Feature Story Borrow Direct from the Ivies

UChicago faculty, students and staff can now borrow books and other circulating materials from the libraries of Ivy League universities and MIT through Borrow Direct

The University of Chicago Library joined the Borrow Direct partnership in June and began beta testing the service in August and September, successfully developing procedures for delivering books to UChicago users in approximately four business days—far more rapidly than items requested through traditional interlibrary loan.

Borrow Direct 150pxBorrow Direct can be used to gain rapid access to books that are either not owned by the Library or that are checked out or otherwise unavailable from the University of Chicago Library. The service provides access to more than 50 million volumes from the circulating collections of Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, MIT, Penn, Princeton, and Yale. It works very much like UBorrow, a consortial borrowing program that rapidly delivers materials from other CIC (Big Ten) libraries.

Borrow Direct materials can be kept for up to 12 weeks, unless recalled by the lending library. Standard borrowing policies—including fines and account blocks—apply to overdue Borrow Direct items, and renewals are not permitted.

Four ways to search Borrow Direct

Library users can access materials through Borrow Direct in four ways:

  1. Visit the Borrow Direct catalog directly.
  2. Use the searchbox on theLibrary homepage.
  3. Click on the “FindIt!” button from within Library resources like WorldCat and select the Borrow Direct option.
  4. In Lens, click on “Request via Borrow Direct” for checked out items.

For more detailed information visit our Borrow Direct library guide.

Why Borrow Direct?

“The Borrow Direct partnership will provide rapid and increased access to rich collections held by our peer institutions, thus helping to connect our students and scholars with the composite wealth of these collections,” said Judith Nadler, Director and University Librarian at the University of Chicago.  “At the same time, the project will provide a venue to explore future models for shared collection building that include both print and digital forms.”

Announcement of Chicago’s participation in Borrow Direct has already been well received on campus.  “Both personally and on behalf of the faculty and students of the art history department, I want to thank you and your staff for negotiating for Chicago to enter the Borrow Direct program,” Professor Christine Mehring, Chair of the Department of Art History, wrote Nadler upon reading the news. “Having used it frequently while I was a faculty member at Yale, I know colleagues and students will benefit from it greatly and daily.”

The launch of Borrow Direct at the University of Chicago is made possible by a generous gift from the Rhoades Foundation with the cooperation of Julius Lewis, AB’50, AM’54.            

Need government information?

19991116 CTY OPEN. Yes we're open sign for MXR cover.

It’s week 2 of classes and the federal government shutdown.

We would like to remind you that the D’Angelo Law Library is OPEN and ready to help you find the information you need. We are experts at tracking down alternative sources if the information or report you need is currently not online. Stop by the reference desk or contact us at Ask A Law Librarian for more information. 

As a reminder, many units of government or websites are open: 

The Federal Judiciary remains open until  October 15, 2013 when the Judiciary will reassess its situation and provide further guidance. PACER docket information is still available to law students through the Bloomberg Law dockets. 

The Supreme Court of the United States will continue to conduct its normal operations through October 11. The Court building will hear the scheduled oral arguments today, the official beginning of the Court’s Term.  A further update will be provided in the event the lapse of appropriations continues beyond October 11.  

The Library of Congress is shut down, with the exception of Legislative website THOMAS.gov and beta.congress.gov which are open and being updated.  

FDsys will continue to process and post Congressional materials only. Federal Register services on FDsys will be limited to documents that “protect life and property”. The remaining collections on FDsys will not be updated until funding is restored.

One go-to source that we librarians use is the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine which includes captured government sites

The Library also subscribes to commercial databases that provide access to government information:

For more commentary on the web regarding the shutdown, see GovTrack.us’s Legislative status during the shutdown and Sunlight Foundation’s What Happens to .gov in a Shutdown?

If you are interested in learning more about the shutdown, check out this CRS report issued September 25, 2013. 

