Events

For workshops & events.

NLM Webinar Series: “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed”

Beginning November 30, 2016, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) will present the three-part Webinar series “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed”.

This series of workshops will introduce new users to the basics of using EDirect to access exactly the PubMed data you need, in the format you need. Over the course of three 90-minute sessions, students will learn how to use EDirect commands in a Unix environment to access PubMed, design custom output formats, create basic data pipelines to get data quickly and efficiently, and develop simple strategies for solving real-world PubMed data-gathering challenges. No prior Unix knowledge is required; novice users are welcome!

This series of classes involves hands-on demonstrations and exercises, and we encourage students to follow along. Before registering for these classes, we strongly recommend that you:

  • Watch the first Insider’s Guide class “Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed,” or be familiar with the basic concepts of APIs and E-utilities
  • Be familiar with structured XML data (basic syntax, elements, attributes, etc.)
  • Have access to a Unix command-line environment on your computer. For more information, see our Installing EDirect page.
  • Install the EDirect software. For more information, see our EDirect installation page.

Due to the nature of this class, registration will be limited to 50 students per offering.

Registration is currently open for the November/December 2016 series:

  • Part 1: Getting PubMed Data: Wednesday, November 30, 1:00 – 2:30 PM EST
  • Part 2: Extracting Data from XML: Wednesday, December 7, 1:00 – 2:30 PM EST
  • Part 3: Building Practical Solutions: Wednesday, December 14, 1:00 – 2:30 PM EST

Students are expected to attend Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 in a single series.

To register, and for more information, visit: https://dataguide.nlm.nih.gov/classes.html#edirect-for-pubmed

All About EndNote (Desktop Version) Monday, Nov 21, 12-1 PM

When: Monday, November 21, 2016 12:001:00 p.m.
Where: Crerar Library, Computer Classroom
5730 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL
Description: EndNote is a reference manager used to manage citations, PDFs, and create formatted bibliographies as you write your paper. In this workshop, learn how to use the desktop version of EndNote. Topics covered include: creating and managing citation libraries, importing citations from online databases and other sources, importing and managing PDFs and creating bibliographies. Registration is required.
Register: http://rooms.lib.uchicago.edu/event/2959806
Contact: John Crerar Library
773-702-7715
Tag: Graduate Students, Workshops, Training, Staff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

The Impact of the Digital on Japanese Studies

When: November 11-12, 2016
Where: Joseph Regenstein Library, Room 122
The Digital Humanities Workshop of the University of Chicago will be hosting a public workshop on “The Impact of the Digital on Japanese Studies” on November 11-12, 2016. The goal of the workshop is to bring together a variety of Japan scholars to consider how digital data and computational methods are changing the ways we organize and analyze cultural and historical information. It is also meant to catalyze new initiatives and projects by bringing together experienced and newer voices to brainstorm, discuss, and offer critical feedback on digitally inflected work and how it might support humanistic scholarship.The workshop is organized around projects at various stages of completion, ranging from those at a conceptual stage to those more fully realized. Presenters will share the results of any data-driven work they have done while addressing the technical or methodological processes involved in this work and possible future directions for research. Subject matter will range widely across multiple time periods and disciplines and will interrogate some of the most popular computational methods: text analysis, network analysis, and spatial analysis. A tentative schedule of panel sessions and individual presentation titles is provided below.For more information about the workshop, please contact the organizer, Hoyt Long, at hoytlong@uchicago.edu. Visitors from outside Chicago can find out about transportation and local accommodations here.

Schedule

Friday, November 11

10:00 – 12:00     Session 1
12:00 – 1:00       Lunch
1:00 – 3:30         Session 2
4:00 – 5:00        Group Discussion/Roundtable
5:00 – 6:30        Reception

Saturday, November 12

9:30 – 11:30        Session 3
11:30 – 12:30       Lunch
12:30 – 2:30       Session 4
2:30 – 3:00        Wrap-up Discussion

Workshop Sessions

Session 1

Hyakunin Isshu as a Mini Database
Catherine Ryu, Michigan State University

On Structure and Style in the Dai Nihon Shi
Aliz Horvath, University of Chicago

On Late Medieval Forgery Production
Paula R. Curtis, University of Michigan

To view the abstracts, click here.


Session 2

The Epigraphy of Business Documents
Raja Adal, University of Pittsburgh

On the Politics of Text
Amy Catalinac, New York University

On the Language of Empire in Taiyo Magazine (1895-1925)
Molly Des Jardin, University of Pennsylvania

Political Discourse in Early Meiji Japan
Mark Ravina, Emory University

To view the abstracts, click here.


Session 3

Mapping Medical Edo/Tokyo
Susan Burns, University of Chicago

Can You Sing a Map?
Joel Legassie, University of Victoria

On Scale
Jonathan Zwicker, University of California, Berkeley

To view the abstracts, click here.


Session 4

On Collecting Data
Jonathan Abel, Penn State University

On Aozora Bunko as Archive
Hoyt Long, University of Chicago

On Japanese Corpora and Tokenization
Toshinobu Ogiso, National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics

To view the abstracts, click here.

Webinar: PubMed for Clinicians

PubMed logoOn November 9th, NCBI staff will show health care professionals how to search PubMed for the most relevant and recent literature, explore specific clinical research areas, set up email alerts, and more.

