Westlaw training sessions, Mon., Feb. 1, 12:15 p.m. & 2:45 p.m.

Dennis Elverman from Westlaw will be at the Law School on Monday, February 1, to give two presentations on using Westlaw to research the Winter Quarter Bigelow Program open memo assignment.

    • Westlaw Certification 101/201 – 12:15 – 1:00 p.m. – Room F (lunch provided for this session)
    • Westlaw Certification 101/201 – 2:45 – 3:30 p.m. – Room D

The material covered by these classes is as follows:

Westlaw Certification 101 – In this section of the class Dennis will go over an introduction to case law research on Westlaw, will go over tips to make you a better researcher, and will review the tools on Westlaw that will allow you to manage all your research completely online.

Westlaw Certification 201 – This section of the class takes a deeper dive into Westlaw advanced searching techniques, statutory research, and strategies to locate trial court documents and content that will make document drafting an easier process.

To RSVP for one of the classes click here: http://goo.gl/forms/542O5NUr9F

Do not hesitate to reach out to Dennis (dennis.elverman@thomsonreuters.com) if you have any questions.

Keystone program: Productivity and Project Management Tools, Mon., Jan. 25 at 3 pm in Room III

Organizing PDFs, using multiple devices, collaborating… how do you work efficiently? This workshop will give you tools and tips to help you fine tune your individual and group productivity needs. The workshop will take place on Monday, January 25, at 3 pm in Law School Classroom III. Kaitlin Springmier, Resident Librarian for Online Learning, and Todd Ito, Coordinator of Instruction and Outreach, will give an overview of our favorite free web tools for note taking, cloud storage, organizing and annotating articles, and managing collaborative projects. These tools, tips, and strategies should help you be more efficient with whatever you’re working on, whether it’s the open memo assignment, your SRP, comment, or a project for one of the clinics.

Attendance at this program will earn you 10 Keystone points.

Sponsored by the Office of the Dean of Students & the D’Angelo Law Library.

New online resource: Investment Arbitration Reporter

The D’Angelo Law Library now has a subscription to the Investment Arbitration Reporter. The IAReporter is a news and analysis service covering legal developments and policy trends in investment treaty arbitration. It also provides access to selected source documents such as pleadings, decisions, and arbitral awards. The IAReporter site has profiles of arbitrators active in the field of investor-state arbitration. You can sign up for email alerts. The IAReporter is one of the best ways to get the latest news and documents for your research.

You can browse investment arbitration news headlines by date/in chrono order or by theme: Countries/Regions (Argentina, Central/Eastern Europe, CIS & Ukraine, India, Intra-European Union, Venezuela); Forums/Processes (ICC, ICSID, SCC, UNCITRAL, Ad-Hoc); Hot Topics (e.g. Amicus Curiae Interventions, Environmental Disputes, Human Rights and Investment Law, Land Reform Disputes); Industries (Energy, Mining, Telecoms, Transportation); Major Treaties (CAFTA, Energy Charter Treaty, NAFTA).

[Note that you also have access to the Investor-State Law Guide  (ISLG) via the Law Library subscription. Click on the “Login” button on the upper right-hand corner to start your research.]

Preserving the Texture of Legal History: The Pleasure and Privilege of Rare Books

On the D’Angelo Law Library’s sixth floor, behind the glass walls and the keycard-entry doors, bathed in air that is always between 60–65°F and 45–60 percent humidity, are the really old books.

The artifacts sit in this climate-controlled silence, brought out for the occasional visitor but more often viewed digitally by students and scholars who might never have cradled a 400-year-old calfskin volume or turned a heavy parchment page printed in calligraphy. There are more than 3,700 items in the Law School’s collection, and more than half are available in digital form—meaning those volumes are both physically rare and more accessible than ever before. It is a modern paradox: as technology brings content closer—and reduces the need for in-person use—does a rare book become more so, or less? Can it be both?

Photos of the Rare Books sections at the University of Chicago's D'Angelo Law Library.

