D’Angelo Law Announcements

Restricted access to the D’Angelo Law Library during reading period and finals

Access to the D’Angelo Law Library for non-law students will be limited from Friday, May 18 through Friday, June 1 during the Law School reading and exam periods. During this period, the library will continue to be accessible to any member of the University community who needs access to legal materials or who would like to work with one of our reference librarians. In addition, all non-law students who are taking Law School classes will have access to the library.

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library page on Access for additional information.

Exam preparation resources at the D’Angelo Law Library

The D’Angelo Law Library provides a variety of resources to help students prepare for exams.

Past exams: Perhaps most importantly, the Library provides copies of past exams given at the Law School, in addition to model student answers and memos written by the professors where available. The exams are organized by course and faculty member. Everything we have been given permission to post is available on the Library website.

Screenshot of Law Library website

Study Supplements: Another helpful resource for preparing student outlines and studying for exams are the many study supplements, including the popular Examples & Explanations and Understanding series, that are available in the Reserve Room. Our Hornbooks & Study Supplements page provides lists of the available study supplements by course name. Students also have access to the Wolters Kluwer Online Study Aids and West Academic Study Aids e-book packages. These provide online access to many of the study supplements, including Examples & Explanations, Glannon Guides, West’s Concise Hornbook Series, the Law Stories Series, and all of the Nutshells.

CALI Lessons: If you prefer something more interactive, CALI lessons might be the resource for you.  The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) provides UofC law students with access to nearly 1,000 internet-based lessons on different legal topics. Lessons range from core 1L courses (92 lessons on property, for example) to many different upper level courses. CALI lessons are often interactive and feature questions to test your knowledge as you go through them. If you have not already registered an account with CALI, you can Ask a Law Librarian to get the authorization code for the Law School.

Student Outlines: Student outlines for various courses taught at the Law School are made available by the UChicago Law Students Association (LSA) in an online outline bank on the LSA’s website. You will need to enter a password to access. If you do not have the password, Ask a Law Librarian.

Study Rooms: If you want to meet with a study group, the D’Angelo Law Library has seven study rooms that can be reserved online: two study rooms on each of the 4th, 5th and 6th floors, and one study room on the second floor. Law students may reserve use of a study room using the Law School’s room reservation system. For further assistance, see How to Reserve a Law Library Study Room.

Quiet Study Space: Quieter study spaces are available on the upper floors of the Law Library. Law School students are also able to study in any of the other libraries on campus. Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week. For a full list of library hours, see https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/using/libraries-hours/.

Lockers: Please remember to secure your belongings when you take breaks. You can check out a locker key from the Circulation Desk. Library lockers are located in the northeast corner of the second and third floors. Two types of lockers are available: laptop lockers, which are smaller and each equipped with an electrical outlet, and bookbag lockers, which are large enough to accommodate a bookbag and/or coat.

Good luck with exams!

Get to know Todd Ito, Head of Instruction and Outreach

As the year winds to a close, we thought it was time to give the people the interview they’ve been clamoring for, so here it is. You’ve seen him at the reference desk, he’s taught you how to do legal research, and now you can read all about what makes him tick.  Ladies and gentlemen–Todd Ito, Head of Instruction and Outreach.

How long have you been at the D’Angelo Law Library?

I started here back in October of 2006. I moved to Chicago from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and it snowed the day I moved in. Everyone kept asking me if I was ready for winter, to the point that it kind of freaked me out.

In the time you’ve worked in the law library, what is the most memorable event you’ve attended?

I would say the time President Obama came to the Law School, but they wouldn’t let staff come to work that day (for security reasons), which was a bummer, so I can’t say I attended that. I’m pretty sure I saw his helicopter fly by my apartment on the way to the airport later that day, though.

What activities consume most of your time as a law librarian?

As my title (Head of Instruction and Outreach) indicates, I’m primarily responsible for coordinating the instruction provided by the D’Angelo librarians through the Bigelow program, the Advanced Legal Research course I teach, and other instructional sessions like the Prepare to Practice program coming up on May 8. I also help manage the Library’s outreach to the Law School clinics, the student-edited journals, and other student organizations. Beyond that, I am the main editor for the Law Library website, so if anyone has any feedback on the website, please let us know!

What upcoming changes to the D’Angelo Law Library are you most excited about?

I heard there are some video tutorials in the works and that Thomas Drueke is going to do the narrating. That’s pretty exciting.

What are some of your interests outside of law libraries?