Date and time: Wednesday, November 9, 2016 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM CST

Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2feyobc

After registering for the webinar, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the webinar. After the live presentation, the webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. Any related materials will be accessible on the Webinars and Courses page; you can also learn about future webinars on this page.

Microsoft Office training for Law students

Organized by the Office of the Dean of Students and the D’Angelo Law Library, this program will give Law students all of the basic Microsoft Office skills they will need during the school year, in summer employment, and as an attorney.

There is no charge for the program; Law students may attend the morning session, the afternoon session, or both. Lunch will be provided but you must bring your own laptop. The program will be applicable for both Mac and PC users.

It will be held Saturday, October 22, with Word training  from 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. and Excel & PowerPoint from 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., followed by a question and answer period.

Law Students must register in advance for this  program at  http://www.law.uchicago.edu/microsoftofficetrainingRSVPPlease RSVP by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 19.

Attend economics orientation programs

The Business and Economics Librarians at University of Chicago will be offering an orientation for new economics PhD students and an orientation for students in the College planning on studying economics this week.

The orientation for economics PhD students will be held at 4:30pm on Thursday, September 22 in room A-11.  After an overview of library resources relevant to the field of economics, a tour will be held.

Econ 101, the orientation for students in the College, will be held at 11am on Friday, September 23 in room A-11.   If you are majoring in economics, this is a can’t miss 60-minute session.  Learn about all the services the Library can provide to aid your research, from accessing the major relevant newspapers and journals (think The Economist and The Wall Street Journal) to finding economics articles and papers.  An introduction to some of the best sources for economics data will also be provided.  The session will begin promptly on the hour.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services

 

Library orientations, tours, and welcome programs

The Library offers a number of orientations, tours, and special programs during the first weeks of the quarter, tailored to graduate students in various programs, and College students and their families. Below are some of the upcoming orientation opportunities. Click on a session to view details.

Library Orientations for the College

Library Boot Camp

Librarian teaching a class

Photo by Jason Smith.

The John Crerar Library: Science Information You Want, Resources You Need

Library Reception for New Students and Families

Econ 101: An Introduction to Library Resources


Library Orientations for Graduate Students

Center for Latin American Studies Orientation

 Orientation for Computational Social Sciences

 English Department Orientation

Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences (MAPSS) and Committee on International Relations (CIR) Library Orientation

Romance Languages & Literature Orientation


For programs and departments other than those listed, please contact the appropriate subject specialist.

The Art and Adventuresome Life of Cyrus LeRoy Baldridge, PhB 1911

Saturday, June 4, 2016
11 a.m. – 12 noon
Special Collections Research Center Classroom
The Joseph Regenstein Library
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

At this discussion, Jay Mulberry, AB’63, looks toward a summer Special Collections Research Center exhibition he will co-curate on the Art of Cyrus LeRoy Baldridge. Many of Baldridge’s fine book illustrations from World War I, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East are housed in the Smart Museum.

Expanded access to BrowZine now available

BrowZine is a tool for keeping up to date with your favorite journals. The Library has provided access to this tool to users of iOS devices for the past two years. We now offer access for Android devices as well as on your desktop using any web browser.

BrowZine works with publishers to make journal tables of contents accessible through the BrowZine app and web site. You can then access articles directly through the app, rather than going to the journal web site or a Library database. You can browse through journals by discipline and save up to 64 titles on your personal bookshelf. The iOS and Android apps display alerts when a new issue of a journal is available. You can download articles in the app and read them at any time, even when you aren’t online.

Try BrowZine through their web site, or download the app for your Android or iOS device.

Our guide to BrowZine has more information on using the app, including configuring it for off-campus use.

A Reading by Poet Bernadette Mayer on April 20

Bernadette Mayer, a major influence in the contemporary poetry scene for more than four decades, will read from her work at the Joseph Regenstein Library, 1100 East 57th Street, Room 122, Chicago, on April 20 from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.

Bernadette Mayer

Bernadette Mayer (Photo by Philip Good)

Mayer is the author of more than 27 collections, including The Helens of Troy (2013), The Formal Field of Kissing (1990) and Eating The Colors of a Lineup of Words: The Early Books of Bernadette Mayer (2015), as well as countless chapbooks and artist’s books. She has received grants from The Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts and the Foundation for Contemporary Arts. She is also the recipient of the 2014 Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America.

From 1980 to 1984, Mayer served as the director of the St. Mark’s Poetry Project. She has edited and founded 0 to 9 journal and United Artists books and magazines. She has also taught at the New School for Social Research, Naropa Institute, Long Island University, and Miami University.

This reading is presented by the University of Chicago Library and the University’s Program in Poetry and Poetics.

Poetry holds a special place among the collections of the University of Chicago Library, particularly since Harriet Monroe presented it with her own poetry library, papers, and the editorial files of Poetry magazine in 1931. The collection continues to grow, with a particular focus on modern poetry from the Chicago area. Literature of significant poetry movements such as the Imagists is complemented by the works of student poets, the publications of poetry societies, and finely printed editions. At present, the Library’s modern poetry book collection comprises well over 25,000 volumes, and the collection continues to grow by 1,000 to 1,200 volumes a year.