New online resource: Greenleaf Online Library

University of Chicago researchers now have access to Greenleaf Online Library.

Greenleaf Online Library crosses over all sectors of business with an emphasis on ‘green’ greenleafmanagement, ethical business and corporate social responsibility.  It contains approximately 4,000 items, including ebooks, case studies, research papers and journal articles.

Topics covered include:

  • Sustainability
  • Ethics
  • Innovation, enterprise and social enterprise
  • Environmental management
  • Industry sectors including extractives, fashion and textiles, banking and finance, transport, engineering, construction
  • Corporate governance
  • Responsible leadership
  • Social responsibility/business in society
  • Government, policy and compliance
  • Reporting and standards
  • Sustainability in Higher Education
  • Poverty
  • Gender and diversity
  • Responsible investment and finance, including microfinance

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

 

The business benefits of learning another language

In today’s global economy, it’s no surprise that businesses benefit from the skills of polyglots.  Of course, the most obvious benefit is the ability to transfer information in multiple languages.  Learning a second language also provides a window into the culture of the speakers of the language as well as an empathetic view of the effort many people around the world have made to learn English.   These additional insights facilitate relationship building, a must when trying to do business anywhere in any language.mango

University of Chicago researchers have access to Mango Languages, an online interactive language learning tool for learning vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar and culture all in a single, integrated experience.  It covers more than 70 languages from American Sign Language to Arabic, Vietnamese and Yiddish.  Non-native English speakers can also study English as a second language.  Seventeen different versions are available.  In order to use all of the functions of Mango, users need to create a personal account and log in.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

Feature Story ProductivityU: Be more efficient with the Library’s help

Librarian Consultation

Experts will be on hand to guide you to the best productivity tools. (Photo by Jason Smith)

Now that you’ve had one quarter of the academic year under your belt, it’s time to reflect on your productivity pitfalls and add new tools to help you overcome these obstacles. On January 15 from noon to five, the University of Chicago Library is holding an inaugural ‘Productivity Unconference,’ where students, librarians, and technologists will be invited to meet to share tips, tricks, and tools to be a more efficient and productive researcher, student, and academic professional. The unconference will have time for consultations, workshops, and presentations on tools like citation managers, social bookmarking apps, and cloud storage as well as tips to stay efficient and productive during the busy academic quarter.

Everyone across campus including students, faculty, and staff are invited to meet with experienced ‘productivity experts’ from across campus to:

  • Learn how to use free web tools such as Evernote, Box, and Google Apps to superpower productivity
  • Practice new strategies in time management
  • Discover innovative ways to stay in-the-know
  • Manage research documents such as course readings, book chapters, and paper drafts
  • Ensure security online and in research documents

Schedule of Events
January 15, Noon – 5:00 PM
Regenstein, Room 122

12:00 PM – 2:00 PM: Productivity & Project Management Consultations
Members of the University of Chicago community can sign up for 15-minute consultations with librarians, academic technologists, and tech experts to learn about key productivity tools and strategies.

2:00 PM – 3:00 PM: Productivity Tools & Strategies Lightning Talks
Participants present proposed lighting talks on their favorite project management/productivity tools or strategies. The Lightning talks blocked at 5 minutes apiece, and will give an opportunity for peer sharing and presentation skills.

3:00 PM – 5:00 PM: Productivity & Project Management Consultations & Productivity “In”
Participants can meet with consultants on key productivity tools & strategies. This time also serves as a place for students to have a “productivity-in,” where students can get to work planning and organizing course readings, assignments, and extracurricular duties for the quarter.

Sign up for a consultation today!

Interested in presenting a lightning talk? Fill out a lightning talk proposal.

Don’t want to commit? Feel free to drop in during the event, grab a snack provided by the library, and chat with other people across campus to learn some new tools and share your strategies on staying productive.

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in a Library workshop or training session should contact Kaitlin Springmier at 773-702-0229.