Digitization of rare texts has been an important development—scanned books are accessible to a greater number of researchers and are searchable—but it is impossible to fully replicate the experience of working with an original. The process of converting the documents into searchable text isn’t perfect; abbreviations, for instance, aren’t always translated consistently or accurately. Context can be lost if a full volume isn’t available and one can’t flip back to find a full citation or foundational details. And the experience of holding and reading a physical volume is lost when it appears only on a screen. To visit the two rooms housing the D’Angelo Law Library’s Rare Books Collection—or better, to thumb through a centuries-old volume beside a historian like Alison LaCroix, the Robert Newton Reid Professor of Law, or R.H. Helmholz, the Ruth Wyatt Rosenson Distinguished Service Professor of Law—is to peer into the lives and minds of the long-gone scholars and leaders who created our nation’s governing structure, or interpreted canon law, or commented on the decisions of a 17th-century European court. It is to touch what they touched, to see the law in a slightly different way, and to remember that all of these ideas were created and shaped by people.

It is, simply, to feel the curves and coils of history.

***
One afternoon last fall, LaCroix held some of these curves and coils in her hand—a 225-year-old, first-edition French translation of the United States Constitution and acts of the first U.S. Congress that the D’Angelo acquired about two years ago. The book, Actes passés à un congrès des Etats-Unis de l’Amérique, is believed to be the first French translation of the Bill of Rights and is curious for any number of reasons, not the least of which is that it essentially groups the nation’s supreme law alongside things like the Tariff Act of 1789.

“We don’t usually think of the Constitution as an act of Congress—it’s not just some regular old statute,” LaCroix said. “But there it is.”

Photograph of page of ConstitutionThen there’s the puzzle of the book’s origin, a question made somehow more compelling by the volume’s physical presence. The text was translated by one Monsieur Hubert, who appears to have been a lawyer or judge in the French parliament, or court—but who asked Monsieur Hubert to do it? And what might that decision tell us about the America’s efforts to gain recognition on the world stage, Europe’s view of the fledgling democracy, or early U.S. political divisions? What clues might lurk in the volume’s marginalia, or the ways in which the content is structured? The timing makes it intriguing: the late 1780s brought not just the ratification of the U.S. Constitution but the start of the French Revolution, a 10-year conflict that inspired both enthusiasm and fear among Americans. There was marked division in America—those who were pro-British and those, like Thomas Jefferson, who were pro-French. Had someone in America thought it important to share our law with the French during their time of upheaval, or had someone in France requested it?

“Who was the audience? Who in France said, ‘I want the U.S. Constitution, and I want to know what the U.S. Congress is doing?’” LaCroix said. “As often happens when you pick up a primary source, all these questions arise.”

As she turned the pages, history seemed to swell and take shape: there, in French, was the Judiciary Act of 1789, which would eventually become the first congressional act to be partially invalidated by the U.S. Supreme Court. But when it was translated for this volume, the act was still new and whole: it would be more than a decade before the landmark Marbury v. Madison struck down one of its provisions, affirming the concept of judicial review.

“When we’re talking about these periods in law school, it doesn’t always seem concrete: it is Marbury v. Madison, it is John Adams and George Washington and their theories. They’re in casebooks, so the texture is stripped away,” LaCroix said. “But there is so much literal texture in this volume: just feeling the pages and seeing the print. It’s a mode of human connection with people who created the structures of government institutions and offices.”

She ran her finger down a page, examining the text as she spoke.

“These were things that were created by people,” she continued, “let’s not forget that.”

***

The strength of the D’Angelo’s Rare Books Collection is historical U.S. law; the D’Angelo has nearly all the original primary sources in that category. The library is working to expand the European collection, an important area of growth, D’Angelo Law Library Director Sheri Lewis said. Right now, the library adds at least a few rare materials each year, and acquisitions are often driven by opportunity. Librarians—often Lyonette Louis-Jacques, Foreign and International Law Librarian, and Bill Schwesig, Bibliographer for Common Law—peruse dealer catalogs, participate in rare book auctions, and look for other chances to acquire volumes that meet particular research interests or add valuable dimension to the collection. In the autumn of 2014, for instance, the D’Angelo acquired about 100 rare titles that had been withdrawn from the collection at the Rutgers School of Law-Camden Law Library.

Photograph of a rare bookThe vast majority of the D’Angelo’s rare books are from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, though fourteen percent are from the seventeenth century and four percent are from sixteenth century. There are early volumes of the United States Reports, sixteenth-century canon law written in Latin, and volumes of Consilia, which are collections of opinions written to advise European judges in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and early eighteenth centuries. There are books on Prussian law, materials on witchcraft trials, and volumes of Sir William Blackstone’s eighteenth-century Commentaries on the Laws of England, which are influential treatises that played a role in the development of the American legal system. Some of the books in the D’Angelo’s rare collection are heavy elephant folios; others are just a few inches long, small enough to fit in the palm of a hand. Many of the books are beautiful, featuring ornate, handset type or fore-edge painting, which are designs or pictures painted onto the edges of the pages. Some have elegant, handwritten notes in the margins—the insights of early readers. Some volumes have held up surprisingly well for their age, and others have been rebound or preserved in other ways.

