Regenstein A Level closed June 13 to Sept. 9 to create a collaborative learning center

Work continues this summer on a three-phase project to transform the Regenstein A Level Reading Room into an inviting and attractive collaborative learning center where students, faculty, academic technologists, and librarians can interact. Library and IT Services staff have worked with Woodhouse Tinucci Architects to create a design that will transform the floor into a vibrant laboratory of interactive learning.

From June 13 until September 9, the A Level Reading Room will be closed for phase two renovations. At the center of the floor, a broad, open area will be created, where groups can work at whiteboard panels suspended from the ceiling. Around this central zone, 10 new collaboration nooks lined with whiteboards will be built to allow four to six people to work together comfortably. Video monitors will be available in some nooks.

Last fall, during the first phase of the project, a 72-foot glass wall was installed, bringing daylight deep inside the room and providing a view of the Jean Block Garden. This summer, a new terrazzo floor and café tables will be added along the glass.

An easy-to-operate “one button” video production studio will also be added this summer, enabling students to create video essays and rehearse presentations.

In the final phase of the project, tentatively planned for summer 2017, contractors will create a 36-person active learning classroom and a technology zone, including studio space for creating web tutorials, producing webinars, and delivering online instruction.

During construction, crews will be working weekdays until approximately 4 p.m. The Library apologizes for the noise and inconvenience caused by this work.

A Level rendering

A Level rendering (courtesy of Woodhouse Tinucci)

Alert Extended Library hours June 3 – 5

To support students preparing for finals, Crerar, Mansueto and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week.

Mansueto will be open Friday, June 4 and Saturday, June 5 until 12:45 a.m. Crerar and Regenstein will be open these days until 1:00 a.m.

The Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will be open 24 hours until the end of finals on Friday, June 10.

For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

The Art and Adventuresome Life of Cyrus LeRoy Baldridge, PhB 1911

Saturday, June 4, 2016
11 a.m. – 12 noon
Special Collections Research Center Classroom
The Joseph Regenstein Library
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

At this discussion, Jay Mulberry, AB’63, looks toward a summer Special Collections Research Center exhibition he will co-curate on the Art of Cyrus LeRoy Baldridge. Many of Baldridge’s fine book illustrations from World War I, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East are housed in the Smart Museum.

Summer research tips

Whether you are on campus or away from Chicago, the University of Chicago Library provides many resources and services available to help support your research during the summer.

Access to Online Resources
The Library’s electronic resources (including ebooks and ejournals) may be accessed no matter where you are located this summer. Learn how to connect to our online resources from off-campus.

Finding the Best Research Tools
Library Guides, many created by subject librarians, provide guidance on how to locate the best resources for a particular field or major. The Library also provides help guides on finding specific types of sources, such as newspapers or data.

Scan and Deliver
Do you need to read an article or essay in a book that is not available online? Use our Scan and Deliver service to request a copy be sent to you via e-mail.

Photo of a Librarian

Librarians are available during the summer to help you–in person or remotely via our Ask a Librarian service. Photo by Jason Smith.

Reciprocal Borrowing Agreements
The Library has reciprocal borrowing agreements with several academic libraries which allow UChicago students and faculty to borrow books directly from their collections. These include libraries in Borrow Direct Plus, as well as several Chicago-area institutions, including Northwestern.

Visiting Other Libraries
If you need to visit libraries and archives outside our reciprocal agreements, view our guide to doing research at other libraries before your visit. You’ll find tips on how to access different institutions, and strategies for identifying relevant collections.

Learn About Citation Managers
Summer is an ideal time to learn how citation managers can ease your research process.  Use citation managers such as Zotero or EndNote to organize your research and create footnotes and bibliographies automatically for your paper.  View our online tutorial for Zotero or guides to learn more about these tools.

Ask a Librarian/Reference Services
Librarians are on hand throughout the summer to help you with your research. Contact them directly via our Ask a Librarian service.  Or, if you are staying in Chicago, this may be a good time to schedule a consultation with a librarian who can suggest sources and research strategies for your project.

Graduating? Services and Tools to Support Your Research
Alumni can continue to visit and use our campus libraries if they live in the Chicago area. The Library and Alumni Association provide off-campus access to select research databases for alumni. For additional resources, the Library has a guide listing free online research tools that are available to anyone.