Soda tax and soda price in Mexico

On November 9th, Jeffrey Grogger, the Irving Harris Professor in Urban Policy at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, presented his preliminary research on soda tax and soda price in Mexico as part of the Becker Brown Bag Series.  Mexico’s nine percent soda tax took effect on January 1, 2014.  In addition to taxing soda, fruit juices and waters with added sugars are also being taxed.  The Mexico soda tax is a straightforward example of price theory.  The tax raises the price and the higher price lowers consumption.  The lower consumption then ideally leads to lower weight and less chronic disease.

Professor Grogger’s research strives to answer two key questions that aren’t addressed by the theory:

  1. How much do prices rise?
  2. What happens if consumers substitute other caloric drinks for sodas?

Interested in exploring this topic further? View Professor Grogger’s presentation and his slides.

University of Chicago researchers also have access to Euromonitor data through Passport GMID.  Euromonitor’s category briefing on sugar confectionery in Mexico discusses the effect of the tax.  Consumption data is also available, although Professor Grogger noted in his presentation that consumption data varied greatly across different sources.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

 

 

The legacy of Chicago economics

chicago-econ-panel

Photo credit: Chicago Economics Through the Years | Becker Friedman Institute. Retrieved October 15, 2015, from http://bfi.uchicago.edu/feature-story/chicago-economics-through-years

On October 5th, the Becker Friedman Institute hosted The Legacy of Chicago Economics conference, where leading scholars in economics gathered together to discuss the impressive history of Chicago economics.  A complete list of speakers and the research they discussed can be found on the event page.  Video recordings taken during the conference will also be available soon.

The conference culminated with the Living the Legacy: Chicago Economics throughout the Years panel, which included prominent members of the Department of Economics and the Booth School of Business faculty.  In President Zimmer’s introduction, he shared the astounding fact that the panelists had a total of 229 years of experience.  The panel included three Nobel laureates and was chaired by fourth.

Selected bibliographies of all the panelists can be found on the Faculty Publications page of the Business and Economics research guide.  These bibliographies link directly to full text provided by the library.

The library also owns several print and electronic books discussing the Chicago school of economics, several of which are listed below.

The Special Collections Research Center holds the archives of Chicago Department of Economics records from 1912-1961. Documents from this collection were included in one of the conference presentations discussing the department deliberations that led to Milton Friedman being hired.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

 

Apply for the Library Student Advisory Group

The Library is currently seeking representatives for the Library Student Advisory Group (LSAG) from the following Divisions and Schools:

  • The College (Class of 2019)
  • Chicago Booth School of Business
  • Harris School of Public Policy
  • Physical Sciences Division
  • School of Social Service Administration

The Library Student Advisory Group serves as a formal channel of communication between students and the Library administration.  The LSAG discusses the collections and services provided through all of the University’s campus libraries — Crerar, D’Angelo, Eckhart, Mansueto, Regenstein, and SSA — and the present and future needs of the student community.  The Group assists in making specific recommendations to improve the Library and considers proposals for future changes in services.  Finally, members of the LSAG discuss how the Library can raise awareness of its offerings among students, and how students can communicate their wishes, needs, and concerns to the Library.

If you are interested in serving, please complete the online application by October 25, 2015.  If you would like additional information about the Library Student Advisory Group or would like to apply via e-mail, please contact Rebecca Starkey at rstarkey@uchicago.edu.

Resource spotlight: Factiva

University of Chicago researchers have access to Factiva, a database of global news and business information.  Factiva provides access to thousands of domestic and international newspapers, newswires, company profiles and media programs with sources from over 100 countries in 28 languages. logo_factiva  Its powerful search engine allows for comprehensive research and the Factiva Expert Search feature has been created to simplify complex searches, including investor and news sentiment.

The News Pages section makes it easy to browse the top business publications, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and Barron’s.  Once you’ve found articles you would like to read, translations are available and the articles can be downloaded as MP3s to listen to on your commute or as you walk around campus.

