Featured Electronic Resources

New online resource: Black Freedom Struggle in the Twentieth Century

Mississippi Subversion of the Right to Vote

Cover of Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) pamphlet published in Atlanta, 1965

Researchers at the University of Chicago now have access to Black Freedom Struggle in the Twentieth Century, a collection of digital primary sources consisting of government documents, organizational records, and personal papers. The resource, which consists of four modules, includes major collections of civil rights records from the Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush presidencies; the Martin Luther King FBI file and FBI files on locations of major civil rights demonstrations; and the records of the American Committee on Africa (ACOA); Records of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters; Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACWC), Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). Also included in the collection are the personal papers of Mary McLeod Bethune and Charles A. Barnett.

An online trove of Biblical manuscripts

The digitization of the Goodspeed Manuscript Collection

An extraordinary collection of 68 New Testament and other Biblical manuscripts dating from the fourth to the twentieth centuries has been digitized and made available for study online. This fall, the University of Chicago Library celebrates the completion of a website (goodspeed.lib.uchicago.edu) featuring digital facsimiles of rare and delicate Greek, Syriac, Ethiopic, Armenian, Arabic, and Latin manuscripts from the Edgar J. Goodspeed Manuscript Collection in the Special Collections Research Center.  This premier collection holds great artistic, historical, and textual significance for scholars.

Eusebius of Caesarea, letter to Carpianus

Goodspeed Manuscript Collection, gms-1017-007, Eusebius of Caesarea, letter to Carpianus. Gospels in Armenian. (Aleppo Gospels). Aleppo, Syria (Berea), 1624.

The inspiration for the digitization project came from faculty working in a range of disciplines from religious studies to art history and classics.  All had an interest in bringing digitized images of manuscripts into the classroom and onto the laptops of students and faculty.  An initial grant from the University of Chicago Provost’s Program for Academic Technology Innovation and an award from the Institute of Museum and Library Services National Leadership Grants for Libraries helped to fund the early years of the project.

Completion of the digitization project was the result of a successful collaboration across Library units including the Digital Library Development Center, Special Collections Research Center, Preservation Department, and Cataloging Department.  Specialists in the Library overcame numerous challenges over the course of the digitization process.  For example, many of the manuscripts are bound in vellum or leather with parchment text pages that are proteinaceous, causing the material to cockle and stiffen over the centuries.  Others feature extraordinary illustrations—from decorative headpieces and initials to full-page images—on media that needed to be handled with the utmost care to prevent flaking or crumbling.

The faithfully photographed works are represented online by high-resolution 24-bit color images that researchers can view in tremendous detail using the zooming capability of the web interface. In addition, Special Collections staff provided detailed metadata about each manuscript’s intellectual content together with descriptions of miniatures, watermarks, and heraldic devices.  This enables both general and advanced users of all disciplines to search and browse the online collection using a wide range of subject headings, descriptive terms, and manuscript features.

Visit goodspeed.lib.uchicago.edu to see the Goodspeed Manuscripts online.

New Library website launches July 5

Update: The Library will be launching the new website described below starting at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 5. Site visitors should expect service interruptions throughout the evening, and, because the changes will take time to propagate over the internet, some users may be unable to reach the site through July 6.

Access to resources outside of the main Library website should continue uninterrupted during this time. These include:

Thank you for your patience as we roll out these changes.

____________________

The University of Chicago Library will launch a new website over the summer.  The new site’s improved navigation and mobile-friendly design will provide faculty and students with ready access to curated, scholarly information and research expertise.

Changes to the design and structure of the new Library website are being made in response to the needs and feedback of UChicago faculty, students, and staff. The new site will be optimized for both desktop and mobile use, with a modern look and feel. It is being made easier to browse and navigate by

  • providing streamlined access to search tools for articles, journals, and databases;
  • providing more consistent navigation across the top of the site’s pages;
  • reorganizing information into categories developed directly from user input;
  • making it easier to find information about distinctive collections, exhibitions, study spaces, hours, and locations; and
  • connecting related collections, tools, and experts, making it easier for users to take advantage of the wealth of information and services offered by the Library.