Constitute – your new source for the world’s constitutions online!

On Monday, September 23, 2013, the Comparative Constitutions Project (directed by Tom Ginsburg (University of Chicago Law School), Zachary Elkins, and James Melton)  launched Constitute, a website that enables you to read and search 160 constitutions, and compare them across nearly 350 topics.  Constitute currently includes constitutions in force, but will eventually contain the text of all constitutions written since 1789.  The Constitute Project was developed with the support of Google Ideas, The National Science Foundation, the Indigo Trust,  IC² Institute, the Cline Center for Democracy at the University of Illinois, the University of Texas, the University of Chicago, and the Constitution Unit at University College London (check its blog announcement for more information).  Free access to foreign constitutions will facilitate comparative constitutional law research worldwide.

 

 

Constitute in the News

Check out Constitute and see how it compares with World Constitutions Illustrated and Oxford Constitutions of the World (OCW is newly created from the merger of the Constitutions of the Countries of the World, Constitutions of Dependencies and Territories, and Constitutions of the United States:  National and State online resources).

Apply for the D’Angelo Law Library Student Advisory Board

Students in Reading RoomDo you want to help shape the D’Angelo Law Library experience for you and your fellow students? If you do, consider applying for the D’Angelo Law Library Student Advisory Board. We’re looking for Law School students from all class years (including incoming 1L and LLM students) and who participate in a range of student organizations and extracurricular activities. Even if you don’t think you use the library very much, we want to hear from you, too!

The Board was started last year, and the students’ feedback led to several improvements in Library services, including the extra computer monitors in the stacks and clarified Reserve Room policies. Minutes from last year’s meetings are available on the Board’s website. The librarians look forward to receiving more valuable feedback from this year’s Board on a variety of topics, from library hours to legal research instruction in the Bigelow program to promotion of Library services like BorrowDirect and Scan & Deliver. The Board will meet approximately two times per quarter, with the meeting dates and times set once Board members are selected.

To apply, fill out the brief online application by Monday, October 14. For questions or additional information, please contact Todd Ito at tito@uchicago.edu.

Student Advisory Board Application: http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/law/using/dllboardapp

How to find Law School course syllabi in Chalk

If you’re looking for the syllabus for a Law School course in which you are not yet enrolled, you might be able to view the syllabus in Chalk.

1. Log into Chalk and look in the left frame for the Quick Links box and click the “Course Catalog” link.

chalk1

2. On the next screen, select Laws from the list of categories.

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3. Select the course in which you’re interested, and if the professor has made the syllabus available, a link should show up in the left frame. 

chalk3

D’Angelo Law Library update for returning students

The D’Angelo Law Library welcomes returning students back to the Law School! We wanted to make sure everyone was aware of some changes that took place over the summer months. First, late in Spring Quarter, the Law School Information Technology department distributed five computer monitors on several tables in the D’Angelo Law Library stacks so that students can have extra monitors to use with their laptops. There is one monitor in each of the semi-enclosed conference rooms on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Floors and two monitors on one of the tables in the northeast corner of the Fourth Floor. 

Students with PC’s should be able to plug the monitors directly into their laptops, while students with Macs can check out a VGA adapter at the Circulation Desk. This is a pilot program, and we welcome any feedback you have on the monitors.

Lexis Advance

Students logging into LexisNexis should immediately notice that Lexis has moved to a single ID system to simplify the way faculty and students access LexisNexis products. This means that Law School users now have access to LexisNexis only through the Lexis Advance platform. Users will still be able to access Lexis.com through a link in Lexis Advance (see image below). You will only need your Lexis Advance ID to use both Lexis Advance and Lexis.com. If you do not have a Lexis Advance ID, contact LexisNexis Customer Service at 800-45-LEXIS or contact the Law School’s LexisNexis Account Executive Nikki Harris at nikki.harris@lexisnexis.com.

