faculty and students with ready access to curated, scholarly information and research expertise.

Changes to the design and structure of the new Library website are being made in response to the needs and feedback of UChicago faculty, students, and staff. The new site will be optimized for both desktop and mobile use, with a modern look and feel. It is being made easier to browse and navigate by

  • providing streamlined access to search tools for articles, journals, and databases;
  • providing more consistent navigation across the top of the site’s pages;
  • reorganizing information into categories developed directly from user input;
  • making it easier to find information about distinctive collections, exhibitions, study spaces, hours, and locations; and
  • connecting related collections, tools, and experts, making it easier for users to take advantage of the wealth of information and services offered by the Library.

In addition, Library news will be presented in a more engaging way on the site, and pages will be optimized for discovery via Google or other search engines.

The current Library Catalog, launched in 2014, is not being redesigned as a part of this project.

The new Library website will first go live in mid-summer and will be further refined in the weeks leading up to fall orientation.  During this period, if you have any difficulty finding the information you are looking for, librarians will be happy to assist you via our Ask a Librarian service.

The University of Chicago Library website serves as a gateway to UChicago collections and licensed resources; the online Ask a Librarian service, including live chat; Library staff with expertise in a wide range of subjects; research guides in numerous fields; and videos and guides explaining how to conduct research using library resources.

Expanded access to BrowZine now available

BrowZine is a tool for keeping up to date with your favorite journals. The Library has provided access to this tool to users of iOS devices for the past two years. We now offer access for Android devices as well as on your desktop using any web browser.

BrowZine works with publishers to make journal tables of contents accessible through the BrowZine app and web site. You can then access articles directly through the app, rather than going to the journal web site or a Library database. You can browse through journals by discipline and save up to 64 titles on your personal bookshelf. The iOS and Android apps display alerts when a new issue of a journal is available. You can download articles in the app and read them at any time, even when you aren’t online.

Try BrowZine through their web site, or download the app for your Android or iOS device.

Our guide to BrowZine has more information on using the app, including configuring it for off-campus use.

Organize It! Tools and Tricks for Managing Your Digital Documents: workshop

When: Wednesday, April 27, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Class readings, research articles, news stories, assignments….how do you keep track of it all? This workshop will give you a brief overview places to store your digital documents, as well as methods to keep it all organized. Participants will be able to see demonstrations of free cloud storage tools like Google Drive, and Box, and be introduced to key features of the tools and strategies to help you find all your stored documents with ease.
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
Tag: Graduate Students, Workshops, Training
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Hone your IT, media, and productivity skills with

University of Chicago researchers have access to, a leading provider of online courses covering business, media, and technology.  Researchers can choose from over 4,000 courses, all of which are broken up into short, easy to use videos.  Business courses cover LyndaLinkedin_blackeverything from leadership and marketing to product management, while media courses cover specific software such as Adobe Photoshop and Adobe InDesign, as well as general techniques for graphic design, video editing and more.  Technology courses cover a full range of software and skills, including Java, R, SPSS, data analysis and cyber security.  Course levels range from introductory to advanced and instructors are vetted industry experts.

In addition to courses, has created guides using a collection of short videos, articles and checklists, that provide a step by step process for starting a business and becoming a manager.  The Starting a Business guide covers everything from evaluating yourself and your business idea to establishing operations.’s Weekly Series feature guarantees that content stays fresh.  The most recent video in the Marketing Tips weekly series discusses representing the keyword funnel through SEO.

Questions about how to leverage this powerful tool? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

New online resource: Greenleaf Online Library

University of Chicago researchers now have access to Greenleaf Online Library.

Greenleaf Online Library crosses over all sectors of business with an emphasis on ‘green’ greenleafmanagement, ethical business and corporate social responsibility.  It contains approximately 4,000 items, including ebooks, case studies, research papers and journal articles.

Topics covered include:

  • Sustainability
  • Ethics
  • Innovation, enterprise and social enterprise
  • Environmental management
  • Industry sectors including extractives, fashion and textiles, banking and finance, transport, engineering, construction
  • Corporate governance
  • Responsible leadership
  • Social responsibility/business in society
  • Government, policy and compliance
  • Reporting and standards
  • Sustainability in Higher Education
  • Poverty
  • Gender and diversity
  • Responsible investment and finance, including microfinance

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.