I’m kind of a music guy, as a fan rather than as musician, so I like to go to shows and buy records and stuff. In addition to music, I listen to lot of podcasts, read various things, and hit the occasional lecture or reading.

I’m also a sports fan, but my interest is deep rather than wide, meaning that I know a lot about UNC basketball and Everton Football Club and next to nothing about what’s currently going on with baseball, hockey, the NFL, etc. Since the U.S. failed to qualify, I’ve been trying to learn more about the Japanese national team heading into the World Cup. I’m hoping my new favorite player Tatsuya Ito (Hamburger SV) makes the squad!

What’s the best thing you watched, listened to, and/or drank recently?

I watched this amazing Japanese movie called Kapone ōi ni naku (translated into English as Capone Cries in his Sleep or Capone Cries a Lot) at Doc Films back in March. It’s directed by Seijun Suzuki, the maverick director probably best known for the 1967 yakuza film Branded to Kill. To use some American reference points, it’s like a bizarre cross between Harmony Korine and Quentin Tarantino (two filmmakers he influenced), if you can imagine that. It’s a delightfully odd movie, but also has some profound things to say about race, gender, immigration, music, and art.

I’ve been listening to a lot of Fly Anakin and Koncept Jack$on, two rappers from Richmond, VA, which is close-ish to where I grew up. You could call it throwback 90s hip-hop, but I think they have a unique sound that takes it well beyond mere revivalism. One of my other favorite recent discoveries is this Brazilian group Metá Metá, which iTunes classifies as Alternative, Jazz, or Afro Punk, none of which really captures their sound. They prefer the phrase “samba sujo” (“dirty samba”), so let’s go with that.

Drank? I was lucky enough to get some Toppling Goliath King Sue when I was in Minnesota a while back, and I think it’s the best double IPA I’ve ever had. For more everyday drinking, I’ve been really enjoying Cozmo, a pale ale from Noon Whistle Brewing, out in Lombard. At 5% ABV, it’s perfect for an after work beer or while watching sports on the weekend.

Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law access over the summer

Your law student accounts for Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law can all be used over the summer, though under different terms for each service.

Westlaw

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls:

You can use Thomson Reuters products, including Westlaw and Practical Law, over the summer for non-commercial research. You can turn to these resources to gain understanding and build confidence in your research skills, but you cannot use them in situations where you are billing a client. Examples of permissible uses for your academic password include the following:

  • Summer coursework
  • Research assistant assignments
  • Law Review or Journal research
  • Moot Court research
  • Non-Profit work
  • Clinical work
  • Externship sponsored by the school

Graduating 3Ls:

Graduating students have access to Thomson Reuters products, including Westlaw and Practical Law, for six-months after graduation. Your “Grad Elite” access gives you 60-hours of usage on these products per month to gain understanding and build confidence in your research skills. While you cannot use it in situations where you are billing a client, Thomson Reuters encourages you to use these tools to build your knowledge of the law and prepare for your bar exam. In addition, you get access to job searching databases on Westlaw and TWEN for 18-months after graduation for 1-hour a month. Extend access by logging into www.lawschool.westlaw.com or at https://lawschool.westlaw.com/authentication/gradelite.

For help or more information, contact the Law School’s Westlaw Account Manager Tami Carson at Tami.Carson@thomsonreuters.com.

Lexis

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls:

Continuing students are welcome to use their Lexis Advance ID for academic or employment purposes during May – August.

Graduating 3Ls:

Graduating students will have their Lexis Advance IDs automatically transitioned to Graduate IDs on July 1, with access through December 31, 2018. Those graduates going to work for a 501(c)(3) can apply for an ASPIRE ID for a full year of access following graduation. Qualifying graduates can apply from this site: https://www.lexisnexis.com/grad-access/

For help or more information, contact our LexisNexis Account Executive, Carter Isham at carter.isham@lexisnexis.com.

Bloomberg Law

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls:

Bloomberg Law provides unlimited and unrestricted access over the summer. There is no need to register, as your student account will remain active and available all summer.

Graduating 3Ls:

Students graduating this spring have unlimited and unrestricted access to Bloomberg Law for six months after graduation.

For help or more information, contact our Bloomberg Law Account Manager, Chrishantha Vedhanayagam at cvedhanayagam@bna.com.

Get to know Lyonette Louis-Jacques, Foreign and International Law Librarian

If you spend any amount of time in the D’Angelo Law Library, chances are good that you have been greeted by a warm smile from one of our longest-tenured librarians–Lyonette “Lyo” Louis-Jacques.  Scott Vanderlin took a moment to interview Lyo to find out about her life, career, and some of her fondest memories from her time here at UChicago.

