People Diane Dallis joins UChicago as Associate University Librarian for Research and Learning

Diane Dallis joined the University of Chicago Library on May 10 as Associate University Librarian for Research and Learning.  Diane was most recently the Associate Dean for Library Academic Services at Indiana University and will bring to Chicago extensive experience in transforming reference services, building new programs and spaces that support research and learning, and creative use of assessment to evaluate the effectiveness of operations and to understand the role the library plays in faculty and student success.

Diane Dallis

Diane Dallis, Associate University Librarian for Research and Learning

At Indiana University Ms. Dallis worked closely with the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning, the University Information Technology Services, the Associate Vice Provost for Research in Arts & Humanities, and the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education to collaboratively develop new programs including support for new research technologies, scholarly publishing, and research and learning skills.  Ms. Dallis oversaw the development of a Learning Commons that provided students a more learner-centered environment with access to the tools, systems, and support needed to turn information into knowledge. Ms. Dallis also led the creation of a Scholars’ Commons that supports cutting edge research by providing easy access to experts and technology for every stage of a researcher’s scholarship from curiosity to discovery to publication, including consultation services in areas such as GIS, text mining, visualization, intellectual property, data management, digitization, metadata, and project management.

At the University of Chicago Library, Ms. Dallis oversees Humanities, Social Sciences, Area Studies, Special Collections, East Asia, and the Sciences, ensuring a coherent and responsive information and service environment for the highly interdisciplinary research and teaching needs of the campus.  Ms. Dallis will bring to the position both her experience at Indiana University, and her strong record of national leadership in the field, including serving as chair of the Public Services Big Heads group and the Big Ten Academic Alliance Public Services Discussion Group.

Exhibits (Co)-Humanitarian

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Fifth Floor
Exhibit Dates: May 1 – August 1, 2017

Cover image of 조선 유적유물도감 / Joseon Dynasty Ruins & Relics Illustrated Book

조선 유적유물도감
Joseon Dynasty Ruins & Relics Illustrated Book

(Co)-Humanitarian uses print and visual resources to illustrate the ideological and geographic divisions between South and North Korea.  The exhibit also conveys North Korea’s human rights issues. In 1948 Korea separated into South and North Korea; it has remained a divided country ever since. The exhibit exposes our generation’s role in acknowledging and understanding the differences between South and North Korea with a view to fostering peaceful communication between the separated nations. The younger generation of the Chicago Korean community conceived this exhibition as a way to connect with North Koreans living in Empower House, which is a U.S. North Korean defector shelter located in Hyde Park, through academic education, art activities, and discussions.

보물을 찾는 소년들 / Boys Searching for Treasure

보물을 찾는 소년들
Boys Searching for Treasure

(Co)-Humanitarian is a collaboration between the University of Chicago Library and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC). Each institution has curated display cases  on the same topic, but with two different approaches. Emphasizing visual imagery, (Co)-Humanitarian was presented at the SAIC Flaxman Library in January and February 2017 making use of the Joan Flasch Artist Book collections.  The exhibit at the University of Chicago Library displays print publications from South Korea, North Korea, and other countries, focusing on 3 different subjects: North Korean politics, culture, and human rights.

Collection selected by librarians at the University of Chicago:
Jee-Young Park, Korean Studies Librarian, and Nanju Kwon, Visiting Librarian Intern

Display designed by student artists at the Art Institute of Chicago:
Jae Hwan Lim, Rachel Chung and Eun Pyo Hong

Library exhibition poster

The University of Chicago Library display cases

The University of Chicago Library display cases

 

SAIC Flaxman Library display case

SAIC Flaxman Library display case

Exhibits Catholics, Freethinkers, and the Printed Word in Czech Chicago

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Second Floor
Exhibit Dates: April 24 – August 1, 2017

Portrait of August Geringer

August Geringer (1842-1930), publisher of Svornost, the first Czech-language daily newspaper in the United States, and numerous books of Freethought literature.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Chicago was the largest Czech enclave in the United States and, indeed, constituted the third largest urban concentration of Czechs in the world. Living primarily in the Pilsen and Lawndale neighborhoods on the west side of Chicago, members of the Czech community shared a common language and a strong sense of ethnic identity that manifested itself in a rich and vigorous associational life. There was, however, considerable social tension within this community, based on differing attitudes to religious belief. The primary fault line lay between members of the Catholic Church and those who espoused a form of secular humanism, known as Freethought.

The roots of the division between Catholics and Freethinkers lay in the history and political conditions of the Czech lands, where Catholicism was the state religion and thus strongly associated with Hapsburg rule and its Germanizing cultural policy, while anticlericalism and, more broadly, anti-Catholicism were conjoined with the nationalistic attitudes of those eager to emancipate their land from Austrian political control and cultural hegemony. Because Czech-American Freethought was strongly tinged with anticlericalism, Catholics and Freethinkers came to form two rival camps among Czech Americans, each of which carved out its own distinctive institutional and associational life.

Photograph of Fr. Prokop Neužil

Fr. Prokop Neužil, OSB (1861-1946), founder of the Bohemian Benedictine Press and third abbot of St. Procopius Abbey, Lisle, Illinois.

As ideological rivals, Freethinkers and Catholics sought to make use of the printed word to propagate their views within the Czech-American community. The Czech-language press thus became an important medium in setting the tone for Czech-American culture. The city of Chicago was home to the most important Czech-American Freethought and Catholic publishers in the country—on one side, August Geringer, owner of a small publishing empire based around the daily newspaper Svornost and a committed Freethinker whose press published numerous works of Freethought literature, and, on the other, the Bohemian Benedictine Press run by the Benedictine monks of St. Procopius Abbey, which was the leading publishing venue for Czech-language Catholic literature in the United States. Drawing primarily upon the rich resources of the University of Chicago Library’s ACASA (Archives of Czechs and Slovaks Abroad) collection, this one-case exhibit presents a small selection of the publications of these two presses, illustrating some of the characteristic features of the two poles of Czech-American culture that they represented.