Memorial Day: Eckhart and SSA libraries closed, other campus libraries remain open

On Monday, May 30, Eckhart and SSA libraries will be closed for the Memorial Day holiday.

Crerar, D’Angelo Law, Mansueto, and Regenstein libraries will be open during their regular building hours. The All-Night Study Space on the 1st Floor of Regenstein will also remain open.

Jewish Studies Research Resources: workshop

When: Friday, May 20, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room A-11
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: A lunch hour session for graduate students with Anne Knafl, Religion & Philosophy Bibliographer, about Library resources for Jewish Studies research. Time for Q&A afterwards until 2pm…ask about anything Jewish Studies related, from computer software to journal subscriptions to special collections Can’t make it this time? There will be another session in Fall 2016. Or drop Anne an email (aknafl@uchicago.edu) and she’s happy to meet with you individually! Coffee courtesy of CCJS. BYO lunch.
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Graduate Students, Workshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Exhibits Regenstein opens new undergraduate student exhibit

Poster for Curated Mysticism Exhibit

Poster image from Chaucer, Geoffrey, Walter W. (Walter William) Skeat, and al-Miṡrī Mā Shā’ Allas. A Treatise On the Astrolabe. London: Pub. for the Early English Text Society, by N. Trübner & Co., 1872, page xcix.

Visit our new undergraduate student exhibit, “Curated Mysticism: Visual Representations of the Cosmos and Consciousness”.  The exhibit is located in the alcove outside the Dissertation Office on the 1st floor of Regenstein Library (near ExLibris) through July 31.

“Curated Mysticism” is the first in our pilot undergraduate student exhibit program. The program supports student-curated “mini-exhibits”, focusing on a topic in the humanities or social sciences, highlighting materials found in Regenstein’s collections.

This quarter’s exhibit is curated by Sana Shohail, a 3rd year in The College studying neuroscience and art. She is interested in how sensory diversity, material culture, and memory interact with the development of self-awareness, as well as the underlying therapeutic mechanisms of art. In speaking about the exhibit, Sana notes: “The visually-rich traditions and philosophies explored in this exhibit were all intended to enlighten the mind about ourselves and the world around us. The question remains about how these embodied practices, both deeply visual and physical experiences, reflect specific perceptions and impact our well-being.”  Her exhibit abstract describes this is more detail:

Humans have had a long history of interpreting the ‘symbols’ around them, from divining the future through the arrangement of stars in the night sky, to tracing out the lines of luck and life on palms, to predicting future fortunes from a stack of cards. This rich visual tradition of mysticism has trickled down to us today in the form of magazine horoscopes, ‘cootie catchers’ (origami fortune tellers), appropriated evil eyes, and more recently, the outpouring of mandala colouring books. This curated set of books represents an investigation into the visual representation of mysticism and cosmology across cultures. Art, whether in the form of paintings, maps, or talismans, can reveal so much about how a culture understands the world around them and their own place within it. How is a philosophical understanding of the universe echoed in its visual representation?

Sana Sohail and Exhibit

Sana Sohail, 3rd Year Student in The College, with her Regenstein exhibit.

This question would be repeated throughout this exhibit, which is deliberately broad to bring attention to several different forms of mysticism from various cultures. Can Zen Buddhist ideas about the centre of the cosmos and the individual be found within the visually complex and colourful images of Tibetan mandalas? What is the relationship between the production of endlessly repeated designs and meditation? How is the Sufi understanding of envy and enchantment related to the mystical forms of the evil (or third) eye? What can depictions of constellations in illuminated manuscripts reveal about past beliefs in how the planets’ positions impacted daily life? How is a person’s astrological fate coded into the visual practice of palmistry or tarot card designs? These are the questions I hope students will contemplate in viewing the exhibition materials.

“Curated Mysticism” is available for viewing during regular Library hours—including whenever the All Night Study Space is open. For a list of materials used in the exhibit, visit the exhibit website.

 

Research After Graduation: workshop

When: Thursday, May 19, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Are you preparing to graduate? Leaving the University means leaving some library resources behind. This workshop will help you understand your library privileges as an alumnus, as well as introduce you to research sources outside the Reg.
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1680
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Workshops, Graduate Students, Training
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Exhibits On the 100th Anniversary of Kafka’s Metamorphosis

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Second Floor
Exhibit Dates: April 27 – June 30, 2016

Artist James Legros's image of the transformation of Gregor Samsa.

