Tips for assessing fair use in teaching materials

In celebration of Fair Use Week, the University of Chicago Library is sharing tips for assessing fair use and understanding copyright.

Fair Use icon: A scale showing a copyright symbol and mortarboard in balance

© 2008 Michael Brewer & ALA Office of Information Technology Policy, CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

In order to determine whether fair use applies to materials being considered for classroom use, instructors should take four factors into consideration:

  1. Purpose of the use: Materials should be used in class only for the purpose of serving the needs of specified educational programs.
  2. Nature of the work: Only those portions of the work relevant to the educational objectives of the course should be used in the classroom.
  3. Amount of the work: The amount of the work used should be related directly to the educational objectives of the course.
  4. Effect of the use on the market for the original: The instructor should consider whether the copying harms the market or sale of the copyrighted material.

Visit our Fair Use guide to learn more, and see how you can take advantage of fair use.

Final days: Library asks graduate and professional school students to complete survey by March 4

The University of Chicago Library is conducting a survey of all currently enrolled graduate and professional school students. This survey is being offered in partnership with Graduate Student Affairs, and the findings will be used to inform decisions about future University and Library services.

The survey was distributed by email on February 4. Graduate and professional school students, please check your email for a message from the University of Chicago Library with an individualized link to the survey. Participants who complete the survey will have the opportunity to enter a drawing for a number of prizes, including:

  • A dedicated faculty study at Regenstein Library or Crerar Library for one year.
  • Locker rental at Regenstein Library for one year.
  • Gift cards for Amazon.com, the Seminary Co-op, or the University of Chicago Bookstore.

Previous surveys conducted by the Library resulted in the implementation of the Library’s Scan and Deliver service, as well as the creation of new group study spaces in Regenstein Library. Results gathered from the Library’s last survey of graduate and professional school students, conducted in February 2010, are available online.

For more information or to report problems with the survey, please contact the project team by email at ithaka@lib.uchicago.edu.

Spend College Break Day at RegFest, February 13

Elevated view of the Regenstein Library, from the University of Chicago architectural guidebook titled Building Ideas, published summer of 2013. (Photo by Tom Rossiter)

Regenstein Library (Photo by Tom Rossiter). Spend your College Break (February 13) at RegFest, a day of programs highlighting fun and unique ways to use the resources available at Regenstein Library.

Spend your College Break at RegFest, a day of programs highlighting fun and unique ways to use the resources available at Regenstein Library. 

Programs will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein Library, Room 160.

  • Trace your family history
  • Lean more about the equipment and services at the TECHB@R
  • View a selection of acerbic letters from Ezra Pound in the Special Collections Research Center
  • Track down your (or your professor’s) citations
  • Create your own UChicago-themed Valentine’s Day cards
  • Play UChicago trivia
  • And more!

Snacks will be provided at our lunchtime and closing programs. Enter our drawing for an Amazon gift card, and increase your chance to win by the number of RegFest sessions that you attend.

Short on time? Feel free to drop by anytime with your friends for our Regenstein photo booth!

View the complete RegFest schedule and RSVP today!

RegFest is a joint University of Chicago Library and IT Services Academic and Scholarly Technology Services event.

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact Rebecca Starkey at rstarkey@uchicago.edu or 773-702-4484 for assistance.

Canceled: Developing Assignments that Use the Library: workshop

Update: Canceled 1/28/2015

When:

Canceled: Thursday, January 29, 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Where: Wieboldt Hall, Room 310 D/E
1050 East 59th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: This course is designed for faculty, instructors, and graduate students interested in teaching.

Have you found that your students aren’t using the academic sources you expect for their assignments? Do your students seem to lack basic library research skills? In this program, University of Chicago librarians will highlight ways you can integrate library research instruction into your courses to promote the acquisition of the skills necessary to complete research assignments. We’ll demonstrate ready-to-go online tools that can be integrated into your Chalk site, and discuss the different types of in-class instruction the Library can provide. At the end of the session, we’ll work together to create some sample assignments designed to help students learn how to use the Library’s collections and online resources.

Presenters:
Julia Gardner, Head of Reader Services, The Special Collections Research Center
Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach, Regenstein Library
Debra Werner, Librarian for Science Instruction and Outreach, Crerar Library

Registration is recommended. To register, please select the website below.