“Our library is fortunate to have these treasures of law and legal history in our collection,” Lewis said. “Our aspiration is to grow; there are still scholars who work with this material, and they work with it in a way that makes the actual artifact desirable.”

After all, not everything has been digitized; books that aren’t available online—especially ones that fit faculty research interests—are of obvious and particular value. The first-edition French translation of the Constitution, for instance, was a title the library knew LaCroix would appreciate. When the library acquired it, the book was in pamphlet form, and they took it to a rare book conservator to have it rebound.

D’Angelo librarians often consult with Helmholz, the rare book collection’s most frequent user. Right now, he’s hoping to help them find a collection of volumes published near the end of the sixteenth century: Tractatus universi iuris, or “The Treatise of All Laws.”

“It was a standard book, and we don’t have a copy, but we should,” he said. “It’s proving a little hard to find one, but it’s the kind of thing I’d like to get.”

A scholar whose expertise includes canon law, Helmholz has his own collection of rare books in his office and at home—though none, he notes, are on the extreme end of rare or valuable. For instance, there’s a 1556 volume covering basic canon law of the Middle Ages that he got a bit of a deal on.

“It’s quite a handsome volume, but look at this,” he said, flipping through the inside, “it was lacking some of the pages. So what the book dealer did is Xerox from another edition and paste these in. It’s a far-from-perfect copy—even the title page is gone, and the binding isn’t in great shape. But it’s useful, and for my purposes, it works. And I was able to buy it for, I don’t remember, maybe $400.”

Students and others who visit Helmholz’s office will sometimes ask about the books, and he usually doesn’t mind pulling a volume or two from the shelf. It’s gratifying, he said, to see the interest.

Shelf of rare books“Pick one out,” he told a visitor one morning last fall, before offering a brief tour of a heavy 1709 volume detailing the duties of ecclesiastical judges. “Did you have any Latin?” he asked the visitor—who hadn’t—before translating some of the text and encouraging her to be less hesitant in turning and touching the pages.

“They’re not fragile—you can see this is done in rag paper,” he said. “These things will still be around when most of the books we have from the 1900s are dust.”

This is another part of the draw: many old books are durable, a tribute to the craftsmanship of their time. They’re also practical in ways that digital versions are not. In any book, for instance, one can stumble upon related content or deliberately flip back a few pages for context. A rare book might represent the only opportunity to do that within a given niche.

“If you pull up a statute online and you’re in a small subset—small Roman numeral iv, part 3—you don’t know where you are,” LaCroix said. “As an intellectual matter, you need to be able to work back up the tree and see what’s next to it.”

Optical Character Recognition, the technology that converts the books to searchable documents, can fall short, particularly in dealing with abbreviations in Latin or other foreign languages.

“By experience, you can work out what these abbreviations mean, but you can’t really search for them,” Helmholz said. “Some of the sources cited in rare books become quite unrecognizable in scanned versions. Normally, in rare books, scanned versions are not adequate substitutes for the original.”

As these volumes continue to become both older and more accessible, Helmholz wonders if the market might offer an advantage to those who are still after the physical experience of the old book.

“My hope is that prices [of rare books] will decline markedly so we can buy more. I haven’t seen evidence of that yet, but it is my hope,” he said. “If you can get what you need in digitized form, why would you pay a small fortune for a book—except for the pleasure or privilege of having a rare book and being able to look at it?”

A University of Chicago Law School news release

PLC Global now available via WestlawNext

Great news! Comparative corporate law research is now much easier. Law School users now have access to PLC Global content through the Practical Law platform on WestlawNext!

Screenshot of Practical Law Global

To access the global materials, click on Practical Law on WestlawNext. At the bottom of the page on the right-hand side, click on the Global Content link. From this page you can access all of the PLC Global content – over 70 countries – arranged by these categories: Core Countries (U.S., UK, China); Europe (35, including France, Germany, and Italy); Asia Pacific (12, including Australia, Japan, South Korea); Africa, Middle East, and India (12, including Bahrain, Qatar, UAE); Latin American and the Caribbean (10, including Argentina, Brazil, Cayman Islands); and United States and Canada.