The business benefits of learning another language

In today’s global economy, it’s no surprise that businesses benefit from the skills of polyglots.  Of course, the most obvious benefit is the ability to transfer information in multiple languages.  Learning a second language also provides a window into the culture of the speakers of the language as well as an empathetic view of the effort many people around the world have made to learn English.   These additional insights facilitate relationship building, a must when trying to do business anywhere in any

University of Chicago researchers have access to Mango Languages, an online interactive language learning tool for learning vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar and culture all in a single, integrated experience.  It covers more than 70 languages from American Sign Language to Arabic, Vietnamese and Yiddish.  Non-native English speakers can also study English as a second language.  Seventeen different versions are available.  In order to use all of the functions of Mango, users need to create a personal account and log in.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

Feature Story ProductivityU: Be more efficient with the Library’s help

Librarian Consultation

Experts will be on hand to guide you to the best productivity tools. (Photo by Jason Smith)

Now that you’ve had one quarter of the academic year under your belt, it’s time to reflect on your productivity pitfalls and add new tools to help you overcome these obstacles. On January 15 from noon to five, the University of Chicago Library is holding an inaugural ‘Productivity Unconference,’ where students, librarians, and technologists will be invited to meet to share tips, tricks, and tools to be a more efficient and productive researcher, student, and academic professional. The unconference will have time for consultations, workshops, and presentations on tools like citation managers, social bookmarking apps, and cloud storage as well as tips to stay efficient and productive during the busy academic quarter.

Everyone across campus including students, faculty, and staff are invited to meet with experienced ‘productivity experts’ from across campus to:

  • Learn how to use free web tools such as Evernote, Box, and Google Apps to superpower productivity
  • Practice new strategies in time management
  • Discover innovative ways to stay in-the-know
  • Manage research documents such as course readings, book chapters, and paper drafts
  • Ensure security online and in research documents

Schedule of Events
January 15, Noon – 5:00 PM
Regenstein, Room 122

12:00 PM – 2:00 PM: Productivity & Project Management Consultations
Members of the University of Chicago community can sign up for 15-minute consultations with librarians, academic technologists, and tech experts to learn about key productivity tools and strategies.

2:00 PM – 3:00 PM: Productivity Tools & Strategies Lightning Talks
Participants present proposed lighting talks on their favorite project management/productivity tools or strategies. The Lightning talks blocked at 5 minutes apiece, and will give an opportunity for peer sharing and presentation skills.

3:00 PM – 5:00 PM: Productivity & Project Management Consultations & Productivity “In”
Participants can meet with consultants on key productivity tools & strategies. This time also serves as a place for students to have a “productivity-in,” where students can get to work planning and organizing course readings, assignments, and extracurricular duties for the quarter.

Sign up for a consultation today!

Interested in presenting a lightning talk? Fill out a lightning talk proposal.

Don’t want to commit? Feel free to drop in during the event, grab a snack provided by the library, and chat with other people across campus to learn some new tools and share your strategies on staying productive.

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in a Library workshop or training session should contact Kaitlin Springmier at 773-702-0229.

Soda tax and soda price in Mexico

On November 9th, Jeffrey Grogger, the Irving Harris Professor in Urban Policy at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, presented his preliminary research on soda tax and soda price in Mexico as part of the Becker Brown Bag Series.  Mexico’s nine percent soda tax took effect on January 1, 2014.  In addition to taxing soda, fruit juices and waters with added sugars are also being taxed.  The Mexico soda tax is a straightforward example of price theory.  The tax raises the price and the higher price lowers consumption.  The lower consumption then ideally leads to lower weight and less chronic disease.

Professor Grogger’s research strives to answer two key questions that aren’t addressed by the theory:

  1. How much do prices rise?
  2. What happens if consumers substitute other caloric drinks for sodas?

Interested in exploring this topic further? View Professor Grogger’s presentation and his slides.

University of Chicago researchers also have access to Euromonitor data through Passport GMID.  Euromonitor’s category briefing on sugar confectionery in Mexico discusses the effect of the tax.  Consumption data is also available, although Professor Grogger noted in his presentation that consumption data varied greatly across different sources.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.



The legacy of Chicago economics


Photo credit: Chicago Economics Through the Years | Becker Friedman Institute. Retrieved October 15, 2015, from

On October 5th, the Becker Friedman Institute hosted The Legacy of Chicago Economics conference, where leading scholars in economics gathered together to discuss the impressive history of Chicago economics.  A complete list of speakers and the research they discussed can be found on the event page.  Video recordings taken during the conference will also be available soon.

The conference culminated with the Living the Legacy: Chicago Economics throughout the Years panel, which included prominent members of the Department of Economics and the Booth School of Business faculty.  In President Zimmer’s introduction, he shared the astounding fact that the panelists had a total of 229 years of experience.  The panel included three Nobel laureates and was chaired by fourth.

Selected bibliographies of all the panelists can be found on the Faculty Publications page of the Business and Economics research guide.  These bibliographies link directly to full text provided by the library.

The library also owns several print and electronic books discussing the Chicago school of economics, several of which are listed below.

The Special Collections Research Center holds the archives of Chicago Department of Economics records from 1912-1961. Documents from this collection were included in one of the conference presentations discussing the department deliberations that led to Milton Friedman being hired.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.


