Library book sale, Feb. 10 – 14 and Feb. 17

When: February 10 – February 14 and February 17
9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room A-10 (via 1st Floor lobby)
1100 East 57th Street Chicago, IL 60637
For accessible access, please contact Scott Perry.
Description: The Library is holding a sale of more than 10,000 duplicate and discarded volumes in Regenstein Library, Room A10, accessible via the staircase in the entryway of Regenstein beginning Monday February 10. These include hardbacks, trade and scholarly paperbacks, multi-volume sets, maps and miscellaneous material. 

Prices start at $20/Hardbacks, $10/paperbacks/CDs, and $5/miscellaneous materials. Prices will be reduced each successive day with all remaining items free on the final day, Monday, February 17. There are no Saturday and Sunday hours.

Monday, 2/10
Hardbacks/$20 Paperbacks/CDs/$10
Miscellaneous Materials/$5

Tuesday, 2/11
Hardbacks/$10 Paperbacks/CDs/$5
Miscellaneous Materials/$3

Wednesday, 2/12
Hardbacks/$5 Paperbacks/CDs/$3
Miscellaneous Materials/$1

Thursday, 2/13
Hardbacks/$3Paperbacks/CDs/$1
Miscellaneous Materials/$.50

Friday, 2/14
Hardbacks/$1 Paperbacks/CDs/$.50
Miscellaneous Materials/$.25

Monday, 2/17
FREE

Contact: Scott Perry
Tag: StaffSalesStudent Events Calendar
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Current Exhibits Super Metroid: A 20th Anniversary exhibit extended to March 22

Original Japanese Super Metroid Box

Original Japanese Super Metroid Box

Exhibit Title: Super Metroid: A 20th Anniversary
Dates: January 28 – March 22, 2014
Location: Regenstein Library, Third Floor and  http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/webexhibits/supermetroid/

One of the greatest games of all time, Super Metroid was released on March 19, 1994. It is praised for visual style and graphics, atmospheric sound design and music, and detailed environments, as well as refined controls and gameplay.

Recognizing the 20th anniversary of the game’s release, this exhibit celebrates the art of the videogame as seen in one of its early classics.  Additionally, the exhibit explores the creative activity that lies beyond the game itself, from concept art and promotional materials to the fan art the game still inspires twenty years later. The great diversity of these ancillary pieces, the variety of styles and media used to promote and interpret the game, its characters and world, remains one of the most fascinating parts of its history. The one-case exhibit on the third floor complements the online portion of the exhibit (and vice versa).

 Update, 2/27/14: The closing date of the exhibit has been extended to March 22.

Feature Story Library begins acting on faculty survey results

89% of respondents report collections meet research and teaching needs

The Library invited 3,701 faculty, emeriti, postdocs, and other academic appointees to contribute to the Library’s planning process in January 2013 by completing a survey that assessed Library offerings. A total of 645 individuals responded, expressing nuanced opinions, indicating strong support, and identifying areas for improvement in the Library’s collections, current and proposed services, spaces, and interfaces.  Many respondents expressed appreciation for the Library’s support of campus researchers, as exemplified in this comment: “I think the library is superb.  It is the heart of my life.  The responsiveness of the staff is wonderful; I have only gratitude.”

Collections

Overall, 89% of respondents indicated that the Library’s print and electronic collections are effective in meeting their research and teaching needs. Respondents value both on-site browsing and remote access to Library resources, and expressed a desire for expanded growth in both print and electronic formats, particularly additional journals and electronic access to those journals. Results demonstrate a growing acceptance of e-books from across the University, though respondents expressed a number of reservations about existing electronic formats, including concerns about preservation, long-term access, and the limitations of the myriad e-book platforms.

 In response, the Library has begun to:

  1. Resolve specific problems in accessing e-resources.
  2. Review items recommended for digitization to identify priorities for our digitization program.
  3. Purchase many requested individual titles following review by subject bibliographers.
  4. Refer requests for additional materials in specific subject areas to bibliographers for their information as they set priorities for future purchasing.
  5. Appoint a study group to respond to the wide variety of opinions and preferences for print and online resources expressed in survey comments.

Services

Many respondents both used and praised Library services and service providers, particularly Scan and Deliver, UBorrow, the reference desk, and library subject specialists. Respondents expressed appreciation for course reserves while indicating areas for improvement in the delivery of this service. Among potential new services raised for consideration, respondents expressed the strongest interest in tools for citation management and sharing, archiving of digital research, support for understanding copyright issues, and paging and delivery of materials between Library facilities.

