Events

For workshops & events.

A Poetry Reading with Harmony Holiday

When: Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 6:008:00 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description:
Harmony Holiday

Harmony Holiday

Harmony Holiday is the author of Negro League Baseball, Go Find Your Father/ A Famous Blues and most recently Hollywood Forever. She is also the founder of Mythscience, an arts collective devoted to cross-disciplinary work that helps artists re-engage with their bodies and the physical world in this so-called digital age, and the Afrosonics archive of jazz and everyday diaspora poetics. She studied rhetoric at the University of California, Berkeley and taught for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre. She received her MFA from Columbia University. She is currently working on a book of poems and lyric essays on reparations and a biography of jazz singer Abbey Lincoln. She lives in Los Angeles.

This event is free and open to the public.

Presented by Chicago Review and the University of Chicago Library

Cost: Free
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
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Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.

Spatial Data & GIS Workshops

This spring Resident Librarian for GIS Taylor Hixson is hosting three introductory workshops about spatial data and geographic information systems (GIS).

Spatial Data Literacy

Date: Thursday, March 30 @ 4-5 p.m.
Register

This introductory workshop will cover what makes something spatial data, spatial data files that are compatible with geographic information systems (GIS), and best practices for keeping GIS projects organized.

Introduction to ArcGIS Online

Date: Thursday, April 6 @ 4-5:30 p.m.
Register

This hands-on workshop will give a basic introduction to the ArcGIS Online platform, including adding data to a map and creating web apps. If you’ve wanted to learn how to make an interactive map but don’t know how to code, don’t miss this workshop!

Finding Spatial Data

Date: Thursday, April 13 @ 4-5 p.m.
Register

Thousands of resources exist online for finding spatial data, but finding the right resource can be a challenge. This workshop will focus on techniques for finding spatial data, the top free and open resources online, and resources available through UChicago.

Crerar Lower Level Map

The workshops will be held on the lower level of Crerar Library. The entrance to the lower level is on the left-hand side of the vestibule, the area before the library gates. The classroom is behind the staircase.

E-mail Taylor (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu) with any questions about the workshops. If you are not able to attend the workshops but are interested in learning more about GIS and spatial data, check out the GIS Research Guide for helpful resources.

Call for proposals – Zar Symposium 2017

Open Data: Science, Health, Community
5th Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium
April 28, 2017
The John Crerar Library
The University of Chicago

Web Page: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/conferences/zar-symposium/
Email: zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu
#zarsymposium
@CrerarLibrary

Call for proposals

The organizers of the 5th biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, Open Data: Science, Health, Community, to be held Friday, April 28, invite proposals for presentations that provide insight into open data projects and initiatives, whether established or newly created, which have an impact on science, health, or community.  The focus may be, but is not limited to, opportunities for libraries and information professionals to contribute to or play an active role in projects or initiatives.

The organizers are interested in presentations that provide examples of collaborative efforts between institutions, groups, or individuals, with a focus on practical, real use cases of using open data.  Proposals selected for full oral presentations will be eligible for travel stipend.

Proposals should be submitted online at: http://bit.do/zar2017. Proposals must include a title, author(s), and abstract (maximum 600 words).  Presentations will be 30-45 minutes. The deadline for submission is Wednesday, March 8th.

Please consider the following questions when preparing proposals:

* How has your institution or community engaged with open data?
* If you led an open data project or initiative, how and why was it initiated, and what were the results?
* What are the opportunities and challenges of using or collecting open data?
* How are responsibilities determined and distributed?
* What kinds of tools and techniques may be used?

The symposium organizers will also consider interactive alternatives to a traditional oral presentations.

The intended audience of the symposium includes all who are involved or interested in open data, with a focus on, but not limited to, academic institutions.

About the Symposium:

Open data is data that can be freely used, re-used and redistributed.   Some examples of open data resources include the Human Genome Project, the United Nations UNdata, and the City of Chicago data portal.  Open data can spur business innovation, help patients and families make better decisions about their health, or accelerate the pace of scientific discovery.  This symposium will provide participants with an understanding of what open data is, how it gets created and shared, and examples of how open data might contribute to progress in our communities.

For more information, contact the symposium organizers at: zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu

 

Join us for Love Your Data week, Feb. 12-17

The Library is celebrating international Love Your Data week, February 12-17. The purpose of the Love Your Data (LYD) campaign is to raise awareness and build a community to engage on topics related to research data management, sharing, preservation, reuse, and library-based research data services. We will share practical tips, resources, and stories to help researchers at any stage in their career use good data practices.

Learn more about loving your data with events held at the John Crerar Library and on social media.

Monday, February 13: Defining Data Quality

In 2015, the popular WBEZ podcast This American Life published a message retracting an episode. The episode featured an article published in Science, a highly respected peer-reviewed journal, about the success of canvassing. However, the data in the article was falsified.