Contact: Rebecca Starkey at rstarkey@uchicago.edu or 773-702-4484.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1248
Contact: Other Contacts (see description)
Tag: Staff, Training, Seminars, Workshops, Graduate Students
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Introduction to Zotero: workshop

When: Thursday, January 29, noon – 1 p.m.
Wednesday, February 4, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Zotero is a free citation manager that allows you to save citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in standard citation styles, including MLA, Chicago and APA. This workshop will introduce some of the key functions of Zotero such as: installing Zotero, adding citations to your Zotero library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Microsoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents.

To register, click on the link below.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1010
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Student Events, Training, Workshops, Graduate Students, Staff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

New Library Director and University Librarian arrives on campus

Brenda Johnson

Brenda Johnson

Dear University of Chicago Faculty, Students and Staff,

As I begin my second week on campus, I would like to say how very happy I am to have arrived at the University of Chicago. The warm welcome I have received from so many of you in the last few days has made me feel immediately at home.

The University of Chicago’s status as one of the world’s premier academic and research institutions and its Library’s role in fueling intellectual inquiry and a transformative education are well known internationally. As the year unfolds, I look forward to learning much more about your work; about the ways you rely on the Library to support your research, teaching and study; and about the ways you see your needs evolving as you break new scholarly ground or advance in your education.

It will be my great pleasure to meet many more of you and to discuss these matters with you in the coming months.

With warm regards,

Brenda L. Johnson
Library Director and University Librarian
The University of Chicago Library

MLK Day, Monday, Jan. 19: D’Angelo Law, Eckhart, and SSA closed, other campus libraries remain open

On Monday, January 19, D’Angelo Law, Eckhart, and SSA libraries will be closed in observance of the Martin Luther King Day holiday.

Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein libraries will be open during their regular building hours. The All-Night Study Space on the 1st Floor of Regenstein will also remain open.

Dissertation Procedures for Staff: workshop

When: Wednesday, January 14, 9 a.m. – 10 a.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Doctoral candidates use the ProQuest ETD Administrator for online submission, review, and publication of dissertations. In this session, we will review the administrator’s role in helping students file their dissertations electronically. New graduate program administrators as well as experienced staff are invited. Feel free to bring your questions to this information session. If you would like to review the ETD interface, please visit: http://www.etdadmin.com/uchicago
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=730
Contact: Dissertation Office
(773) 702-7404
Tag: Training, Meetings, Workshops, Staff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Exhibits Coal Swamp Fossils: The Robert Springfield Fossil Collection – new web exhibit

Calamites sp.

A branch of Calamites sp. that shows multiple spore producing cones of a sphenopsid.

A web version is now available of the current Crerar Library exhibit: Coal Swamp Fossils: The Robert Springfield Fossil Collection.  The physical exhibition, consisting of 16 fossils, is on view in the Crerar Library’s First Floor Reading Room for the 2014-2015 academic year.  It was curated by Benjamin Rhind, University of Chicago Laboratory Schools high school senior.

Exhibit Description: This collection of fossils was collected by Robert Springfield in mines in southern Tennessee and northern Alabama.  They contain many fossils from the Carboniferous Period, ranging from 330,000,000 -300,000,000 BCE.  The period was defined by the large deposits of coal beds that it left behind.  This massive amount of coal was because of the development of bark bearing trees and the fact that a lower sea level during this age left behind large lowland, swampy forests.  Plant life during the period was diverse, and although this collection of fossils contains several different genera and species, they all fit into one of three categories: sphenopsids, lycopods and pteridosperms.

The University of Chicago Library is grateful to the Springfield family for their gift of fossil specimens, which brings unique materials to the Library’s collections.  The Robert Springfield Fossil Collection is on loan from the Library’s Special Collections Research Center.

 

Exhibits Feature Story ‘I Step Out of Myself’: Portrait Photography in Special Collections

Julio Antonio Mella.  1928. Photograph by Tina Modotti (1896-1942). Frances Hooper Papers. Special Collections Research Center.  The University of Chicago Library.

Julio Antonio Mella, 1928. Photograph by Tina Modotti (1896-1942). Frances Hooper Papers. Special Collections Research Center. The University of Chicago Library.