In response, the Library has begun to:

  1. Implement processing efficiencies in the course reserves service, which have already reduced the turnaround time for making course readings available.
  2. Investigate new scanning equipment (including a public overhead scanner) and new microform equipment, which should be in place on or about August 1, 2014.
  3. Examine the costs and feasibility of a paging service that would allow users to request material to be pulled and made available for pick up at any of the Library’s circulation desks.
  4. Expand sections of the Copyright Information Center and develop a copyright workshop.
  5. Plan for digital repository services in partnership with IT Services and the Research Computing Center.

Spaces and interfaces

Library interfaces, particularly the website and Catalog, are heavily used and greatly appreciated by survey respondents. This is consistent with findings from the 2012 ITHAKA S+R US Faculty Survey, which indicated a growing reliance on library catalogs, particularly in the humanities. Respondents described specific challenges to the use of these interfaces, particularly in Lens, and expressed frustration with the complexity of our research environment. The Library has been planning to address many of these issues with the implementation of a new Catalog based on VuFind, currently scheduled for 2014.

While many respondents made minimal use of Library spaces, most who did agreed that spaces met their needs. Respondents praised the Mansueto Library and the remodeling of the first floor of Regenstein Library while also indicating areas where the Library could make valuable improvements to its spaces.

In response, the Library plans to:

  1. Launch a new Library Catalog that will replace both the current Catalog and Lens and will include the most frequently used features of both while incorporating requested new functionality.
  2. Undertake an analysis of our discovery ecosystem with an aim to simplify and rationalize the systems used to access Library resources.
  3. Upgrade projection equipment in the Library classrooms within the next year.

“I am grateful to the many individuals who expressed the importance of the Library to their work by responding to our survey,” said Director and University Librarian Judith Nadler.   “We are taking steps to further enhance our offerings in response to these survey results and will continue to reflect on the valuable comments from our faculty and researchers and to use them in our decision making as we move forward.”   

Full results of the 2013 faculty survey are available on the Library website.

Introduction to Zotero: workshop

When: Thursday, January 30, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Tuesday, February 11, 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R, Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Zotero is a free citation manager that allows you to save citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in standard citation styles, including MLA, Chicago and APA. This workshop will introduce some of the key functions of Zotero such as: installing Zotero, adding citations to your Zotero library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Microsoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents. 

To register, click on the “Register” link below.

Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1010
Tag: Student EventsTrainingWorkshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

MLK Day, Monday, Jan. 20: D’Angelo Law, Eckhart, and SSA closed, other campus libraries remain open

On Monday, January 20, D’Angelo Law, Eckhart, and SSA libraries will be closed in observance of the Martin Luther King Day holiday.

Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein libraries will be open during their regular building hours. The All-Night Study Space on the 1st Floor of Regenstein will also remain open.

Exhibits O Homer, Where Art Thou? Adaptations of the Iliad and Odyssey: Ancient and Modern

Exhibit Location: Joseph Regenstein Library, Fourth Floor
Exhibit Dates: January 5 – February 28, 2014

DVD box of the film O Brother, Where Art ThouWhat do The Penelopiad of Margaret Atwood, the Coen brothers’ O Brother, Where Art Thou, and James Joyce’s Ulysses have in common? They were all inspired by the Odyssey of Homer.

The Iliad and the Odyssey have fascinated us for nearly 3,000 years, inspiring authors of all ages to produce a variety of creative and distinctive adaptations. Some writers have simply retold the stories in abridged form, maybe for a younger audience or simply to emphasize the most dramatic segments.  Others have retold the tales, but set them in a different time period, sometimes far into the future or in a different setting miles from the Mediterranean.  Retelling the events of the Iliad and Odyssey from another’s point of view has been a favorite vehicle for adaptation.  These narratives, either viewed through the eyes of one of the main characters or through completely made up figures, often purport to correct the Homeric account.  Sometimes an elaborate hoax serves as a narrative frame.  And, of course, parodies are an amusing nod to Homer and always delight.

Cover of Odyssey comic book published inHeavy Metal

Navarro, Francisco and José Sauri, The Odyssey (Rockville Centre, NY: Heavy Metal, 2007).

Stories from the Iliad and Odyssey have also been favorites with illustrators, both ancient and modern.  In the exhibit comic books and graphic novels are displayed alongside photographs of ancient marble panels with captioned scenes of the Homeric epics carved in low relief and a series of Roman wall paintings depicting the colorful events  of Odysseus’s voyage.

