Law Featured Resources

Digitized campus publications open a century of University history and debate to researchers

The Daily Maroon, October 1, 1902 (page 1)

October 1, 1902, seemed an auspicious day to the staff of the new University of Chicago student newspaper, the Daily Maroon. Its writers took great pride in a number of historic events occurring that day: the launch of their paper; the opening of the new Law School; the start of autumn quarter, featuring the largest attendance in University history to date; and even the prospects for “a successful and satisfactory foot-ball season.”

But in addition to conveying school pride, page 1 also reports on the controversies associated with student life. The founding of the Daily Maroon as “a self-supporting student activity” rather than a university-funded entity is reported to have occurred only after extensive debates among faculty, administration, students, alumni, and the owner of a preexisting literary magazine. And an article on autumn quarter registration reports that a newly segregated registration process—with women in Cobb Hall and men in the Press Building—had become “the subject for conjectures among the students as to whether or not it was a forerunner of separate instruction.”

Sexual segregation cartoon

Sexual segregation cartoon, Cap and Gown, 1903 (page 17).

Digitized copies of the first 20 years of the Daily Maroon have recently been added to the University of Chicago Campus Publications website. Launched in April 2017, the Campus Publications site allows researchers to readily explore history from 1892 to 1995. Beginning at launch, the site provided digital access to four periodicals: Cap and Gown, the College yearbook; the University of Chicago Magazine, the official alumni publication; Quarterly Calendar, an early omnibus publication; and the University Record, its successor.

Other campus publications, such as the Maroon, are being added on an ongoing basis as digitization continues, and additional issues of the Maroon are expected to be added over the coming academic year. Because Maroon student reporters covered campus events of all kinds, even when other press did not, the Maroon’s accounts of lectures by visiting scholars, faculty academic debates, and arts performances are sometimes the only surviving historical record.

Outgoing dean hands "grand master" key to incoming dean

The cover illustration of outgoing Dean Gerhard Casper handing the “Grand Master” key to incoming Dean Geoffrey Stone was drawn by David Rothman, JD’62. The Law School Record, vol. 33, no. 1 (Spring 1987)

By visiting campub.lib.uchicago.edu, members of the UChicago community and researchers around the world can conduct a simultaneous keyword search of all of the publications on the site, using an interface built and maintained by the University of Chicago Library. As a result, researchers can sometimes rapidly access the distinct voices and perspectives of faculty, administrators, students, alumni, and guest lecturers as they engage with the vital issues of the day. One example can illustrate the point: “sex segregation”—as alluded to in the first issue of the Daily Maroon—was a vital subject in the early 20th century, and the University briefly experimented with separate instruction for first and second year male and female undergraduates. A search for the word “segregation” on the site turns up more than 100 citations for the decade 1900-09, often connected with sex segregation. Searches on other topics such as war or urban renewal uncover campus debates and involvement in topics of vital local, national, and international importance.

The Law School’s scholarship repository, Chicago Unbound at chicagounbound.uchicago.edu also serves as a home to many historical publications and other materials of interest to the campus community, alumni, and outside scholars. Developed by the D’Angelo Law Library and the Law School’s Communications Department and launched in 2014, Chicago Unbound includes PDFs of all issues of the school’s alumni magazine, The University of Chicago Law School Record, from its original publication in 1951 to 2017. The site also makes available all issues of the Law School’s Announcements back to 1903-1904. An essential resource on the Law School’s history, the Announcements includes course descriptions and information on the faculty and administration. Chicago Unbound also has video and audio recordings for three notable lecture series: the Maurice and Muriel Fulton Lectureship in Legal History, the Coase Lecture in Law and Economics, and Chicago’s Best Ideas. The D’Angelo Law Library will continue to build Chicago Unbound as a digital repository for researchers to uncover the Law School’s past.

The Law School Record, vol. 35, no. 1 (Spring 1989), cover

Chicago Unbound provides access to some of the innumerable debates that have been central to the life of the Law School throughout its history. In the Fall 1999 issue of the Law School Record, for example, Law School faculty, deans, and alumni are shown to take pride in representing opposing parties in important cases “that unsettle precedent, fire policy debate, and advance new lines of legal analysis” on subjects ranging from anti-gang loitering ordinances to bankruptcy law to the constitutionality of same-sex marriage (Fall 1999, page 8).