Fun fact: Transcripts are available from BBC, ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, CNN and NPR.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

Attend Econ 101: an introduction to library resources

The Business and Economics Librarians at University of Chicago will be offering an orientation for new students in The College planning on studying economics on Friday, September 25.  If you are majoring in economics, this is a can’t miss 60-minute session.  Learn about all the services the Library can provide to aid your research, from accessing the major relevant newspapers and journals (think The Economist and The Wall Street Journal) to finding economics articles and papers.  An introduction to some of the best sources for economics data will also be provided.  The session will begin promptly on the hour.

Where: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Room 523

When: Friday, September 25 at 11am

 

Questions? Ask a Librarian

 

 

Business & economics now on social media

Bus+EconIconThe Business & Economics Librarians at University of Chicago Library are now providing research services and support on Twitter and Facebook.  Follow and like these accounts for updates on resources, research recommendations and more.  The Business & Economics Librarians will also be available to answer research questions through both platforms.

The Business of China

This week’s “Black Monday” market crash clearly demonstrates how interconnected China’s economy is with the rest of the world’s economies.  The Economist‘s online article The Causes and Consequences of China’s Market Crash provides insight into what seems to have been the cause.  Chinese markets have remained volatile since the devaluation of the yuan on August 11.  The continued decline last week of the Shanghai Composite Index is suggesting that China’s industrial activity is slowing.  University of Chicago researchers interested in diving into China’s industry data to form their own analysis can do so with China Data Online.  Data for over 30 industry categories are available for general analysis going back until 1999.  Monthly statistics on output and production, top enterprises and market analysis by city and region are available as well, including statistics from 2015.

University of Chicago researchers can also search Factiva and EconLit for articles discussing business in China.

 

Questions? Ask a Librarian

 

Citation: (2015, August 24). The causes and consequences of China’s market crash.  The Economist. Retrieved from http://www.economist.com/news/business-and-finance/21662092-china-sneezing-rest-world-rightly-nervous-causes-and-consequences-chinas

 

New online resource: IBISWorld

University of Chicago researchers now have access to IBISWorld.

IBISWorldIBISWorld is a database that provides comprehensive industry reports for over 700 industries ranging from biotechnology to pawn shops.  These reports provide strategic insight and analysis which can be used to gain a better understanding of market conditions and forecasts, industry supply chain, and competitive landscape.

The reports include breakdowns of industry performance, outlook, products and markets, major competitors and operation conditions.  In addition to being able to download the complete report, key statistics can be downloaded to excel and specific infographics can be downloaded and inserted into your own reports and presentations.  

Questions? Ask A Librarian.
 

People Meet new Business & Economics Librarian for Instruction & Outreach Emily Treptow

Treptow Emily2014Emily Treptow joined the University of Chicago Library on June 1 as the new Business & Economics Librarian for Instruction & Outreach.  She came to us from Michigan State University where she was a Business Reference Librarian from November 2012 to May 2015.

Below, Emily has answered questions about her plans for her work at the University of Chicago 

How do you envision working with faculty and students in your new role here?

I am very excited about my new role, which is also a brand new position at the library.  It was created with leeway for me to spend time outside the library to meet with students and faculty at the locations most convenient for them.  I will be available to travel to Booth’s Harper Center and Gleacher Center and to the Economics Department in Saieh Hall to provide research assistance via office hours and instruction.  I also envision leveraging this flexibility by attending relevant discussions and workshops on campus to better equip myself to build a program of outreach that will provide the research services that faculty and students need.  I hope to be involved in orientation sessions for new Booth and Economics students, in addition to providing increased point of need services and instruction.

Do you have a sense of what you’d like to accomplish in your first year at University of Chicago?

In my first year, I would like to spend time meeting with Booth and Economics students, staff and faculty to learn more about their needs and how I can create services to meet those needs.  I would also like use social media as another means for building these connections. 

UChicago faculty and students are encouraged to contact Emily with questions or requests for assistance with business & economics research, teaching and learning. You can reach Emily at etreptow@uchicago.edu or 773.834.3415.