While the epics may have begun with the voice of a singing bard, they have found their way into a wide array of new media: on a stage as a play, musical, or opera, over the air waves in radio programs and television shows, and onto the silver screen from silent film to Hollywood blockbuster.

This two-case exhibit was designed as a companion exhibit to “Homer in Print: The Transmission and Reception of Homer’s Works,” running from January 13 – March 15, 2014 in the Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery in the Joseph Regenstein Library, First Floor.

The Stalin Digital Archive (SDA)

StalinDigitalArchiveThe Library patrons now have access to the Stalin Digital Archive (SDA), a collaborative effort between the Russian State Archive of Social and Political History (RGASPI) and Yale University Press (YUP) to create an electronic database of finding aids, to digitize documents and images, and to publish in different forms and media materials from the recently declassified Stalin archive in the holdings of RGASPI.

J. Arch Getty at UCLA in his introduction to the database writes:

Joseph Stalin’s life (1878–1953) coincided with the most momentous events of the twentieth century: two world wars, several revolutions in Russia and China, the Cold War, and the dawn of the nuclear age. Stalin was influential in the Chinese revolutions and communist victory, the Korean conflict, and the occupation of Eastern Europe. In terms of modern Russian history he played key roles in the revolutionary movement, the Bolshevik revolution of 1917, Soviet industrialization, the terror of the 1930s, World War II, and the Cold War.

It is therefore difficult to imagine a more important primary source for these events than Stalin’s personal archive, major portions of which are now declassified and available for study. Although specialists have known and used these documents for some time in the Russian State Archive of Social and Political History (RGASPI) in Moscow, the Stalin Digital Archive (SDA) will now make them available electronically, eliminating the need to travel to Moscow and rendering the documents searchable and printable, actions that are difficult even in the Moscow archive.

Moreover, the SDA will for the first time make these documents accessible to students and specialists in other fields for both research and teaching. The SDA will provide translations of hundreds of selected key documents from Russian into English. These translated documents will be accompanied by scholarly annotations.

The importance of Stalin’s archive might be seen in two ways, external and internal.Stalin Externally, Stalin’s papers provide us with unparalleled information on the development of key historical events from the point of view of a participant. Obviously, because he was a dictator, everything of importance came across his desk. For example, these materials fully document Soviet industrialization and agricultural collectivization from the late 1920s. There is practically a full series of economic reports to and orders from Stalin over many years. Foreign relations, both with Germans and potential allies in the 1930s and with Cold War opponents in the 1940s, received his close attention. It will be possible to rewrite and restudy the histories of such important events of a violent century.

One of the differences between the Nazi and Soviet regimes is the level of sensitive documentation. Although the Nazis were meticulous in keeping some kinds of records, at the top we have practically nothing in writing about many kinds of decisions. We have almost no “smoking gun” documents about the decision to exterminate Jews and others, and not much about the inner politics of Hitler’s court and the bureaucratic empires of his courtiers. In short, Hitler did not write much down, nor was he interested in documenting his decisions.

The Stalinists, on the other hand, were not ashamed of or worried about recording their most sensitive (and evil) decisions. During the Stalinist terror of the 1930s, we have Stalin’s correspondence with his secret police chiefs N. I. Ezhov and L. P. Beria in which he ordered the arrest, torture, and execution of various people. When in 1940 Stalin and the Politburo decided to shoot more than 20,000 captured Polish officers at Katyn, they recorded their decisions in memos and resolutions, complete with justifications. Compared with that of the Nazis, the documentation on Soviet repression is full and rich, and some of the most important elements of it came from Stalin’s desk and trademark blue pencil.

In addition to enhancing our ability to study major events of the twentieth century with new materials, Stalin’s archive also has a fascinating internal, personal component. It shows us the nature and evolution of Stalin’s own thought, opinions, and decision-making process.

Consider, for example, the more than 300 books in his personal library. Stalin once told his lieutenants that if they weren’t reading several hundred pages a week, they were illiterate. The record shows that Stalin was a voracious reader of a wide variety of subjects who made detailed notations in the margins of what he read. His opinions about political, literary, and philosophical works are fascinating and revealing about how he thought.