Practical Law focuses on transactional law and provides model documents (with legal drafting and negotiating tips), step-by-step checklists, timelines, handy overviews of transactional practice areas, and legal updates on the latest market developments. With PLC Global, we now have access to these tools and resources for many non-U.S. jurisdictions!

Lexis training session for 1Ls, Wed., Jan. 13, 12:15 p.m. in Room B

Lexis Advance logoCarter Mills from LexisNexis will be at the Law School this Wednesday, January 13, at 12:15 pm in Classroom B, to give a presentation on using Lexis Advance for researching the Winter Quarter Bigelow Program open memo assignment. Students can RSVP at https://www.lexisnexis.com/lawschool.

Food will be provided.

MLK Day, Monday, Jan. 18: D’Angelo Law, Eckhart, and SSA closed, other campus libraries remain open

On Monday, January 18, D’Angelo Law, Eckhart, and SSA libraries will be closed in observance of the Martin Luther King Day holiday.

Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein libraries will be open during their regular building hours. The All-Night Study Space on the 1st Floor of Regenstein will also remain open.

Illinois laws new in 2016

237 new Illinois laws take effect on January 1, 2016. For a full list, see New Illinois Laws. Included are new restrictions on persons convicted of driving under the influence (PA 99-0296), an end to mandatory life sentences for minors (PA 99‐0069), and a provision making pumpkin pie the official state pie (PA 99‐0364).

TRIAL: Ravel Law Judge Analytics

Ravel Law is a relatively new legal research and analytics platform that recently announced a project with the Harvard Law School to digitize Harvard’s entire collection of U.S. case law and make the collection available online for free. In addition to providing access to case law, Ravel Law also features data visualization tools to help legal researchers analyze relationships among cases.

Through December 31, 2015, University of Chicago Law School users also have access to another Ravel tool called  Judge Analytics, which provides an overview of an individual judge’s entire career, showing every decision and every citation in a single location. Students interested in studying judicial behavior, as well as those considering clerkships and summer externships with judges, can take advantage of this tool to learn more about specific judges.

Judge Analytics uses citation information to show which cases, circuits, and judges a judge has cited most often. Users can use it determine when a judge may look to law from an unexpected jurisdiction, to see when a judge demonstrates historical patterns on a subject or procedure, or to see which cases, rules, and exact language a judge may prefer and uses often. Judge Analytics currently covers all Federal Supreme, Circuit, and District Court judges.

To access the Judge Analytics trial, go to https://www.ravellaw.com/academics to set up an account and then select “Judge Analytics” from the list of products.

Quarter loans due January 8 – please return or renew

Quarter loans borrowed or renewed before December 14 are due Friday, January 8.

Items may be renewed via My Account or returned to any campus library.

Items that have been renewed 3 times must be returned and checked out again if you wish to keep them.  This limit does not apply to students in Ph.D. or J.S.D. programs.

D’Angelo Law Library Study Break

Coffee and cookies in the Reading Room this Saturday, December 12 from noon until 2:00 p.m., or whenever the coffee runs out.  Stop by the table in front of the Reference Desk and help yourself.

D’Angelo Law Library winter interim hours, Dec. 16 – Jan. 3

Beginning Wednesday, December 16, the D’Angelo Law Library will have reduced building hours for the winter interim. Normal hours resume Sunday, January 3.

Additionally, access to the D’Angelo Law Library for non-law students is limited from Friday, December 4 through Tuesday, December 15 during the Law School reading and exam periods.

All campus libraries will be closed on December 25 and January 1.

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

D’Angelo Law Library restricted access during exams

Access to the D’Angelo Law Library for non-law students will be limited from Friday, December 4 through Tuesday, December 15 during the Law School reading and exam periods. During this period, the library will continue to be accessible to any member of the University community who needs access to legal materials or who would like to work with one of our reference librarians. In addition, all non-law students who are taking Law School classes will have access to the library.

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library webpage on access for additional information.

Exam preparation resources at the D’Angelo Law Library

The D’Angelo Law Library provides a variety of resources to help students prepare for exams.

Past exams: Perhaps most importantly, the Library provides copies of past exams given at the Law School, in addition to model student answers and memos written by the professors where available. The exams are organized by course and faculty member. Everything we have been given permission to post is available on the Library website.