Exhibits “Seward’s Folly” – “Walrussia” – “The New National Ice House”: In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the purchase of Alaska from Russia, 1867-2017

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Second Floor
Exhibit Dates: April 24 – August 1, 2017

Why did Russia sell Alaska? Why did the United States purchase it? And how did the American public and press react to this purchase in 1867, so soon after the end of the Civil War?

Signing of the Treaty on 30 March 1867

Signing of the Treaty on 30 March 1867
Robert S. Chew (Chief Clerk, State Department), William Seward (Secretary of State), William Hunter (Second Assistant Secretary of State), Vladimir Bodisko (Secretary of the Russian Legation), Eduard Stoeckl (Russian Ambassador to the US), Charles Sumner (Senator from Massachusetts), Frederick Seward (Assistant Secretary of State)

WHY SELL? By the end of the 1850s, after its defeat in the Crimean War, Russia’s tsarist government had no further use for the Russian American Company and began searching for a buyer of the colonies in northwest America, preferably not the British, Russia’s greatest rival in the Pacific. By 1863 Russia concluded that the Russian colonies in America were “at a perfect standstill as regards colonization, hunting, trade, and civic development, and that, generally speaking, the Russian American Company has far from justified the expectations which the government had placed in it” (S. B. Okun. The Russian-American Company.
Tr. by Carl Ginzburg. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1951: 232-33.)

WHY BUY?  William H. Seward, 24th United States Secretary of State (1861-1868), saw the purchase of Alaska as another step in the expansion of the United States in the west, as did Charles Sumner, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts whose 2 1/2 hour speech to the Committee on Foreign Relations presented all of the facts then known about Russian America (i.e. Alaska). He articulated four advantages pertinent to the future interests of the United States: Advantages to the Pacific Coast, Extension of Dominion, Extension of Republican Institutions, and Anticipation of Great Britain.

Treasury draft no. 9759

Treasury draft no. 9759, the check that paid for the purchase of Alaska.
The check, in the amount of $7,200,000, amounted to two cents per acre, and is dated more than a year after the signing of the Treaty of the Cession of the Russian Possessions in North America

Although the Treaty to purchase Alaska was ratified by a 37-2 margin, at a cost of $7,200,000, it caused a great deal of pro and con exposition in the nation’s papers, with the purchase being labeled as “Seward’s Folly,” “Icebergia,” “Walrussia,” “The Nation’s Ice House.” It was well into the 20th century before Alaska’s purchase was generally acknowledged to be of great strategic and financial importance.

Exhibits Witness: Holocaust Memorial Books

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Fourth Floor
Exhibit Dates: April 21 – April 30, 2017

Illustration from yizkor book

Yizker-bukh fun der Zshelekhover Yidisher kehile, “Memorial Book for the Jewish Community of Zhelekhov”

In the wake of the destruction of the Jewish communities of Europe and the murder of 6 million Jews by the Nazi Regime, survivors sought to preserve the history of these cities and towns and the lives of their residents. The yizkor book, or community memorial volume, became a preferred method of preservation. This one-case exhibit displays yizkor books from the University of Chicago Library’s collection in commemoration of Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Memorial Day), which begins at sundown on April 23, 2017.

Publication of such volumes began immediately after the war and peaked in the 1960s, though volumes continue to be published today, often as translations of earlier volumes. Yizkor books, sifre zikaron in Hebrew, yisker bikher or pinkeysim in Yiddish, were written primarily by Holocaust survivors in their countries of resettlement, typically by landsmanshaftn, mutual aid organizations comprised of immigrants from the same town or region. It is estimated that 600-800 such volumes have been published, mostly in Israel and the United States. The majority were written in Hebrew or Yiddish, sometimes both, and some with a summary or introduction in English.

Yizkor books are typically divided into four parts: the town and its inhabitants  before the war, the events during the war, the fate of the town and its people after the war, and a necrology. They were meant to serve as witnesses both to the pre-War Jewish community and the crimes of the Holocaust, as such they include multiple autobiographical accounts of survivors, maps of city before the War, and photographs of the murdered and of survivors, such as those who served in the Israeli army and who edited the volume.  The volumes often incorporate illustrations that draw heavily of flame imagery, referencing the Jewish custom of lighting a candle at the time of death and every year on the anniversary of the death of a family member.

Exhibits Resources for the study of the use of gas by the Nazis to murder

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Fourth Floor
Exhibit Dates: April 12 – April 30, 2017

Pile of clothes next to entrance to gas chamber at Dachau.

Dachau, Germany, 1945, Entrance to a gas chamber and pile of clothes. (Yad Vashem archive, item 13526).

Hitler’s use of gas to murder millions, including German citizens, is well-documented. During World War II, the Nazi regime systematically murdered 6 million Jews, men, women, and children. The first death camp was established on December 8, 1941, at Chelmno in Poland, where gas vans were used to murder 300,000 Polish Jews and 5,000 Sinti and Roma. Starting in March 1942, the Germans built permanent gas chambers at concentration camps in Belzec, Sobibor, and Treblinka. Approximately 1.7 million Polish Jews were murdered at these camps. The Germans established a fifth death camp in Majdanek in late 1941 where approximately 78,000 Jews, Slovaks, Czechs, Germans, and Poles were murdered by the Nazis. Auschwitz-Birkenau was the largest Nazi concentration and extermination camp. The Germans began exterminations at Birkenau in October of 1941, using Zyklon B gas in four, permanent gas chambers. There, the Nazis murdered over 1,100,000 Jews, 70,000 Poles, 25,000 Sinti and Roma, and 15,000 prisoners of war.