Similarly, the archive contains hundreds of manuscripts sent to Stalin by others for his corrections and comments. He often answered them in written letters, but just as often he made detailed marginalia that show his reactions. Both types of reactions are preserved in his archives. Similarly, although most of his articles and speeches have been published, the drafts and rewrites of them are in his archive and show the evolution of his thinking as well as his consideration of word choice and discursive strategy.

The archive contains a wealth of Stalin’s correspondence with his lieutenants on important and secret subjects. These letters and telegrams show Stalin’s opinions of Lenin, other Bolshevik leaders, and world figures as well as his reflections on policy choices. When writing to his closest Politburo assistants, he was informal and often quite unguarded.

We have nothing like this level of documentation for Hitler or other twentieth-century dictators, and the scope of SDA documents is comparable with the archival source bases we have for world leaders in more-open societies. It is probably not an exaggeration to say that study of these documents will enrich, if not revolutionize, our understanding of the Soviet Union.

 

Graduate students needed for the Library Student Advisory Group

The Library is currently seeking graduate student representatives for the Library Student Advisory Group (LSAG) from the following Divisions and Schools:

  • Biological Sciences Division
  • Humanities Division
  • Physical Sciences Division
  • Pritzker School of Medicine

The Library Student Advisory Group serves as a formal channel of communication between students and the Library administration.  The LSAG discusses the collections and services provided through all of the University’s campus libraries — Crerar, D’Angelo, Eckhart, Mansueto, Regenstein, and SSA — and the present and future needs of the student community.  The Group assists in making specific recommendations to improve the Library and considers proposals for future changes in services.  Finally, members of the LSAG discuss how the Library can raise awareness of its offerings among students, and how students can communicate their wishes, needs, and concerns to the Library.  Judith Nadler, Director and University Librarian, chairs the LSAG

If you are a graduate student interested in serving, please complete the online application by January 31st.  If you would like additional information about the Library Student Advisory Group or would like to apply via e-mail, please contact Rebecca Starkey
at rstarkey@uchicago.edu.

Introduction to EndNote Web: workshop

When: Thursday, January 23, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Wednesday, February 5, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: EndNote Web is a citation management tool available through the Library that helps you collect, organize, and share citations from library databases and catalogs. EndNote Web also helps you format your papers, creating bibliographies and footnotes in a wide variety citation styles (Chicago, MLA, APA, Turabian, etc.). To register, click on the link below.
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1339
Tag: StaffStudent EventsTrainingWorkshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Dissertation Procedures for Staff: workshop

When: Thursday, January 23, 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Where: TECHB@R, Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Winter 2014 doctoral candidates will use a web-based interface for online submission, review, and publication of dissertations. In this session, we will review the administrator’s role in helping students file their dissertations electronically. New graduate program administrators as well as experienced staff who would like a refresher are welcome to attend. Please feel free to bring your questions to this information session. If you would like to review the ETD interface, please visit: http://www.etdadmin.com/uchicago
Contact: Dissertation Office 
(773) 702-7404
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=730
Tag: TrainingMeetingsWorkshopsStaff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Dissertation Procedures for Students: workshop

When: Thursday, January 16, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Wednesday, January 22, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R, Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Are you a Ph.D. student planning to graduate in March 2014? March 2014 doctoral candidates will use a web-based interface for online submission, review, and publication of dissertations. In this session, we will review the procedures for submitting your dissertation electronically. Please feel free to bring your questions to the session. If you would like to review the ETD interface, visit: http://www.etdadmin.com/uchicago.

To register, click on the “Register” link below.

Contact: Dissertation Office 
(773) 702-7404
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=731
Tag: WorkshopsMeetingsStudent Events Calendar
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Exhibits Feature Story Homer in Print: Transmission and Reception

Homer - George Chapman title page

Title page. George Chapman (1559?–1634). “The Whole Works of Homer. . . . ” London:
Printed for Nathaniell Butter, [1616]. Rare Books Collection, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Exhibition Title: Homer in Print: The Transmission and Reception of Homer’s Works

Dates: January 13 – March 15, 2014

Hours: Monday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.; Saturdays, 9 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. when classes are in session

Location: Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

Price: Free and open to the public

Curators: Alice Schreyer, Catherine Uecker, and Catherine Mardikes

Description: For almost 3,000 years, the Homeric epics have been among the best-known and most widely studied texts of Western civilization. Generations of students have read the Iliad and the Odyssey to learn Greek or to study Greek mythology, history, and culture, or for the sheer enjoyment  of the stories themselves. Concepts such as heroism, nationalism, friendship, and loyalty have been shaped by Homer’s works. Countless editions, translations, abridgements, and adaptations have appeared since the invention of printing, making Homer accessible to students, scholars, and general readers.