James Legros’s depiction of the transformation of Gregor Samsa.

“When Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from disturbing dreams, he found himself transformed…”

Into what sort of thing was Gregor transformed? Why? How did his family and the world react to this transformation? Some very few responses are presented from the enormous body of scholarship and artistic vizualizations that in the past 100 years, have made this story a gem of world literature.

Exhibits Benjamin Elijah Mays and the University of Chicago

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Fourth Floor
Exhibit Dates: April 19 – July 31, 2016

Benjamin Elijah Mays

Benjamin Elijah Mays in his office at Morehouse College

“We should not boast or glorify in our wisdom because we cannot choose our parents and we cannot choose the places of birth. And whether we were born rich or poor, wise or foolish, it is largely by accident, and we had little choice in the matter.” Thus spoke Dr. Benjamin Elijah Mays to an audience of 150 at Rockefeller Chapel on Sunday, December 5, 1971. In this sermon, “In What Shall We Glory?,” Mays offers his reading of Jeremiah 9:23-24 as an admonishment to turn away from glorifying in hierarchical divisions and, instead, commit oneself to kindness, justice and righteousness; not only in one’s daily existence, but played out in “our political, economic, national and international lives.”

Dr. Mays (1894-1984) was the most prominent and influential black intellectual of his time, who sought to produce Christian ministers and community leaders committed to public service, social justice, racial equality and intellectual excellence. He is best known as the mentor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Mays and King met in 1944 at the start of Mays’s 27-year service as President of Morehouse College and while King was still a teenager.

Benjamin Elijah Mays was born near Rambo (now Epworth), South Carolina in 1894 to

Hezekiah Mays and Louvenia Carter, tenant farmers who had been enslaved. He earned his Bachelor’s degree from Bates College in 1920. That same year, he was ordained a Baptist minister. Interested in pursuing graduate work in religion, Mays applied to Newton Theological Seminary but was denied admittance based on his race. In turn, he applied and was admitted to the University of Chicago, Divinity School. Mays earned his A.M (1925) and Ph.D. (1935) through the Divinity School. In his autobiography, Lord, The People Have Driven Me On, he describes his intellectual flourishing under the direction of “some of the world’s greatest scholars,” but also pervasive prejudice against blacks both at the University and in the city of Chicago.

Mays’s autobiography dedicated to Hanna Gray

A copy of Mays’s autobiography, Lord, The People Have Driven Me On, which he has dedicated to Hanna Gray, president of the University of Chicago, 1978-1993

This two-case exhibit displays materials from the University of Chicago Library’s collection by and about Benjamin Elijah Mays, with special attention to his relationship to the University. Items on display include facsimile reproductions of correspondence between Mays and members of the University administration from the archives of the Special Collections Research Center. A portrait of Dr. Mays, to honor his relationship to the Divinity School, will be unveiled on April 21, 2016, to be permanently displayed in the Common Room of Swift Hall. This exhibit is on display April 19 through July 31, 2016, in the 4th floor Reading Room of the Regenstein Library.

People Milton Watkins, Regenstein Entry Attendant, 1925–2016

A dedicated member of the University of Chicago Library staff for nearly two decades, Milton Watkins warmly greeted students, faculty, staff, alumni, and visitors at the Regenstein entry desk between 1992 and 2012. He died of multiple myeloma on April 13 at the age of 90.

Milton Watkins

Milton Watkins in front of Regenstein Library (Photo by Kiku Hibino)

Often referred to as the “Face of the Place,” Milton was the first person most people saw when entering the Joseph Regenstein Library.  He was able to make everyone who entered the Library feel welcome—students, faculty, and staff (some of whom came at exactly the same time each day), alumni, prospective students and their families, visiting scholars, and the occasional tourist who wanted to see Regenstein or Mansueto. He provided expert assistance when requested to both first-time visitors and long-time library users.

Milton began working at the University after a very full life.  He grew up at 38th and Federal on the South Side, attending Edward Hardigan Grammar School and Wendell Phillips High School.  Following graduation, he served in the U.S. Army as a radar technician and troop instructor between 1944 and 1952. After returning to Chicago, Milton wed his fiancée Mary, who survives him.  Milton worked for the American Maize Products Company for 30 years; he also worked for the United States Post Office for 27 years as a postal clerk.  It was only after these retirements that he came to the Library.