Lyo at the Hockey Hall of Fame

How long have you been at the D’Angelo Law Library?

Since August 1992 (almost 25 years?!).

What is your subject specialty, and what activities consume most of your time as a law librarian?

I’m the specialist for civil/non-common law, comparative law, and international law questions. I also help with human rights and international relations research.

And, as a law librarian, I’m busiest helping with reference questions, which I love doing! Keep on asking me questions, y’all! 🙂

What are the biggest changes in the D’Angelo Law Library you’ve noticed over the years?

The biggest change is the space. I love how the reading room has these majestic stairs you can climb up to now. And every time I’m at the law library reference desk, I imagine the space being used to put on plays and musicals. Romeo and Juliet? (we have a balcony). Beauty and the Beast? (Belle comes down the stairs and then dances with the Beast).

In the time you’ve worked in the law library, what is the most memorable event you’ve attended?

I’ve been here a while, so a lot of memorable events! 🙂 But generally, the Law School musicals. I like seeing the students play faculty members! 🙂 Cracks me up. And most recently, the “Law School Attempts Talent” show. There was singing, dancing, instrument-playing. I think a spoken word poem? And lots of teasing and laughing. Loved it!

What are some of your interests outside of law libraries?

They’ve changed over time. I used to write crossword puzzles and collect romance and mystery novels, read a lot, and watch lots of sports (all of them, except fishing). Now I mostly read Twitter (y’all follow @jonnysun, @sheaserrno, and @lin_manuel – they are amazing!). And watch sports.  I’ve enjoyed watching March Madness recently, even though my brackets for the men’s and women’s tournaments were all busted.

What’s the best thing you read, watched, or listened to recently?

The best thing because I’m a bit of a fanatic about it is Hamilton: The Musical. I have seen it on Broadway, Chicago, San Francisco, and London. It’s like following a band… 🙂 Looking at what city I want to go see it in next. And I’m getting into other musicals – so far, I’ve seen Rent and Wicked. I am hooked! And Dear Evan Hansen is coming to Chicago in 2019!

New Harry Potter book display and research guide

Harry Potter Book Display

Display of books about the Harry Potter series. Photo by Rebecca Starkey.

Do you need a little bit of magic during reading period and finals week? Take a break from studying by visiting our new display of Harry Potter materials on the 1st floor of Regenstein (near the Dissertation Office). This one-case display highlights just a few of the items available at the University of Chicago Library about the Harry Potter series, including translations, critical studies, and parodies.

For more Potter-related materials in our collections, visit our accompanying Harry Potter and J. K. Rowling Research Guide which includes links to ebooks, reference sources, music, and more.

Remember, if you need help locating research materials on Harry Potter, J. K. Rowling, children’s literature, or just need help with your final paper, Ask a Librarian!

“Because that’s what Hermione does,’ said Ron, shrugging. ‘When in doubt, go to the library.” – Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Restricted access to the D’Angelo Law Library during reading period and finals

Access to the D’Angelo Law Library for non-law students will be limited from Monday, March 5 through Sunday, March 11 during the Law School reading and exam periods. During this period, the library will continue to be accessible to any member of the University community who needs access to legal materials or who would like to work with one of our reference librarians. In addition, all non-law students who are taking Law School classes will have access to the library.

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library page on Access for additional information.

Introducing Ian Williams, new Access Services Assistant

If you study in the library during the evening, you may have seen a new face at the circulation desk. Ian Williams joined the D’Angelo Law Library at the beginning of January as our new Access Services Assistant. Scott Vanderlin, Student Services Librarian, interviewed Ian to find out how he found his way to the library world and what keeps him busy when he’s not at work.

What were you doing prior to coming to the D’Angelo Law Library?

Prior to coming to D’Angelo, I had two part-time positions: working as a circulation clerk for Evanston Public Library and as a Library Assistant for the Oriental Institute Museum here at the University of Chicago.

What has been the biggest difference you’ve noticed between libraries you’ve previously worked at and D’Angelo?

The D’Angelo Law Library is very committed to providing a comprehensive experience for students. D’Angelo supports students in their academic careers with instruction, remote reference, and paging and ILL services, while also providing great spaces and materials for students to relax and take needed breaks from studying. Because of that, I think D’Angelo feels like the best parts of an academic library and a public library merged together.

What originally got you interested in libraries?