Cover image from book on Zyclon B gas

Cover image of Zyklon B: die Produktion in Dessau und der Missbrauch durch die deutschen Faschisten (Norderstedt: Books on Demand, 2007).

This exhibit highlights some of the resources available at the University of Chicago Library for the study of Nazi atrocities during World War II.  A list of more resources owned by the library can be found here. In addition, the Library subscribes to online databases, including Testaments of the Holocaust.  Finally, there are many resources available, including vast documentation of Nazi atrocities, through the websites of Yad Vashem: The World Holocaust Museum and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Zar GIS & Story Maps Prize for College Students

The Kathleen A. Zar GIS & Story Maps Prize for College students is now accepting submissions. First prize is $1500. Second prize is $500. Third prize is $300.

The deadline for submission is April 20, 2017.The Kathleen A. Zar GIS & Story Maps Prize

The prize acknowledges the ability of a University of Chicago student in the College to utilize GIS and spatial thinking to develop a digital narrative using Esri’s Story Maps applications. The prize organizers welcome submissions that provide spatial insights or narratives from all subjects and perspectives.

Visit the Zar GIS & Story Maps page for more information about submitting an entry. For questions about getting started with GIS and Story Maps, e-mail Resident Librarian for GIS Taylor Hixson (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu).

A Poetry Reading with Harmony Holiday

When: Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 6:008:00 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description:
Harmony Holiday

Harmony Holiday

Harmony Holiday is the author of Negro League Baseball, Go Find Your Father/ A Famous Blues and most recently Hollywood Forever. She is also the founder of Mythscience, an arts collective devoted to cross-disciplinary work that helps artists re-engage with their bodies and the physical world in this so-called digital age, and the Afrosonics archive of jazz and everyday diaspora poetics. She studied rhetoric at the University of California, Berkeley and taught for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre. She received her MFA from Columbia University. She is currently working on a book of poems and lyric essays on reparations and a biography of jazz singer Abbey Lincoln. She lives in Los Angeles.

This event is free and open to the public.

Presented by Chicago Review and the University of Chicago Library

Cost: Free
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
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Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.

New research guide for finding maps

Screen capture of the new finding maps research guide home page.Consulting maps is often a crucial part of primary source research, but knowing how and where to locate the right maps for research can prove challenging.

The Library’s new research guide for finding maps can help demystify that process. The guide has resources to assist with:

  • searching for maps
  • finding maps at the University of Chicago
  • map resources online
  • U.S. Census maps

To learn more about the University of Chicago’s Map Collection, visit the Map Collection’s main web page or the physical collection in Regenstein Library room 370 Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday 12-5 p.m. during the academic quarter and Monday-Friday from 12-5p.m. during the interim.

Contact Sam Brown (sbb@uchicago.edu) with questions about using the map collection. Contact Taylor Hixson (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu) with comments or questions about the guide.

Mansueto Library 360° video

Explore the Mansueto Library’s Grand Reading Room, get a robot’s-eye view of the automated storage and retrieval system, and see preservation experts at work in the conservation and digitization laboratories in this 360° video.

How to view 360° videos

On desktop computers, use a web browser compatible with 360° playback (Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, or Opera). Click and drag the mouse to adjust the frame. Set the video quality to 2160S (4K) for an optimal viewing experience.

On mobile devices, install the YouTube app, and visit https://youtu.be/fV6CAJsqWLA. Either tap and drag your finger to adjust the frame, or move the full device around with your hands.

About the Mansueto Library

The Joe and Rika Mansueto Library opened at the heart of the University of Chicago campus in 2011. It features a soaring elliptical glass dome capping a 180-seat Grand Reading Room, state-of-the-art conservation and digitization laboratories, and an underground high-density automated storage and retrieval system.

Learn more at mansueto.lib.uchicago.edu.

Exhibits In Memory of Charles E. Bidwell, Sociology and Education Scholar, 1932-2016

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Second Floor
Exhibit Dates: January 12 – March 27, 2017

Photo of Charles E. Bidwell, seated by a window

Charles Bidwell,
William Claude Reavis Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago

Charles E. Bidwell, was an accomplished scholar in the sociology of education.  He spent almost his entire academic career at the University of Chicago and his research sought to understand the organizational behaviors and functions in and around schools.

This one-case exhibit highlights a selection of his most heavily cited and influential works as well as his dissertation and accomplishments as an administrator, including editor for three important journals, the Sociology of Education, American Journal of Sociology, and the American Journal of Education.

Exhibits Feature Story Concrete Poetry, Concrete Book

Exhibition: Concrete Poetry, Concrete Book: Artists’ Books in German-speaking Space after 1945
Dates
: January 17 – March 17, 2017
Location: Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637

Die Schastrommel

“Die Schastrommel” no. 9. Bolzano: Österreichische Exilregierung. 1973. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Following the Second World War and with increasing intensity in the 1960s and 1970s, artists working throughout Western Europe explored new media and techniques, engaging in participatory and performative practices that tested the limits of language, representation, and action. Across Austria, Germany, Switzerland, and beyond, friendships formed amongst artists concerned with generating new avenues of access to their artistic aims, often realized in the form of public group events, as well as collaborative publications like art journals, inexpensive multiples, and artists’ books, all of which could be widely circulated and enjoyed independently of fine art institutions.

Drawing on the remarkable collection of rare artists’ books housed in the University of Chicago Library, Concrete Poetry, Concrete Book considers how the artist’s book emerged as a significant preoccupation in this milieu. The exhibition establishes links between artists affiliated with the reduced forms and focused design quality of concrete poetry and artists whose unruly, often messy materials and actions defined performance art. For all of these artists, books afforded sites for experimentation with visual and tactile experience, and the activity of “reading.”

