Law Featured Resources

New interface Westlaw Edge

On Monday, August 27, the University of Chicago Law School will switch over to the new Westlaw platform called Westlaw Edge. Law School users with current Westlaw accounts should be automatically switched over to the new platform and will not have to take any action to update their accounts.

What’s new and different about Westlaw Edge? Well, the first thing you’ll notice is that the home page is now blue. Other than that, it mostly functions the same way as Westlaw, but includes four major new features:

  • An enhanced version of the KeyCite citator that provides warnings that cases may no longer be good law, even though they have not been expressly overruled;
  • Litigation analytics that provide detailed docket analytics covering judges, courts, attorneys, and law firms, for both federal and state courts;
  • Statutes Compare, a tool that allows researchers to compare different versions of the same statute; and
  • WestSearch Plus, an AI-driven legal research tool that provides answers to specific legal questions.

To learn more about Westlaw Edge, you can visit the Thomson Reuters website, as well as detailed reviews from LawSites, Legaltech news, and the Dewey B Strategic blog. As always, Ask a Law Librarian if you have any questions or concerns about Westlaw Edge.

New online resource: ProQuest Regulatory Insight

Logo for ProQuest Regulatory Insight

ProQuest Regulatory Insight organizes the regulatory histories associated with Public Laws and Executive Orders from 1936-present, compiling Federal Register (FR) articles, proposed and final rules, and comments associated with them, organized by the Public Law to which they relate, the agency making the rule, and Regulation Identifier Number (RIN), and docket numbers.

General searching is by keyword, or Public Law Number, Popular Name of the statute, Statutes at Large (Stat.) citation, U.S. Code citation, RIN, and Agency Docket numbers. A special “Search Comments” page enables searching Regulatory Insight‘s extensive archive of comments by keyword, docket, RIN, and Comment ID number, and the following fields: Agency, Country, Organization, Submitter.

A fully-indexed Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) from 1938-present is included with browse and search options.

Regulatory Insight is a new addition to the Library’s other ProQuest subscriptions – Congressional, Legislative Insight, Supreme Court Insight (1975-2016). We welcome your feedback on its usefulness for your research. Contact us and let us know what you think!

New Elgar online law databases

Cover of Elgar Encyclopedia of Law and Economics bookUniversity researchers now have access to the following new Elgar online resources via the D’Angelo Law Library’s subscription:


Campus users can also search full texts of recent handbooks, monographs, commentaries, and research reviews via the Elgaronline Law-Academic platform. Individual books can also be located via the library catalog. Great ways to find ebooks on all types of topics, including foreign, comparative, and international law.

Elgaronline complements our other law ebook collections: Oxford Scholarship Online: Law, Oxford Handbooks Online in Law, Oxford Scholarly Authorities in International Law (OSAIL), PLI Plus, SpringerLink, Recueil des cours = Collected Courses (Hague Academy of International Law), and various The Making of Modern Law and HeinOnline modules.

 

The John F. Kennedy Assassination Collection: New database from HeinOnline

HeinOnline has recently added the John F. Kennedy Assassination Collection. For those of you who have always wondered about the grassy knoll, but never had the time, energy, or resources to delve into the conspiracy theories, conflicting statements, and governmental records surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy, this collection offers all U.S. government documents relating to the assassination, including state and local law enforcement materials. The President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992 directed the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) to create the collection and provided that release of the documents begin in 2017, 25 years after the law was enacted. In October, 2017, the first set of 50,000 documents were released. 18,000 more documents were released and added to the database in April of 2018, and further documents will be added until the last set, which is scheduled to be declassified in 2021.

HeinOnline has organized and indexed the documents to make them easy for scholars to research. Approximately 58% of the documents from NARA came from the CIA, and another 37% from the FBI, according to the Data Visualization Charts that introduce the collection. HeinOnline has added to the documents a collection of books, hearings, scholarly articles, and other related works, to create a database that promises to be a rich resource for scholarship for years to come.

 

New Indian Database: SCC Online

The D’Angelo Law Library has subscribed to SCC Online. SCC Online has Indian Supreme Court and state High Court case law, pre-independence case law, central and state statutes, bills in Parliament, government policy documents, and reports of committees and commissions.