Exhibition Location: Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Dates: January 12 – March 20, 2015
Hours: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m; and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. while classes are in session.  Consult hours.lib.uchicago.edu for Special Collections Research Center hours.
Free and open to the public

Curators: Ashley Locke Gosselar, Laura Alagna, Brittan Nannenga, and Eileen Ielmini

Associated web exhibit: lib.uchicago.edu/e/webexhibits/istepoutofmyself/

“I Step Out of Myself”: Portrait Photography in Special Collections highlights outstanding examples of fine art and photojournalistic portraiture held in the Special Collections Research Center. Displaying selections rarely on public view, the exhibition will draw from the work of a varied group of 20th-century photographers: Eva Watson Schütze, Carl Van Vechten, Layle Silbert, Mildred Mead, Yousuf Karsh, Alice Boughton, Joan Eggan, and Tina Modotti. From the romance of Schütze’s portraits of domestic life at the turn of the 20th century, to the stylized glamour of Van Vechten’s celebrity photographs in the 1930s, to the unflinching presentation of raw poverty in Mildred Mead’s portraits of residents of Chicago slums in the 1950s, “I Step Out of Myself” explores the wide range of technique, style, subject matter, and emotion found in modern photographic portraiture.

Use of Images and Media Contact

Images from the exhibition included on this page are available for members of the media, and are reserved for editorial use in connection with University of Chicago Library exhibitions, programs, or related news.  Contact Rachel Rosenberg at ra-rosenberg@uchicago.edu or 773-834-1519.

Something’s Brewing web exhibit launched

brewing_thumb

Drawing of beer barrels in storage.

Something’s Brewing. The Art, Science and Technology of Beer Brewing 

(an online exhibit)

There is more to brewing than barley and hops. Beverages have been brewed from beans, oatmeal, honey, molasses, rye, wheat, old bread, and even whole chickens. Ancient Egyptians, medieval monks, and Chicago city founders have all practiced the art of brewing.

The Crerar Library exhibit, Something’s Brewing: The Art, Science and Technology of Brewing, was originally shown January 8 – March 31, 2007 and explored the development of brewing, from the ancient Sumerians’ rice-based beverages to the rise and fall of the Chicago brewing industry.  The Library is pleased to present a web version of the exhibit, including links to original works in digital online libraries where available.  

This exhibit was curated by Andrea Twiss-Brooks and Debra Werner.  The images and text were adapted for the web exhibit by Jennifer Hart and Andrea Twiss-Brooks.

Final phase of Regenstein B Level flooring replacement begins

Beginning over winter interim, the Library will commence the final phase of a project to replace cracked and worn floor tile throughout the Regenstein B Level bookstacks. This phase replaces floor tile in the main aisles; flooring in the compact shelving book aisles was completed over the summer. Work will take place between 6 a.m. and 3 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and will involve noise and dust at times, as well as limiting access to some aisles.

The work has been planned to cause as little disruption as possible, but some main aisles will be inaccessible for two to three days at a time during all building hours. Most book aisles will remain accessible throughout the project, although users may need to use alternate routes to reach book aisles at times. A small number of book aisles will be inaccessible for short periods, but no individual book aisle will be inaccessible for more than two working days.

To request a book from an inaccessible book aisle, visit the 1st Floor Circulation Desk. Staff will page material as soon as the aisle re-opens; users will receive a notice as soon as items are available for pickup at Circulation.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your patience while this important work is completed. For updated information about this project, visit lib.uchicago.edu/e/reg/using/floorplans.

Alert Fall quarter loans to quarterly borrowers automatically extended to April 3

Items checked out by current quarterly borrowers with privileges in good standing and due January 9 will be automatically renewed by the Library for winter quarter. As of December 18, all such items will have a new due date of April 3, 2015. No action by borrowers is necessary.

The automatic renewal is being performed because the functionality to manually renew items is temporarily unavailable in the Catalog. The Library is working to restore this functionality as soon as possible.

Users may view a list of all items out, including current due dates, via My Account.

For assistance, please contact Circulation online or visit a Library circulation desk.

Ex Libris Café winter interim hours, Dec. 13 – Jan. 4

Beginning Saturday, December 13, the Ex Libris Café will have reduced service hours for the winter interim. From December 29 to January 2, only beverage service will be available, including drip coffee, espresso drinks, tea, and canned and bottled drinks. Normal hours resume Monday, January 5.

