Events

For workshops & events.

Global Leadership Program for Korean Librarians, June 23

Poster for NLK Library Global Leadership ProgramThe Library welcomes visiting participants in the Global Leadership Program for Korean Librarians, a librarian education and training program organized by the National Library Korea, which is holding a one-day workshop of lectures and tours at the University of Chicago Library.  Twenty-one librarians from academic, public and government libraries in Korea will attend the sessions and have the opportunity to learn about the University of Chicago Library system and its services.

When:  Friday, June 23, 2017
Where: Joseph Regenstein Library, Room 122

Lectures and Tours

Welcoming remarks
Yuan Zhou, Curator for East Asian Collection

  1. 9:30 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.
    The Subject Specialist in an Academic Library
    Jee-Young Park, Korean Studies Librarian
  2. 10:35 a.m. – 11:25 a.m.
    Instruction and Outreach at the University of Chicago Library
    Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach
  3. 1:30 p.m. – 2:20 p.m.
    Joe and Rika Mansueto Library Tour
  4. 2:30 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.
    Special Collections Tour
    Daniel Meyer, Director, Special Collections and Research Center

This program is sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS).

ALA conference attendees invited to visit UChicago Library

ALA Annual2017 conference logoAttendees of the American Library Association 2017 Annual Conference and Exhibition in Chicago are welcome to visit the University of Chicago’s campus libraries during the conference, June 22-27.  Informational handouts will be available at the Regenstein Library Ask a Librarian desk and the Mansueto Library Circulation desk.

Please bring your conference badge to gain admittance.  For a listing of library hours, visit hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

 

Alumni Weekend at the Library

The Library is delighted to welcome alumni and their guests for tours, meet and greets, and an exhibition during Alumni Weekend. Alumni and their guests are also welcome to visit the Library while on campus outside formal event times.

UChicago Alumni Weekend logoTour: Libraries in a New Light

Meet at the Joseph Regenstein Library, Lobby, 1100 E. 57th St.

Offered at four times:

  • Thursday, June 1, 2–3:15 p.m.
  • Friday, June 2, 2–3:15 p.m.
  • Saturday, June 3, 2–3:15 p.m.
  • Saturday, June 3, 3:30–4:45 p.m.

The Library remains at the center of research, learning, and campus life at UChicago, providing innovative digital services for the information age. Tour the newly transformed Regenstein A Level and the Joe and Rika Mansueto Library. Admire the striking glass-domed reading room, see the robotic storage and retrieval system, and get a behind-the-scenes look at the preservation laboratories where collections from across the centuries are conserved and digitized.

Tensions in Renaissance Cities: View the Special Collections Exhibition and Meet the Curators

The Joseph Regenstein Library, Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, 1100 E. 57th St.

  • Saturday, June 3: 1–2 p.m.

This Special Collections Research Center exhibition charts the tensions of Renaissance capitals from Venice to Mexico City as they looked eastward, westward, backward toward antiquity, or upward to the celestial geographies offered by magic, science, and theology. See highlights from the Library’s rare book and manuscript collections and the Smart Museum of Art and meet the curators—Ada Palmer, assistant professor in the Department of History and the College; PhD student Hilary Barker, AM’06; and Margo Weitzman, AM’15.

Meet and Greet with Library Director and University Librarian Brenda Johnson

Joseph Regenstein Library, Lobby, 1100 E. 57th St.

  • Saturday, June 3: 2–4 p.m.

Enjoy light refreshments and conversation with Library Director and University Librarian Brenda L. Johnson. Explore the online archives for photos from your years at UChicago, learn about the Library’s emerging work in geographic information systems, discover the digital repository Knowledge@UChicago, and learn about Library resources for alumni.

For more information about Alumni Weekend, visit alumniweekend.uchicago.edu.

 

Citizen science workshop for students

citizen science imageAll UChicago students are invited to attend an introductory citizen science workshop on Thursday, April 27 from 12-2 p.m. led by Dr. Laura Trouille of Adler Planetarium and Zooniverse.

Citizen science—engaging the public in research—has proved a creative and capable response to the increasing size of scientific datasets, particularly when coupled with machine learning algorithms and sophisticated task allocation and retirement rules.

During the first hour of the workshop, pizza will be served, and Dr. Trouille will deliver a lecture about citizen science.

In the second hour, snacks will be served, and attendees can start exploring citizen science projects on Zooniverse or start building their own project with the easy to use project builder.

For more information about the workshop, visit the event page, or e-mail the Zar Symposium Committee (zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu).

Register for the workshop.

Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, “Open Data: Science, Health, Community”

The 5th Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, Open Data: Science, Health, Community, will be held on Friday, April 28, 2017, at the University of Chicago’s John Crerar Library.

Open data is data that can be freely used, re-used and redistributed.   Some examples of open data resources include the Human Genome Project, the United Nations UNdata, and the City of Chicago data portal.  Open data can spur business innovation, help patients and families make better decisions about their health, or accelerate the pace of scientific discovery.

This symposium will provide participants–researchers and librarians–with an understanding of what open data is, how it gets created and shared, and examples of how open data might contribute to progress in our communities.

Registration and full schedule at: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/conferences/zar-symposium/

The symposium is a biennial event held at the John Crerar Library of the University of Chicago and made possible through the support of the Kathleen and Howard Zar Science Library Fund.

A Poetry Reading with Harmony Holiday

When: Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 6:008:00 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description:
Harmony Holiday

Harmony Holiday

Harmony Holiday is the author of Negro League Baseball, Go Find Your Father/ A Famous Blues and most recently Hollywood Forever. She is also the founder of Mythscience, an arts collective devoted to cross-disciplinary work that helps artists re-engage with their bodies and the physical world in this so-called digital age, and the Afrosonics archive of jazz and everyday diaspora poetics. She studied rhetoric at the University of California, Berkeley and taught for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre. She received her MFA from Columbia University. She is currently working on a book of poems and lyric essays on reparations and a biography of jazz singer Abbey Lincoln. She lives in Los Angeles.

This event is free and open to the public.

Presented by Chicago Review and the University of Chicago Library

Cost: Free
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Find me on facebook
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.

Spatial Data & GIS Workshops

This spring Resident Librarian for GIS Taylor Hixson is hosting three introductory workshops about spatial data and geographic information systems (GIS).

Spatial Data Literacy

Date: Thursday, March 30 @ 4-5 p.m.
Register

This introductory workshop will cover what makes something spatial data, spatial data files that are compatible with geographic information systems (GIS), and best practices for keeping GIS projects organized.

Introduction to ArcGIS Online

Date: Thursday, April 6 @ 4-5:30 p.m.
Register

This hands-on workshop will give a basic introduction to the ArcGIS Online platform, including adding data to a map and creating web apps. If you’ve wanted to learn how to make an interactive map but don’t know how to code, don’t miss this workshop!

Finding Spatial Data

Date: Thursday, April 13 @ 4-5 p.m.
Register

Thousands of resources exist online for finding spatial data, but finding the right resource can be a challenge. This workshop will focus on techniques for finding spatial data, the top free and open resources online, and resources available through UChicago.

Crerar Lower Level Map

The workshops will be held on the lower level of Crerar Library. The entrance to the lower level is on the left-hand side of the vestibule, the area before the library gates. The classroom is behind the staircase.

E-mail Taylor (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu) with any questions about the workshops. If you are not able to attend the workshops but are interested in learning more about GIS and spatial data, check out the GIS Research Guide for helpful resources.

Call for proposals – Zar Symposium 2017

Open Data: Science, Health, Community
5th Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium
April 28, 2017
The John Crerar Library
The University of Chicago

Web Page: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/conferences/zar-symposium/
Email: zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu
#zarsymposium
@CrerarLibrary

Call for proposals

The organizers of the 5th biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, Open Data: Science, Health, Community, to be held Friday, April 28, invite proposals for presentations that provide insight into open data projects and initiatives, whether established or newly created, which have an impact on science, health, or community.  The focus may be, but is not limited to, opportunities for libraries and information professionals to contribute to or play an active role in projects or initiatives.

The organizers are interested in presentations that provide examples of collaborative efforts between institutions, groups, or individuals, with a focus on practical, real use cases of using open data.  Proposals selected for full oral presentations will be eligible for travel stipend.

Proposals should be submitted online at: http://bit.do/zar2017. Proposals must include a title, author(s), and abstract (maximum 600 words).  Presentations will be 30-45 minutes. The deadline for submission is Wednesday, March 8th.

Please consider the following questions when preparing proposals:

* How has your institution or community engaged with open data?
* If you led an open data project or initiative, how and why was it initiated, and what were the results?
* What are the opportunities and challenges of using or collecting open data?
* How are responsibilities determined and distributed?
* What kinds of tools and techniques may be used?

The symposium organizers will also consider interactive alternatives to a traditional oral presentations.

The intended audience of the symposium includes all who are involved or interested in open data, with a focus on, but not limited to, academic institutions.