SCC Online is available to the entire University of Chicago community. Access is by IP address, but not anonymous–you must register and sign in with your uchicago email address, in the blank below the IP Access tab.

We welcome comments on SCC Online, how useful and user friendly you find it, and how it compares with our other Indian law database, Manupatra.

New Library Guide: Data Sources for Empirical Legal Research

Do you have a research hypothesis or question you’d like to test, but aren’t sure about which data to use or even where to begin looking? Thinking about including some empirical analysis in your substantial paper requirement or journal comment, but don’t know where to find the right dataset? Mastering linear regressions or the Monte Carlo method and need more sample data to crunch?

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library’s “Empirical Legal Research: Data Sources & Repositories” guide to help discover the right data for your next empirical project. This periodically-updated research guide compiles and describes a vast array of data sources (available through Library databases or on the open web) on a wide variety of legal and law-related topics, including U.S. and global economics, law enforcement and criminal justice, litigation, intellectual property, civil and criminal case filings/dispositions, bankruptcy, finance, securities filings and enforcement, and U.S. government agency data.

Check back soon for D’Angelo Law Library’s upcoming research guides, “Empirical Legal Research: Tools and Methodologies” and “Empirical Legal Research: Getting Started.

Online Examples & Explanations…and more

 

Wolters Kluwer Titles

Members of the University of Chicago academic community now have online access to many of the most popular legal study guides and exam preparation tools through the Wolters Kluwer Online Study Aid Library.

This collection includes titles such as the ever-popular Examples & Explanations series, Emanuel Law Outlines, Glannon Guides, and more!  Materials in this collection can be sorted by course, topic, or series, and are viewable as PDFs or online eBooks.  Users can also download entire titles for offline viewing.

Topic coverage ranges from core 1L courses like Torts and Contracts to upper level topics like Environmental Law and Business Organizations.

If you have any questions about access or use of the Wolters Kluwer Online Study Aid Library, feel free to stop by the reference desk or use the Ask a Law Librarian feature.

 

New database trial: Oxford International Organizations (OXIO)

We have received trial access to the following database:

Oxford International Organizations (OXIO)

This resource has been created with “the aim of providing practitioners, scholars, legal advisers, policy-makers, and observers of international relations with the most precise, holistic and up-to-date picture of the acts of international organizations possible, and with an increased understanding of the contribution of these organizations.” OXIO is available via the Oxford Public International Law platform.

Access this resource via the Database Trials page.

This trial is available through July 31, 2018.

Please direct your feedback to Lyonette Louis-Jacques.

Digitized campus publications open a century of University history and debate to researchers

The Daily Maroon, October 1, 1902 (page 1)

October 1, 1902, seemed an auspicious day to the staff of the new University of Chicago student newspaper, the Daily Maroon. Its writers took great pride in a number of historic events occurring that day: the launch of their paper; the opening of the new Law School; the start of autumn quarter, featuring the largest attendance in University history to date; and even the prospects for “a successful and satisfactory foot-ball season.”

But in addition to conveying school pride, page 1 also reports on the controversies associated with student life. The founding of the Daily Maroon as “a self-supporting student activity” rather than a university-funded entity is reported to have occurred only after extensive debates among faculty, administration, students, alumni, and the owner of a preexisting literary magazine. And an article on autumn quarter registration reports that a newly segregated registration process—with women in Cobb Hall and men in the Press Building—had become “the subject for conjectures among the students as to whether or not it was a forerunner of separate instruction.”

Sexual segregation cartoon

Sexual segregation cartoon, Cap and Gown, 1903 (page 17).

Digitized copies of the first 20 years of the Daily Maroon have recently been added to the University of Chicago Campus Publications website. Launched in April 2017, the Campus Publications site allows researchers to readily explore history from 1892 to 1995. Beginning at launch, the site provided digital access to four periodicals: Cap and Gown, the College yearbook; the University of Chicago Magazine, the official alumni publication; Quarterly Calendar, an early omnibus publication; and the University Record, its successor.