How, as researchers, can we recognize good research and bad research? The most elemental way to verify a scholar’s claim is to analyze their data. In day 1 of Love Your Data week, we’ll be sharing resources to help you define good data and spot bad data. Follow Crerar Library on Twitter (@Crerar Library) for resources and case studies in defining good data.

You can also read David Brockman’s (Stanford) claim that the original article contained fake data, or listen to This American Life’s recap of the original story and updates featuring researchers replicating the canvassing experiment.

Tuesday, February 14: Documenting, Describing, Defining

Good data documentation is important for so many reasons. Most notably, though, it makes analysis and write-up stages of your project easier and less stressful and improves the integrity of your scholarly research. On Tuesday, you can learn the basics of data documentation by attending our library workshop in the Crerar Computer Classroom from 4 to 5 p.m., or by following Crerar Library Twitter (@CrerarLibrary) for resources and horror stories on data organization gone wrong.

You can also learn more about documenting, describing, and defining by visiting the Library’s guides on Author and Research Identifiers and Data Management.

Wednesday, February 15: Good Data

When data is good, it is findable, accessible, interoperable, and re-usable (FAIR). For example, this dataset is still around and usable more than 50 years after the data were collected and more than 40 years after it was last used in a publication. Today, we’re asking you to share your favorite data set with us. How and why is it good for your project?

Try out the FAIR Principles to describe and share examples of good data for your discipline. Tell us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram (#loveyourdata)!

Thursday, February 16: Finding the Right Data

In a 2004 Science Daily News article, the National Science Foundation used the phrase “here there be data” to highlight the exploratory nature of traversing the “untamed” scientific data landscape. The use of that phrase harkens to older maps of the world where unexplored territories or areas on maps bore the warning “here, there be monsters” to alert explorers to the dangers of the unknown. While the research data landscape is (slightly) less foreboding, there’s still an adventurous quality to looking for research data. Learn the best ways to find data using library resources by attending our second library workshop in the Crerar Computer Classroom from 12:30 to 1 p.m. or by following Crerar Library on Twitter (@CrerarLibrary) to hear about our librarians’ favorite data sources.

Additionally, we invite you to explore the Library’s guide on Finding Data with library resources.

Friday, February 17: Rescuing Unloved Data

In 2015, The Atlantic published a story of a journalist, who, after being named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for a 34-part news series, lost his publication to the Internet. Digital data loss can happen instantly. However, thanks to #datarefuge and Internet Archive, websites and legacy data are being preserved.

Securing legacy data takes time, resources and expertise but is well worth the effort as old data can enable new research and the loss of data could impede future research. The library provides resources to help the campus community secure data via our institutional repository: Knowledge@UChicago. Contact us to learn more.

 

The HistoryMakers, an African American Oral Video History Archive – workshop

 

When: Wednesday, December 7, 2016 3:004:30 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: Two interviewees in The HistoryMakersThis 90-minute workshop on The HistoryMakers, an African American oral video history archive, is presented by staff from The HistoryMakers project, including Julieanna Richardson, Founder & Executive Director. Co-hosted by the University of Chicago Library and the Office of Civic Engagement, the workshop is open to UChicago faculty, students, and staff who are interested in video oral history or African American contributions to any aspect of American life or culture.

For more about The HistoryMakers resource, visit http://www.thehistorymakers.com/

Cost: Free
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
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Tag: Diversity, Workshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

NLM Webinar Series: “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed”

Beginning November 30, 2016, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) will present the three-part Webinar series “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed”.

This series of workshops will introduce new users to the basics of using EDirect to access exactly the PubMed data you need, in the format you need. Over the course of three 90-minute sessions, students will learn how to use EDirect commands in a Unix environment to access PubMed, design custom output formats, create basic data pipelines to get data quickly and efficiently, and develop simple strategies for solving real-world PubMed data-gathering challenges. No prior Unix knowledge is required; novice users are welcome!

This series of classes involves hands-on demonstrations and exercises, and we encourage students to follow along. Before registering for these classes, we strongly recommend that you:

  • Watch the first Insider’s Guide class “Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed,” or be familiar with the basic concepts of APIs and E-utilities
  • Be familiar with structured XML data (basic syntax, elements, attributes, etc.)
  • Have access to a Unix command-line environment on your computer. For more information, see our Installing EDirect page.
  • Install the EDirect software. For more information, see our EDirect installation page.

Due to the nature of this class, registration will be limited to 50 students per offering.

Registration is currently open for the November/December 2016 series:

  • Part 1: Getting PubMed Data: Wednesday, November 30, 1:00 – 2:30 PM EST
  • Part 2: Extracting Data from XML: Wednesday, December 7, 1:00 – 2:30 PM EST
  • Part 3: Building Practical Solutions: Wednesday, December 14, 1:00 – 2:30 PM EST

Students are expected to attend Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 in a single series.