Saturday, Dec. 13 – Sunday, Dec. 14: Closed
Monday, Dec. 15 – Friday, Dec. 19: 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 20 – Sunday, Dec. 28: Closed
Monday, Dec. 29 – Wednesday, Dec. 31: 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.; beverage service only
Thursday, Jan. 1: Closed
Friday, Jan. 2: 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.; beverage service only
Saturday, Jan. 3 – Sunday, Jan. 4: Closed

As always, the seating area and vending machines will remain open during Regenstein’s building hours.

Library winter interim hours, Dec. 13 – Jan. 4

Beginning Saturday, December 13, the Library will have reduced building hours at all of its locations for the winter interim. Normal hours resume Monday, January 5.

All Locations
December 25: Closed
January 1: Closed

Crerar Library
Sunday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.
Friday – Saturday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Exceptions: December 24 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.; Jan. 4 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 a.m. 

D’Angelo Law Library Circulation
D’Angelo Law will be open with restricted access its regular hours through Dec. 16 for the Law School exam period. Interim hours take effect starting Wednesday, Dec. 17.

Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed
Exceptions: Dec. 24 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.; Dec. 31 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.; Jan. 4 noon – 9:00 p.m. 

Eckhart Library
Monday – noon – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed
Exceptions: Dec. 24 noon – 3:00 p.m. 

Mansueto Library
Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 7:45 p.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Exceptions: Dec. 24 8:00 a.m. – 2:45 p.m.; Jan. 4 10:00 a.m. – 12:45 a.m.

Regenstein Library
Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Friday – Saturday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Exceptions: Dec. 24 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.; Jan. 4 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 a.m.

Regenstein All-Night Study
Closed until January 6

SSA Library
Monday – Friday 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed
Exceptions: Dec. 24 9:00 a.m. – noon; Dec. 26 Closed; Jan. 2 Closed

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Extended Library hours December 5 – 7

To support students preparing for finals, Crerar, Mansueto and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week.

Mansueto will be open Friday, December 5 and Saturday, December 6 until 12:45 a.m. Crerar and Regenstein will be open these days until 1:00 a.m.

The Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will be open 24 hours until the end of finals on Friday, December 12.

For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

STATA: Getting Started: TECHB@R workshop

When: Thursday, December 4, 5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This 90 minute workshop will give you the tools to become a STATA pro. The workshop will start with an explanation of when to use STATA over other stats programs and a walk through the interface. Then, the bulk of the workshop time will be spent learning basic commands and processes. A “do file” will be provided for easy access to the commands as well as a handout for keeping track of all of them. The last part of the workshop will bring it all together, moving beyond the basics, blending the commands to create regressions and graphics. 

Be prepared for a fast paced class, some familiarity with Statistics or programming is helpful, but not necessary. 

Please feel free to bring your laptop with STATA installed to follow along. If you want to attend and follow along, but do not have STATA on your computer – then take a look the virtual lab commander is for you. If you need help setting it up, come to the Techbar at least 15 min. before the workshop and the staff can help. 

Classes are free, but registration is required. Click the website link below for more information and to register.

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
More info: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1486
Tag: WorkshopsGraduate StudentsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Thanksgiving week hours 2014

Hours for the University of Chicago Library over the week of Thanksgiving 2014 are as follows:

Wednesday, November 26

Crerar is open 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.

D’Angelo Law is open 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Eckhart is open 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Mansueto is open 8:00 a.m. – 9:45 p.m.

Regenstein is open 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.

SSA is open 8:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Thursday, November 27

All libraries are closed in observance of Thanksgiving.

Friday, November 28

Crerar is open 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.

D’Angelo Law is open 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Eckhart is closed. 

Mansueto is open 8:00 a.m. – 10:45 p.m.

Regenstein is open 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m.

SSA is closed.

Saturday, November 29

Eckhart is closed. Normal hours resume for all other libraries.

Regenstein All Night Study

All Night Study closes Wednesday, November 26 at 8:00 a.m. and reopens at 1:00 a.m. on Monday, December 1.

For a complete list of Library hours, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

EndNote Online or Zotero? Selecting the Best Citation Manager: online workshop

When: Wednesday, November 19, noon – 1 p.m.
Friday, November 21, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: online workshop
Description: Citation managers are powerful, time-saving tools that help you manage your research. They can also help you format your papers in MS Word by creating bibliographies, citations, and footnotes automatically in the style you choose, such as APA or Chicago.