Lexis_screenshot

No More Free Westlaw Printing

Westlaw no longer provides free printing for Law School students. Students will still be able to print from WestlawNext and Westlaw, but those pages will be routed to Law School printers and will count against the student’s print quota.

Free printing from Lexis Advance will continue for at least the next academic year. Students are also encouraged to use the foldering features in Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law to save and share documents. Another option is using Westlaw’s mobile apps, including their iPad app, which automatically sync with your Westlaw account. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to Ask a Law Librarian or contact the Law School’s Westlaw account manager Ben Segreto at ben.segreto@thomsonreuters.com.

Finally, although Westlaw stopped providing free printing, they did generously donate a new mobile device charging station for student use. It is located in the Third Floor computer lab, just to the right of the entrance, and provides charging for up to eight devices: 5 Apple (3 legacy, 2 lightning), 2 Micro (charges all Android, Blackberry, Windows phones), and 1 Mini (for older devices). Please do not leave your mobile devices unattended while they are charging.

The D’Angelo Law Library welcomes new students

DLLTower.w.FlowersThe D’Angelo Law Library welcomes the JD class of 2016 and the LLM class of 2014 this week during University of Chicago Law School orientation. The D’Angelo librarians will introduce new JD and LLM students to the Library’s resources and services in orientation meetings. Law students are encouraged to explore the online information in the Library Guide for Law Students and in the D’Angelo’s organization site on Chalk, the University’s Blackboard course system. 

University of Chicago students in other schools and programs are welcome at the D’Angelo Law Library. If you are interested in an introductory D’Angelo tour or a research consultation with a law reference librarian, please use the Ask a Law Librarian service to schedule a time with one of us. 

New Chalk module connects students to Library services

Image of Library Help Module in Chalk

Example of the new Library module for an Art History course in Chalk.

Beginning this week, all newly created Chalk courses include a module from the University of Chicago Library.  The Library Help module suggests appropriate Library research guides and librarian contacts for the course.  The new module appears on the recently redesigned course Home Page in Chalk

The guides and librarians listed in the module are automatically selected based on the department or program affiliated with the course.  Instructors and TAs may contact the Library to alter the guides and librarians listed in the module, or add a custom-designed research guide for their course. 

The Library module will only appear in courses added to Chalk after September 15th. If a course is copied from a previous quarter, the module will not appear automatically. However, instructors and TAs may add the module manually to their Chalk course.

More information is available on our Library Help Module guide.  We also welcome questions or comments about this new Chalk feature.

Users with $50 in fines to have borrowing privileges temporarily suspended

As of Friday, September 13, Library users who owe $50 or more in overdue fines and other charges will have their borrowing privileges suspended until they have resolved their outstanding fines. This $50 limit is designed to help users better manage their Library accounts and to encourage them to resolve any fine balances before they reach $100, when their ability to register for classes or obtain transcripts will be restricted.

In the past, Library users have been allowed to accumulate $99 in fines before their borrowing privileges have been suspended. To assist users in making this transition, the Library is, as a one-time measure, reducing the current balance owed for past overdue fines by 50% for fines incurred through September 12. A user who owed $50 in overdue fines on September 12, for example, will owe $25 in overdue fines on September 13.

This one-time reduction in overdue fines is intended to prevent users with $50 to $99 in overdue fines from having their borrowing privileges suspended under the new $50 limit. Lost book charges, locker fees, and other outstanding library fees other than overdue fines will not be reduced and will count toward the $50 limit on outstanding charges. 

Fines incurred on or after September 13 that raise the balance owed to $50 will cause a user’s borrowing privileges to be suspended. Users can view any outstanding fines by logging into My Account and selecting Blocks. Users who owe more than $50 can restore their borrowing privileges by paying any outstanding fines on their account.

More information about borrowing policies, including fines, is available at lib.uchicago.edu/e/using/borrow.