In addition, Library news will be presented in a more engaging way on the site, and pages will be optimized for discovery via Google or other search engines.

The current Library Catalog, launched in 2014, is not being redesigned as a part of this project.

The new Library website will first go live in mid-summer and will be further refined in the weeks leading up to fall orientation.  During this period, if you have any difficulty finding the information you are looking for, librarians will be happy to assist you via our Ask a Librarian service.

The University of Chicago Library website serves as a gateway to UChicago collections and licensed resources; the online Ask a Librarian service, including live chat; Library staff with expertise in a wide range of subjects; research guides in numerous fields; and videos and guides explaining how to conduct research using library resources.

New online resource: Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical Texts

Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical TextsThe researchers at the University of Chicago now have online access to the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical Texts through Brill. The database includes high resolution images of the biblical texts discovered in the Judean desert along with a side-by-side comparison of Hebrew transcription, English translation and the text of the Leningrad Codex. Until now, this content was only accessible electronically through the CD-ROM version published in 1999. Through the online database, researchers are able to search across the entire content, link between texts and download images of scrolls either on or off-campus. Included at this time is the Revised List of Texts from the Judean Desert (2010) that includes non-biblical texts, though these are currently not available to read online. Since the database is published by Brill, researchers can simultaneously access related databases published by Brill, such as The Context of Scripture online or the Coptic Gnostic Library online. Any questions can be directed to Anne K. Knafl, Bibliographer for Religion and Philosophy.

The display of a fragment from Genesis 19:27-28 from the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Online.

The display of a fragment from Genesis 19:27-28 from the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Online.

 

A single portal to Chicago history

UChicago Library partners with 21 institutions to create a tool for exploring the history and culture of Chicago

IdaBWells-asas-00054_400p

Ida B. Wells-Barnett with her children, 1909, 13.7 x 9.5 cm. Ida B. Wells Papers, Box 10, Folder 1. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

The University of Chicago Library is a major partner in the creation of a new online portal, Explore Chicago Collections, that documents the rich history and culture of the Chicago region. Launching on October 22, the free portal helps researchers, students, and the general public to locate and access more than 100,000 maps, photos, letters, and other materials from across the city.

This portal is the cornerstone initiative of a city-wide consortium, Chicago Collections, that includes universities, museums, and organizations as diverse as the Alliance Française and the Chicago Zoological Society.

Charles Blair, Director of the University of Chicago Library’s Digital Library Development Center, has played a key role in the development of this new search tool. As Co-chair of the Chicago Collections Portal Committee he has contributed technical expertise in the underlying portal software as well as experience developing effective digital asset management and discovery tools that meet the needs of a wide variety of users. The Library will also be contributing content for the portal, including finding aids describing our Chicago-related archival and manuscript collections, as well as several thousand digitized photographs, beginning with 33 photographs of pioneering Chicago civil rights activist Ida B. Wells and more than 1,000 of Chicago neighborhoods and urban renewal by photographer Mildred Mead.

In addition to bringing resources from member organizations together into a single search interface, the consortium has been developing a wide range of outreach programs and services including an exhibition, lectures, and a Cooperative Reference Network that will provide answers to questions from researchers and the general public about Chicago history and member collections.

Access the portal at explore.chicagocollections.org.

New online resource: IBISWorld

University of Chicago researchers now have access to IBISWorld.

IBISWorldIBISWorld is a database that provides comprehensive industry reports for over 700 industries ranging from biotechnology to pawn shops.  These reports provide strategic insight and analysis which can be used to gain a better understanding of market conditions and forecasts, industry supply chain, and competitive landscape.