This webinar will compare how EndNote Online and Zotero — two popular citation managers — allow you to save, share, and cite information. In order to provide a side-by-side comparison of tools, the format of this workshop is demonstration rather than hands-on training.

Registration is required. Please click the event URL below to learn more and register.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1455
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Graduate StudentsStaffWorkshopsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

The Library for Instructors and TAs: workshop

When: Wednesday, November 19, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Thursday, November 20, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description:

You may use the Library’s resources for your research, but do you know how the Library supports teaching? Learn about the Library services available to you as an instructor or TA for a course, including: 

• How to set up course reserves in Chalk
• Requesting Library instruction or training programs
• Setting up your Library Chalk module
• Using Special Collections for your teaching
• Reserving Library classrooms and equipment

In addition, the program will provide an overview of some little-known services available for your students, including reference consultations, statistical software support, and citation managers.

Registration is requested. Please feel free to bring your lunch.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1541
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Graduate StudentsStaffWorkshopsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Introduction to Zotero: workshop

When: Wednesday, November 12, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Thursday, November 13, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Zotero is a free citation manager that allows you to save citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in standard citation styles, including MLA, Chicago and APA. This workshop will introduce some of the key functions of Zotero such as: installing Zotero, adding citations to your Zotero library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Microsoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents. 
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1010
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Student EventsTrainingWorkshopsGraduate Students
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Exhibits Chinese New Year paintings held in the Shanghai Library

Exhibit Location:  The Joseph Regenstein Library, Fifth Floor
Exhibit Dates: October 31, 2014 – February 28, 2015 

The children of a wealthy family are playing drums and suona to celebrate the New Year. In the background the grandfather scold a naughty child.

The children of a wealthy family are playing drums and suona to celebrate the New Year. In the background the grandfather attends to his grandchild.

Chinese New Year painting is a unique and fascinating  genre of Chinese painting.   Customarily, these paintings are often posted by Chinese people in their homes to celebrate the New Year, offering hopes and blessings for an auspicious and happy New Year.

A family is celebrating the Lantern Festival.

A family reunion during the Lantern Festival. The peonies and plum blossoms in the vase indicate the season and create a festive atmosphere.

Over the years, the Shanghai Library has collected over 4,000 New Year paintings produced from the end of the Qing Dynasty to the early years of the Republican Period. This exhibition displays 10 replicas of New Year paintings selected by the Shanghai Library from their collection, which focus on local products and cover eight topics including, for example, “Good Fortune,” “Happy Family,” “Auspicious New Year”, “Celebrating the Lantern Festival,” and “Children at Play.”

The three gods, Fu, Lu and Shou (good fortune, prosperity,and longevity) are pictured.

Good fortune, prosperity, longevity and happiness (fu lu shou xi) are words commonly used in traditional Chinese customs for good wishes. The three gods, Fu, Lu and Shou, are pictured.

BorrowDirect is back, now with on-site borrowing and access to Johns Hopkins collections

BorrowDirect is available once again to University of Chicago faculty, students, and staff, both through the new Library Catalog as well as lib.uchicago.edu/h/borrowdirect. BorrowDirect offers faculty, students, and staff at Ivy League and other partner institutions unmediated requesting and expedited delivery of items from a combined collection of over 50 million volumes. Since its inception in 1999, BorrowDirect has successfully filled almost 2 million user requests with book delivery in three to five days. The University of Chicago joined the BorrowDirect partnership in June 2013.

Visit our Library Guide for more information about how to use BorrowDirect.

On-site borrowing added through new BorrowDirect Plus agreement

UChicago faculty, students, and staff can now obtain on-site borrowing privileges at BorrowDirect institutions and Duke University as a result of the new BorrowDirect Plus agreement. The BorrowDirect partnership includes Brown, Chicago, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, MIT, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, and Yale.

BorrowDirect logoUChicago faculty, students, and staff who have home library accounts in good standing will have access to selected circulating materials in many of the library collections at the BorrowDirect partner institutions. When visiting one of these libraries, UChicago users will need to show their UChicago Card and log into UChicago’s BorrowDirect web page at lib.uchicago.edu/h/borrowdirect; once logged in, the user will need to click on the My Account link in BorrowDirect. A staff member will verify that a user is able to access My Account as authorization for borrowing privileges.