Redesigned research guides are easier to use and navigate

This weekend, the University of Chicago’s Library Guides were migrated to a new platform that features a number of improvements. Most notably, use of responsive design greatly improves the user’s experience on mobile devices and assistive technology, such as screen readers.

Mobile view of a Library Guide

A Library Guide as seen on a smartphone

The new platform also uses navigation menus on the left side of the screen, rather than the tabs across the top, which should make it easier and more intuitive for users to locate content in the guides.

Our librarians have created guides on a wide variety of academic subjects studied at the University. In addition, Help Guides show you how to locate specific types of material, such as newspapers, and to use Library tools and services, such as interlibrary loan.

Visit our Library Guides page for a complete list of our guides. 

 

What is the value of a brand?

Earlier this year, the question What is the value of a brand? was  answered on The Big Question, a video series created by Booth’s research magazine Capital Ideas.  An expert panel consisting of Professor Ann L. McGill and Professor Pradeep K. Chintagunta as well as Ann  Mukherjee, the president of global snacks and global insights at PepsiCo, discussed the function of brands, building a brand,  and measuring and increasing brand value.

University of Chicago researchers can learn more about brand value using the following resources:

  • eMarketer provides rankings by brand value across different different industries based on overall financial return to an organization’s investors, the brand’s influence on the generation of demand through choice, and the ability of the brand to create loyalty and keep generating demand and profit into the future.
  • Factiva allows you easily filter your search for content in the subject area of Branding.
  • Passport GMID covers a range of topics including brand divestment and provides  international brand share statistics and brand analysis.

Questions?  Ask a Librarian.

New online resource: eMarketer

University of Chicago researchers now have access to eMarketer.

emarketereMarketer is a database that provides digital market research information ranging from digital ad spend in the automotive industry to use statistics of the newest social media platforms, such as Meerkat and Periscope.  This data can be used to benchmark consumer behavior, size markets, and value initiatives.  

This resource includes articles, analysts reports and statistical tables which can be downloaded to Excel for further analysis.  Custom data dashboards can be built using thousands of eMarketer forecasts including ad spending, device and platform usage, retail and ecommerce sales, and time spent with media.  In addition to eMarketer’s own forecast estimate data, it is possible to compare estimates from other research groups and firms.  

Questions? Ask A Librarian.
 

International Monetary Fund data now freely available

The International Monetary Fund recently announced that all of their data sets are now free to everyone. Previously, IMF data were only available through Library subscriptions. The subscription interface is still available, but will be discontinued in the near future. The new open platform allows registered users to download entire data sets in addition to data query results.

Access the new data portal at
http://data.imf.org

Extensive help files are available at
http://datahelp.imf.org/

If you created an account on the old system, your login credentials should work at the new site. Saved data queries will not be transferred, however.

Words are data

Amy Merick’s article “Why words are the new numbers: the coming revolution of data analysis” appears in the latest issue of Chicago Booth’s Capital Ideas.  The article highlights the research of many Chicago Booth faculty in the area of text analysis.  The references will take you directly to a sample of related faculty publications. 

For a complete list of faculty publications with links please refer to the library guide Selected Bibliographies of Business and Economics Faculty.

Final days: Library asks graduate and professional school students to complete survey by March 4

The University of Chicago Library is conducting a survey of all currently enrolled graduate and professional school students. This survey is being offered in partnership with Graduate Student Affairs, and the findings will be used to inform decisions about future University and Library services.

The survey was distributed by email on February 4. Graduate and professional school students, please check your email for a message from the University of Chicago Library with an individualized link to the survey. Participants who complete the survey will have the opportunity to enter a drawing for a number of prizes, including:

  • A dedicated faculty study at Regenstein Library or Crerar Library for one year.
  • Locker rental at Regenstein Library for one year.
  • Gift cards for Amazon.com, the Seminary Co-op, or the University of Chicago Bookstore.

Previous surveys conducted by the Library resulted in the implementation of the Library’s Scan and Deliver service, as well as the creation of new group study spaces in Regenstein Library. Results gathered from the Library’s last survey of graduate and professional school students, conducted in February 2010, are available online.