The Iliad comic book

Cover. “The Iliad.” New York: Gilberton Company, 1950. Classics Illustrated, no. 77. Illustrated by Alex A. Blum. Walter C. Dopierala Comic Book Collection. The University of Chicago Library.

Homer in Print puts the spotlight on the text itself, not as an object of literary or linguistic analysis, but rather as the product of a particular time, place, editor, printer, publisher, or translator. From the very first printed edition of Homer through the 21st century, every editor of a Greek edition must decide what sources should be consulted and whether notes are needed to achieve the goal of the particular edition. Translators face a host of additional choices: Will they produce a prose or verse translation, if verse then in what poetic form, and will they aim at fidelity to the words and meter or to the spirit of the “original” (however that is defined). The way each translator answers these questions reflects available sources, literary principles, and individual preferences.

The study of Homer has been part of the core curriculum at the University of Chicago since the first year of classes in 1892-93, and from its earliest days the Library built a collection strong in Greek editions, commentaries, translations, and scholarly literature. In 2007 M. C. Lang donated the Bibliotheca Homerica Langiana to the University of Chicago. He had formed the collection, consisting of 187 separate items, with the goal of tracing the transmission of the text in printed form. Homer in Print draws on this splendid gift as well as Homeric works acquired before and afterwards to tell this story.

Among the editions and translations in the exhibition ranging from the 15th century to the 21st are the earliest printed edition of Homer; editions and translations aimed at scholars, students, children, and other specialized audiences; scholarship; and finely printed, illustrated, and graphic editions. Together they illustrate the profound influence of the Homeric poems on classical studies, the history of printing and print culture, textual editing, translation studies, and the development of English language and literature as well as their enduring appeal to this day.

 

First page of the Odyssey

The first page of Alexander Pope (1688–1744). “The Odyssey of Homer.” London: Printed for Bernard Lintot, 1725–26. Rare Books Collection, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago.

Associated Publication

A Catalogue of the Bibliotheca Homerica Langiana at the University of Chicago Library. Edited by Glenn W. Most and Alice Schreyer. Published by the University of Chicago Library. Distributed by University of Chicago Press.

 

Associated Web Exhibit

Visit lib.uchicago.edu/e/webexhibits/homerinprint

 

Associated Event

Colloquium Title: The Homeric Library: Translations, Editions, Commentaries

When: Friday, February 14, 2014

Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

Description: This colloquium will explore the paths through Homer’s poetry opened by the University of Chicago Library’s Homer collection, which stretches from the 15th century to the 21st. It is co-sponsored by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and the University of Chicago Library in conjunction with the exhibition Homer in Print at the Special Collections Research Center.

Speakers include Glenn Most, University of Chicago and Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa; Larry Norman, University of Chicago; Sophie Rabau, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3; Tiphaine Somoyault, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3; and David Wray, University of Chicago.

 

Use of Images

Images from the exhibition included on this page are available for members of the media, and are reserved for editorial use in connection with University of Chicago Library exhibitions, programs, or related news.  Email Rachel Rosenberg (phone: 773-834-1519) or Joseph Scott (phone: 773-702-6655)  to request high-resolution images.

The Iliad in Greek, 1497-1599?

A passage from “The Iliad” printed in Greek. Johann Herwagen (1497–1559?). “Homeri Ilias et Vlyssea. . . .” Basel: Apud Io. Hervagium, 1535. Rare Books Collection, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

 

Cover of Lattimore Iliad

Dust jacket. Richmond Alexander Lattimore (1906–1984). “The Iliad of Homer. . . .” Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1951. Rare Books Collection, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Library publishes ‘Homer in Print’ catalogue

Homer in Print: A Catalogue of the Bibliotheca Homerica Langiana at the University of Chicago Library, is now available for consultation or check out at the Library and for purchase from the University of Chicago Press.

Homer in Print cover

Homer in Print cover art. Jacket design by Jerry Kelly, using a roundel by Bruce Rogers from his 1932 edition of the Odyssey.