Apply for the Library Student Advisory Group

The Library is currently seeking representatives for the Library Student Advisory Group (LSAG) from the following Divisions and Schools:

  • The College (Class of 2019)
  • Chicago Booth School of Business
  • Harris School of Public Policy
  • Physical Sciences Division
  • School of Social Service Administration

The Library Student Advisory Group serves as a formal channel of communication between students and the Library administration.  The LSAG discusses the collections and services provided through all of the University’s campus libraries — Crerar, D’Angelo, Eckhart, Mansueto, Regenstein, and SSA — and the present and future needs of the student community.  The Group assists in making specific recommendations to improve the Library and considers proposals for future changes in services.  Finally, members of the LSAG discuss how the Library can raise awareness of its offerings among students, and how students can communicate their wishes, needs, and concerns to the Library.

If you are interested in serving, please complete the online application by October 25, 2015.  If you would like additional information about the Library Student Advisory Group or would like to apply via e-mail, please contact Rebecca Starkey at

Resource spotlight: Factiva

University of Chicago researchers have access to Factiva, a database of global news and business information.  Factiva provides access to thousands of domestic and international newspapers, newswires, company profiles and media programs with sources from over 100 countries in 28 languages. logo_factiva  Its powerful search engine allows for comprehensive research and the Factiva Expert Search feature has been created to simplify complex searches, including investor and news sentiment.

The News Pages section makes it easy to browse the top business publications, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and Barron’s.  Once you’ve found articles you would like to read, translations are available and the articles can be downloaded as MP3s to listen to on your commute or as you walk around campus.

Fun fact: Transcripts are available from BBC, ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, CNN and NPR.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

Attend Econ 101: an introduction to library resources

The Business and Economics Librarians at University of Chicago will be offering an orientation for new students in The College planning on studying economics on Friday, September 25.  If you are majoring in economics, this is a can’t miss 60-minute session.  Learn about all the services the Library can provide to aid your research, from accessing the major relevant newspapers and journals (think The Economist and The Wall Street Journal) to finding economics articles and papers.  An introduction to some of the best sources for economics data will also be provided.  The session will begin promptly on the hour.

Where: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Room 523

When: Friday, September 25 at 11am


Questions? Ask a Librarian



Business & economics now on social media

Bus+EconIconThe Business & Economics Librarians at University of Chicago Library are now providing research services and support on Twitter and Facebook.  Follow and like these accounts for updates on resources, research recommendations and more.  The Business & Economics Librarians will also be available to answer research questions through both platforms.

The Business of China

This week’s “Black Monday” market crash clearly demonstrates how interconnected China’s economy is with the rest of the world’s economies.  The Economist‘s online article The Causes and Consequences of China’s Market Crash provides insight into what seems to have been the cause.  Chinese markets have remained volatile since the devaluation of the yuan on August 11.  The continued decline last week of the Shanghai Composite Index is suggesting that China’s industrial activity is slowing.  University of Chicago researchers interested in diving into China’s industry data to form their own analysis can do so with China Data Online.  Data for over 30 industry categories are available for general analysis going back until 1999.  Monthly statistics on output and production, top enterprises and market analysis by city and region are available as well, including statistics from 2015.

University of Chicago researchers can also search Factiva and EconLit for articles discussing business in China.


Questions? Ask a Librarian


Citation: (2015, August 24). The causes and consequences of China’s market crash.  The Economist. Retrieved from


New online resource: IBISWorld

University of Chicago researchers now have access to IBISWorld.

IBISWorldIBISWorld is a database that provides comprehensive industry reports for over 700 industries ranging from biotechnology to pawn shops.  These reports provide strategic insight and analysis which can be used to gain a better understanding of market conditions and forecasts, industry supply chain, and competitive landscape.

The reports include breakdowns of industry performance, outlook, products and markets, major competitors and operation conditions.  In addition to being able to download the complete report, key statistics can be downloaded to excel and specific infographics can be downloaded and inserted into your own reports and presentations.  

Questions? Ask A Librarian.

People Meet new Business & Economics Librarian for Instruction & Outreach Emily Treptow

Treptow Emily2014Emily Treptow joined the University of Chicago Library on June 1 as the new Business & Economics Librarian for Instruction & Outreach.  She came to us from Michigan State University where she was a Business Reference Librarian from November 2012 to May 2015.

Below, Emily has answered questions about her plans for her work at the University of Chicago 

How do you envision working with faculty and students in your new role here?

I am very excited about my new role, which is also a brand new position at the library.  It was created with leeway for me to spend time outside the library to meet with students and faculty at the locations most convenient for them.  I will be available to travel to Booth’s Harper Center and Gleacher Center and to the Economics Department in Saieh Hall to provide research assistance via office hours and instruction.  I also envision leveraging this flexibility by attending relevant discussions and workshops on campus to better equip myself to build a program of outreach that will provide the research services that faculty and students need.  I hope to be involved in orientation sessions for new Booth and Economics students, in addition to providing increased point of need services and instruction.