Other campus publications, such as the Maroon, are being added on an ongoing basis as digitization continues, and additional issues of the Maroon are expected to be added over the coming academic year. Because Maroon student reporters covered campus events of all kinds, even when other press did not, the Maroon’s accounts of lectures by visiting scholars, faculty academic debates, and arts performances are sometimes the only surviving historical record.

Outgoing dean hands "grand master" key to incoming dean

The cover illustration of outgoing Dean Gerhard Casper handing the “Grand Master” key to incoming Dean Geoffrey Stone was drawn by David Rothman, JD’62. The Law School Record, vol. 33, no. 1 (Spring 1987)

By visiting campub.lib.uchicago.edu, members of the UChicago community and researchers around the world can conduct a simultaneous keyword search of all of the publications on the site, using an interface built and maintained by the University of Chicago Library. As a result, researchers can sometimes rapidly access the distinct voices and perspectives of faculty, administrators, students, alumni, and guest lecturers as they engage with the vital issues of the day. One example can illustrate the point: “sex segregation”—as alluded to in the first issue of the Daily Maroon—was a vital subject in the early 20th century, and the University briefly experimented with separate instruction for first and second year male and female undergraduates. A search for the word “segregation” on the site turns up more than 100 citations for the decade 1900-09, often connected with sex segregation. Searches on other topics such as war or urban renewal uncover campus debates and involvement in topics of vital local, national, and international importance.

The Law School’s scholarship repository, Chicago Unbound at chicagounbound.uchicago.edu also serves as a home to many historical publications and other materials of interest to the campus community, alumni, and outside scholars. Developed by the D’Angelo Law Library and the Law School’s Communications Department and launched in 2014, Chicago Unbound includes PDFs of all issues of the school’s alumni magazine, The University of Chicago Law School Record, from its original publication in 1951 to 2017. The site also makes available all issues of the Law School’s Announcements back to 1903-1904. An essential resource on the Law School’s history, the Announcements includes course descriptions and information on the faculty and administration. Chicago Unbound also has video and audio recordings for three notable lecture series: the Maurice and Muriel Fulton Lectureship in Legal History, the Coase Lecture in Law and Economics, and Chicago’s Best Ideas. The D’Angelo Law Library will continue to build Chicago Unbound as a digital repository for researchers to uncover the Law School’s past.

The Law School Record, vol. 35, no. 1 (Spring 1989), cover

Chicago Unbound provides access to some of the innumerable debates that have been central to the life of the Law School throughout its history. In the Fall 1999 issue of the Law School Record, for example, Law School faculty, deans, and alumni are shown to take pride in representing opposing parties in important cases “that unsettle precedent, fire policy debate, and advance new lines of legal analysis” on subjects ranging from anti-gang loitering ordinances to bankruptcy law to the constitutionality of same-sex marriage (Fall 1999, page 8).

UChicago faculty, students, staff, and everyone interested in University of Chicago history are encouraged to visit Campus Publications and Chicago Unbound to explore other campus debates and historic moments.

Try new CCH research platform Cheetah

The Library now provides access to Cheetah, the new Wolters Kluwer platform, which replaces the old platform CCH IntelliConnect. It includes the same content as IntelliConnect, but in a modern, more intuitive user interface with improved searching and browsing capabilities. Cheetah also utilizes responsive user design, so it works equally well on desktop and mobile devices so you have access whenever you need it.

Cheetah includes primary sources and secondary sources for antitrust, corporate and securities, banking, intellectual property, and tax law, including the treatises Antitrust Law: An Analysis of Antitrust Principles and Their Application by Areeda and Hovenkamp and Securities Regulation by Loss, Seligman and Paredes; the topical reporters Federal Securities Law Reporter,Trade Regulation ReporterStandard Federal Tax Reporter, and U.S. Tax Treaties Reporter; and many other looseleaf services, treatises, practice tools, and newsletters. The focus is on the United States, but there is some international coverage, as well.

For help using Cheetah, visit Wolters Kluwer’s training site or Ask a Law Librarian for assistance.