D’Angelo Law Announcements

D’Angelo Winterfest 2019

We invite all students to stop by the D’Angelo Law Library’s Wilson Reading Room tomorrow from 1:00 – 4:00 pm for an afternoon of fun, games, refreshments and prizes! Visit all four stations, fill out your game card, and you will be entered into a drawing for fun library-themed prizes.

See you tomorrow!

Wright Fellowship for promising new academic law librarians

The D’Angelo Law Library at the University of Chicago is accepting applications through March 8 for the 2019 Judith M. Wright Fellowship.  Established on the occasion of Ms. Wright’s retirement as the director of the D’Angelo Law Library in 2013, the Fellowship recognizes her 40 years of service to the University of Chicago Law School and her legacy as a mentor to generations of law librarians.

Judith Wright

Judith Wright

The Wright Fellowship will develop promising new professionals in academic law librarianship by supporting a career training program at the D’Angelo Law Library. It provides $4,000 to a law school or library science student or recent graduate for a minimum of six consecutive weeks of temporary, full-time work to occur between June 10 and September 13, 2019.

The Fellowship is intended to give candidates interested in law librarianship as a career an opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge in an academic law library setting. Fellows will work in the D’Angelo Law Library under the guidance and supervision of the Law Library Director and other librarians and will learn about the overall functions, policies, and practices of the D’Angelo Law Library in both collection services and user services departments.

The primary focus of the Fellow’s work will be determined by the interests and prior experience of the Fellow and the needs of the D’Angelo Law Library. In addition to participating in the daily work of a premier academic law library, Fellows will undertake and complete a project based on the needs and capabilities of the D’Angelo Law Library.

The project for Summer 2019 will be one of the following:

  1. Chicago Unbound, the University of Chicago Law School’s institutional repository, contains the scholarship of the Law School community, providing full-text access to decades of Chicago Law faculty scholarship and the archives of many Law School journals and publications. The 2019 Wright Fellow will help develop a new Chicago Unbound collection highlighting the scholarship and service of the Law School’s deans throughout its history. The Fellow will create a space for this historical collection in Chicago Unbound and complete materials for three to five former deans. Creating the new collection will involve reviewing and selecting materials (e.g. articles, speeches, manuscripts, photographs) as well as organizing and describing the selected materials in Chicago Unbound.
  2. As part of its rare books holdings, the D’Angelo Law Library has a unique manuscript collection of portraits of justices of the United States Supreme Court and documents by and/or about them with their signatures. The manuscript materials date from the eighteenth century, beginning with the first chief justice, John Jay, and continue through Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. The collection has been digitized but not yet described or organized optimally for online research. The 2019 Wright Fellow will create a web exhibit of the United States Supreme Court Portraits and Autographs collection, including background on the justices, metadata descriptions for individual items, and references to related material.
  3. The D’Angelo Law Library has an extensive orientation and training program for University of Chicago Law School students that includes in-person tours and learning sessions, online research guides, and customized training and research support for courses and programs. The D’Angelo librarians also maintain a resource guide to the many digital tutorials created and maintained by law database vendors, including Westlaw, Lexis, Bloomberg Law and HeinOnline. The 2019 Wright Fellow will expand the learning opportunities available to UChicago law students by creating digital tutorials specific to D’Angelo services and collections.

For detailed information on eligibility, requirements, and how to apply, visit the Library website.

Get to know Connie Fleischer, Research Services Librarian

As a continuation of the D’Angelo Interview Series that we began last year, Scott Vanderlin took a moment to catch up with our Research Services Librarian, Connie Fleischer. Connie shares highlights of her career to this point at the University of Chicago, her day-to-day life, and her interests outside of law librarianship.

How long have you been at the D’Angelo Law Library? 

I began working at the D’Angelo Law Library in 1992 as the Reference/Government Documents Librarian. My title now is Research Services Librarian. Obviously, the information landscape has changed dramatically. The work I do (helping our patrons) is basically the same, just using different tools. It is an extremely exciting and interesting time to be a law librarian. While keeping up with technology is a huge challenge, I have found it fascinating to see how legal research platforms continue to evolve.

In the time you’ve worked in the law library, what is the most memorable event you’ve attended?

In general, working with our amazing students and faculty over the years has been a privilege. They go on to do remarkable things! One example is the time I was pregnant with my oldest son at the same time Michelle Obama was pregnant with Malia. I would run into Barack Obama, then a Senior Lecturer at the Law School, in the Law School Café. We would exchange pleasantries about the excitement of expecting a new baby. Now those babies are in college! I was sorry to miss his most recent visit to the Law School but am looking forward to the opening of the new Obama Presidential Library.