Outside of the Library, much of Milton’s time was spent sharing in the ministries of St. John Church-Baptist at 48th and Michigan, where he served for many years as a deacon.  Milton’s dedication to the service of others as a church deacon carried over to his work at the Library.  He was a wonderful listener and helpful counselor whose smile and laugh could cheer up almost anyone.

For those entering Regenstein who Milton saw every day, his cheery “How are you doing?” made the day special.  For Library staff, his big smile and his reminder that “there’s a lot to do in a big place like this” also helped to make the work day special.  His friendly presence created a welcoming environment throughout the entire Library.

In addition to his wife, Mary, Milton is survived by his son-in-law Daniel Adams, his grandchildren (Danny Adams, Sheena Adams, Quintin Adams), and his great grandchildren (Devon Adams, Jordan Davis, Danyel Adams).  Milton’s daughter and Daniel’s wife, Anita Watkins-Adams, died in 2012.

A memorial visitation will be held on Saturday, April 23 at St. John Church-Baptist, 4821 S. Michigan beginning at 10 a.m. until the 11 a.m. funeral service.

Organize It! Tools and Tricks for Managing Your Digital Documents: workshop

When: Wednesday, April 27, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Class readings, research articles, news stories, assignments….how do you keep track of it all? This workshop will give you a brief overview places to store your digital documents, as well as methods to keep it all organized. Participants will be able to see demonstrations of free cloud storage tools like Google Drive, and Box, and be introduced to key features of the tools and strategies to help you find all your stored documents with ease.
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1679
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Graduate Students, Workshops, Training
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Introduction to Zotero, Bibliography Builder: online workshop

When: Tuesday, April 19, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: Online webinar
Description: Zotero is a free bibliography builder that allows you to save citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in standard citation styles, including MLA, Chicago and APA. This workshop will introduce some of the key functions of Zotero such as: installing Zotero, adding citations to your Zotero library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Microsoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents.

This workshop is an online webinar. Click the “Register” link below to learn more and sign up.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1010
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
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Tag: Student Events, Training, Workshops, Graduate Students, Staff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Introduction to Zotero, Bibliography Builder: workshop

When: Thursday, April 14, noon –1 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Zotero is a free bibliography builder that allows you to save citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in standard citation styles, including MLA, Chicago and APA. This workshop will introduce some of the key functions of Zotero such as: installing Zotero, adding citations to your Zotero library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Microsoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents.
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1010
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Follow me on twitter Find me on facebook
Tag: Student Events, Training, Workshops, Graduate Students, Staff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

A Reading by Poet Bernadette Mayer on April 20

Bernadette Mayer, a major influence in the contemporary poetry scene for more than four decades, will read from her work at the Joseph Regenstein Library, 1100 East 57th Street, Room 122, Chicago, on April 20 from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m.

Bernadette Mayer

Bernadette Mayer (Photo by Philip Good)

Mayer is the author of more than 27 collections, including The Helens of Troy (2013), The Formal Field of Kissing (1990) and Eating The Colors of a Lineup of Words: The Early Books of Bernadette Mayer (2015), as well as countless chapbooks and artist’s books. She has received grants from The Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts and the Foundation for Contemporary Arts. She is also the recipient of the 2014 Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America.

From 1980 to 1984, Mayer served as the director of the St. Mark’s Poetry Project. She has edited and founded 0 to 9 journal and United Artists books and magazines. She has also taught at the New School for Social Research, Naropa Institute, Long Island University, and Miami University.

This reading is presented by the University of Chicago Library and the University’s Program in Poetry and Poetics.

Poetry holds a special place among the collections of the University of Chicago Library, particularly since Harriet Monroe presented it with her own poetry library, papers, and the editorial files of Poetry magazine in 1931. The collection continues to grow, with a particular focus on modern poetry from the Chicago area. Literature of significant poetry movements such as the Imagists is complemented by the works of student poets, the publications of poetry societies, and finely printed editions. At present, the Library’s modern poetry book collection comprises well over 25,000 volumes, and the collection continues to grow by 1,000 to 1,200 volumes a year.

Mother’s Room, Regenstein B51

Regenstein Room B51, located on the building’s B Level, has been renovated to create an accessible, ADA-compliant Mother’s Room for the exclusive use of nursing mothers currently affiliated with the University and visiting researchers using the Library’s collections. This single-use, private room is available for up to one hour increments.