UChicago faculty, students, staff, and everyone interested in University of Chicago history are encouraged to visit Campus Publications and Chicago Unbound to explore other campus debates and historic moments.

Try new CCH research platform Cheetah

The Library now provides access to Cheetah, the new Wolters Kluwer platform, which replaces the old platform CCH IntelliConnect. It includes the same content as IntelliConnect, but in a modern, more intuitive user interface with improved searching and browsing capabilities. Cheetah also utilizes responsive user design, so it works equally well on desktop and mobile devices so you have access whenever you need it.

Cheetah includes primary sources and secondary sources for antitrust, corporate and securities, banking, intellectual property, and tax law, including the treatises Antitrust Law: An Analysis of Antitrust Principles and Their Application by Areeda and Hovenkamp and Securities Regulation by Loss, Seligman and Paredes; the topical reporters Federal Securities Law Reporter,Trade Regulation ReporterStandard Federal Tax Reporter, and U.S. Tax Treaties Reporter; and many other looseleaf services, treatises, practice tools, and newsletters. The focus is on the United States, but there is some international coverage, as well.

For help using Cheetah, visit Wolters Kluwer’s training site or Ask a Law Librarian for assistance.

Ronald H. Coase Papers

The Ronald H. Coase papers are ready for use at the Special Collections Research Center. The Nobel Prize winning economist taught at the Law School from 1964 until 1982, where he edited the Journal of Law and Economics. Mr. Coase’s papers on social costs, broadcasting regulation, and the nature of the firm were fundamental to the field of Law and Economics. A detailed finding aid provides access to the papers.

 

New online resource: Global-Regulation

Global-Regulation

“Search 1,530,460 laws from 78 countries, in English. Find, compare and analyse more than 750,000 translated foreign laws.”

The Library is now subscribed to: Global-Regulation. This e-resource contains English translations of laws from many jurisdictions, and especially Canada, Australia, and European countries. You can do one Global Law Search or search individual country’s laws via the Global-Regulation Law Database Coverage Details page. The page also lists the total number of laws for each country or jurisdiction (including the European Union) and has a scope of coverage map.

Note that Global-Regulation translations are not “human-vetted,” so use with care:

“Our service is entirely run by computer algorithms…There may be inaccuracies in information due to our algorithmic extraction of information. Always consult the official source when making use of legal information.”

Global-Regulation, Inc. is partnered with Amazon, Microsoft, and Google. The vision of the Canada-based corporation with Global-Regulation is: “To make all of the world’s laws accessible to users in a way that’s as easy as a Google search.”

Check it out!

West Academic Study Aids now includes audio content

The West Academic Study Aids package, which provides online access to study supplements such as West’s Concise Hornbook Series, the Law Stories Series, and the Nutshells, now also includes audio content from the Sum & Substance Audio and Law School Legends Audio series. Users can stream each audio title and also view the transcripts.

New online resource: Global Arbitration Review (GAR)

The Library recently subscribed to Global Arbitration Review. GAR is a Law Business Research e-resource launched in 2006. It describes itself as “the leading resource on international arbitration news and community intelligence.” GAR features include, besides the Review (GAR: The International Journal of Commercial and Treaty Arbitration), daily news briefings, email alerts (@GARalerts on Twitter), annual reports, and surveys.

GAR Trump

The Global Arbitration Review database has additional content such as: magazine issues in print, digital, and mobile formats; in-depth features on international arbitration around the world; the GAR 100 guide to specialist international arbitration firms worldwide; the Guide to Regional Arbitration; practitioner know-how and insights on commercial arbitration, construction arbitration, investment treaty arbitration, litigation, and maritime & offshore arbitration; and three annual reviews: The Arbitration Review of the Americas, The Asia-Pacific Arbitration Review, and The European, Middle Eastern and African Arbitration Review.

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases now on Hein Online

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases, published by the American Bar Association, has moved to Hein Online. There are eight issues per term. The first seven issues report on oral arguments, and the eighth issue gives a roundup of the term. All published issues are available, back to the 1973 term.

