Ex Libris café summer hours

Beginning June 14, the Ex Libris café in Regenstein will have reduced service hours during summer quarter. Regular hours will resume Monday, September 29.

Monday — Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Saturday — Sunday, Closed

As always, the seating area and vending machines will remain open during Regenstein’s building hours.

Library summer interim hours, June 14 – 22

Beginning Saturday, June 14, the Library will have reduced building hours at all of its locations for the summer interim. Summer quarter hours will begin Monday, June 23.

Crerar Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Friday – Sunday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

D’Angelo Law Library Circulation
Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Eckhart Library
Monday – Friday noon – 5 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Mansueto Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 7:45 p.m.
Friday 8 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday noon – 4:45 p.m.

Regenstein Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Friday  – Saturday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sunday noon – 5 p.m.

Regenstein All-Night Study
Closed until September 29 at 1 a.m.

SSA Library
Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Feature Story College book collectors win Brooker Prize

Student winners focus book collections on spoken word, manga, and European imperialism

Brooker Prize winners and committee members discuss the winning collections.

Brooker Prize winners and committee members discuss the winning collections. (Left to right) Mox Schults, Drew Synan, AB’13, G. Philip Crean IV, Kareem Mohammad, Sarah Wenzel, and Alice Schreyer.

Impressed by this year’s applications, the Committee for the T. Kimball Brooker Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting broke with tradition by honoring three outstanding University of Chicago students: fourth years Kareem Mohammad and Mox Schults, and second-year G. Philip Crean IV.

In a typical year, the Library awards two Brooker prizes: one to a fourth-year student and another to a second-year. After considering this year’s entries, the Brooker Prize Committee decided to honor two fourth-years, who each received $1000. Mox Schults won for his collection A Library for Babel(ing): Books for Reading Aloud. Driven by the power of the spoken word, Schults designed a collection of publications meant to foster human interaction by being read aloud in groups. His project, “Mouth Thought,” brings together a fluid group of people at the University and Blackstone Library to read aloud with a focus on sharing literature from as many languages and cultures as possible. Schults wrote, “I intend to cultivate this collection and to be carrying it with me the rest of my life, and to organize “Mouth Thought” events wherever I go—to engage people with words on the page, with different languages and cultures, and, above all, with each other.”

Book from Mox Schults’s winning collection

Book from Mox Schults’s winning collection

Kareem Mohammad won for his collection Works by Clamp, Four Female Manga Creators. He began collecting manga—Japanese comic books or graphic novels–14 years ago, inspired by his favorite childhood television show, only to quickly become immersed “in an established and fascinatingly complex entertainment genre abounding with classics that had pushed the limits of animation.” In describing his favorite manga, Kareem explains, “the works represented an exquisite blend of striking artwork, exotic storytelling, and robust character development that spoke to me on a deeper level than any other piece of fiction I had encountered. I found the story to be exceedingly relevant and the physical collection would ultimately serve as a symbolization of the transformation I was undergoing as a student of the University of Chicago.”

Second-year G. Philip Crean IV won $750 for his collection The Rise and Fall of European High Imperialism, focusing on the origins of both the Industrial Revolution and World War I. “I have loved my short time collecting and plan to maintain it as a life‐long endeavor,” Crean states in his application. “[M]y collection will never be complete, and my task will never be done. So long as I see a heretofore unknown work listed in a footnote, I know I will still have books to search for and enjoy.” 

This year’s Brooker Prize Committee members were Alice Schreyer, Assistant University Librarian for Humanities, Social Sciences, and Special Collections; Jennifer Scappettone, Associate Professor in the Department of English, Committee on Creative Writing, and the College; Sarah Wenzel, Bibliographer for Literatures of Europe & the Americas; and Drew Synan, AB’13, last year’s fourth-year Brooker Prize winner.

 

Stephen A. Douglas Papers available for research

Stephen A. Douglas

Stephen A. Douglas

The Stephen A. Douglas Papers are once again available for research.   The collection has been reprocessed to incorporate additional materials. Most of these additions were to Series II: Political, Series III: Personal, and Series IV: Oversize. There are also new Lincoln items within the collection. 

Excel for the Mac: Tools to Organize Data: TECHB@R workshop

When: Thursday, May 29, 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Do you need to organize and summarize data sets in Excel 2011 for the Macintosh computer? 