New database: Oxford Scholarly Authorities on International Law

You now have access to online book-length commentary on the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, ICSID, CEDAW, WTO Agreements, TRIPs, the 1951 Refugees Convention, the Convention Against Torture,  and  the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court via the D’Angelo Law Library’s newest database subscription - Oxford Scholarly Authorities on International Law

The OSAIL contains “full-text online editions of market-leading reference works and treatises published by Oxford University Press. Books  such as Oppenheim, our Oxford Handbooks in international law, and the Oxford Commentaries on International Law are made available online for the first time, fully searchable and linked by the Oxford Law Citator.”  Rosalyn Higgins’ Problems and Process:  International Law and How We Use It as well as Satow’s Diplomatic Practice (6th ed.) are also in OSAIL. 

 

Try the Investment Arbitration Reporter until the end of the year

The D’Angelo Law Library has arranged a trial of the Investment Arbitration Reporter (IAReporter) through December 31, 2013.  To try it out, click on the link below:

http://www.iareporter.com/autologin

What is the IAReporter?  The “Investment Arbitration Reporter is a news & analysis service tracking international arbitrations between foreign investors and sovereign governments…IAReporter helps a broad range of readers – including lawyers, academics and government officials – stay abreast of the latest legal developments and policy trends in investment treaty arbitration…[It offers] a window into otherwise confidential proceedings, legal pleadings, and arbitral awards arising out of investment arbitrations.”

The IAReporter is edited and published by Luke Eric Peterson.

 

 

 

New charging station in Third Floor computer lab

The Law School now has a mobile device charging station for student use, located in the Third Floor computer lab, just to the right of the entrance to the room with the computers. Generously donated by Westlaw, it provides charging for up to eight devices: 5 Apple (3 legacy, 2 lightning), 2 Micro (charges all Android, Blackberry, Windows phones), and 1 Mini (for older devices). 

Please do not leave your mobile devices unattended while they are charging.

Picture of charging station

 

Feature Story Get books from the Ivies: try Borrow Direct beta

University of Chicago faculty, students, and staff can now borrow books and other circulating materials from the libraries of Ivy League universities and MIT through Borrow Direct, which begins its beta implementation phase at UChicago on August 1. Borrow Direct will typically deliver books to UChicago users in approximately four calendar days—far more rapidly than items requested through traditional interlibrary loan.

Borrow Direct logo 200Borrow Direct can be used to gain rapid access to books that are checked out or otherwise unavailable from the University of Chicago Library. The service provides access to more than 50 million volumes from the circulating collections of Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, MIT, Penn, Princeton, and Yale. It works very much like UBorrow, the year-old consortial borrowing program that rapidly delivers materials from other CIC (Big Ten) libraries.

Borrow Direct materials can be kept for up to 12 weeks, unless recalled by the lending library. Standard borrowing policies—including fines and account blocks—apply to overdue Borrow Direct items, and renewals are not permitted.

Borrow Direct materials will typically arrive in approximately four calendar days, but a few extra days may be needed during the beta phase as we test methods for exchanging books with our Ivy League partners.

Help us test Borrow Direct

Open bookUsing Borrow Direct during the beta phase is simple:

  1. Log in to the Borrow Direct catalog with your CNet ID and password.
  2. Search for the item you want and click on the “Request” link within its record.
  3. Select your pick-up location and click on “Submit” to complete your request.

You will receive an email once the item arrives notifying you that it is available for pickup.

For more detailed information visit our Borrow Direct library guide.

Summer movies in Hyde Park

If you are on campus this summer, you have some great local options for watching movies.  The Harper Theater at 52d & Harper is showing Fruitvale Station, Turbo, The Conjuring…and The Wolverine!  (Hugh Jackman never disappoints). 