Past_Exams

Study Supplements: Another helpful resource for preparing student outlines and studying for exams are the many study supplements, including the popular Examples & Explanations and Understanding series, that are available in the Reserve Room. Our Hornbooks & Study Supplements page provides lists of the available study supplements by course name. This year, we’ve also added the online West Academic Study Aids package. This package provides online access to many of the study supplements, including West’s Concise Hornbook Series, the Law Stories Series, and all of the Nutshells. To access the study supplements, you will need to go to http://lawschool.westlaw.com and click the link for “Study Aids Subscription.” The first time you log in, you will need to create an account with West Academic, but from then on, you should be able to log in with your OnePass username and password.

CALI Lessons: If you prefer something more interactive, CALI lessons might be the resource for you.  The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) provides UofC law students with access to nearly 1,000 internet-based lessons on different legal topics. Lessons range from core 1L courses (92 lessons on property, for example) to many different upper level courses. CALI lessons are often interactive and feature questions to test your knowledge as you go through them. If you have not already registered an account with CALI, you can Ask a Law Librarian to get the authorization code for the Law School.

Student Outlines: Student outlines for various courses taught at the Law School are made available by the UChicago Law Students Association (LSA) in an online outline bank on the LSA’s website. You will need to enter a password to access. If you do not have the password, Ask a Law Librarian.

Study Rooms: If you want to meet with a study group, the D’Angelo Law Library has seven study rooms that can be reserved online: two study rooms on each of the 4th, 5th and 6th floors, and one study room on the second floor. Law students may reserve use of a study room using the Law School’s room reservation system. For further assistance, see How to Reserve a Law Library Study Room.

Quiet Study Space: Quieter study spaces are available on the upper floors of the Law Library. Law School students are also able to study in any of the other libraries on campus. Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week. Mansueto will be open Friday, December 4 and Saturday, December 5 until 12:45 a.m. Crerar and Regenstein will be open these days until 1 a.m. The Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will be open 24 hours from Monday, November 30 until the end of finals on Friday, December 11. For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Lockers: Please remember to secure your belongings when you take breaks. You can check out a locker key from the Circulation Desk. Library lockers are located in the northeast corner of the second and third floors. Two types of lockers are available: laptop lockers, which are smaller and each equipped with an electrical outlet, and bookbag lockers, which are large enough to accommodate a bookbag and/or coat.

Study Breaks: On Saturday, December 12, enjoy free coffee and small snacks near the Reference Desk in the D’Angelo Law Library, from noon until 2:00 p.m., or whenever the coffee runs out.

Also, on Sunday, December 6, Regenstein Library will be hosting a study break from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m on the A-Level. Join fellow students and librarians for coloring, 3-D modeling, music, and snacks. The event is free, and snacks will be available on a first come, first served basis. Sign up for the event on Facebook.

Good luck with exams!

Thanksgiving hours for the D’Angelo Law Library

Hours for the D’Angelo Law Library over the week of Thanksgiving 2015 are as follows:

Wednesday, November 25

8 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Thursday, November 26

Closed in observance of Thanksgiving.

Friday, November 27

10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturday, November 28

Normal hours resume.

For a complete list of Library hours, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

TRIAL: Latin Lawyer

The D’Angelo Law Library has arranged a trial to Latin Lawyer (trial access expires 18th December 2015).

Here’s info about Latin Lawyer:

Latin Lawyer 250 image“Latin Lawyer is the definitive business law resource for Latin America. Latin Lawyer’s independent team of journalists provides news and analysis of deals and cases, as well as legal and policy developments across the region. Alongside this, for over 10 years Latin Lawyer has compiled surveys, league tables, country profiles, interviews and roundtable discussions. Besides keeping readers up- to- date with a daily news email briefing, Latin Lawyer content is available online and through a magazine published 10 times a year…

…The Latin Lawyer editorial team provides intensive area research in the form of the Latin Lawyer 250: Latin America’s leading guide to business law firms. This guide provides an annual review of the legal marketplace across multiple Latin American jurisdictions, complete with analysis of the Latin American practices of international law firms…

…Latin Lawyer Reference provides answers to key legal and regulatory questions in Latin America on major practice areas. Leading practitioners and local counsel provide insight in over twenty practice areas, including Project Finance, Mergers & Acquisitions, Intellectual Property, Litigation, Arbitration and Bank Financing. The interactive format allows for quick-and-easy comparisons across jurisdictions.”