Availability of specific items and collections and participation of specific campus libraries vary by institution. The lending library’s policies and loan periods apply to UChicago borrowers. It is recommended that users considering a visit to another library view their policies in advance by consulting www.borrowdirect.org/on-site-borrowing. Borrowed items may be returned at either the lending library or UChicago campus libraries.

For the most part, these same materials are already available through BorrowDirect, the rapid online book request and delivery system used by all of the participating institutions with the exception of Duke. The new agreement expands the system to include this in-person component.

Johns Hopkins joins BorrowDirect library partnership

In September, Johns Hopkins University joined the 10 existing BorrowDirect partner libraries to engage in resource sharing and other collaborative library projects. Johns Hopkins University was founded in 1876 and provides information services to more than 21,000 graduate and undergraduate students, 7,000 faculty, 10 divisions, and a wide range of academic and research programs. The Johns Hopkins Libraries contain more than 4.3 million volumes with collection strengths in German and Romance languages, philosophy, the ancient Near East, biomedical engineering, chemistry, and environmental engineering.

Feature Story French illustrators at war: An interview with the curators

Harris and Edelstein explore WWI illustrations in a Special Collections exhibition

Neil Harris and Teri J. Edelstein

Neil Harris and Teri J. Edelstein

En Guerre: French Illustrators and World War I runs through January 2, 2015, in the Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery at the University of Chicago Library. In this edited interview, co-curators Neil Harris, Preston and Sterling Morton Professor of History and Art History Emeritus, and Dr. Teri J. Edelstein speak with Rachel Rosenberg about the role of French illustrators in World War I, the satiric and surprising aspects of their art, and the origins of the exhibition.

What role did French illustrators play in World War I, and how would you say that affects their illustrations?

Sur le pont

Louis Lefèvre. “Sur le pont.” Rondes glorieuses. [S.l.: s.n., n.d.]. 1ière série. On loan from a private collection.

HARRIS: The French had a very well developed illustrated tradition by the time the war began, and that was one of their assets in the war. They recognized this on a whole series of levels. A number of the illustrations are funny. That is, they’re satirical—they’re pointed. These artists were aware of the ironies of war and are part of a long French tradition of political caricature. Many illustrations in this show are by artists who were—I wouldn’t say twisting the knife in the back of the government, but skeptical about official wisdom. They glorified ordinary people as best they could while raising questions about the war’s logic. The illustrations convey a more complicated set of messages than the propaganda posters of the time.

EDELSTEIN: The posters, by and large, were made officially by government or quasi-government agencies. They were recruitment posters. They urged people to buy national bonds. The illustrations in this exhibition reflect a much more nuanced and personal take on the war. Many of the illustrators were motivated by patriotism, and many of these artists served in the war.

HARRIS: Many were wounded. There was a total mobilization in France, so almost all of their artists who were fit and of age—and who were not foreign nationals, like Picasso—went to war. Many went to the front. They were wounded—in some cases, killed. The enemy was demonized by many of the artists. The Germans, and the Austro-Hungarians, and the Turks were caricatured mercilessly—particularly the leadership. So that wasn’t nuanced. But what was more nuanced was the way French illustrators presented the experiences of the war and focused on the poilu—the ordinary French soldier— who was a key figure in every history of the war.

Conte de fées

Lucien Laforge. “Conte de fées.” Paris: Librairie Lutetia, [n.d.]. World War I Printed Media and Art Collection, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books & Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania.

Is there a particular example of a satiric or subtle illustration that stands out for you?

HARRIS: One is by Lucien Laforge, a socialist, an anarchist, who worked for left-wing journals. He did a broadside called Conte de fées that tells a story of the war as a fairytale. The German ogre is beheaded by three little girls playing in a garden. Figuring out what he meant by this is difficult. Was it an implied critique of what the French referred to as the bourrage de crâne, the war fever that overtook people’s minds? Is it satirical? Is Laforge poking fun at the reductionist character of the war? Or is he, in fact, endorsing the war? It’s hard to say.

Are there aspects of the exhibition that you expect to particularly surprise your audience?

EDELSTEIN: I think people will find it unexpected and riveting to see the extent to which the subject of World War I appears in fashion illustration. The reason for this is threefold. One, fashion was a very important French industry. Two, fashion was an area where the French felt they could nationalistically distinguish themselves from their enemies. They felt that French fashion was at a great remove from German so-called fashion. Three, the illustrators employed by fashion were, by and large, out of work for the duration of the war, so they turned their attention to finding jobs elsewhere. Many issues of La baïonnette feature satirical cartoons that hinge on the notion of French fashion. We also have individual prints on patriotic themes connected to the war that were done by fashion illustrators.