Do you have a sense of what you’d like to accomplish in your first year at University of Chicago?

In my first year, I would like to spend time meeting with Booth and Economics students, staff and faculty to learn more about their needs and how I can create services to meet those needs.  I would also like use social media as another means for building these connections. 

UChicago faculty and students are encouraged to contact Emily with questions or requests for assistance with business & economics research, teaching and learning. You can reach Emily at or 773.834.3415.

Redesigned research guides are easier to use and navigate

This weekend, the University of Chicago’s Library Guides were migrated to a new platform that features a number of improvements. Most notably, use of responsive design greatly improves the user’s experience on mobile devices and assistive technology, such as screen readers.

Mobile view of a Library Guide

A Library Guide as seen on a smartphone

The new platform also uses navigation menus on the left side of the screen, rather than the tabs across the top, which should make it easier and more intuitive for users to locate content in the guides.

Our librarians have created guides on a wide variety of academic subjects studied at the University. In addition, Help Guides show you how to locate specific types of material, such as newspapers, and to use Library tools and services, such as interlibrary loan.

Visit our Library Guides page for a complete list of our guides. 


What is the value of a brand?

Earlier this year, the question What is the value of a brand? was  answered on The Big Question, a video series created by Booth’s research magazine Capital Ideas.  An expert panel consisting of Professor Ann L. McGill and Professor Pradeep K. Chintagunta as well as Ann  Mukherjee, the president of global snacks and global insights at PepsiCo, discussed the function of brands, building a brand,  and measuring and increasing brand value.

University of Chicago researchers can learn more about brand value using the following resources:

  • eMarketer provides rankings by brand value across different different industries based on overall financial return to an organization’s investors, the brand’s influence on the generation of demand through choice, and the ability of the brand to create loyalty and keep generating demand and profit into the future.
  • Factiva allows you easily filter your search for content in the subject area of Branding.
  • Passport GMID covers a range of topics including brand divestment and provides  international brand share statistics and brand analysis.

Questions?  Ask a Librarian.

New online resource: eMarketer

University of Chicago researchers now have access to eMarketer.

emarketereMarketer is a database that provides digital market research information ranging from digital ad spend in the automotive industry to use statistics of the newest social media platforms, such as Meerkat and Periscope.  This data can be used to benchmark consumer behavior, size markets, and value initiatives.  

This resource includes articles, analysts reports and statistical tables which can be downloaded to Excel for further analysis.  Custom data dashboards can be built using thousands of eMarketer forecasts including ad spending, device and platform usage, retail and ecommerce sales, and time spent with media.  In addition to eMarketer’s own forecast estimate data, it is possible to compare estimates from other research groups and firms.  

Questions? Ask A Librarian.

International Monetary Fund data now freely available

The International Monetary Fund recently announced that all of their data sets are now free to everyone. Previously, IMF data were only available through Library subscriptions. The subscription interface is still available, but will be discontinued in the near future. The new open platform allows registered users to download entire data sets in addition to data query results.

Access the new data portal at

Extensive help files are available at

If you created an account on the old system, your login credentials should work at the new site. Saved data queries will not be transferred, however.

Words are data

Amy Merick’s article “Why words are the new numbers: the coming revolution of data analysis” appears in the latest issue of Chicago Booth’s Capital Ideas.  The article highlights the research of many Chicago Booth faculty in the area of text analysis.  The references will take you directly to a sample of related faculty publications. 

For a complete list of faculty publications with links please refer to the library guide Selected Bibliographies of Business and Economics Faculty.

Final days: Library asks graduate and professional school students to complete survey by March 4

The University of Chicago Library is conducting a survey of all currently enrolled graduate and professional school students. This survey is being offered in partnership with Graduate Student Affairs, and the findings will be used to inform decisions about future University and Library services.

The survey was distributed by email on February 4. Graduate and professional school students, please check your email for a message from the University of Chicago Library with an individualized link to the survey. Participants who complete the survey will have the opportunity to enter a drawing for a number of prizes, including:

  • A dedicated faculty study at Regenstein Library or Crerar Library for one year.
  • Locker rental at Regenstein Library for one year.
  • Gift cards for, the Seminary Co-op, or the University of Chicago Bookstore.

Previous surveys conducted by the Library resulted in the implementation of the Library’s Scan and Deliver service, as well as the creation of new group study spaces in Regenstein Library. Results gathered from the Library’s last survey of graduate and professional school students, conducted in February 2010, are available online.

For more information or to report problems with the survey, please contact the project team by email at