This 90 minute session will demonstrate how to navigate data sets, create pivot tables, use conditional formatting, and take advantage of useful data ribbon features including goal seek and data validation. After this class you should have a full set of tools to use with your own data. Please note, this class is for people who are familiar with Excel 2011.

Classes are free, but registration is required. Click the website link below for more information and to register.

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1156
Tag: FeaturedTrainingSeminarsWorkshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Library book sale, May 19 – 23 and May 28

When: May 19 – May 23 and May 28
9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room A-10 
1100 East 57th Street Chicago, IL 60637
Description:

The Library is holding a sale of more than 7,000 duplicate and discarded volumes in Regenstein Library, Room A10, accessible via the staircase in the entryway of Regenstein beginning Monday May 19. These include hardbacks, trade and scholarly paperbacks, multi-volume sets, maps and miscellaneous material.

Prices start at $20/Hardbacks, $10/paperbacks/CDs, and $5/miscellaneous materials. Prices will be reduced each successive day with all remaining items free on the final day, Wednesday May 28. 

Monday, 5/19
Hardbacks/$20 Paperbacks/CDs/$10
Miscellaneous Materials/$5

Tuesday, 5/20
Hardbacks/$10 Paperbacks/CDs/$5
Miscellaneous Materials/$3

Wednesday, 5/21
Hardbacks/$5 Paperbacks/CDs/$3
Miscellaneous Materials/$1

Thursday, 5/22
Hardbacks/$3Paperbacks/CDs/$1
Miscellaneous Materials/$.50

Friday, 5/23
Hardbacks/$1 Paperbacks/CDs/$.50
Miscellaneous Materials/$.25

Wednesday, 5/28
FREE

Contact: Scott Perry
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Extended Library hours June 6 – 8

To support students preparing for finals, Crerar, Mansueto and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours Friday, June 6 and Saturday, June 7.

Mansueto will be open all weekend until 12:45 a.m.; Crerar and Regenstein will be open until 1:00 a.m.

The Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will be open 24 hours until the end of finals on Friday, June 13.

For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Memorial Day: Eckhart and SSA libraries closed, other campus libraries remain open

On Monday, May 26, Eckhart and SSA libraries will be closed for the Memorial Day holiday.

Crerar, D’Angelo Law, Mansueto, and Regenstein libraries will be open during their regular building hours. The All-Night Study Space on the 1st Floor of Regenstein will also remain open.

Alert Mansueto closed 1:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Thursday, May 22

The Joe and Rika Mansueto Library will be closed from 1:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 22. Mansueto will re-open at 8 p.m. and remain open until its usual closing time of 12:45 a.m.

Managing Problems with Excel Models: TECHB@R workshop

When: Wednesday, May 14, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This 60-minute workshop will focus on ways to manage problems with Excel models. This workshop will be delivered at a fairly fast pace and is intended for users with some familiarity with modeling using Excel. We will look at ways to manage issues around circularity and build sensitivities and scenarios to enhance analytical output. Some functions that will be covered will include IFERROR, ISERROR, OFFSET functions and What-If-Analysis.

Please feel free to bring your laptop with Excel 2010 or 2013 installed to follow along. There may be a few laptops available to borrow from the TechBar if you do not have a laptop and would like to follow along. 

There is no fee for training, but registration is required. Seating is limited, so sign up soon! Click the link below to register.

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1478
Tag: Graduate StudentsTrainingStudent Career DevelopmentWorkshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

CNET: Writing in rare 16th-century Homer identified

Mysterious writing in rare 16th-century Homer identified
CNET – May 6, 2014

NBCNews.com: Computer engineer identifies mystery script in rare ‘Odyssey’

Not all Greek: Mystery script in rare copy of Homer’s ‘Odyssey’ solved
NBCNews.com – May 5, 2014

Feature Story Homer mystery script contest winner and results

By Alice Schreyer, Assistant University Librarian for Humanities, Social Sciences, & Special Collections and Curator of Rare Books

Daniele Metilli, an Italian computer engineer and software developer, is the prize winner of a contest to identify the script used for handwritten annotations in a rare 1504 Venice edition of Homer’s Odyssey in Greek, held by the University of Chicago Library. The contest featured a $1000 prize for the first person to identify the script, provide evidence to support the conclusion, and execute a translation of selected portions of the mysterious marginalia. Coordinated by the Library’s Special Collections Research Center, the contest was sponsored by M.C. Lang, who donated his extensive Homer collection to the University of Chicago in 2007.