Jörg Immendorff (1945-2007). "Hier und jetzt." Köln: König, 1973. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Jörg Immendorff (1945-2007). “Hier und jetzt.” Köln: König, 1973. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Referring to the way that language takes up space on the page, arrests the eyes, and requires perceptual interaction, works of concrete poetry test the graphical display of language, focusing on the material quality of letters and words. Concrete poetry often required that books take on unusual forms, such as the sequential unbound pages of Gerhard Rühm’s bewegung (1964) and Hansjörg Mayer’s fold-out book typoaktionen (1967), which reinvents the alphabet for tactile encounter. Artists’ books activate the process of reading, inviting the reader to play with and participate in how language and form produce meaning, as in André Thomkins’ “polyglot machine” Dogmat Mot (1965).

At the same time, artists’ books tend to deemphasize reading as a technique for understanding, foregrounding instead tactility, physicality, and materiality, as exemplified in the die-cut multi-colored laminate pages of Dieter Roth’s Bilderbuch (1957/1976). Indeed, Wolf Vostell’s 20-pound Betonbuch (1971), which encases in actual concrete his own book of sardonic proposals “to concretify” cities, furniture, and even clouds, may be read as a definitive if not paradoxical example of an artist’s book: unreadable in any conventional sense, it provokes and at the same time frustrates interaction.

Austrian Cultural Forum New York, Swiss Benevolent Society of Chicago and UChicago Arts logos

In tandem with the year-long UChicago Arts Program Concrete Happenings devoted to Vostell, this exhibition aims to showcase artists’ books that intersect with and depart from the ambitions of concrete poetry and Fluxus.

Presented by the University of Chicago Library, with additional support generously provided by the Austrian Cultural Forum New York, Swiss Benevolent Society of Chicago, UChicago Arts, and individual donors.

Hours: Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m., and, when University of Chicago classes are in session, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Related Events

Concrete Poetry, Concrete Book: Artists’ Books in German-speaking Space after 1945 is part of Concrete Happenings at the University of Chicago, a collaborative series of public exhibitions, screenings, symposia, and other programs that mark the return of Wolf Vostell’s colossal Concrete Traffic (1970) to public view following a major conservation effort. Concurrent exhibitions at the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society and Smart Museum of Art delve into other aspects of the Fluxus movement and Vostell’s work.  Among the programs on offer are Reading Fluxus Films and a two-part Concrete Poetry Workshop. Learn more about all of these projects at arts.uchicago.edu/concretehappenings.

First Week Events at the Library

Library Society Winter Reception for Concrete Poetry, Concrete Book

Thursday, January 19, 2017, 5 p.m. exhibit viewing, 5:45 p.m. lecture and soundscape, 6:45 p.m. reception
The Joseph Regenstein Library (1100 E. 57th Street, Room 122)

Join the University of Chicago Library Society to celebrate the Special Collections Research Center exhibition Concrete Poetry, Concrete Book: Artists’ Books in German-speaking Space after 1945. Following an exhibition viewing, Christine Mehring, Chair and Professor of the Department of Art History, will present a lecture on highlights of the exhibition. A “Soundscape” inspired by select scores from items in the exhibition will be performed in collaboration with the Department of Music. A wine and cheese reception will follow the lecture and performance.

Free, but space is limited. Registration is required in advance at http://bit.ly/2gyeaEE. Free valet parking will be available in front of the Regenstein Library as of 4:30pm.

Presented by the University of Chicago Library Society.

Instructions for a Chicago Fluxus Opening

Sunday, January 22, 2017, 3–6 p.m.
Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society (5701 South Woodlawn Avenue), Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library (1100 East 57th Street), and Smart Museum of Art (5550 South Greenwood Avenue)

A set of “instructions”—inspired by participatory Happenings orchestrated by Fluxus artist Wolf Vostell—will guide you across the University of Chicago campus during this opening celebration for three related exhibitions: Fantastic Architecture (Neubauer Collegium), Concrete Poetry, Concrete Book (Special Collections Research Center), and Vostell Concrete (Smart Museum). Enjoy a variety of free programs, food, and drinks at the three locations. A free shuttle will run between locations, but please bring your own thermometer.

Free, open to all.

Presented by the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society, Special Collections Research Center at the University of Chicago Library, and Smart Museum of Art.

Use of Images and Media Contact

Images from the exhibition included on this page are available for download by members of the media and are reserved for editorial use in connection with University of Chicago Library exhibitions, programs, or related news.

For more information, contact Rachel Rosenberg at ra-rosenberg@uchicago.edu or 773-834-1519.

Take a virtual tour of Regenstein Library

Regenstein Library is a memorable part of the University of Chicago experience. Affectionately referred to as “the Reg,” the University’s largest library is a hub for students, faculty, and staff. The Library invites you to learn more about this unique building in a virtual tour.

The Reg’s brutalist architecture distinguishes it from the Gothic spires of the University’s first buildings. But don’t let the grey limestone exterior fool you; inside the Reg is a dynamic mixed-use space with a collaborative, open study floor; massive, quiet bookstacks; and innovative technology studios.

In the virtual tour, you can visit the Library and explore spaces such as the Special Collections Research Center and the newly redesigned A Level, as well as the Mansueto Library, which is connected to Regenstein by a glass bridge. The video also shows users how to find and borrow a book, get software and research assistance, and reserve a group study room.

If you have any questions about the Library, its services, or its spaces please Ask a Librarian.

Map Collection extends hours, GIS assistance

The Regenstein Library Map Collection has extended its hours Monday through Thursday: now opening at 10 a.m.

In addition to regular Map Collection use, between 10 a.m. and 12 p.m. Monday through Thursday during the academic quarter, GIS Resident Librarian Taylor Hixson will offer walk-in GIS assistance to patrons.