If you haven’t seen a movie at Harper Theater yet, check it out!  Here’s a review of Harper Theater from a law library staff member:  “I saw Pacific Rim (giant robots versus giant monsters) at the Harper Theater over the weekend and it was pretty fun…Harper Theater shows current movies at lower prices ($8, $6 matinee) than downtown, and has comfortable new seats.  The theater [is small], but that’s kind of nice in some ways. We often end up chatting with a lot of the people around us before the movie because everyone can hear everyone else’s conversations.”

Do you want to watch a movie outdoors?  There’s the Uncommon Nights – Movie on the Quad showing of Oblivion on July 30, 8:30 p.m., Bartlett Quad.  With free popcorn!

Midweek at The Movies/Night Out: Family Movie Night at Midway Plaisance 2013 sponsored by the University of Chicago/Chicago Park District features the following movies:  Oz the Great and Powerful (Aug. 7), Men in Black 3 (Aug. 14), The Avengers (Aug. 21).

Cover photo of Despicable Me.And there are so many choices for summer blockbuster movies in downtown theaters!  Star Trek:  Into Darkness is a must see.  Iron Man 3 with Robert Downey, Jr. is as action-packed and fun, with heart, as the first two (though the first Iron Man was the best).  I loved RED, and have high hopes for RED 2 (Bruce Willis!).  Though critics have panned The Lone Ranger, go see it for Johnny Depp’s performance (which I hear is amazing).  I’ve probably worn out the Law Library’s copy of Despicable Me because of how many times I’ve checked it out and watched it, so, not surprisingly, I’m recommending going to see Despicable Me 2…:-)  Not as good as the first one, but still entertaining.

Finally, you can always check out previous summer blockbusters, prequels, action flicks, and film noir classics in our D’Angelo Law Library DVD Collection.  If you can’t decide where to start, see TV Guide’s list of “The Best Summer Movies Ever“.  And, if you see a good movie this summer, let us know!  When it’s available on DVD, we’ll add it to our collection.

Copying and printing prices increasing Aug. 1; scanning and faxing prices not changing

The price of photocopying and printing on multifunction devices and microform stations in the University of Chicago residence halls and campus libraries—including Crerar, D’Angelo Law, Mansueto, Regenstein and SSA libraries—will increase on August 1, while prices for scanning and faxing will remain the same.  This will be the first price increase for copying and printing on Canon Unified Printing devices at the University of Chicago in four years. 

For 8.5 x 11 inch pages, prices for black-and-white copying or printing will increase from 10 cents to 13 cents per page, while color copying and printing will increase from 15 cents to 18 cents per page.  The charge for scans will remain at 2 cents per page.  Faxes will continue to cost 25 cents per page.

Fees charged for use of multifunction devices are intended solely to cover the cost of users’ photocopying, printing, faxing and scanning as provided by Canon.  Such fees are not used to underwrite the cost of any other offerings provided by the Library or other University units.

A full list of prices as of August 1, 2013, follows below and is available at printing.uchicago.edu:

Canon Unified Printing cost per page as of August 1, 2013

For more information about Canon Unified Printing, visit printing.uchicago.edu.

Free Westlaw printing discontinued as of June 30

Please be aware that Westlaw will be removing the free printing option from all Law School accounts as of June 30. Students will still be able to print from WestlawNext and Westlaw, but those pages will be routed to Law School printers and will count against the student’s print quota.

Free printing from Lexis Advance will continue for at least the next academic year. Students can also use the foldering features in Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law to save and share documents. Another option is using Westlaw’s mobile apps, including their iPad app, which automatically sync with your Westlaw account. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to Ask a Law Librarian or contact the Law School’s Westlaw account manager Ben Segreto at ben.segreto@thomsonreuters.com.

LexisNexis now accessible only through Lexis Advance

Starting Monday, June 24, LexisNexis will be using a single ID system to simplify the way faculty and students access LexisNexis products. This means that Law School users will have access to LexisNexis only through the Lexis Advance platform. Lexis.com IDs will deactivate on or about June 22.