Historic database on Chicago Police misconduct launched

The groundbreaking Citizens Police Data Project, launched yesterday by the Invisible Institute and the Law School’s Civil Rights and Police Accountability Clinic, is a searchable database that contains more than 56,000 complaints filed against more than 8,500 Chicago police officers between 2001 and September of this year. There are gaps in that 14-year period, but the database has every allegation of misconduct made against an officer between March 2011 and this September.

This data set is based on requests made under the Freedom of Information Act which became public information in 2014, when the Clinic won the landmark Illinois appellate case Kalven v. City of Chicago, 7 N.E.3d 741 (Ill. App. Ct. 2014). The database offers a variety of tools for sorting, filtering, and mapping the data. Each record contains information about the complaint and its outcome; the accused officer, including the officer’s name, race, age, gender, and unit of assignment; demographic information on the complainant, including race, age, and gender; and geographic information on where the incident occurred.

For related information on the topic, see the D’Angelo Law Library’s Civil Rights and Police Accountability research guide.

TRIAL: American Immigration Lawyers Association’s AILALink

We have a month-long trial to AILALink: http://ailalink.aila.org/.  Access is via campus IP address (not available off-campus via the proxy server).

AILALink includes primary law materials (immigration statutes, regulations, court and administrative decisions, memos, cables, minutes), government manuals, forms, AILA periodicals, and books such as Kurzban’s Immigration Law SourcebookEssentials of Immigration Law, Navigating the Fundamentals of Immigration Law, AILA’s Asylum Primer, Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) Practice Manual, Representing Clients in Immigration Court, and the Consular Practice Handbook.

Try it and let us know what you think!

 

 

The Library as a hub: Connecting people and ideas

With the autumn quarter of my first year at the University well underway, I have developed an understanding of the enduring relevance of the University of Chicago Library’s mission.

We begin with the University’s motto — Crescat scientia; vita excolatur — and embody it by providing comprehensive resources and services to support the research, teaching, and learning needs of the University community. Put another way: we serve as a hub that connects people and ideas.

Brenda L. Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian. (Photo by John Zich)

Brenda L. Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian. (Photo by John Zich)

Over the years, we have developed six primary approaches to providing these comprehensive resources and services to the University that remain relevant today. We work to understand our users; build collections and tools; promote access and discovery; ensure preservation; collaborate with faculty, students, and University staff, as well as librarians and technologists from around the world; and develop expertise and an innovative spirit in our Library staff.

Building collections remains a vital, ongoing part of our mission, and our special collections offer faculty and students opportunities to do original research and learn from rare and unique primary sources. As we celebrate the 125th anniversary of the University of Chicago this year, new materials have been donated to the University Archives, and many have visited to explore our shared history. In addition, recently received volumes from the Nineteenth-Century English Poetry Collection of Dr. Gerald N. Wachs, generously donated by Deborah Wachs Barnes, Sharon Wachs Hirsch, Judith Pieprz, and Joel Wachs, AB’92, together with funding for a special exhibition, an accompanying catalogue, and additional essential Library support, comprise a campaign leadership gift that expands our distinctive collections and promotes their discovery.

We also process our collections so that they can be easily discovered and accessed. We are grateful to Bob and Carolyn Nelson for their support for the processing of the Saul Bellow Papers, which began this summer and will facilitate research into the life and works of this Nobel Prize-winning author.

Even as these critical Library activities continue, new ones are being undertaken. Faculty and students in every field are taking advantage of technological advancements to pursue new lines of inquiry using new tools and techniques. Interdisciplinary work is more important than ever. The output of research and scholarship looks different today than it did in the past. Creativity, collaborative learning, and hands-on learning are increasingly prized by students and faculty alike.

How can the Library build better bridges between its resources and the University community? How can we promote and ease the transition to new ways of learning? How can the Library become a partner in the research process in the future?

Our fall issue of Libra and the Library News site share a few of the steps we are taking in moving toward this future. I am particularly pleased to announce the launch of the Library’s new residency program, which is designed to bring some of the brightest new graduates of today’s library and information schools and other graduate programs to Chicago to help us launch or expand new programs. Our first new resident, Kaitlin Springmier, the Resident Librarian for Online Learning, is supported by generous gifts from Preston Torbert and Diana Hunt King.

The Library is supporting graduate students’ education and professional development in additional ways. This summer, we offered four unique internships that provided hands-on experience and mentors for PhD students interested in developing new perspectives on scholarship.