The reports include breakdowns of industry performance, outlook, products and markets, major competitors and operation conditions.  In addition to being able to download the complete report, key statistics can be downloaded to excel and specific infographics can be downloaded and inserted into your own reports and presentations.  

Questions? Ask A Librarian.
 

Library purchases access to Met Opera on Demand

Photograph from Les Contes d'Hoffmann

Les Contes d’Hoffmann
Abel; Morley, Gerzmava, Rice, Grigolo, Hampson

     The Metropolitan Opera was founded in 1883, with its first opera house built on Broadway and 39th Street.  One-hundred-twenty-three years after its formation, the Metropolitan entered the digital world with its 2006 release of The Met: Live in HD.  This digital transmission product now reaches 70 countries with live high definition performances.  Later, in 2008, the Metropolitan released Met Opera on Demand.  This online source, to which the Library now subscribes, includes 550 opera performances, some being varying productions of the same work.  Library users can follow the link for Met Opera on Demand to access the resource.  For the website to function properly, users must be certain their personal computers have the most recent version of Adobe Flash Player installed.

Redesigned research guides are easier to use and navigate

This weekend, the University of Chicago’s Library Guides were migrated to a new platform that features a number of improvements. Most notably, use of responsive design greatly improves the user’s experience on mobile devices and assistive technology, such as screen readers.

Mobile view of a Library Guide

A Library Guide as seen on a smartphone

The new platform also uses navigation menus on the left side of the screen, rather than the tabs across the top, which should make it easier and more intuitive for users to locate content in the guides.

Our librarians have created guides on a wide variety of academic subjects studied at the University. In addition, Help Guides show you how to locate specific types of material, such as newspapers, and to use Library tools and services, such as interlibrary loan.

Visit our Library Guides page for a complete list of our guides. 

 

Have an international relations research topic? Check the Chatham House Online Archive

Chatham House logoThe Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) was founded in 1920 following the Paris Peace Conference. University of Chicago researchers now have access to its archives. The  Chatham House Online Archive “provides a searchable, browsable research environment that enables users to explore approximately half a million pages and over ninety years of research, expert analysis, and commentary published in briefing papers, special reports, pamphlets, conference papers and books.”

The archive includes the full text of Chatham House’s flagship publication, International Affairs, a leading academic journal on international relations (IR) topics, as well as audio recordings of Chatham House lectures, with searchable transcripts. 

You can explore the Chatham House Online Archive by region or by subject: 

  • Business and Trade
  • Communications and Media
  • Energy, Environment and Resources
  • Health and Population
  • International Economics, Finance and Investment
  • International Law
  • International Politics, Ideology and Diplomacy
  • International Security, War and Conflict
  • United Nations and UN Bodies

ChathamHouseOnlineArchive browse screenshot

 

 

Library Catalog improvements

The Library has released a new version of its Library Catalog, offering enhancements and new features to improve your search:

  • Basic and advanced keyword search forms have merged. There is now one tab with keyword searching, with an option to switch to advanced search.
  • Improved printing and exporting, including the ability to mark multiple records.
  • Search terms are retained when switching to a new search option.
  • Vernacular character searching for languages such as Korean, Russian, or Arabic, is now available in all keyword searches. However, the vernacular must be included in the catalog record.
  • Improvements have been made to call number browse. Call number prefixes (such as f or s) are now ignored.
  • More information, including ebook platform, for full-text links in catalog records.
  • Search limits are now joined by Boolean OR rather than AND.
  • Catalog records can now be formatted into Chicago style.
  • Greatly improved Zotero support.
  • WorldCat search option added to the header of the catalog for quick access.

In the next few months, additional enhancements will be coming, including:

  • Improved access on mobile devices.
  • Catalog records details will be removed from tabs.
  • Addition of more Tables of Content to more book records.

For more information regarding the Library Catalog, view our help guide. Comments and questions about the Library Catalog can be submitted via our Catalog Feedback Form.

The University of Chicago Library Catalog

The new version of the Library Catalog