Taylor can assist walk-in patrons by:

  • identifying spatial data resources
  • helping organize, format, and join spatial datasets
  • finding journal articles, books, and other research about GIS
  • providing basic instruction for desktop GIS and web mapping tools
  • consulting with patrons about planning and managing spatial data research
  • linking patrons with advanced spatial analysis and computing centers at the university

Taylor is also available for scheduled GIS consultations in Crerar Library. To schedule a GIS consultation, e-mail her at taylorhixson@uchicago.edu.

The Map Collection is located on the third floor of Regenstein Library, and during the academic quarters its hours of operation are Monday-Thursday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday 12 -5 p.m.  Hours during interims are Monday-Friday 12-5 p.m.

The HistoryMakers, an African American Oral Video History Archive – workshop

 

When: Wednesday, December 7, 2016 3:004:30 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: Two interviewees in The HistoryMakersThis 90-minute workshop on The HistoryMakers, an African American oral video history archive, is presented by staff from The HistoryMakers project, including Julieanna Richardson, Founder & Executive Director. Co-hosted by the University of Chicago Library and the Office of Civic Engagement, the workshop is open to UChicago faculty, students, and staff who are interested in video oral history or African American contributions to any aspect of American life or culture.

For more about The HistoryMakers resource, visit http://www.thehistorymakers.com/

Cost: Free
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
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Tag: Diversity, Workshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Burst the bubble: expanding the news sources you read

Image of Facebook Screen

Facebook page” (CC BY 2.0) by reynermedia.

Over the last week, major internet companies such has Facebook and Google have been under attack for their role in the circulation of ‘fake news’. Critics assert that these platforms publicize most-clicked content as news without verifying facts and claims. Some even say that publicizing this ‘fake news’ influenced the outcome of the presidential election. In addition, news on social media tends to be shared among followers and friends, so the news you see there often aligns with the political affiliations and perspectives closest to your own. For these reasons, using social media and popular news aggregators such as Google News, can put you in what has been called a ‘filter bubble’. Library resources can help you burst that bubble.

The Library will be offering 30-minute workshops highlighting databases available to the University of Chicago community that contain a wide variety of news sources.  Learn how to browse major dailies such as the Washington Post or New York Times in just a few clicks, search international newspapers online, and find transcripts from cable and radio news programs.

Burst Your Bubble: Making the Most of the Library’s News Databases
Regenstein Library, Room 207
Monday, November 21, 10:00–10:30 a.m.  Register Now
Tuesday, November 22, 1:30 – 2:00 p.m.  Register Now

Can’t make a workshop?  Begin exploring the news databases available to you using our research guides:

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact Rebecca Starkey at rstarkey@uchicago.edu for assistance.

The Impact of the Digital on Japanese Studies

When: November 11-12, 2016
Where: Joseph Regenstein Library, Room 122
The Digital Humanities Workshop of the University of Chicago will be hosting a public workshop on “The Impact of the Digital on Japanese Studies” on November 11-12, 2016. The goal of the workshop is to bring together a variety of Japan scholars to consider how digital data and computational methods are changing the ways we organize and analyze cultural and historical information. It is also meant to catalyze new initiatives and projects by bringing together experienced and newer voices to brainstorm, discuss, and offer critical feedback on digitally inflected work and how it might support humanistic scholarship.The workshop is organized around projects at various stages of completion, ranging from those at a conceptual stage to those more fully realized. Presenters will share the results of any data-driven work they have done while addressing the technical or methodological processes involved in this work and possible future directions for research. Subject matter will range widely across multiple time periods and disciplines and will interrogate some of the most popular computational methods: text analysis, network analysis, and spatial analysis. A tentative schedule of panel sessions and individual presentation titles is provided below.For more information about the workshop, please contact the organizer, Hoyt Long, at hoytlong@uchicago.edu. Visitors from outside Chicago can find out about transportation and local accommodations here.

Schedule

Friday, November 11

10:00 – 12:00     Session 1
12:00 – 1:00       Lunch
1:00 – 3:30         Session 2
4:00 – 5:00        Group Discussion/Roundtable
5:00 – 6:30        Reception

Saturday, November 12

9:30 – 11:30        Session 3
11:30 – 12:30       Lunch
12:30 – 2:30       Session 4
2:30 – 3:00        Wrap-up Discussion

Workshop Sessions

Session 1

Hyakunin Isshu as a Mini Database
Catherine Ryu, Michigan State University

On Structure and Style in the Dai Nihon Shi
Aliz Horvath, University of Chicago

On Late Medieval Forgery Production
Paula R. Curtis, University of Michigan

To view the abstracts, click here.


Session 2

The Epigraphy of Business Documents
Raja Adal, University of Pittsburgh

On the Politics of Text
Amy Catalinac, New York University

On the Language of Empire in Taiyo Magazine (1895-1925)
Molly Des Jardin, University of Pennsylvania

Political Discourse in Early Meiji Japan
Mark Ravina, Emory University

To view the abstracts, click here.


Session 3

Mapping Medical Edo/Tokyo
Susan Burns, University of Chicago

Can You Sing a Map?
Joel Legassie, University of Victoria

On Scale
Jonathan Zwicker, University of California, Berkeley

To view the abstracts, click here.


Session 4

On Collecting Data
Jonathan Abel, Penn State University

On Aozora Bunko as Archive
Hoyt Long, University of Chicago

On Japanese Corpora and Tokenization
Toshinobu Ogiso, National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics

To view the abstracts, click here.