To register, and for more information, visit: https://dataguide.nlm.nih.gov/classes.html#edirect-for-pubmed

All About EndNote (Desktop Version) Monday, Nov 21, 12-1 PM

When: Monday, November 21, 2016 12:001:00 p.m.
Where: Crerar Library, Computer Classroom
5730 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL
Description: EndNote is a reference manager used to manage citations, PDFs, and create formatted bibliographies as you write your paper. In this workshop, learn how to use the desktop version of EndNote. Topics covered include: creating and managing citation libraries, importing citations from online databases and other sources, importing and managing PDFs and creating bibliographies. Registration is required.
Register: http://rooms.lib.uchicago.edu/event/2959806
Contact: John Crerar Library
773-702-7715
Tag: Graduate Students, Workshops, Training, Staff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

The Impact of the Digital on Japanese Studies

When: November 11-12, 2016
Where: Joseph Regenstein Library, Room 122
The Digital Humanities Workshop of the University of Chicago will be hosting a public workshop on “The Impact of the Digital on Japanese Studies” on November 11-12, 2016. The goal of the workshop is to bring together a variety of Japan scholars to consider how digital data and computational methods are changing the ways we organize and analyze cultural and historical information. It is also meant to catalyze new initiatives and projects by bringing together experienced and newer voices to brainstorm, discuss, and offer critical feedback on digitally inflected work and how it might support humanistic scholarship.The workshop is organized around projects at various stages of completion, ranging from those at a conceptual stage to those more fully realized. Presenters will share the results of any data-driven work they have done while addressing the technical or methodological processes involved in this work and possible future directions for research. Subject matter will range widely across multiple time periods and disciplines and will interrogate some of the most popular computational methods: text analysis, network analysis, and spatial analysis. A tentative schedule of panel sessions and individual presentation titles is provided below.For more information about the workshop, please contact the organizer, Hoyt Long, at hoytlong@uchicago.edu. Visitors from outside Chicago can find out about transportation and local accommodations here.

Schedule

Friday, November 11

10:00 – 12:00     Session 1
12:00 – 1:00       Lunch
1:00 – 3:30         Session 2
4:00 – 5:00        Group Discussion/Roundtable
5:00 – 6:30        Reception

Saturday, November 12

9:30 – 11:30        Session 3
11:30 – 12:30       Lunch
12:30 – 2:30       Session 4
2:30 – 3:00        Wrap-up Discussion

Workshop Sessions

Session 1

Hyakunin Isshu as a Mini Database
Catherine Ryu, Michigan State University

On Structure and Style in the Dai Nihon Shi
Aliz Horvath, University of Chicago

On Late Medieval Forgery Production
Paula R. Curtis, University of Michigan

To view the abstracts, click here.


Session 2

The Epigraphy of Business Documents
Raja Adal, University of Pittsburgh

On the Politics of Text
Amy Catalinac, New York University

On the Language of Empire in Taiyo Magazine (1895-1925)
Molly Des Jardin, University of Pennsylvania

Political Discourse in Early Meiji Japan
Mark Ravina, Emory University

To view the abstracts, click here.


Session 3

Mapping Medical Edo/Tokyo
Susan Burns, University of Chicago

Can You Sing a Map?
Joel Legassie, University of Victoria

On Scale
Jonathan Zwicker, University of California, Berkeley

To view the abstracts, click here.


Session 4

On Collecting Data
Jonathan Abel, Penn State University

On Aozora Bunko as Archive
Hoyt Long, University of Chicago

On Japanese Corpora and Tokenization
Toshinobu Ogiso, National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics

To view the abstracts, click here.

Webinar: PubMed for Clinicians

PubMed logoOn November 9th, NCBI staff will show health care professionals how to search PubMed for the most relevant and recent literature, explore specific clinical research areas, set up email alerts, and more.

Date and time: Wednesday, November 9, 2016 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM CST

Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2feyobc

After registering for the webinar, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the webinar. After the live presentation, the webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. Any related materials will be accessible on the Webinars and Courses page; you can also learn about future webinars on this page.

Microsoft Office training for Law students

Organized by the Office of the Dean of Students and the D’Angelo Law Library, this program will give Law students all of the basic Microsoft Office skills they will need during the school year, in summer employment, and as an attorney.

There is no charge for the program; Law students may attend the morning session, the afternoon session, or both. Lunch will be provided but you must bring your own laptop. The program will be applicable for both Mac and PC users.

It will be held Saturday, October 22, with Word training  from 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. and Excel & PowerPoint from 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., followed by a question and answer period.

Law Students must register in advance for this  program at  http://www.law.uchicago.edu/microsoftofficetrainingRSVPPlease RSVP by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 19.