When I was young, my parents worked long hours and were unable to pick up my sister and me after school. The local public library was a safe place for us to work on assignments and socialize with friends. Because of that experience, I’ve always viewed libraries as an important part of strong communities and later decided that I wanted to be a part of that experience for new generations of library users.

What are some of your interests outside of work?

I enjoy exploring the city, sightseeing and finding new restaurants or interesting places to visit. I have an affinity for libraries and museums and want to see every new exhibit that I can. I also enjoy spending my time reading during my daily commutes.

What’s the best thing you read, watched, or listened to recently?

Read: A collection of short stories by Josh Weil titled The Age of Perpetual Light. Weil’s prose is so detailed, and his storytelling is so compact that each story feels like its own novel. Though all are fiction, each story made me reflect on aspects of history, society, and modern living.

Listened to: The podcast series More Perfect about interesting cases handled by the U.S. Supreme Court. Every case is fascinating and leaves me questioning whether I agree with the court’s decision and how I would have voted if I were a Supreme Court justice.

 

Politico Pro Trial

Our trial of Politico Pro has been extended. Politico Pro’s reporters cover federal government activity in these areas: Agriculture, Budget & Appropriations, Campaigns, Cybersecurity, Defence, Education, Employment & Immigration, Energy, Financial Services, Health Care, Tax, Trade, Technology, and Transportation with very timely stories and daily newsletters. The Politico Pro trial now continues through April 30, 2018.

 

Wright Fellowship for promising new academic law librarians

The D’Angelo Law Library at the University of Chicago is accepting applications through March 5 for the 2018 Judith M. Wright Fellowship.  Established on the occasion of Ms. Wright’s retirement as the director of the D’Angelo Law Library in 2013, the Fellowship recognizes her 40 years of service to the University of Chicago Law School and her legacy as a mentor to generations of law librarians.

Judith Wright

Judith Wright

The Wright Fellowship will develop promising new professionals in academic law librarianship by supporting a career training program at the D’Angelo Law Library. It provides $4,000 to a law school or library science student or recent graduate for a minimum of six consecutive weeks of temporary, full-time work to occur between June 11 and September 14, 2018.

The Fellowship is intended to give candidates interested in law librarianship as a career an opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge in an academic law library setting. Fellows will work in the D’Angelo Law Library under the guidance and supervision of the Law Library Director and other librarians and will learn about the overall functions, policies, and practices of the D’Angelo Law Library in both collection services and user services departments.

The primary focus of the Fellow’s work will be determined by the interests and prior experience of the Fellow and the needs of the D’Angelo Law Library. In addition to participating in the daily work of a premier academic law library, Fellows will undertake and complete a project based on the needs and capabilities of the D’Angelo Law Library.

The project for Summer 2018 will be one of the following:

  1. Chicago Unbound, the University of Chicago Law School’s institutional repository, contains the scholarship of the Law School community, providing full-text access to decades of Chicago Law faculty scholarship and the archives of many Law School journals and publications. The 2018 Wright Fellow will help develop a new Chicago Unbound collection highlighting the scholarship and service of the Law School’s deans throughout its history. The Fellow will create a space for this historical collection in Chicago Unbound and complete materials for three to five former deans. Creating the new collection will involve reviewing and selecting materials (e.g. articles, speeches, manuscripts, photographs) as well as organizing and describing the selected materials in Chicago Unbound.
  2. The D’Angelo Law Library has an extensive orientation and training program for University of Chicago Law School students that includes in-person tours and learning sessions, online research guides, and customized training and research support for courses and programs. The D’Angelo librarians also maintain a resource guide to the many digital tutorials created and maintained by law database vendors, including Westlaw, Lexis, Bloomberg Law and HeinOnline. The 2018 Wright Fellow will expand the learning opportunities available to UChicago law students by creating digital tutorials specific to D’Angelo services and collections.
  3. The librarians at the D’Angelo Law Library offer reference services to faculty, students, and other researchers through several channels, including in person or by phone at the reference desk, virtual assistance through email and chat, and research consultations by appointment. Over the past few years, D’Angelo patrons have increasingly made use of the virtual reference services. The 2018 Wright Fellow will conduct a review of reference inquiries submitted through D’Angelo’s virtual channels and complete a report that summarizes and analyzes these reference transactions, including recommendations for strategies to address common questions, such as revisions to D’Angelo’s online FAQ, research guides, and targeted video tutorials.

For detailed information on eligibility, requirements, and how to apply, visit the Library website.