Exhibits Half a Hundred: EALC’s Golden Anniversary 1966–2016

Exhibition Dates: October 28, 2016 – March 20, 2017
Location: Fifth Floor, Regenstein Library, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago

Half a Hundred: EALC's Golden Anniversary, 1966-2016The year 2016 marks the 50th anniversary of the formal establishment of the Department of Far Eastern Languages and Civilizations (now the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations) at the University, although the founding of the teaching program on East Asia at the University can be traced back to 1936 when Herrlee Glessner Creel (1905-1994) was appointed to teach ancient Chinese language and civilization in the Department of Oriental Languages and Civilizations.  To commemorate this landmark year for East Asian Studies at the University, in conjunction with a number of other celebratory activities, a small book exhibition is on display on the Fifth Floor of the Regenstein Library. Entitled Half a Hundred: EALC’s Golden Anniversary 1966-2016, the exhibition showcases scholarly publications by ten former East Asian Studies faculty members who made significant contributions to the Department. The exhibition is curated by Edward L. Shaughnessy, the Lorraine J. and Herrlee G. Creel Distinguished Service Professor in Early Chinese Studies, with assistance from Ayako Yoshimura and Yuan Zhou of the East Asian Collection and Joseph Scott of the Special Collection Research Center of the University Library.

Exhibits Undergraduate exhibit pilot continues in Regenstein

Sana Sohail and Exhibit

Undergraduate Sana Sohail with her Spring 2016 Regenstein exhibit.

 

The undergraduate student exhibit pilot in Regenstein Library continues in Winter Quarter. The Library invites current undergraduates to submit proposals to curate a mini-exhibit focusing on a topic in the humanities or social sciences using materials found in Regenstein Library’s bookstacks.

Proposals may be submitted by individuals or small groups (including RSOs), but all group members must be undergraduates.  Exhibits are mounted a case located on the 1st floor of Regenstein Library, near the Dissertation Office.

Deadline for the Winter Quarter Exhibit:
Friday, November 18, 2016
Proposal guidelines and exhibit responsibilities

Learn more about our previous student exhibit.

For more information, contact Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach.

Advancing digital scholarship

Researchers across the University of Chicago and their collaborators around the world are engaging in a rapidly expanding range of digital research and teaching projects.  The Library has already worked with faculty members on digital projects ranging from the management of archeological information from the site of ancient Ashkelon to the search for and discovery of the Higgs boson. We would like to invite additional faculty members to think of us as partners in digital scholarship and to contact us to discuss how we can collaborate to identify, obtain, disseminate, and preserve digital data.

Brenda L. Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian (Photo by John Zich)

Brenda L. Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian (Photo by John Zich)

Earlier this year, we released Library Strategic Directions, 2016-2019: Inquiry, Innovation, and Impact [PDF].  In it, we defined five directions that will guide the library’s efforts as we continue critical commitments and assume new roles that are vital to research, innovation, and learning at UChicago.  One of those directions focuses on advancing digital scholarship.  The Library is committed to increasing the scholarly impact of the University by building robust services and technology infrastructures to support emerging modes of research, innovation, and scholarship.

What does that mean for faculty and students at the University of Chicago?

A hub for digital scholarship

The Library will be a hub for digital scholarship by providing faculty and students with tools and services that strengthen the impact and visibility of their research and creative endeavors.

Today’s researchers and funders are increasingly interested in transparency, accessibility, and the reproducibility of data sources.  The Library can help you to save and publicly share data in ways that meet these growing demands.  Our new digital repository service for the campus community, Knowledge@UChicago (knowledge.uchicago.edu), is our first major step in that direction.  Built in partnership with IT Services and the Research Computing Center, Knowledge@UChicago can now accept finished research products and small data sets for archiving and sharing. We are currently developing Knowledge@UChicago into a more robust system and are eager to hear from researchers to ensure that we develop functionality that meets your needs.  I encourage you to read more about Knowledge@UChicago and to contact Amy Buckland (knowledge@lib.uchicago.edu) to discuss ways that this digital repository can serve you now and in the future.

Services for the life cycle of research data

The Library will develop an array of services to support the life cycle of research data from assistance with writing a data plan to managing, sharing, and preserving data.

ATLAS cavern at CERN Large Hadron Collider

View of the ATLAS cavern taken during technical stop. ATLAS is one of two general-purpose detectors at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Librarians from UChicago and Notre Dame are collaborating with physicists to explore key issues that must be solved to preserve LHC data, software, and algorithms. (CERN-EX-1209198-02, courtesy of CERN).

The end of a digital project is not the only time librarians can assist you.  The Library is supporting faculty needs for research data management services through programs that include workshops on granting agency requirements and best practices for describing and managing research data.

The Library can be a particularly good partner for faculty involved in cross-disciplinary and inter-institutional projects. Librarians are skilled in determining how to make data interoperable, so that the data you have collected for one purpose can be reused by other researchers asking different questions or can be aggregated with colleagues’ data to reveal a larger picture.  The Library can also work with inter-institutional projects to determine sustainable long-term solutions for sharing and preserving their publications and data, engaging library partners as appropriate.

We are already working in this area.  For example, as part of the Data and Software for Open Science project, librarians from UChicago and Notre Dame are collaborating with physicists from around the world who are working with data produced by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Together, we are exploring the key issues that must be solved to provide preservation solutions not just for the high energy physics data, but also the software and algorithms associated with that data.

Elisabeth Long and colleagues (digitalscholarship@lib.uchicago.edu) can consult with you as you begin to write a data management plan or at various stages of your research as you consider sustainable data management practices, inter-operability, and long-term access and preservation.

Advancing open scholarship

The Library will take a leadership role in advancing open scholarship at the University by supporting and promoting open access, open data, open educational resources, and other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment.

In addition to developing Knowledge@UChicago to support sharing of UChicago research, the Library has long supported open scholarship by digitizing items in our collections and making them freely available online.  The recently completed Goodspeed Manuscript project is one of many examples.  We also collaborate with libraries around the world on open access projects such as the South Asia Materials Project’s Open Archives Initiative.

If you are interested in making your research or course materials openly available, starting an open access journal, or working with the Library to make resources openly available, please contact Amy Buckland (open@lib.uchicago.edu).