Mr. Metilli is currently enrolled in a digital humanities course and aiming for a career in libraries and archives. Working with Giula Accetta, a colleague who is proficient in contemporary Italian stenography and fluent in French, Mr. Metilli identified the mystery script correctly as the system of tachygraphy invented by Jean Coulon de Thévénot in the late 18th century.

Two runners-up reached the same, correct conclusion: Vanya Visnjic, a PhD student in classics at Princeton University with an interest in cryptography was the second contestant to identify the script and provide translations. Gallagher Flinn, PhD student in linguistics at the University of Chicago, also submitted correct identification and translations.

Based on the mix of French words with the script and a legible date of April 25, 1854, Mr. Metilli and Ms. Accetta began with the assumption that it was a system of French stenography in use in the mid-19th century.

Two images showing the mystery script. One illustrates how French and shorthand notations are mixed together in the annotations, the other shows the date of April 25, 1854 written in French in the margin.

At left: Mixture of French and shorthand notations. At right: Date written in the margin.

After rejecting several 19th-century French stenographic systems, they found a chart comparing one of them to the “tachygraphie” system invented by Jean Coulon de Thévenot (1754-1813) and published in Méthode tachygraphique, ou l’art d’écrire aussi vite que la parole (1789). They found an 1819 edition revised by a professor of stenography, N. Patey, online and, armed with two contemporary French translations of the Odyssey – one published in 1842, the other in 1854-66—began their work.  

Image showing examples of stenography and tachygraphy to compare the two shorthand systems.

Excerpt from a table comparing stenography and tachygraphy.

In Thévenot’s system, inspired by the shorthand system of Tironian notes that are said to have been invented by Cicero’s scribe and used into the Middle Ages, “every consonant and vowel has a starting shape, and they combine together to form new shapes representing syllables,” Mr. Metilli writes. “The vertical alignment is especially important, as the position of a letter above or below the line, or even the length of a letter segment can change the value of the grapheme. This explains why most notes in the Odyssey shorthand are underlined, the line being key to the transcription.”

Below are two examples of the translations submitted by Mr. Metilli and Ms. Accetta, together with their explanation of the methodology they used:

    

An image of the shorthand note that turned out to read “l’enfanta”

L’enfanta

“The note seems to refer to the underlined verb τέκεν, which is on the same line and can be rendered in French as enfanta, ‘gave birth.’ We immediately recognized the last two letters of the word as the syllables fan-ta. We then identified the first syllable as an l and the second as an an, representing the French phonetic value for en. The word can thus be transcribed as l’enfanta, meaning ‘she gave birth to him.’”

An image of the note that turned out to read que recherchaient tous les princes dans les entours” together with the letter-by-letter deciphering.

“K-R-CHAI-R-CHAI-TOU-LAI-PRAIN-S-DAN-L-AN-TOU-R-S, or “que recherchaient tous les princes dans les entours”

 “This note is on the same line as the underlined Greek sentence τὴν πάντες μνώοντο περικτίται, meaning ‘whom all the neighboring princes wooed,’ Using the table provided by Patey we could identify all the shorthand letters: The sentence clearly reads ‘que recherchaient tous les princes dans les entours,’ which is an exact French translation of the Greek words. This is our best match for now and it gives us the certainty that the method we employed is correct.”

Mr. Metilli and Ms. Accetta are continuing to work on the annotations, hoping to discover some clues to the mystery of the author or an explanation for why they only exist in book 11 of the Odyssey.  Mr. Metilli is posting and updating his report on his website.

Most projects that use rare books, archives, or manuscripts from the Special Collections Research Center’s collections do not generate such worldwide excitement, but each one contributes to learning and scholarship. M.C. Lang donated his Homer collection to the University of Chicago because he wanted it to be used by students and researchers.  A group of graduate students and faculty members produced a catalogue of the collection that formed the basis for an exhibition, now available online. Their work illustrates the potential of this collection and many others in Special Collections.

As Mr. Metilli observed, social media and electronic resources made it possible for him “to identify the shorthand and translate the first fragments in a few hours on a Thursday night. If I didn’t have access to online sources such as Google Books, the Greek Word Study Tool of the Perseus Digital Library, and the French corpora of the CNRTL, I probably wouldn’t have won. What great times we live in!” It was also, for him, another confirmation of his desire to work in libraries or archives. “Where else would I find such wonderful mysteries to solve?” he wrote.