What activities consume most of your time as a law librarian?

In addition to staffing the reference desk, I spend considerable time working with law students (as well as students in other divisions/departments on campus) on their research (for an SRP, faculty RA, or clinic work, etc.). I serve as member of the HathiTrust User Support team, which has been an amazing opportunity to learn about digital libraries.

What new services or changes to the D’Angelo Law Library are you most excited about?

The new scanner that the Library just acquired is straight out of The Jetsons! Located in the Reserve Room, it is free to UChicago patrons. Also, I couldn’t be more excited about all of the outreach (ie. Café D’Angelo/ this newsletter) that my colleague, Scott Vanderlin,  is doing to promote the vast services/people resources that the D’Angelo Law Library has to offer.

[editor’s note: duh.]

What is your favorite aspect of working with students?

Our students are so incredibly bright and intellectually curious. I love introducing them to new resources or tools that help them do their work more efficiently

What are some of your interests outside of law libraries?

I enjoy spending time with my family, playing tennis with friends, and attending estate sales.

Cert Denied Cases Now on ProQuest Supreme Court Insight

ProQuest Supreme Court Insight now includes petitions for writ of certiorari for cert denied cases, as well as for argued cases. Dockets and petition-stage briefs are also included for these cases. Coverage is from 1975 to the2017-18 term. Petitions for cert denied cases filed in forma pauperis are not present.

Cert petitions from the Supreme Court’s current term are available from the Supreme Court web site, through their Docket Search.

Get to know Margaret Schilt, Associate Law Librarian for User Services

As a continuation of the D’Angelo Interview Series that we began last year, Scott Vanderlin took a moment to pick the brain of Margaret Schilt, Associate Law Librarian for User Services.  Margaret gives us a glimpse at her career at the University of Chicago, her day-to-day life, and her interests outside of law librarianship.

How long have you been at the D’Angelo Law Library?

I started as an intern in January 2000. In August of that year, I was lucky enough to become the Faculty Services Librarian.

In the time you’ve worked in the law library, what is the most memorable event you’ve attended?

There have been so many memorable events. President Obama’s appearance here in 2017; Geof Stone, doing a Chicago Best Ideas talk about the history of the Vietnam War and the antiwar movement in this country; and many Thursday faculty Work in Progress lunches.

What activities consume most of your time as a law librarian?

One of the best parts of my job is that it is so varied. One day I might be working on library statistics; another day advising faculty on learning management software issues; handling reference and research requests; coordinating the work of the departments I’m responsible for, teaching legal research in the Bigelow program and in the writing and research course for the L.L.M. students. Each day has its own priorities.

What are some of your interests outside of law libraries?

I am a quilter/fabric artist. The quilts I make range from small wall hangings to bed-size quilts, using traditional and modern techniques. I am also a singer – have sung in the DePaul Community Chorus for many years – and a hockey fan. I’m grateful that it’s hockey season again and hope the Hawks do better this year!

What’s the best thing you watched, listened to, and/or read recently?

The best things are two podcasts I have been listening to: The History of English, and the History of England. It’s the only way to cope with Lake Shore Drive construction! Both are obsessively detailed (I’m barely up to Chaucer after 113 episodes in History of English) and David Crowther in the History of England has a rollicking sense of humor. Making the Plantagenets very entertaining…

D’Angelo librarians honored for leadership and service in ‘Celebrating Diversity’ publication

Two D’Angelo librarians, Todd Ito and Lyonette Louis-Jacques, along with retired D’Angelo librarian Lorna Tang, have been honored for their leadership in the American Association of Law Libraries. Each was profiled in an organization publication, “Celebrating Diversity: A Legacy of Minority Leadership in the American Association of Law Libraries.”

Ito, a lecturer in law and the D’Angelo’s head of instruction and outreach, has been involved in numerous AALL committees, including as chair of the AALL Placement Committee. He also has been a leader in AALL’s regional chapter, the Chicago Association of Law Libraries (CALL) and has served on that organization’s executive board as an at-large director and as its president. Ito has also worked as the coordinator of the Illinois State Working Group for AALL’s National Inventory of Primary Legal Materials. He first became interested in working as a law librarian when he was a student reference assistant while in law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Louis-Jacques, a lecturer in law and the D’Angelo’s foreign and international law librarian, has been frequently recognized as one of the most respected foreign, comparative, and international law (FCIL) librarians in the country. In 2014, she received the Dan Wade Outstanding Service Award, which honors contributions in the FCIL area, and in 2015 she received an award for co-authoring the book International Law Legal Research. She is a prolific author and speaker, and has been active in numerous organizations, including the International Association of Law Libraries, the Chicago Association of Law Libraries, the Chinese and American Forum on Legal Information and Law Libraries, the American Society of International Law, and AALL. She served on AALL’s executive board for three years, and has been a mentor to other FCIL librarians.