Lexis_screenshot

Users will still be able to access Lexis.com through a link in Lexis Advance (see image above). You will only need your Lexis Advance ID to use both Lexis Advance and Lexis.com. If you have already registered your Lexis Advance ID, no further action is needed. 

If you do not have a Lexis Advance ID, contact LexisNexis Customer Service at 800-45-LEXIS or Ask a Law Librarian.

While the migration is taking place this weekend, there will be a service interruption from 9 pm CST on Friday, June 21, through 10 am CST on Sunday, June 23.

While users will still be able to access Lexis.com, some of the functionality (such as printing) will no longer be available on that platform. Users will be able to print to the LexisNexis printers only from Lexis Advance.

Also, alerts set up on Lexis.com cannot be transferred to Lexis Advance. If you would like to continue receiving updates, you will need to set them up again on Lexis Advance. If you need assistance setting up alerts on Lexis Advance, please contact the Law School’s LexisNexis Account Executive Nikki Harris at nikki.harris@lexisnexis.com.

 

Library fines to increase effective June 24

Library fines will increase starting June 24, the first day of summer quarter. This is the first increase to Library fines since 1996.

Overdue fines for recalled and interlibrary loan items will increase from $3 per day to $5 per day, while overdue fines for course reserve material and other short term loans will increase from $1 per hour to $3 per hour. The maximum fine amount will also increase from $75 to $100.

As always, there are no daily overdue fines for items on regular loan. This means that items borrowed on regular loan are not affected by the increase unless recalled and overdue on or after June 24. 

In addition to overdue fines, the replacement cost for lost items will increase to a standard minimum fee of $150. For users who choose to provide a replacement copy for a lost item, the processing charge will increase from $25 to $35. As always, the replacement cost may be increased at the discretion of Library staff for an item whose value exceeds the minimum replacement cost.

All of the above fine increases will go into effect for fines incurred on or after Monday, June 24. More information about borrowing policies, including fines, is available at lib.uchicago.edu/e/using/borrow.

Updated June 24, 2013 to reflect increase of replacement copy processing charge to $35; previously the charge had been incorrectly listed as $50.

Feature Story Chicago enters borrowing agreement with Ivies

UChicago community will share in rapid access to more than
50 million volumes with the Ivy League

University of Chicago faculty, students and staff will soon be able to borrow circulating materials from the libraries of Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, MIT, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, Yale, and the Center for Research Libraries as the University of Chicago Library joins the Borrow Direct partnership. 

Borrow Direct 150pxThe circulating collections of the Borrow Direct libraries include more than 50 million volumes, and more than 1.5 million items have been shared across the Borrow Direct partnership since it was initiated in 1999.  When implemented at UChicago in the fall, Borrow Direct will enable users to do a single search of the combined catalogs and to request prompt delivery of circulating items. Materials requested by UChicago borrowers will typically be delivered to their selected campus library within four calendar days.   

“The Borrow Direct partnership is delighted to welcome the University of Chicago as a full participant in the program,” said Jeffrey Horrell, Dean of Libraries at Dartmouth and co-convener of the partnership’s directors group. “The depth of Chicago’s collections will greatly enhance the ­overall resources available in Borrow Direct and will support our collective users in their discovery and scholarship.”

“The Borrow Direct partnership will provide rapid and increased access to rich collections held by our peer institutions, thus helping to connect our students and scholars with the composite wealth of these collections,” said Judith Nadler, Director and University Librarian at the University of Chicago.  “At the same time, the project will provide a venue to explore future models for shared collection building that include both print and digital forms.”

The launch of Borrow Direct at the University of Chicago is made possible by a generous gift from the Rhoades Foundation with the cooperation of Julius Lewis, AB’50, AM’54.              

UChicago’s new agreement with Ivy League universities and MIT expands upon the local success of UBorrow, another consortial borrowing partnership that gives UChicago users access to more than 90 million volumes at regional research libraries participating in the Committee on Institutional Cooperation. 