About the Symposium:

Open data is data that can be freely used, re-used and redistributed.   Some examples of open data resources include the Human Genome Project, the United Nations UNdata, and the City of Chicago data portal.  Open data can spur business innovation, help patients and families make better decisions about their health, or accelerate the pace of scientific discovery.  This symposium will provide participants with an understanding of what open data is, how it gets created and shared, and examples of how open data might contribute to progress in our communities.

For more information, contact the symposium organizers at: zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu

 

Join us for Love Your Data week, Feb. 12-17

The Library is celebrating international Love Your Data week, February 12-17. The purpose of the Love Your Data (LYD) campaign is to raise awareness and build a community to engage on topics related to research data management, sharing, preservation, reuse, and library-based research data services. We will share practical tips, resources, and stories to help researchers at any stage in their career use good data practices.

Learn more about loving your data with events held at the John Crerar Library and on social media.

Monday, February 13: Defining Data Quality

In 2015, the popular WBEZ podcast This American Life published a message retracting an episode. The episode featured an article published in Science, a highly respected peer-reviewed journal, about the success of canvassing. However, the data in the article was falsified.

How, as researchers, can we recognize good research and bad research? The most elemental way to verify a scholar’s claim is to analyze their data. In day 1 of Love Your Data week, we’ll be sharing resources to help you define good data and spot bad data. Follow Crerar Library on Twitter (@Crerar Library) for resources and case studies in defining good data.

You can also read David Brockman’s (Stanford) claim that the original article contained fake data, or listen to This American Life’s recap of the original story and updates featuring researchers replicating the canvassing experiment.

Tuesday, February 14: Documenting, Describing, Defining

Good data documentation is important for so many reasons. Most notably, though, it makes analysis and write-up stages of your project easier and less stressful and improves the integrity of your scholarly research. On Tuesday, you can learn the basics of data documentation by attending our library workshop in the Crerar Computer Classroom from 4 to 5 p.m., or by following Crerar Library Twitter (@CrerarLibrary) for resources and horror stories on data organization gone wrong.

You can also learn more about documenting, describing, and defining by visiting the Library’s guides on Author and Research Identifiers and Data Management.

Wednesday, February 15: Good Data

When data is good, it is findable, accessible, interoperable, and re-usable (FAIR). For example, this dataset is still around and usable more than 50 years after the data were collected and more than 40 years after it was last used in a publication. Today, we’re asking you to share your favorite data set with us. How and why is it good for your project?

Try out the FAIR Principles to describe and share examples of good data for your discipline. Tell us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram (#loveyourdata)!

Thursday, February 16: Finding the Right Data

In a 2004 Science Daily News article, the National Science Foundation used the phrase “here there be data” to highlight the exploratory nature of traversing the “untamed” scientific data landscape. The use of that phrase harkens to older maps of the world where unexplored territories or areas on maps bore the warning “here, there be monsters” to alert explorers to the dangers of the unknown. While the research data landscape is (slightly) less foreboding, there’s still an adventurous quality to looking for research data. Learn the best ways to find data using library resources by attending our second library workshop in the Crerar Computer Classroom from 12:30 to 1 p.m. or by following Crerar Library on Twitter (@CrerarLibrary) to hear about our librarians’ favorite data sources.

Additionally, we invite you to explore the Library’s guide on Finding Data with library resources.

Friday, February 17: Rescuing Unloved Data

In 2015, The Atlantic published a story of a journalist, who, after being named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for a 34-part news series, lost his publication to the Internet. Digital data loss can happen instantly. However, thanks to #datarefuge and Internet Archive, websites and legacy data are being preserved.

Securing legacy data takes time, resources and expertise but is well worth the effort as old data can enable new research and the loss of data could impede future research. The library provides resources to help the campus community secure data via our institutional repository: Knowledge@UChicago. Contact us to learn more.

 

The HistoryMakers, an African American Oral Video History Archive – workshop

 

When: Wednesday, December 7, 2016 3:004:30 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: Two interviewees in The HistoryMakersThis 90-minute workshop on The HistoryMakers, an African American oral video history archive, is presented by staff from The HistoryMakers project, including Julieanna Richardson, Founder & Executive Director. Co-hosted by the University of Chicago Library and the Office of Civic Engagement, the workshop is open to UChicago faculty, students, and staff who are interested in video oral history or African American contributions to any aspect of American life or culture.

For more about The HistoryMakers resource, visit http://www.thehistorymakers.com/

Cost: Free
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Find me on facebook
Tag: Diversity, Workshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
Information on Assistive Listening Device