Mr. Metilli, Mr. Visnjic, and Mr. Flinn all expressed appreciation to the donor for providing the opportunity to work on such a fun puzzle.  We hope you enjoyed the puzzle, too!   

 

NBCNews.com: Mystery in 1504 edition of Homer’s “Odyssey” solved

Mystery text in 1504 copy of Homer’s ‘Odyssey’ is deciphered
NBCNews.com – April 28, 2014

Contest Closed: mystery script identified in rare edition of Homer’s Odyssey

File_2382A researcher has identified the script used for annotations in the 1504 edition of Homer’s Odyssey held by University of Chicago Library. We will announce the results in a few days.

Thanks to all the linguists, classicists, and other amateur detectives who responded to our call for assistance. We hope you enjoyed working on the puzzle.

Identify mystery text, win $1000

Example of Mystery Text

Example of Mystery Text

Calling all historians of cryptography and stenography, Sherlockians (see “The Dancing Men”), and other amateur detectives!  The collection of Homer editions in the Special Collections Research Center – the  Bibliotheca Homerica Langiana(BHL) – includes a copy of the rare 1504 edition of Homer’s Odyssey that contains, in Book 11 (narrating Odysseus’s journey into Hades) handwritten annotations in a strange and as-yet unidentified script.  This marginalia appears only in the pages of Book 11 of the Odyssey; nowhere else in the volume.  Although the donor of the BHL is suspicious that this odd script is a form of 19th-century shorthand (likely French), he acknowledges that this hypothesis remains unsupported by any evidence offered to date.

The donor of the BHL is offering a prize of $1,000 to the first person who identifies the script, provides evidence to support the conclusion, and executes a translation of selected portions of the mysterious marginalia.  In addition to the photographs in this post, the volume is available to consult in person in the Special Collections reading room.  Please visit the Special Collections website for information about requesting items to get started. The contest is open to all, regardless of University of Chicago affiliation. Please direct submissions to the contest, or questions, to Alice Schreyer, Assistant University Librarian, Humanities and Social Sciences and Rare Books Curator, or Catherine Uecker, Rare Books Librarian.

Mystery Text

Mystery Text

Homer. Odysseia. Venice: Aldus, 1504. PA4018.A2 1504 vol. 2

 

Developing Assignments that Use the Library: workshop

When: Monday, April 28, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A 
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: This course is designed for faculty, instructors, and graduate students interested in teaching.

Have you found that your students aren’t using the academic sources you expect for their assignments? Do your students seem to lack basic library research skills? In this program, University of Chicago librarians will highlight ways you can integrate library research instruction into your courses to promote the acquisition of the skills necessary to complete research assignments. We’ll demonstrate ready-to-go online tools that can be integrated into your Chalk site, and discuss the different types of in-class instruction the Library can provide. At the end of the session, we’ll work together to create some sample assignments designed to help students learn how to use the Library’s collections and online resources.

Presenters:
Julia Gardner, Head of Reader Services, The Special Collections Research Center
Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach, Regenstein Library
Debra Werner, Librarian for Science Instruction and Outreach, Crerar Library

Registration is recommended. To register, please select the website below.

Contact: Rebecca Starkey at rstarkey@uchicago.edu or 773-702-4484.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1248
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: StaffTrainingSeminarsWorkshopsGraduate Students
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

EndNote Online or Zotero? Selecting the Best Citation Manager: online workshop

When: Tuesday, April 29, 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Where: Online workshop
Description: Citation managers are powerful, time-saving tools that help you manage your research. They can also help you format your papers in MS Word by creating bibliographies, citations, and footnotes automatically in the style you choose, such as APA or Chicago.

This webinar will compare how EndNote Online and Zotero — two popular citation managers — allow you to save, share, and cite information. In order to provide a side-by-side comparison of tools, the format of this workshop is demonstration rather than hands-on training.

Registration is required. Please the event URL below to learn more and register.

Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1455
Tag: WorkshopsTrainingStaffStudent Events Calendar
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
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Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awards $194,000 grant for Chicago Collections Consortium online portal

The University of Chicago Library is pleased to announce its participation in an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded project to support the development and implementation of the Chicago Portal. The $194,000 grant was awarded to the University of Illinois Board of Trustees on behalf of the Library, which is leading the project with the Chicago Collections Consortium (CCC). The University of Chicago is a member of the CCC.