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases is the best place to find the briefs of the parties, amicus briefs, and oral argument transcripts for cases from the Court’s current term. Click on the case’s docket number in the table of contents to get a list of briefs and transcripts.

preview

 

Consult our Supreme Court research guide for more sources of news and information about the Court.

 

Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law

Hein Online has just added a new library, Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law. This library brings together “all known legal materials on slavery in the United States and the English-speaking world.” This includes every state and federal statute dealing with slavery, and every reported case dealing with slavery, including cases that arose after the abolition of slavery. The library also includes hundreds of pamphlets and trials, every legal article about slavery published before 1920, and modern histories of slavery in America. Editor-in-chief Prof. Paul Finkelman wrote his dissertation about slavery at the University of Chicago, and his published collections of primary sources on slavery and the law are included in the library.

William S. Hein & Co. is making Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law available without charge. This library will be invaluable to researchers studying slavery, and to anyone researching American history in the slavery era.

Looking for foreign laws? Start with the vLex Global database

The Library subscribes to vLex Global, a database that covers legal sources in 13 languages for 132 countries. In particular, it has codes, statutes, and other legislation, case-law/jurisprudence, books, articles, and news sources for these jurisdictions:

  1. Argentina
  2. Belgium
  3. Brazil
  4. Canada
  5. Chile
  6. Colombia
  7. France
  8. India
  9. Italy
  10. Mexico
  11. Peru
  12. Portugal
  13. Spain
  14. United Kingdom
  15. United States
  16. Venezuela

In an assessment from several years ago, there was the most content in vLex Global for these countries in the following order from most strong: Spain, Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela, Portugal, Italy, the UK, Belgium, France, and the U.S. vLex also covers primary law sources for the European Union, the Andean Community, and Mercosur.

vLex is browsable by country, type of source, and searchable by keyword. The Advanced Search has a “translate search terms” option such that the user can enter a search in English and retrieve foreign language search results. Documents retrieved can be auto-translated into Arabic, Catalan, Chinese, Dutch, English, French, Galician, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Swedish.

Note that vLex Global has a 1 simultaneous user limit, so if you are not able to access it because it is in use, please try again later.

Supreme Court Sluggers at D’Angelo Law Library

From the Green Bag, creators of the Supreme Court bobblehead dolls, come the newest Supreme Court collectibles, the Supreme Court slugger “baseball” cards—and ours have been added to the Law Library collection just in time for opening day of baseball season in April. These cards, which are modeled after baseball cards, have a picture of each justice as a baseball player and are complete with their Supreme Court “player” statistics. There are currently 8 cards available, of past and present Justices of the Supreme Court. Each card has a Justice in an appropriate position on the baseball team, and features paintings by John Sargent or Alec Spangler, based on paintings in the collection of the Supreme Court. Instead of RBIs, hits and errors, the statistics include Supreme Court opinions each justice was involved in, both before and during his/her tenure on the Supreme Court, in a number of statistical categories. Each card is accompanied by a pink “Thought Bubble Gum” magnet , completing the baseball card theme.

Photo of Justice Antonin Scalia's baseball card, with thought bubble gum.

Justice Antonin Scalia, Supreme Court Slugger

Details about the statistical methods are included in an article by Law School alum, Ross Davies (JD ’97) and Craig Rust, about the first card for Chief Justice John G. Roberts, “Supreme Court Sluggers: Behind the Numbers” [PDF]. Scans of all available cards with statistics and pictures are available at the Green Bag “Sluggers: Cards & Stats” page.

Currently, the D’Angelo Law Library has 5 cards: Justices Samuel A. Alito, Abe Fortas, James Iredell, John G. Roberts, and Antonin Scalia. The cards are not sold, but made available to subscribers of the Green Bag journal, and are picked up in person by a friend of D’Angelo Law Library. Each card is cataloged separately and they can all be located in the online catalog by searching the series “Supreme Court sluggers.” The cards are stored in a baseball card collectors box in the Law Rare Book Room, along with the Supreme Court bobblehead dolls.