To request use of the Mother’s Room, please contact the secretary in the Library Administration Office (Regenstein 180) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. At other times, please see the Circulation Supervisor on duty.

Recordings Collection now in Mansueto

The Recordings Collection, formerly located in Regenstein Room 360, has been relocated to the Joe and Rika Mansueto Library.

The Collection is now accessible all of the hours that Mansueto is open (107½ hours per week during the academic quarter), compared to the 36 hours per week the collection was formerly accessible in Regenstein Room 360.

In addition to providing longer service hours, the new location allows items in the collection to be requested at any time and from any place with an internet connection via the Library Catalog.  Material will be available for pick up within 15 minutes of the request during the open hours of Mansueto Circulation.  See “How do I request items from Mansueto?” for more information.

For users who wish to listen to recordings on site, one of the glass research cubicles in Mansueto has been converted into a listening station equipped with a CD player, turntable, cassette player and headphones. Users may request access to this new listening station at Mansueto Circulation.

For more information about the Recordings Collection, please contact Scott Landvatter, the Bibliographer for Music.

Library Catalog record for a pair of CDs. Click "Request from Mansueto Library" to retrieve.

Library Catalog record for a pair of CDs. Click “Request from Mansueto Library” to begin retrieval process.

Changes at Ex Libris Café

Over the March interim, three new bar-height tables, each 24 feet long, were installed in Ex Libris, the student run coffee shop located in the northeast corner of the 1st floor of Regenstein.   The new tables, with convenient access to 60 duplex power outlets, provide much-needed additional seating for café users.  They replace a number of the round three-person café tables, which have been moved to the A Level, another Regenstein meal zone, adjacent to the new glass wall.

KI Apply café stoolsEx Libris cafe logo are on order and are expected by the close of April; they will replace the temporary stools being used at the bar-height tables.

Another change in the café this quarter is a new beverage on the menu – cold nitrous infused coffee on tap.

Lastly, for those wondering whether there are now fewer sofas in the café, rest assured that the same number of sofas remain; they have just been rearranged.

EndNote Online or Zotero? Selecting the Best Citation Manager: workshop

When: Friday, April 8, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Citation managers are powerful, time-saving tools that help you manage your research. They can also help you format your papers in MS Word by creating bibliographies, citations, and footnotes automatically in the style you choose, such as APA or Chicago.

This workshop will compare how EndNote Online and Zotero – two popular citation managers – allow you to save, share, and cite information. In order to provide a side-by-side comparison of tools, the format of this workshop is demonstration.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1455
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Workshops, Graduate Students, Staff, Training
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Dissertation Procedures for Students: workshop

When: Thursday, April 7, 1 p.m. – 2 p.m.
Wednesday, April 13, 4 p.m. – 5 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Are you a Ph.D. student planning to graduate in Spring 2016? June 2016 doctoral candidates will use a web-based interface for online submission, review, and publication of dissertations. In this session, we will review the procedures for submitting your dissertation electronically. Please feel free to bring your questions to the session. If you would like to review the ETD interface, visit: http://www.etdadmin.com/uchicago
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=731
Contact: Dissertation Office
(773) 702-7404
Tag: Workshops, Meetings, Graduate Students, Training
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Library partners with CCT & IT Services on workshop series for instructors

The University of Chicago Library, Chicago Center for Teaching, and Academic and Scholarly Technology Services are partnering on a workshop series for graduate students and instructors on improving students’ information literacy skills.

Ruining Google and Wikipedia: Teaching Strategies That Help Students Progress from Knowledge Consumers to Knowledge Producers

In the current age of often unlimited access to information it is important for students, particularly those introductory courses, to learn how to engage with physical and online information ethically, critically, and effectively. This series of three workshops will address pedagogical approaches and considerations that can help students obtain these skills. Each workshop can be taken alone, but we encourage participation in the entire series.

Specifically, each workshop will allow instructors to reflect on the skills students need to read and consume high quality information and build information literacy, to value information and distinguish between their own work and existing work as part of academic integrity, and to engage with information in the age of digital media. Instructors will leave with assignments, resources and strategies that they can use in their classroom.

Feel free to bring your lunch. Dessert will be served.