Homer in Print traces the print transmission and literary reception of the Iliad and the Odyssey from the 15th through the 20th century. Over 175 mini-essays provide new details of each included edition’s textual, intellectual, and publishing history. Three long-form essays contributed by scholars Glenn W. Most and David Wray, and collector M. C. Lang,  place these editions within a wider context, exploring their role in ancient and modern philology, translation studies, and the history of printing. An extensive and strikingly illustrated testament to the power and popularity of Homer over the past 500 years, Homer in Print is an essential text for students and teachers of classics, classical reception, comparative literature, and book history. This volume, a product of new research and sharp scholarship, evidences Homer’s ability to captivate the imaginations of poets, editors, and readers throughout the centuries.

Edited by Glenn W. Most and Alice Schreyer and published by the University of Chicago Library, the Homer in Print catalogue and the collection it documents provide the foundation for the upcoming exhibition Homer in Print: The Transmission and Reception of Homer’s Works, on view at the Special Collections Research Center from January 13 to March 15, 2014.

Ex Libris Café winter interim hours, Dec. 14 – Jan. 5

Update 1/5/14: Ex Libris will be closed on Monday, January 6 due to severe weather.

Beginning Saturday, December 14, the Ex Libris Café will have reduced service hours for the winter interim. From December 30 to January 3, only beverage service will be available, including drip coffee, espresso drinks, tea, and canned and bottled drinks. Normal hours resume Monday, January 6.

Saturday, Dec. 14 – Sunday, Dec. 15: Closed
Monday, Dec. 16 – Friday, Dec. 20: 9:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 21 – Sunday, Dec. 29: Closed
Monday, Dec. 30 – Tuesday, Dec. 31: 9:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.; beverage service only
Wednesday, Jan. 1: Closed
Thursday, Jan. 2 – Friday, Jan. 3: 9:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.; beverage service only
Saturday, Jan. 4 – Sunday, Jan. 5: Closed

As always, the seating area and vending machines will remain open during Regenstein’s building hours.

Library winter interim hours, Dec. 14 – Jan. 5

1/5/14 Update: See updated hours for January 5 and 6 in response to severe weather.

Beginning Saturday, December 14, the Library will have reduced building hours at all of its locations for the winter interim. Normal hours resume Monday, January 6.

All Locations
December 25: Closed
January 1: Closed

Crerar Library
Sunday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.
Friday – Saturday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Exceptions: December 24 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

D’Angelo Law Library Circulation
D’Angelo Law will be open with restricted access its regular hours through Dec. 17 for the Law School exam period. Interim hours take effect starting Wednesday, Dec. 18.

Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed
Exceptions: Dec. 24 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.; Dec. 31 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.; Jan. 5 noon – 9:00 p.m. 

Eckhart Library
Closed for renovation

Mansueto Library
Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 7:45 p.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Exceptions: Dec. 24 8:00 a.m. – 2:45 p.m.; Jan. 5 10:00 a.m. – 12:45 a.m.

Regenstein Library
Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Exceptions: Dec. 24 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.; Jan. 5 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 a.m.

Regenstein All-Night Study
Closed until January 7

SSA Library
Monday – Friday 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed
Exceptions: Dec. 24 9:00 a.m. – noon 

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Extended Library hours December 6 – 8

To support students preparing for finals, Crerar, Mansueto and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week.

Mansueto will be open Friday, December 6 and Saturday, December 7 until 12:45 a.m. Crerar and Regenstein will be open these days until 1:00 a.m.

The Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will be open 24 hours until the end of finals on Friday, December 13.

For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Special Collections Thanksgiving Hours

Special Collections will be closed November 28-Dec. 1 for the Thanksgiving holiday. We will resume our normal hours of 9:00am-4:45pm on Monday, December 2.

Thanksgiving week hours 2013

Hours for the University of Chicago Library over the week of Thanksgiving 2013 are as follows:

Wednesday, November 27

Crerar is open 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.

D’Angelo Law is open 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Mansueto is open 8:00 a.m. – 9:45 p.m.

Regenstein is open 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.

SSA is open 8:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Thursday, November 28

All libraries are closed in observance of Thanksgiving.

Friday, November 29

Crerar is open 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.

D’Angelo Law is open 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Mansueto is open 8:00 a.m. – 10:45 p.m.

Regenstein is open 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m.

SSA is closed.

Saturday, November 30

Normal hours resume for all libraries.

Regenstein All Night Study

All Night Study closes Wednesday, November 27 at 8:00 a.m. and reopens at 1:00 a.m. on Monday, December 2.

For a complete list of Library hours, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Born in the Library: The Neubauer Collegium

The Neubauer Collegium kicks off its first programming year with Library collaboration

Postcard titled “Bombay Dancing Girl.”