More information about using Borrow Direct will be available as the University of Chicago Library implements the service this fall. 

Extra computer monitors in the stacks

computer monitors

We are happy to announce that there are now five computer monitors distributed on several tables in the D’Angelo Law Library stacks so that students can plug in their laptops. There is one monitor in each of the semi-enclosed conference rooms on the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Floors and two monitors on one of the tables in the northeast corner of the Fourth Floor, as shown in the picture on the left. 

Students with PC’s should be able to plug the monitors directly into their laptops, while students with Macs will need a special adapter. We will have Mac adapters available for checkout at the Circulation Desk.

Thank you to David Blood and the Law School Information Technology department for procuring and setting up the monitors and to the D’Angelo Law Library Student Advisory Board for the suggestion!

This is a pilot program, and we welcome any feedback you have on the monitors.

Read journals on your iPad using BrowZine

browzineDo you own an iPad?  Do you read scholarly journals?  Then BrowZine might be a great tool for you!

The Library has arranged for a subscription to the Browzine app for all University of Chicago users.  BrowZine assists users by presenting open access and Library-subscribed journals on a common newsstand.  The result is an easy and familiar way to browse, read and monitor scholarly journals across the disciplines or to have a convenient list of favorite journals titles at your fingertips.  BrowZine works with the campus proxy server, giving you access to your favorite journals on your iPad.

Articles accessed through BrowZine may be synced up with Zotero, Dropbox or several other services to help keep all of your information together in one place.

If you have any questions about BrowZine or would like a guided a tour, please contact crerar-reference@lib.uchicago.edu

 Download BrowZine from the App Store on iTunes (requires a UChicago network connection): https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/browzine/id463787411?mt=8

If you need a little help getting started, BrowZine has this two-minute video tutorial to help: http://thirdiron.com/browzine-ipad-app/video/

(If you are already a BrowZine user, to access the full set of UChicago journals available in the trial, tap the Settings button, log out, then log back in selecting “University of Chicago” from the list of libraries.  You will be prompted for your CNetID and password to authenticate through the campus proxy server.)

This service will continue to expand and add new titles and features as time goes on.  Third Iron welcomes you to follow their progress on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/thirdiron) or Twitter (http://www.twitter.com/third_iron) and reminds you to watch for notifications on your iPad that an update to BrowZine is available. 

LexisNexis, Westlaw, and Bloomberg Law access over the summer

Please read below for details on accessing Lexis, Westlaw, and Bloomberg Law over the summer.

Westlaw/WestlawNext

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls: At the end of June, academic passwords for current students will default to 40 hours for the month of July, even if a student does nothing to extend.

Westlaw does allow students to extend their current access in specific instances, which you can do by going to http://lawschool.westlaw.com/registration/SummerExtension.aspx. Allowable usages for extending include:

  • Summer law school classes
  • Law review or law journal work
  • Project for a professor
  • Moot court
  • Unpaid, nonprofit public-interest internship/externship pro bono work required for graduation

Graduating 3Ls: Students graduating this spring get 5 hours of access in July, even if a student does nothing to extend, to help study for the bar.

For help or more information, contact the Law School’s Westlaw Account Manager Ben Segreto at ben.segreto@thomsonreuters.com.

LexisNexis

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls: Returning students will have full access to Lexis Advance during the summer without special registration, but not Lexis.com.

Graduating 3Ls: Graduates have full Lexis Advance access through July 31, 2013, but not Lexis.com. For help or more information, contact your LexisNexis Account Executive, Nikki Harris at nikki.harris@lexisnexis.com.

Bloomberg Law

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls: Bloomberg Law provides unlimited and unrestricted access over the summer. There is no need to register, as your student account will remain active and available all summer.

Graduating 3Ls: Students graduating this spring have unlimited and unrestricted access to Bloomberg Law for six months after graduation.