The renovation of Regenstein’s A Level will soon create a new environment that encourages interdisciplinary scholarly collaboration through the provision of resources, technology, and spaces. The first phase of the renovation is underway this fall. Additional enhancements are being planned for a later time when funding becomes available.

And the launch of a new multi-institutional Chicago Collections portal will help scholars, students, and members of the public to more easily research the history of Chicago in increasingly interconnected virtual spaces.

By engaging in both traditional and new activities that connect researchers and students with ideas, the Library continuously renews its commitment to supporting the research, teaching, and learning needs of the University of Chicago in a rapidly changing scholarly environment.

TRIAL: ProQuest History Vault: International Relations and Military Conflicts (through November 3d)

The Library has arranged a campuswide trial of the International Relations and Military Conflicts modules of ProQuest’s History Vault which feature ” formerly confidential reports of U.S. diplomats and military officers from 1911-1975″.  The digitzed archival databases provide access to letters, papers, photographs, scrapbooks, financial records, diaries, and other primary source materials.

The International Relations and Military Conflicts modules are as follows:

  • U.S. Military Intelligence Reports, 1911-1944
  • U.S. Diplomatic Post Records, 1914-1945
  • World War II: U.S. Documents on Planning, Operations, Intelligence, Axis War Crimes, and Refugees (including documents on martial law in Hawaii and Nuremberg trials against Nazi war criminals)
  • Office of Strategic Services (OSS)-State Department Intelligence and Research Reports, 1941-1961
  • Confidential U.S. State Department Central Files, Europe, and Latin America, 1960-1969
  • Vietnam War and American Foreign Policy, 1960-1975

 

 

Trial of NAACP Papers

The Library has a trial of the ProQuest History Vault: NAACP Papers until October 24. The trial includes the complete archive–government records and organizational records dealing with the Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century; the NAACP’s major campaigns, from voting rights to anti-lynching, peonage, segregation, and discrimination; legal department files; and activities of local NAACP branches. We welcome your thoughts on what parts of the collection you would find most useful in your research.

New Lexis Printer in 3rd Floor computer lab

A new Lexis printer has been installed in the 3rd Floor computer lab in the Law School. Law School students can print documents to this printer from Lexis Advance by going to a document and then clicking the printer icon and then selecting “Choose new settings”. At that point, you should see a pop up box like the one below allowing you to select the “UC LEXIS LAB” printer. Once you’ve selected that option, your print job will be sent to the printer in the 3rd Floor computer lab. Please try to pick up your print job as soon as possible to minimize clutter in the lab.

Screenshot of Lexis

Law School Record now on Chicago Unbound

The D’Angelo Law Library is pleased to announce that the University of Chicago Law School Record is now available on Chicago Unbound. The Record is the Law School’s magazine for alumni and friends. The Chicago Unbound version includes full-text PDF of issues back to 1951 (volume 1, number 1). It is fully searchable via the Internet and in the CU scholarship repository.

 

New Supreme Court Term

Today is the first day of the Supreme Court’s 2015 term. Follow news about the Supreme Court on United States Law Week, in the Supreme Court Today section. The new Supreme Court Today Tracker, available only on Bloomberg Law, allows you to track individual cases, or all cases on a topic of interest. The Supreme Court Brief section of the National Law Journal is another site for news about the Court.

Find briefs for cases that the Court has decided to hear at the Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases, published by the American Bar Association. The D’Angelo Law Library does not have paper briefs for pending cases. Our U.S. Supreme Court Research Guide has more information about sources of briefs, records, and information about the Court and its justices.

People Recent awards mark latest in D’Angelo’s long history of service and accolades

Significant honors that recognized members of the D’Angelo Law Library staff this year were the latest in a string of accolades for the University of Chicago’s law librarians, whose dedication to their field has long been marked by service to local and national library groups.

Todd Ito

Todd Ito

This spring, Lorna Tang, who retired in June as the Associate Law Librarian for Technical Services after 38 years at the D’Angelo, was given the Chicago Association of Law Libraries (CALL) Outstanding Lifetime Achievement in Law Librarianship Award, and Foreign and International Law Librarian Lyonette Louis-Jacques was given the Global Legal Skills Award for Outstanding Contributions to International Legal Skills Education, as well as a top marketing award from the American Association of Law Libraries, the profession’s national association. Todd Ito, the D’Angelo’s Coordinator of Instruction and Outreach, was also elected Vice President/President-elect of Chicago Association of Law Libraries, becoming the most recent D’Angelo librarian to hold a top leadership position with the organization.