Tang, the D’Angelo’s former associate law librarian for technical services, has been active in both AALL and CALL, serving on nearly two dozen committees over the past five decades. Tang, who retired in 2015, guided the D’Angelo’s technical services department through two major building renovations. She has published numerous articles on technical services, cataloguing, electronic resources acquisition, and vendor relations and received CALL’s Outstanding Lifetime Achievement in Law Librarianship Award.

“The service to our profession from these three librarians has been extraordinary,” said Sheri Lewis, director of the D’Angelo Law Library. “Involvement in associations is not only personally fulfilling but contributes to our library’s success supporting the University of Chicago community.”

The D’Angelo Law Library welcomes students

The D’Angelo Law Library would like to take this opportunity to welcome the JD class of 2021 and the LLM class of 2019, along with all of our returning 2Ls and 3Ls!  We hope that all of you will take advantage of our vast resources and knowledgeable staff. Please remember that if you ever have any questions about the Library, please ask us!

This year, the Law Library has created a 1L Success Portal that gathers together tools, such as study supplements and past exams, for each of the required courses students will take during their 1L year. These tools should aid students in their understanding of the challenging concepts that will form the bedrock of their legal education.

1. Reference librarians are here to help.

Our reference staff is knowledgeable, helpful, and accessible by email, chat, phone, and in person. Each Bigelow section also has a Reference Librarian assigned to teach legal research sessions over the course of the year. You can consider that librarian as your point of contact in the library, although all of our librarians are available to help you. We are available seven days a week through email, chat, phone, text and in person at the Reference Desk. See our Hours page for the exact hours.

2. Start with the Law Library website.

The Library website can direct you to services and tools to help you find what you need to study law and conduct legal research. Use our website to get research help, find databases, learn library policies, and keep up with the latest library and legal research news.

3. Access information using our primary discovery tools.

Library Catalog: You can search the Library Catalog for books, electronic materials, and more. The University of Chicago Library has over 7 million books and access to hundreds of thousands of electronic resources, so if you are looking for something, you should start with the catalog, and chances are we have what you are looking for.

Databases: The Library offers access to hundreds of databases covering various subjects. To locate a database to use for your research, use Database Finder, a tool that enables you to search for a particular database by name or browse by subject to identify relevant databases. The Law Library also provides a list of the main databases used for legal research.

Access to Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis, and Westlaw is restricted to Law School students, and each law student will be supplied with an individual password. You will get this password during your library orientation. If you have any questions about these resources, please do not hesitate to Ask a Law Librarian.

Research Guides: The reference librarians have created research guides on a variety of legal topics. These guides give you starting points for doing research in particular areas of law.

4. We offer a number of on demand services.

Scan & Deliver is an electronic document delivery service that enables members of the University of Chicago community to obtain scanned portions of books or journal articles from the Library’s collections. Requests should be made online, directly from the Library Catalog. Requested documents will be scanned and delivered within four business days. We will scan chapters from books or single articles from journals, provided that the chapter(s) or article does not exceed 20% of the entire book or journal issue.

We also offer a paging service for Law School students. We will retrieve uncharged Library books located in the stacks of other libraries on campus. This service is currently available to Law School students, faculty, and staff only. Materials will generally be collected within two business days and placed on hold at the Circulation Desk or delivered to the appropriate carrel. You will receive an email when your item is available for pick-up.

While searching the Library Catalog, you may also occasionally come across items with the location Mansueto or one of the two D’Angelo Law Library annexes. You can request materials from these storage collections to be delivered to the Law Library. It generally takes less than 24 hours, and you will receive an email when your item is available for pick up at the Law Library circulation desk.

University of Chicago students in other schools and programs are welcome at the D’Angelo Law Library. If you are interested in an introductory D’Angelo tour or a research consultation with a law reference librarian, please use the Ask a Law Librarian service to schedule a time with one of us.

New interface Westlaw Edge

On Monday, August 27, the University of Chicago Law School will switch over to the new Westlaw platform called Westlaw Edge. Law School users with current Westlaw accounts should be automatically switched over to the new platform and will not have to take any action to update their accounts.