Modes de printemps

Odette Champion. “Modes de printemps: Berlin-Vienne-Constantinople.” Fantasio. Paris: Félix Juven, [ 1915]. Gift of Neil Harris and
Teri J. Edelstein, The University of Chicago Library.

Some of the items on display in En Guerre and included in the associated catalogue have long been a part of the Library’s collections, but a great many are part of your personal collections or were collected by you and subsequently donated to the Library. How did you become interested in collecting World War I illustrations, and how did the Library help in developing the exhibition?

HARRIS: We didn’t really start with the war. I had been collecting French illustrated books since the 1970s. At a certain point, we realized that the centenary of World War I was approaching and we had more than enough for an exhibition. And the Library has a number of things that have been very important, most significantly La baïonnette, a quite amazing illustrated magazine done during the War. We hope that when people come to the show they will observe that these things survive only because there’s a library that takes care of them.

EDELSTEIN: The Library and the staff of Special Collections have been endlessly supportive. We’re delighted with our work with the Library.

Visit the associated web exhibit at lib.uchicago.edu/e/webexhibits/enguerre

Bringing South Asian cultures to the world

Grants support UChicago Library’s digitization projects

Major grants from the U.S. Department of Education, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the British Library are enabling the University of Chicago Library to expand and enrich digital resources for South Asian studies. UChicago faculty and students benefit from these projects, as do researchers around the world, through our freely available online presentation of books and images. In two instances the projects are partnerships to digitize materials located elsewhere, to make these unique resources available to UChicago researchers and others.

Historic postcards of colonial India

Cotton Cleaning Postcard

Image of cotton cleaning in Bombay from the private postcard collection of Graham Shaw.

The University of Chicago Library has digitized nearly 12,000 historical postcards of colonial India from one of the largest collections in existence. A grant from the U.S. Department of Education in 2009 and 2010 helped to support our project to present the private collection of Mr. Graham Shaw in London. These postcards cover undivided India as well as Nepal and Sri Lanka. Most date from the 1880s to the 1930s. They depict topographical features as well as the people and their culture—from occupations and faiths to modes of transport and humor. The collection’s significance derives from its extensive visual documentation, the varied perspectives it provides for sites over time, the postage stamps, and the correspondence on the back of many cards. A search engine being launched this fall at postcards.uchicago.edu will allow users to search by location and keyword or to browse through the cards by category.

Monolingual and etymological dictionaries

With the support of a two-year, $300,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities that began in July, the University of Chicago Library will be converting and disseminating 12 monolingual and etymological dictionaries from our own collections as electronic resources, extending the coverage of our Digital Dictionaries of South Asia (DDSA, at dsal.uchicago.edu/dictionaries) and significantly supporting humanities research and advanced language learning. Additionally, the 54 dictionaries currently available from DDSA will be enhanced through improved facilities for searching and displaying data on desktop and mobile devices.

The DDSA is already heavily accessed by scholars and lay users, who currently execute 4 million searches per year. This project enhances the value of the website by extending monolingual lexical coverage in eight critical languages: Kannada, Kashmiri, Konkani, Panjabi, Prakrit, Sindhi, Sinhala, and Telugu.

Early Kannada books

“Preservation and Access for Rare Early Kannada Books” is the most recent digitization project. The British Library’s Endangered Archives Programme has granted £44,950 (approximately $75,700) to save more than 1,650 of the most important early printed publications in the Kannada language, which are held by several public and private collections in south India. This grant also covers a two year period that began in July.

Kannada is an important Dravidian language spoken in south India since the early modern period. The broad spectrum of writings in these publications are invaluable for historians of social, cultural, literary, and intellectual change in this region in the 19th and 20th centuries. Digital page images will be presented via our Digital South Asia Library (dsal.uchicago.edu) and the British Library.

 

elephant battery

Image of an elephant battery from the private postcard collection of Graham Shaw.

The University of Chicago Library’s South Asia collection is widely regarded as the strongest North American university collection about the Indian subcontinent. These digital initiatives expand the resources we are able to offer through international collaborations that open access to rare and unique scholarly resources.