Session 1: Building Student Information Literacy Skills Through Assignments
April 7, 12:00-1:30pm
CCT Classroom, Wieboldt 310 D/E
Register

Co-facilitated by Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction & Outreach and Deb Werner, Librarian for Science Instruction & Outreach and Biomedical Reference Librarian

You’ve created an assignment in the upcoming undergraduate course that you are teaching. Will your students know how to find the types of academic sources you expect for the assignment? If not, how do you help them obtain these skills?  While today’s students are very tech-savvy and have greater access to information than ever before, they often lack the experience needed to find, evaluate, and use scholarly resources. By the end of this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Define information literacy and explain its place in higher education
  • Identify Library services that support information literacy instruction in the classroom
  • Articulate learning outcomes that build your students’ information literacy skills for your discipline

Develop strategies for building research skills into your assignments

Session 2: Academic Integrity in the Classroom
April 14, 12:00pm-1:30pm
CCT Classroom, Wieboldt 310 D/E
Register

Co-facilitated by Joseph Lampert, CCT Associate Director and Julie Piacentine, E-Learning Librarian

How can we address academic integrity in our teaching in a way that supports student learning?  In this workshop, participants will consider this and other questions as they reflect on how to understand this central value and think about how to structure their teaching to promote an appreciation for academic integrity among their students.  During the session, participants will:

  • Discuss potential definitions of academic integrity and what they imply for one’s approach to teaching.
  • Develop strategies for addressing academic integrity in their teaching, focusing especially on structuring assignments to support proper citation of sources.
  • Learn about resources on campus that can help instructors and students promote academic integrity.

Session 3: Ruining Google & Wikipedia: Creating Critical Readers
April 21, 12:00pm-1:30pm
CCT Classroom, Wieboldt 310 D/E
Register

Co-facilitated by Cecilia Lo, Academic Technology Analyst and Kaitlin Springmier, Resident Librarian for Online Learning

Getting students to read carefully and reflectively can be a challenge. And it is often difficult to figure out how exactly students are reading and where they may have difficulty. In this workshop, participants will explore online annotation tool and how they may be used to encourage collaborative and reflective reading. We will then extend the discussion to what does it mean to engage students digitally, why, when and how to engage students digitally successfully.

This is a hands-on workshop, please bring a laptop/tablet. Equipment is available for check-out at the Techbar in Regenstein Library should you need one.

 

Dissertation Procedures for Staff: workshop

When: Wednesday, March 30, – 10 a.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Doctoral candidates use the ProQuest ETD Administrator for online submission, review, and publication of dissertations. In this session, we will review the administrator’s role in helping students file their dissertations electronically. We will also discuss open access for dissertations via the new institutional repository. New graduate program administrators as well as experienced staff are invited. Feel free to bring your questions to this information session. If you would like to review the ETD interface, please visit: http://www.etdadmin.com/uchicago
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=730
Contact: Dissertation Office
(773) 702-7404
Tag: Training, Meetings, Workshops, Staff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Alert Web printing services offline 5 p.m. Sun. to noon Tues.

Because of an upgrade to the Proven printing system, Web Printing and Add Value Online will be unavailable from 5 p.m. Sunday, March 20 through approximately noon, Tuesday, March 22.

All other printing, copying and scanning functions will remain operational during this time.  We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Ex Libris cafe spring interim hours, March 19 – 27

Beginning Saturday, March 19, the Ex Libris Café will have reduced service hours for the spring interim. Regular hours will resume Monday, March 30.

Monday – Friday 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Please note: Intermittent electrical work and furniture installation will take place in Ex Libris March 19 and March 21 – 26 from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

As always, the vending machines will remain accessible during Regenstein’s building hours.

Library spring interim hours, March 19 – 27

Beginning Saturday, March 19, the Library will have reduced building hours at all of its locations for the spring interim. Normal hours resume Monday, March 28.

Crerar Library
Sunday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.
Friday – Saturday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

D’Angelo Law Library Circulation
Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday Closed
Sunday, March 20, Closed
Sunday, March 27, noon – 9:00 p.m.

Eckhart Library
Monday – Friday noon – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Mansueto Library
Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 7:45 p.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday, March 20, 10:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday, March 27, 10:00 a.m. – 12:45 a.m.

Regenstein Library
Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sunday, March 20, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sunday, March 27, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 a.m.

Regenstein All-Night Study
Closed until March 29 at 1:00 a.m.

SSA Library
Monday – Friday 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.