For help or more information, contact your Bloomberg Law Relationship Manager, Jed Lewin at jlewin3@bloomberg.net.

Clarifying D’Angelo Law Reserve Room policies

At the Circulation Desk, we’ve noticed that students are often unclear about how long they can check out material from the Reserve Room and when they can renew reserve material. To help clarify things, we’ve added the following explanation of our Reserve Room policies to our website and posted a sign at the Circulation Desk. If you have any further questions, please let us know.

Reserve Room Policies

  • The first and second copy of reserve items are available for two hour loans.
  • Additional copies on reserve are available for 24 hour check out.
  • These 24 hour copies will generally have a sticker on the back under the barcode labeling them as 24 hour copies.
  • Reserve items checked out within two hours of closing will be due an hour after the library opens the next day.
  • Overdue reserve items accrue fines at the rate of $1 per hour, with a maximum of $75.
  • If you’d like a receipt indicating the time the reserve item is due, please let us know and we can print it out for you.

Reserve Renewals

  • Reserve items can only be renewed if there is another copy of the same book available in the Reserve Room for other students to check out.
  • If all other copies of a reserve book are checked out, a student must wait thirty minutes before checking the item out again to give other students an opportunity to check out the book.
  • If there is only one copy of a book on reserve, the item can be renewed if we haven’t had demand for the item from other students.
  • Renewal requests for reserve items must be done in person.
  • During interim periods, longer loans can be arranged for items on permanent reserve.
  • Reserve material cannot be checked out to a carrel.

New HeinOnline library State Statutes: A Historical Archive

Title page from Laws of the State of New York (1792)

Title page from Laws of the State of New York (1792)

University of Chicago users now have access to HeinOnline’s newest collection State Statutes: A Historical Archive, which includes more than 1,600 volumes and nearly 2 million pages of historical superseded state statutes. Coverage goes back to as early as 1717! For the state of Illinois, the earliest publication included is the Laws of the Territory of Illinois from 1815, which predates its admission to the Union, and extends through the Revised Statutes of the State of Illinois from 1931. 

This collection is a valuable complement to HeinOnline’s existing collection of state session laws. As with all of HeinOnline’s collections, the historical state statutes can be browsed and searched in a number of different ways, including full text.

Ensuring Summer Success programs

The D’Angelo Law Library, along with the Office of the Dean of Students and the Office of Career Services, is sponsoring the program “Ensuring Summer Success” on Thursday, May 2 at 12:15 pm in Room V. The program is designed to get law students ready to succeed in their summer jobs.

The panelists will include a partner from Sidley, an associate from Paul Hastings, an administrative assistant from Jenner, and a reference librarian from Neal Gerber. The panelists will address issues such as: working successfully with non-attorney professionals; how to complete projects without racking up a six figure legal research bill; juggling multiple projects, summer associate activities, and still trying to have a life; and how to avoid the most common summer associate pitfalls that can keep you from receiving an offer for permanent employment. This program was very highly rated last year by rising 3Ls who had attended in preparation for their summer positions. Lunch is provided.  Sponsored by Sidley Austin.   

[This program qualifies for 10 Keystone Professionalism and Leadership Program points in the Managing & Building Your Career category.]

In the next few weeks, there will also be a number of vendor presentations focusing on cost-effective research and resources you will likely use during your summer jobs. All are scheduled during the lunch hour. Keystone points are available. For the Bloomberg Law presentations, RSVP at http://url.ie/hac1. Sign up for the LexisNexis presentation at http://www.lexisnexis.com/lawschool/myschool_1.aspx.

  • Monday, April 22:  Bloomberg Law Prepare to Practice, Room F
  • Wednesday, April 24: Bloomberg Law Prepare to Practice, Room D
  • Thursday, April 25:  LexisNexis Cost-Effective Legal Research, Room F
  • Monday, May 6:  Bloomberg Law Prepare to Practice, Room D