L Map

Chicago Transit Authority. “‘L’ Map of Chicago.” (1933) R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company Archive, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library

The fifteen-month grant will fund the development of CCC’s major first initiative, a freely accessible, online portal to materials documenting the rich history of Chicago. The portal paves the way for CCC to fulfill its vision of connecting and preserving Chicago-focused collections, and increasing public and scholarly interest in and study of the Chicago region’s diverse history and culture.

Mary M. Case, University Librarian and Dean of Libraries at UIC, and Chair of the CCC Board of Directors, commented, “The portal will use the power of technology and the research expertise of librarians and archivists to put information about diaries, photographs, letters, and other original materials from those who shaped Chicago’s history into our hands. We are very grateful to The Mellon Foundation for making it possible for us to tangibly connect the past and present and, in this way, promote scholarship and learning.”

“We are delighted to participate in the realization of this important project,” said Judith Nadler, Director and University Librarian at the University of Chicago and a member of the consortium’s Board and Executive Committee. “Integrating our rich UChicago-based collections with the collections of the other participating members and making them available through the Chicago Portal will advance the shared awareness and use of this enormous resource.”

A venture that will benefit knowledge-seekers beyond the academic and geographic boundaries of Chicago, the portal will provide students, scholars, researchers, and citizen-historians with unprecedented access to a free database of information held by CCC member institutions. It will provide significant scholarly and educational benefit with local, national, and international impact. “The portal will permit users to discover historical resources in ways that are nearly impossible today—resources that are not meant to be contained, but imparted to the world,” remarked Jaclyn Grahl, Executive Director of the CCC, “and it is just the beginning of this terrific collaboration of Chicago institutions working together to provide first-rate programs and services that will benefit the public in exciting new ways.”

University of Chicago Contributions

Ida B. Wells with her children

Ida B. Wells-Barnett with her children, 1909, 13.7 x 9.5 cm. Ida B. Papers, Box 10, Folder 1, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library

Aspects of Chicago’s social, cultural, literary, scientific, economic, political, and architectural history are documented in archives and manuscripts in the University of Chicago Library’s Special Collections Research Center. The records and papers of early 20th-century organizations and social reformers at UChicago include those of the Committee of Fifteen, the Anti-Saloon League and the Chicago Citizens Police Committee, Ida B. Wells, Sophonisba Breckenridge, Edith Abbott, and Marion Talbot. The archives also hold the papers of a generation of University sociologists, most notably Ernest Watson Burgess and his students, who conducted studies of Chicago neighborhoods and ethnic groups.

The Chicago Jazz Archive and the papers of Poetry: A Magazine of Verse and of Saul Bellow—all at UChicago—document the city’s role as a center for literary and musical innovation. The archive of RR Donnelley charts the growth of this printing company from its founding in 1864 as well as the Chicago business, industrial, and graphic design communities with which it was engaged. And the Archival Photographic Files Building and Grounds Series includes images of Chicago—and especially Hyde Park—architecture.

UChicago staff contributing to the development of the project include Charles Blair, Director of the Digital Library Development Center, who has been heavily involved in planning for the technical infrastructure of the portal; Daniel Meyer, Director of the Special Collections Research Center and University Archivist, and Ashley Locke, Processing Archivist in Special Collections, who serve on the Collections Committee that is identifying the UChicago resources to be included; and Elisabeth Long, Associate University Librarian for Digital Services.

About the Chicago Collections Consortium

Fate in a Pleasant Mood album cover

Sun Ra and His Myth Science Arkestra, Fate in a Pleasant Mood, Saturn SR9956-2-B, 33 1/3 rpm, 1965, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library

The CCC is a new nonprofit organization that preserves, presents, and promotes the history and culture of the Chicago region by coordinating and leveraging the collections, programs, and expertise of its member libraries, museums, and other institutions with Chicago-focused archival materials. By promoting cooperation and collaboration across Chicago’s cultural heritage community, CCC aims to develop a robust offering of collaborative programs highlighting the unique collections that document both the history and contemporary concerns of one of North America’s largest and most complex urban communities. With the Chicago Portal as its cornerstone initiative, future projects such as citywide online and physical exhibits, neighborhood guides, curricular materials, and educational programs will be developed.

Founding members of the CCC include: Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago History Museum, Chicago Public Library, Columbia College Chicago, DePaul University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Loyola University Chicago, The Newberry Library, Northwestern University, Roosevelt University, The University of Chicago, and University of Illinois at Chicago.