For more information or to report problems with the survey, please contact the project team by email at ithaka@lib.uchicago.edu.

New Library Director and University Librarian arrives on campus

Brenda Johnson

Brenda Johnson

Dear University of Chicago Faculty, Students and Staff,

As I begin my second week on campus, I would like to say how very happy I am to have arrived at the University of Chicago. The warm welcome I have received from so many of you in the last few days has made me feel immediately at home.

The University of Chicago’s status as one of the world’s premier academic and research institutions and its Library’s role in fueling intellectual inquiry and a transformative education are well known internationally. As the year unfolds, I look forward to learning much more about your work; about the ways you rely on the Library to support your research, teaching and study; and about the ways you see your needs evolving as you break new scholarly ground or advance in your education.

It will be my great pleasure to meet many more of you and to discuss these matters with you in the coming months.

With warm regards,

Brenda L. Johnson
Library Director and University Librarian
The University of Chicago Library

Feature Story Brenda Johnson named Library Director and University Librarian

Brenda L. Johnson, an internationally respected leader in the field of library science, has been appointed Library Director and University Librarian, Provost Eric Isaacs announced Oct. 16. Her five-year term begins Jan. 1, 2015.

“The Library plays a key role in the life of faculty and students at the University of Chicago,” Isaacs said. “Brenda’s expertise in supporting both physical collections and the proliferation of digital resources, along with her history of collaboration and innovative thinking, make her an outstanding leader for this important enterprise.”

Brenda Johnson

Brenda Johnson

Johnson currently serves as Ruth Lilly Dean of University Libraries at Indiana University, Bloomington—a position she has held since 2010. She succeeds Judith Nadler, who retired in June after nearly five decades of service to UChicago.

Before coming to Indiana University, Johnson was University Librarian at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She spent more than 20 years at the University of Michigan, where she served as Associate University Librarian for Public Services, a position with responsibility over that institution’s 19 libraries.

She is active in the national and international library community through service and leadership on a variety of executive boards and committees, such as the board of governors of HathiTrust, the board of directors of CLOCKSS (a digital repository for web-based scholarly publications), the Committee on Institutional Cooperation Library Directors Group, the board of directors of Kuali OLE (Open Library Environment), and the Association of Research Libraries’ Scholarly Communications Steering Committee.

Johnson has become a nationally and internationally recognized voice on topics such as the rapid pace of change in information discovery and dissemination, the development of multi-institution “collective collections,” and research and learning environments, as well as the need for library transformation that fosters scholarly engagement and support. Her recent international speaking engagements have taken her to London, Shanghai, Kyushu and Yokohama, Japan.

“The University of Chicago Library is a unique and influential institution among academic libraries,” Johnson said. “I am truly honored by the opportunity to lead it through a time of transformation for all libraries, and eager to collaborate with faculty, students and staff to ensure its vitality in the years to come.”

Diane Lauderdale, professor of Health Studies, is chair of the Library’s faculty board and chaired the search committee that recommended Johnson for the position of Library Director.

“Brenda Johnson is an experienced library director and well-respected leader in the international academic library community,” Lauderdale said. “She will bring to the University of Chicago a deep understanding of collections, public and technical services and new technologies. We have an outstanding collection and staff here, but like all university libraries, face challenging decisions in the next few years about our physical and digital collections. The search committee felt confident that Brenda had the experience, insight and vision to lead our library to an even higher level of excellence.”

At a time of change for libraries nationwide, the University of Chicago Library has flourished as a center of intellectual inquiry recognized throughout academia and a dynamic learning environment for UChicago students. With its 11.9 million volumes, noted collections in a broad range of fields, including global resources and commitment to keeping its collection on campus, the Library has become a destination for scholars and a model for other institutions worldwide.  

The Joseph Regenstein Library and the adjoining Joe and Rika Mansueto Library are located in the heart of the Hyde Park campus—a testament to the Library’s continued importance to scholarly and campus life at the University, Isaacs said.