Postcard titled “Bombay Dancing Girl.” Courtesy of the Digital South Asia Library, http://dsal.uchicago.edu.

The Neubauer Family Collegium for Culture and Society opens its doors this fall on the premises of its first home—the Joseph Regenstein Library. As scholars from around the world meet here to investigate complex questions that transcend any single discipline or methodology, they draw on the collections, spaces, and staff expertise of the University of Chicago Library.

“The Library has long been a mecca for scholars,” said Judith Nadler, Director and University Librarian. “We are delighted to continue this tradition by working closely with the Neubauer Collegium to enable the investigation of big questions in the humanities and humanistic social sciences.”

“Libraries have always been the great laboratories of the humanities, so it is particularly fitting that we should spend our infancy nourished by the generosity of the Regenstein,” said David Nirenberg, the Roman Family Director of the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society. “And our relationship will always remain close, even after we move into our own building. After all, the Library’s treasures are one of the greatest attractions that bring scholars from all over the world—including our Neubauer Visiting Fellows—to Chicago.”

Three events exemplify the Neubauer Collegium’s collaboration with the Library.

Audio Cultures of India: Sound, Science, and History

Label from a recording of Bhairavi raga by the prominent vocalist Malka Jan of Chulbuli.

Label from a recording of Bhairavi raga by the prominent vocalist Malka Jan of Chulbuli. A 78 rpm shellac gramophone record, released by Ajano Double-Face Record. Produced in Vienna? by A. Janowitzer, 1913?

One of the first events on the Neubauer Collegium calendar, the “Audio Cultures of India” workshop brought project team members and other interested scholars together in Regenstein on September 16 and 17. A second workshop will follow in New Delhi, India, immediately after the opening of the University’s India center at the end of March 2014. The workshops are part of the larger Neubauer Collegium funded project, Audio Cultures of India: New Approaches to the Performance Archive.

Directed by Professors Philip V. Bohlman and Kaley Mason of the Department of Music and by Bibliographer for Southern Asia James Nye and Cataloger and Assistant Southern Asia Librarian Laura Ring of the Library, workshop participants from the University and other institutions are gathering to investigate how the methods of big science might elucidate and facilitate the humanistic understanding of music, speech, and other audio expressions. They are exploring the scientific analysis of sonic recordings, the history of sound in South Asia, and the intersection of audio with such related material artifacts as texts and images. The participants include computational scientists, statisticians, and physicists as well as South Asian specialists in ethnomusicology, linguistics, anthropology, literature, history, geography, and libraries.

Neubauer Collegium Launch Panel Discussion: William Kentridge and Jane Taylor

Following an opening lecture on October 3 in Mandel Hall delivered by internationally acclaimed South African artist William Kentridge, Regenstein’s Room 122 was the site for a panel discussion and reception featuring Kentridge; South African writer, curator and scholar Jane Taylor, a frequent visiting professor at the University of Chicago; and David Nirenberg, who moderated. Speaking on “The Virtues of Bastardy: Mixed Metaphors and Collaborations in the Studio,” Kentridge and Taylor discussed their experiences collaborating with artists ranging from puppeteers to writers to opera singers on projects such as Taylor’s play Ubu and the Truth Commission and Shostakovich’s opera The Nose.

A Worldwide Literature: Jāmī (1414-1492) in the Dar al-Islam and Beyond

This project is developing a research agenda on intellectual trends in the post- classical Muslim tradition by studying the reception of works by the luminary fifteenth-century ‘Abd al-Rahmān Jāmī . The Library’s Southern Asia Department is assisting Professor Thibaut d’Hubert in the preparation of a digital collection and searchable corpus of Unicode texts comprising Jāmī’s works and the Indian commentaries published by Naval Kishore in the nineteenth century. The project is benefiting from well-established bonds between the Library and colleagues in Lahore, Pakistan, who are undertaking digitization of the texts by Jāmī and with the ARTFL Project (Project for American and French Research on the Treasury of the French Language) on campus for presentation of the texts in collaboration with the Digital South Asia Library.

On November 14 and 15, specialists working with languages ranging from Persian, Ottoman Turkish, and Arabic to Malay, Chaghatay, Chinese, Sanskrit and Bengali attended a conference at the University of Chicago Center and the College de France in Paris. They are studying comparatively, for the first time, the variegated impact of Jāmī’s works on the post-classical Islamic intellectual traditions, and particularly on the formation of new vernacular literary idioms.