Excel: Everyday Tips: TECHB@R workshop

When: Friday, April 25, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This 60-minute workshop will cover a variety of topics to help participants use Excel more efficiently. Tips to be covered include conditional formatting, keyboard shortcuts, logical formulas, absolute references, charts, formatting options, and preparing for printing.

Classes are free, but registration is required. Click the website link below for more information and to register. Workshops fill up quick so sign up today!

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1503
Tag: Graduate StudentsStaffWorkshopsTrainingStudent Career Development
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Excel: Managing Worksheets and Workbooks: TECHB@R workshop

When: Friday, April 18, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This 60-minute workshop teaches students how to manage large sets of data efficiently. Topics covered include working with multiple worksheets and workbooks, advanced formatting, consolidating and outlining data, creating subtotals, protecting worksheets, and using logical, conditional, and lookup functions. .

Please feel free to bring your laptop with Excel 2010 installed to follow along.

Classes are free, but registration is required. Click the website link below for more information and to register. Seating is limited, so sign up soon!

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
More info: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1502
Tag: Graduate StudentsWorkshopsStudent Career DevelopmentTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Excel: Keyboard Shortcuts: TECHB@R workshop

When: Thursday, April 24, 2014 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This workshop is intended for beginners and intermediate users and focuses on the use of keyboard shortcuts and function keys to save time when using Microsoft Excel. We will look at ways to manipulate formulas and format data in tables without using a mouse and practise using the shortcuts on a spreadsheet.

There is no fee for training, but registration is required. Please click the Event URL below to register.

Seating is limited, so sign up soon!

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
More info: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1483
Tag: WorkshopsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Word: Mail Merge & Track Changes: TECHB@R workshop

When: Wednesday, April 23, 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Wednesday, May 14, 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Do you ever need to create a set of name tags using labels? Or to collaborate with one of more people to create one document that everyone agrees on? 

If so, this class if for you! This 90 minute hands-on class will cover mail merges and track changes in Office 2010. During this class you will learn the tips and tricks of merging letters, labels and emails; and the advantages of using track changes to collaborate with colleagues.

Classes are free, but registration is required. Click the website link below for more information and to register.

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1154
Tag: FeaturedTrainingSeminarsWorkshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Getting Started in STATA: TECHB@R workshop

When: Tuesday, April 22, 2:30 p.m. –4:00 p.m.
Monday, May 5, 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This 90 minute workshop will give you the tools to become a STATA pro. The workshop will start with an explanation of when to use STATA over other stats programs and a walk through the interface. Then, the bulk of the workshop time will be spent learning basic commands and processes. A “do file” will be provided for easy access to the commands as well as a handout for keeping track of all of them. The last part of the workshop will bring it all together, moving beyond the basics, blending the commands to create regressions and graphics. 

Be prepared for a fast paced class, some familiarity with Statistics or programming is helpful, but not necessary. 

Please feel free to bring your laptop with STATA installed to follow along. If you want to attend and follow along, but do not have STATA on your computer – then take a look the virtual lab commander is for you. If you need help setting it up, come to the Techbar at least 15 min. before the workshop and the staff can help. 

Classes are free, but registration is required. Click the website link below for more information and to register.

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1486
Tag: WorkshopsGraduate StudentsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

InDesign: Getting Started: TECHB@R workshop

When: Friday, April 18, 9:00 a.m. –10:30 a.m.
Thursday, May 8, 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This 90 minute introduction demo workshop will give you the basics InDesign skills so you can further develop and explore InDesign on your own. During the demonstration, the instructor will create a postcard while giving an overview of the interface, document setup, color and image management, and basic text and shape tools. By the end of the workshop, we’ll have a completed postcard that is ready to send to the print shop. (We’ll even discuss data merges to personalize a message if time allows.)

Please Note: This is a demonstration or BYOL (Bring Your Own Laptop) workshop. No computers are not provided. If you have a laptop with InDesign Creative Suite 5 or higher installed, feel free to bring it and follow along. (Files provided on request.) The workshop will be demonstrated using the latest version of InDesign in Adobe Creative Cloud. 

There is no fee for training, but registration is required. Please click the URL below to register.

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1088
Tag: TrainingWorkshopsGraduate Students
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Updated April 15, 2014 to include May 8 session.