The Mansueto Library is the most recent addition to the library system. Mansueto houses cutting-edge facilities for book preservation and digitization, as well as a high-density underground storage system with the capacity to hold 3.5 million volume equivalents. The library was designed to fulfill scholars’ needs for easy access to print resources at a time when many other research universities are moving their collections to off-site storage.

The library is named in honor of Joe Mansueto, AB’78, MBA’80, and Rika Yoshida, AB’91, who gave a $25 million gift to the University in 2008. Architect Helmut Jahn designed the facility’s iconic glass dome, which encloses a light-filled reading room and an underground storage system that descends 50 feet below ground.

Alice Schreyer, Associate University Librarian for Area Studies and Special Collections, has been leading the Library on an interim basis since Nadler’s retirement. She will continue in that role until Johnson’s arrival.

A University of Chicago news release

Apply for the Library Student Advisory Group

The Library is currently seeking representatives for the Library Student Advisory Group (LSAG) from the following Divisions and Schools:

  • The College (1st or 2nd year students)
  • Biological Sciences Division
  • Chicago Booth School of Business
  • Harris School of Public Policy
  • Law School
  • Pritzker School of Medicine
  • School of Social Service Administration

The Library Student Advisory Group serves as a formal channel of communication between students and the Library administration.  The LSAG discusses the collections and services provided through all of the University’s campus libraries — Crerar, D’Angelo, Eckhart, Mansueto, Regenstein, and SSA — and the present and future needs of the student community.  The Group assists in making specific recommendations to improve the Library and considers proposals for future changes in services.  Finally, members of the LSAG discuss how the Library can raise awareness of its offerings among students, and how students can communicate their wishes, needs, and concerns to the Library.

If you are interested in serving, please complete the online application by October 13, 2014.  If you would like additional information about the Library Student Advisory Group or would like to apply via e-mail, please contact Rebecca Starkey
at rstarkey@uchicago.edu.

Summer quarter loans to UChicago students and staff will be automatically extended to January 9

Items checked out by currently registered University of Chicago students and staff for summer quarter and due October 3 will be automatically renewed by the Library for autumn quarter. As of September 21, all such items will have a new due date of January 9, 2015. No action by UChicago students and staff is necessary.

The automatic renewal is designed to ease the transition to the new Library Catalog and management system. The ability to view a list of checked out items and to renew materials online is currently unavailable to Library users through the My Account function in the new Catalog.

Library staff members are happy to generate a list of your checked-out items and to answer other questions about your account upon request. For assistance, please complete this circulation web form or visit a Library circulation desk.

For the latest information about the implementation of the Library Catalog, visit the Library News site or Ask a Librarian.

 

Alert Library improving Catalog and checkout response times

Update 9/22/14: Catalog response times have been improved. The Library continues to work on improving checkout response times.
______

Library staff members are actively working to improve system response times as full implementation of the new Library Catalog and management system continues. The Library apologizes for the inconvenience and appreciates your patience as we work to bring our new systems up to full speed.

Known issues

We expect to resolve these issues in the coming weeks:

Using the Catalog

  • Library Catalog information may be slow to appear.
  • Error messages are sometimes generated during Catalog searches. In such cases, please try your search again in 5 minutes.
  • Account information is currently unavailable through the new Catalog. Library staff members are happy to generate a list of your checked-out items and to answer other questions about your account upon request. For assistance, please complete this circulation web form or visit a Library circulation desk.

Borrowing

  • Checkout processing may be slow.
  • Borrow Direct is currently unavailable. Please use UBorrow or Interlibrary Loan instead.

Quarter loans automatically renewed for autumn

To ease the transition, summer quarter loans to University of Chicago students and staff are being automatically renewed for the autumn quarter on September 21. These books will be due on January 9, 2015.

If you have any questions about the new Catalog, please contact us by email, phone, chat, or in person through our Ask a Librarian service.

Feature Story UChicago launches Kuali OLE and new Catalog

Academic librarians develop open-source software to meet faculty and student needs

The University of Chicago Library is pleased to announce its launch of the Kuali Open Library Environment (OLE) and a new Catalog based on VuFind.