What’s new and different about Westlaw Edge? Well, the first thing you’ll notice is that the home page is now blue. Other than that, it mostly functions the same way as Westlaw, but includes four major new features:

  • An enhanced version of the KeyCite citator that provides warnings that cases may no longer be good law, even though they have not been expressly overruled;
  • Litigation analytics that provide detailed docket analytics covering judges, courts, attorneys, and law firms, for both federal and state courts;
  • Statutes Compare, a tool that allows researchers to compare different versions of the same statute; and
  • WestSearch Plus, an AI-driven legal research tool that provides answers to specific legal questions.

To learn more about Westlaw Edge, you can visit the Thomson Reuters website, as well as detailed reviews from LawSites, Legaltech news, and the Dewey B Strategic blog. As always, Ask a Law Librarian if you have any questions or concerns about Westlaw Edge.

June Pachuta Farris, Bibliographer for Slavic and East European Studies, 1947-2018

June Pachuta Farris was valued and recognized by scholars and librarians throughout the world for her expertise as a bibliographer in Slavic and East European Studies and for the generosity she demonstrated throughout her decades of service to the profession.  She died on July 27 after a short illness at age 70.

June Pachuta Farris
(Photo by John Zich)

June served the University of Chicago for more than three decades, most recently holding the title of Bibliographer for Slavic and East European Studies and General Linguistics.  “We are deeply saddened by June’s passing,” said Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian at the University of Chicago.  “June was a dedicated librarian who built one of the finest Slavic and East European Studies collections in the world.  She was a wonderful colleague, both to us at Chicago and to the Slavic librarian community.”

In 2012, the Association for Women in Slavic Studies (AWSS), an affiliate of the Association for Slavic, East European & Eurasian Studies (ASEEES), recognized June with its Outstanding Achievement Award. “The entire profession has been enriched by June’s unassuming yet dedicated commitment to helping scholars wherever they work—whether formally, through her many published bibliographies on subjects as diverse as Dostoevsky and Czech and Slovak émigrés, or informally through her willingness to respond to countless queries from individuals,” the Association noted.  June was widely known for her quarterly and annual “Current Bibliography on Women and Gender in Russia and Eastern Europe,” which began appearing in the AWSS newsletter in 1999.  She also collaborated with Irina Livezeanu, Christine Worobec, and Mary Zirin, on a two-volume publication, Women and Gender in Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Eurasia: A Comprehensive Bibliography (2007), considered an invaluable resource in the field. Earlier this year, June learned that she is to be further recognized by the ASEEES at its December meeting as the 2018 recipient of the Distinguished Service Award from its Committee on Libraries and Information Resources.

June earned a BA in Russian and French from Case Western Reserve University; an MA in Russian Language and Literature from Ohio State University, writing a thesis on “The Concepts of Metaphysical Rebellion and Freedom in Dostoevsky and Camus,” and an MA in Library Science from University of Denver.  She served as Slavic Reference Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Administration at the University of Illinois, before coming to Chicago in 1986.

June spoke French, Russian, and Czech fluently and was conversant with most Slavic languages as well as Greek.  She also had a great love of musical theater and had memorized all the lyrics to a large number of shows, both old and new.

Sandra Levy, Associate Slavic Librarian, who worked closely with June for the 28 years since she was hired at Chicago in 1989, first met June even earlier, in the 1970s, when Sandra was a graduate student visiting the University of Illinois, where June was beginning her library career.  June began answering reference questions and mentoring Sandra even then.  “It’s who she was,” Sandra said.  “It wasn’t just that she was a mentor to me—she was a mentor to everyone.”  Sandra has received an outpouring of tributes from Slavic librarians who shared this experience: “June would tackle each and every reference question as if it were the most important question in the world.”

Colleagues are invited to send tributes and stories about June and her impact to junefarrismemories@lib.uchicago.edu.  These will be collected, shared with June’s family, and deposited in the University Archives.

Law Review Call for Papers: Symposium on Re-Assessing the Chicago School of Antitrust Law

The University of Chicago Law Review has announced a call for papers for the 2019 University of Chicago Law Review symposium on “Re-assessing the Chicago School of Antitrust Law,” which will take place May 10-11, 2019.

Submit your proposals to Elizabeth Nielson (enielson@uchicago.eduno later than September 30, 2018. Submissions must be exclusive, and the organizers’ decisions will be communicated no later than October 31, 2018. Travel expenses are eligible for reimbursement.

Please direct any inquiries to Elizabeth Nielson, Symposium and Reviews Editor (enielson@uchicago.edu) and to Professor Adam Chilton (adamchilton@uchicago.edu).

For more detailed information, see “CALL FOR PAPERS Symposium on Re-Assessing the Chicago School of Antitrust Law.