EndNote Web or Zotero? Selecting the Best Citation Manager: online workshop

When: Wednesday, November 13, 5:30–6:30 p.m.
Thursday, November 14, 5:30–6:30 p.m.
Where: Online Session
Description: Citation managers are powerful, time-saving tools that help you manage your research. They can also help you format your papers in MS Word by creating bibliographies, citations, and footnotes automatically in the style you choose, such as APA or Chicago.

This webinar will compare how EndNote Web and Zotero—two popular citation managers—allow you to save, share, and cite information. In order to provide a side-by-side comparison of tools, the format of this workshop is demonstration rather than hands-on training.

Registration is required. Please the event URL below to learn more and register.

Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1455
Tag: WorkshopsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Exhibits Benjamin Britten’s Literary Connections

A photo of Benjamin Britten and his friend W.H. Auden

Benjamin Britten and W.H. Auden

The 3rd Floor of Regenstein Library is playing host to a single case exhibit on Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) as part of a larger campus celebration of the centennial of Britten’s birth.  This exhibit focuses on Britten’s literary connections, highlighting the links between music and literature seen in his work.  Over his career Britten set many poetic works to music including work by Edith Sitwell, T.S. Eliot, Wilfred Owen and Britten’s personal friend W.H. Auden.  This exhibit displays excerpts from many of Britten’s work alongside the original texts from which they are adapted.  Also included are several works adapted from folk poems and short stories, including work by Guy de Maupassant.  The exhibit runs from November 1 through December 18, 2013. 

Resources for Linguistics Research: workshop

When: Monday, October 28, 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Where: Regenstein Library, Room A-11
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description:
Resources for Linguistics research for faculty, graduate students, and College students.
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Calendars: LibraryStudent EventsTrainingWorkshops
 
Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Workshop for Comparative Human Development Students on Library Databases

When: Friday, October 25, noon – 1:00 pm
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 207
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description:
Workshop for Comparative Human Development students on Library Databases: how to find the most appropriate databases for your research and how to take advantage of all the bells and whistles built into them. Plus, time for questions and answers about any Library matters you would like to discuss.

No registration required.

Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Calendars: LibraryTrainingWorkshops
 
Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Apply for the Library Student Resource Group

The University of Chicago Library is seeking student representatives for the Library Student Resource Group (LSRG).   

The LSRG serves as a formal channel of communication between students and the Library administration.  The Group discusses the collections and services provided through all of the University’s campus libraries — Crerar, D’Angelo, Eckhart, Mansueto, Regenstein, and SSA — and the present and future needs of the student community.  The LSRG assists in making specific recommendations to improve the Library and considers proposals for future changes in services.  Finally, members of the LSRG discuss how the Library can raise awareness of its offerings among students, and how students can communicate their wishes, needs, and concerns to the Library.  

The LSRG meets two times a quarter during the regular academic year.  Representatives serve two-year terms.  Judith Nadler, Director and University Librarian, chairs the group. 

The Library is currently accepting applications from students in the following academic programs:

  • The Biological Sciences Division
  • The Social Sciences Division 
  • The College – Class of 2015, 2016, and 2017

If you are interested in serving on the LSRG, please complete the online applications below by October 31, 2013:

If you would like additional information about the group, or would prefer to complete the application via e-mail, please contact:

Rebecca Starkey
Librarian for College Instruction & Outreach
rstarkey@uchicago.edu
773-702-4484

Online access to The Times of India

Times of India masthead.The University of Chicago Library now provides online access to the historical backfile of The Times of India, one of the Subcontinent’s most important English-language newspapers.  Library users can browse single issues and search all content (articles, editorials, and advertisements) published 1838-2003.

 A link to the resource is available at here.  Coverage includes: Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce (1838-1859), The Bombay Times and Standard (1860-1861), and The Times of India (1861-2003).

This new resource will be of interest across all disciplines.  Social scientists and humanists will value the coverage of events from the late stages of the East India Company through colonial and into post-colonial India.  It is a valuable resource for the study of law, business, economics, the arts, popular culture, international relations, social services, and public policy, as well as the biological and physical sciences.

 Our one-year trial subscription will allow us to assess levels of usage and make the case for a permanent subscription.

 Please contact James Nye, Bibliographer for Southern Asia, or Laura Ring, Assistant Southern Asia Librarian, if you have comments on The Times of India or if you would like assistance.