“The D’Angelo librarians have always had a strong commitment to service in professional law library associations,” said Sheri Lewis, Director of the D’Angelo Law Library. “This commitment is reflected not only in the awards bestowed on University of Chicago law librarians but in the ongoing respect from colleagues who actively seek and rely upon D’Angelo leadership in the professional community.”

Tang—who managed her staff through two major renovations of the library building, each time reorganizing work spaces and revising workflows—was the third librarian associated with the D’Angelo to win CALL’s lifetime achievement award.  The award, also given in 2013 to retired D’Angelo Law Library Director Judith M. Wright and in 2012 to former D’Angelo librarian Judith Gaskell, recognizes an “outstanding contribution to the Chicago law library community” and “consistently high levels of noteworthy professional contribution.” Tang became a member of CALL in 1977 and served on numerous committees.

Louis-Jacques received her award at the Global Legal Skills Conference, which is a leading international gathering for global skills education. She was honored for her 2013 book, International Law Legal Research, which was designed to show how to research sources of international law and help schools create stand-alone courses in international law legal research. She also won the 2015 Excellence in Marketing Award, Best Newsletter from AALL. It recognized the Chicago Association of Law Libraries’ CALL Bulletin, which Louis-Jacques co-edited.

Ito, who has been involved with CALL since he moved to Chicago in 2006 to work at the D’Angelo, also became the organization’s incoming Vice President and President-elect this spring.

“CALL has enabled me to connect with so many colleagues at other law school libraries, as well as at law firm, court, government, and public law libraries in the area,” Ito said. “Other AALL chapters are very spread out geographically, and the close proximity is a real benefit. We see each other at business meetings and other programs throughout the year, so we get more of a chance to get to know each other. That has made it easy for me to be able to reach out to another academic law librarians in the city to discuss what they’re doing with legal research instruction, or to talk to a law firm colleague about what legal research databases they’re using.”

The D’Angelo Law Library has a long history of high-profile accolades and appointments, for example:

  • AALL’s Marian Gould Gallagher Distinguished Service Award—one of the highest awards a law librarian can receive—has been given four times to a law librarian who has worked at the D’Angelo. Former D’Angelo librarians Nancy Johnson (2012), Adolf Sprudzs (2000), Elizabeth Benyon (1992), and Leon M. Liddell (1989) all received this honor.
  • Five members of the AALL Hall of Fame at one time worked for the D’Angelo: Wright, Johnson, Benyon, Liddell, and Sprudzs.
  • Librarians associated with the D’Angelo have won nine major awards from the CALL, including three for lifetime achievement. Lewis also won the Agnes and Harry Reid Award for Outstanding Contribution to Law Librarianship in 2011.
  • Two D’Angelo law librarians have served as president of CALL. Margaret Schilt, the Associate Law Librarian for User Services, in 2014 – 2015, and Lewis in 2008 – 2009.
  • All of the D’Angelo librarians have held leadership positions in CALL at some point. Head of Cataloging Patricia Sayre-McCoy served on the Executive Board and has chaired several CALL committees and is now on the Local Arrangements Committee for the 2016 AALL Annual Meeting. Common Law Bibliographer Bill Schwesig led the CALL’s Internet Committee for several years. Catalog Librarian Michael D. Brown and Faculty Services Librarian Thomas Drueke have participated in CALL committees.
  • At the national level, Louis-Jacques also has been on the AALL Executive Board and she, along with Lewis, Ito, and Sayre-McCoy, have chaired AALL special interest sections and/or committees. Interim Head of Technical Services Julie Stauffer is a co-editor of the Technical Services section bulletin.
  • Reference and Virtual Access Librarian Connie Fleischer currently is serving on the Illinois Government Depository Council, an advisory group to the Illinois State Library on government information issues.
  • Sprudzs, a former D’Angelo Foreign and International Law Librarian who was instrumental in building and expanding the D’Angelo’s foreign law collection, was a founding member and former president of International Association of Law Librarians in 1959.

“Librarians are born collaborators and rely on their professional networks both to keep current on new developments in legal information but also to enhance library services. We all have many stories about impressing a faculty member or student by getting a hidden gem for them,” Lewis said. “Law library associations are part of the secret to our success—it is not only what you know but who you know.”

A University of Chicago Law School news release