Looking to the future

In the coming years, the Library seeks to make its digital scholarship services increasingly robust, ensuring students and faculty have access to spaces, technologies, and consultation services that support their exploration of new methodologies, analysis of complex data, and sharing of their research and creative endeavors through new publishing models.

There are many ways we can pursue this goal.  I look forward to learning more about how we can collaborate with you on digital scholarship.

 

An online trove of Biblical manuscripts

The digitization of the Goodspeed Manuscript Collection

An extraordinary collection of 68 New Testament and other Biblical manuscripts dating from the fourth to the twentieth centuries has been digitized and made available for study online. This fall, the University of Chicago Library celebrates the completion of a website (goodspeed.lib.uchicago.edu) featuring digital facsimiles of rare and delicate Greek, Syriac, Ethiopic, Armenian, Arabic, and Latin manuscripts from the Edgar J. Goodspeed Manuscript Collection in the Special Collections Research Center.  This premier collection holds great artistic, historical, and textual significance for scholars.

Eusebius of Caesarea, letter to Carpianus

Goodspeed Manuscript Collection, gms-1017-007, Eusebius of Caesarea, letter to Carpianus. Gospels in Armenian. (Aleppo Gospels). Aleppo, Syria (Berea), 1624.

The inspiration for the digitization project came from faculty working in a range of disciplines from religious studies to art history and classics.  All had an interest in bringing digitized images of manuscripts into the classroom and onto the laptops of students and faculty.  An initial grant from the University of Chicago Provost’s Program for Academic Technology Innovation and an award from the Institute of Museum and Library Services National Leadership Grants for Libraries helped to fund the early years of the project.

Completion of the digitization project was the result of a successful collaboration across Library units including the Digital Library Development Center, Special Collections Research Center, Preservation Department, and Cataloging Department.  Specialists in the Library overcame numerous challenges over the course of the digitization process.  For example, many of the manuscripts are bound in vellum or leather with parchment text pages that are proteinaceous, causing the material to cockle and stiffen over the centuries.  Others feature extraordinary illustrations—from decorative headpieces and initials to full-page images—on media that needed to be handled with the utmost care to prevent flaking or crumbling.

The faithfully photographed works are represented online by high-resolution 24-bit color images that researchers can view in tremendous detail using the zooming capability of the web interface. In addition, Special Collections staff provided detailed metadata about each manuscript’s intellectual content together with descriptions of miniatures, watermarks, and heraldic devices.  This enables both general and advanced users of all disciplines to search and browse the online collection using a wide range of subject headings, descriptive terms, and manuscript features.

Visit goodspeed.lib.uchicago.edu to see the Goodspeed Manuscripts online.

Exhibits Alma and Donald Lach’s legacies continue in Special Collections

Alma Lach Test Kitchen

Alma Lach, photograph, ca.1980, Alma Lach Papers, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

The late Alma S. (1914-2013) and Donald F. Lach (1917-2000) were a notable Hyde Park–University of Chicago team. The couple hosted countless dinner parties, beautifully prepared by Alma, EX’38, a great chef, author, and food consultant of her time, and their home was often a gathering place for the esteemed Professor Donald Lach’s students of history.

As a culinary arts leader and a groundbreaking historian, Alma and Donald reached worldwide audiences. Thanks to the generosity of their daughter Sandra Lach Arlinghaus and her husband William C. Arlinghaus, the legacies of both Donald and Alma continue to benefit UChicago’s students and faculty, as well as scholars around the globe. The Special Collections Research Center at the University of Chicago Library has been the proud home of the Donald F. Lach Papers since 1995 and recently received the Alma Lach Papers and Alma Lach Culinary Library from Sandra and William.

Hows and Whys of French Cooking

Alma Lach. Hows and Whys of French Cooking. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974. Alma Lach Culinary Library, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Alma Lach’s Kitchen: Transforming Taste, the current Special Collections Research Center exhibition, displays items from Alma’s rich archive through January 6, 2017.  Alma blazed a path for herself in the culinary world. One of the first Americans to graduate from Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, she earned her Grand Diplôme in 1956. Upon her return to Chicago, Alma secured a position at the Chicago Sun-Times as the Food Editor, writing a weekly column on gourmet cookery until 1965. In 1955 she hosted a public television show for children, Let’s Cook. This was one of the earliest cooking shows of any kind on TV, and Alma was one of the earliest chefs to appear before the camera for a regularly broadcasted show. In 1965 Alma launched her own cooking school and was a very popular teacher; she also served as a food consultant for airlines and food companies, such as Lettuce Entertain You, and invented the Curly Dog Cutting Board. Perhaps most notably, in 1974, Alma wrote Hows and Whys of French Cooking (originally published as Cooking à la Cordon Bleu), a best seller that incorporated her knowledge of French cooking and cuisine.

Curly-Dog Cutting Board

Curly-Dog Cutting Board label, Alma Lach Papers, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Alma emerged as an important figure in the transformation of American cuisine in the latter half of the 20th century, moving American palates and kitchens away from basic, conventional cooking  to embrace new flavors, combinations, ingredients, and techniques not only from France but from around the world. She was intrigued by international cuisines as well as the accompanying social aspects. Her culinary book collection contains volumes about ethnic cuisines, including Hungarian, Chinese, Italian, Mexican, Hispanic, and Indian. Some of these cookbooks, as well as selections from her papers, are on display in the exhibition.

Sandra Arlinghaus considers the Special Collections Research Center an excellent home for the Alma Lach Papers and Alma Lach Culinary Library for several reasons. “Mom’s entire culinary career was centered in Hyde Park!” she wrote. “Of equal importance was the fact that my father’s collection was already well-cared for at the University of Chicago Library. It was nice to think that my parents could continue to be together, in perpetuity, at the site where they first met (as students living in International House) and lived most of their adult lives.”