An open-source, community-based library management system, Kuali OLE was created by a partnership of some of the nation’s leading university libraries, including the University of Chicago Library. Kuali OLE, which provides the Library’s technical infrastructure, is intentionally designed to function with a wide range of user interfaces chosen by various individual libraries, including Chicago’s new Catalog.

“We are especially pleased that by implementing Kuali OLE and VuFind we will be providing both a business system and a patron access module that are open source—planned, designed, governed and owned by the library community,” said James Mouw, Associate University Librarian for Collections Services at University of Chicago and Treasurer of the Kuali OLE Board. “Community ownership of key library systems affords us the ability to manage, develop, and enhance our infrastructure as new technologies emerge and the needs of our scholarly community evolve. The ability to move quickly and effectively, working in partnership with other academic research institutions with similar needs is something we have not had with commercial systems.”

Kuali OLE

Kuali OLE was founded by a partnership of research libraries that now includes University of Chicago, Indiana University (lead), SOAS—University of London, Lehigh University, Duke University, North Carolina State University, University of Florida, University of Maryland, University of Michigan, University of Pennsylvania and Villanova University. The partners pooled resources and expertise beginning in 2008 with several grants from the Mellon Foundation to develop this next-generation library system. Chicago and Lehigh University are the initial implementers. Other partners plan to adopt the new system in summer 2015.

Kuali OLE partners

Kuali OLE partners

UChicago Library staff members have played an integral role in the development of Kuali OLE since the design phase in 2008 and continue to do so by developing specifications, participating in software development, undertaking migration planning, providing subject specialist expertise, and testing new development. They hold several key leadership positions on the Kuali OLE team, and dozens more are participating in working groups supporting development activities. Development continues with the next Kuali OLE release due in summer 2015.

New University of Chicago Library Catalog

UChicago Library staff members have tailored VuFind, a library catalog originally developed at Villanova University, to meet the needs of local users. Design goals for the Catalog were drawn from an extensive series of interviews with UChicago faculty and students, conducted to ensure that the new tool meets the needs of researchers. Initial designs were refined throughout the first half of 2014, following the public beta testing of the Catalog by users beginning on February 14, 2014.

Alumna tries out the new Library Catalog

Sylva Osbourne, AB’14, tries out the new Library Catalog. (Photo by Lloyd DeGrane)

“Participating in the VuFind open-source project has allowed the Library to take advantage of commonly requested features already developed by the VuFind community while giving us the latitude to create functionality unique to UChicago needs,” said Elisabeth Long, Associate University Librarian for Digital Services.  “The level of engagement by our faculty and students in helping us design this new Catalog has been especially gratifying.”

The new Catalog features a simple, clean visual design while retaining all of the functionality that patrons identified as valuable in the pre-existing UChicago systems. It also adds new features requested during interviews, including display of the current availability of items on the search results page, as well as easier access to ebooks and ejournals.

“The successful, coordinated launch of these two new Library systems, designed to improve discovery and management of growing collections, could not have been accomplished without the creativity and talent of University of Chicago Library staff,” said Alice Schreyer, Interim Library Director and Associate University Librarian for Area Studies and Special Collections at the University of Chicago. “We are proud to collaborate with our colleagues to develop these new systems that will benefit researchers from around the world.”

Alert New Catalog launched, BorrowDirect restored

10/23/14 update: BorrowDirect is restored.

The University of Chicago Library has launched its new Library Catalog, and most Library services that were temporarily interrupted during the transition period are now restored.   As of today, Lens and the previous Catalog are retired.

We are aware that some system functions may be working slowly. This will be addressed in the coming weeks.

For information about how to use the new Catalog, visit the Catalog Help page or contact us through our Ask a Librarian service.

If you have saved records using My Discoveries in Lens and wish to retain them, there is still time to place a request to have these migrated to the new Library Catalog.

We encourage you to report any difficulties you encounter in using the new Catalog, so that Library staff can quickly diagnose and resolve them.