A Child's First Cook Book.

Alma Lach. A Child’s First Cook Book. New York: Hart Publishing Co., 1950. Alma Lach Culinary Library, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Donald F. Lach, PhD’41, was professor of History at the University of Chicago from 1948 to 1988. His scholarship focused on the influence Asia had on the history and development of Europe between the 16th and 18th centuries. The extensive materials found in the Donald F. Lach Papers have been processed into a consolidated collection, and an online finding aid, an indispensable tool for accessing this important resource, has been created.

The Library is raising funds so that Alma’s culinary book collection and papers can be catalogued, processed, and preserved, and, therefore, can become discoverable by all. Both Lach collections are prime examples of archives that warrant care and discovery. Together and separately, the Lachs helped shape their disciplines. With the acquisition and processing of both the Lachs’ archives, Donald and Alma can continue to influence others.

For information about ways to support the Alma Lach Papers and Alma Lach Culinary Library, please contact Yasmin Omer, Director of Development, at 773-834-3744 or at yasminomer@uchicago.edu.

Building the Library’s general collections

Since the University’s founding, the Library’s collections have been central to the unique character of UChicago. With an astonishing 11 million volumes and counting, the University of Chicago Library’s collections are among the largest and most distinctive in North America.

Browsing bookshelves

Browsing the stacks (Photo by Bradley Busenius)

Our students and faculty rely on our resources for their research and teaching. The jewels found in our collections fuel our students’ intellectual growth and our scholarly community’s groundbreaking insights and innovations. Our librarians expertly continue a tradition of thoughtful and informed collection building for all of the University’s disciplines, in both print and digital forms.

Consider a gift to support the continued acquisition, organization, and preservation of the Library’s general collections. Contributions of any amount are gratefully accepted and may be designated for collections generally or for an area or academic discipline of your choice. We would be pleased to recognize you for your gift or pledge of $5,000 or more with a digital bookplate displayed in the Library’s online catalog.

For more information on ways to support Library collections, please contact Yasmin Omer, Director of Development, at (773) 834-3744 or at yasminomer@uchicago.edu.

 

The art and science of bringing Asian resources online

Scholars and students at the University of Chicago and around the world have a fundamental need for access to digital Asian resources in all disciplines.  By collaborating with librarians, faculty, computer scientists, and other colleagues at libraries and universities around the world, the University of Chicago Library is expanding the size and range of Asian digital collections that are freely available and discoverable online, while developing sophisticated new approaches to presenting and connecting materials in a variety of sonic and visual formats.

The Bodhisattva Siddhartha

The Bodhisattva Siddhartha (Sakyamuni Buddha as a Prince). From a set of relief sculptures depicting the life of the Buddha at the Royal Bhutanese Monastery, Bodhgaya, India. 20th century. Photo by Eric Huntington (PhD’13), 2007.

Metadata for Huntington Photographic Archive of Buddhist and Asian Art

The University of Chicago has been awarded a $50,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation to improve the metadata for the John C. and Susan L. Huntington Photographic Archive of Buddhist and Asian Art currently at The Ohio State University. Our Library is collaborating with the Huntingtons to augment and improve access to the metadata for more than 27,500 photographs of the art of China, Korea, and Japan, as well as Thailand, Myanmar (Burma), and Indonesia for improved scholarly and public understanding of Asia from ancient to modern times.

The Huntington Archive represents the efforts of 45 years of field documentation photography by John and Susan Huntington, who visited sites in remote regions of Asia, photographing many works of art that had never been published. Since the time many of these photos were taken, in far too many cases, the works of art have since been lost through theft or have been destroyed through natural and man-made disasters. The photos comprise one of the most important sources of information about these works.

Sonic and Visual South Asia in Space and Time

Continuing work that first began with a grant from the Neubauer Family Collegium for Culture and Society in 2013, this summer, Laura Ring, Assistant Southern Asia Librarian, and I collaborated with faculty including Philip Bohlman, Kaley Mason, and Anna Lise Seastrand to lead a workshop in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on philosophical and practical considerations with metadata titled Sonic and Visual South Asia in Space and Time—Connecting Objects, Texts, People and Places.

Participants included ethnomusicologists, art historians, leaders of cultural heritage institutions, social historians, archeologists, media and industry experts, computational scientists, archivists, and librarians.  Our intention is to investigate over several years how the methods of science might elucidate and facilitate the humanistic understanding of the resources upon which we focus.

SAMP Open Archives Initiative

The South Asia Materials Project’s (SAMP’s) Open Archives Initiative, launched in April, is creating and maintaining a collection of open access materials for the study of South Asia.  Subject specialists focused on the South Asian subcontinent from university libraries across the U.S. and South Asia have begun to work together to set priorities for digitization of resources on South Asia in every discipline from the humanities to the sciences. Among the intended candidates for digitization are official publications from colonial British India, 19th– and 20th-century serials, newspapers and monographs, and manuscript collections such as the Muslim League papers and the Indian National Congress papers and official correspondence.

People Apply for the Library Student Advisory Group

Mansueto Library at sunset

Mansueto Library (Photo by Tom Rossiter)

Applications due October 23, 2016.

The Library Student Advisory Group serves as a formal channel of communication between students and the Library administration. The group assists in making specific recommendations to improve the Library and considers proposals for future changes in services. The Library Student Advisory Group meets two times a quarter and representatives serve two-year terms.

We are looking for student representatives from the College (Class of 2020) and from each of the Graduate Divisions and Professional Schools.

Please complete our online application by October 23, 2016.

For more information about the Library Student Advisory Group, or the application process, please contact:

Rebecca Starkey
Librarian for College Instruction & Outreach
773-702-4484
rstarkey@uchicago.edu