Featured Electronic Resources

Hone your IT, media, and productivity skills with Lynda.com

University of Chicago researchers have access to Lynda.com, a leading provider of online courses covering business, media, and technology.  Researchers can choose from over 4,000 courses, all of which are broken up into short, easy to use videos.  Business courses cover LyndaLinkedin_blackeverything from leadership and marketing to product management, while media courses cover specific software such as Adobe Photoshop and Adobe InDesign, as well as general techniques for graphic design, video editing and more.  Technology courses cover a full range of software and skills, including Java, R, SPSS, data analysis and cyber security.  Course levels range from introductory to advanced and instructors are vetted industry experts.

In addition to courses, Lynda.com has created guides using a collection of short videos, articles and checklists, that provide a step by step process for starting a business and becoming a manager.  The Starting a Business guide covers everything from evaluating yourself and your business idea to establishing operations.  Lynda.com’s Weekly Series feature guarantees that content stays fresh.  The most recent video in the Marketing Tips weekly series discusses representing the keyword funnel through SEO.

Questions about how to leverage this powerful tool? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

New online resource: Greenleaf Online Library

University of Chicago researchers now have access to Greenleaf Online Library.

Greenleaf Online Library crosses over all sectors of business with an emphasis on ‘green’ greenleafmanagement, ethical business and corporate social responsibility.  It contains approximately 4,000 items, including ebooks, case studies, research papers and journal articles.

Topics covered include:

  • Sustainability
  • Ethics
  • Innovation, enterprise and social enterprise
  • Environmental management
  • Industry sectors including extractives, fashion and textiles, banking and finance, transport, engineering, construction
  • Corporate governance
  • Responsible leadership
  • Social responsibility/business in society
  • Government, policy and compliance
  • Reporting and standards
  • Sustainability in Higher Education
  • Poverty
  • Gender and diversity
  • Responsible investment and finance, including microfinance

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

 

New online resource: Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical Texts

Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical TextsThe researchers at the University of Chicago now have online access to the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Biblical Texts through Brill. The database includes high resolution images of the biblical texts discovered in the Judean desert along with a side-by-side comparison of Hebrew transcription, English translation and the text of the Leningrad Codex. Until now, this content was only accessible electronically through the CD-ROM version published in 1999. Through the online database, researchers are able to search across the entire content, link between texts and download images of scrolls either on or off-campus. Included at this time is the Revised List of Texts from the Judean Desert (2010) that includes non-biblical texts, though these are currently not available to read online. Since the database is published by Brill, researchers can simultaneously access related databases published by Brill, such as The Context of Scripture online or the Coptic Gnostic Library online. Any questions can be directed to Anne K. Knafl, Bibliographer for Religion and Philosophy.

The display of a fragment from Genesis 19:27-28 from the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Online.

The display of a fragment from Genesis 19:27-28 from the Dead Sea Scrolls Electronic Library Online.

 

Soda tax and soda price in Mexico

On November 9th, Jeffrey Grogger, the Irving Harris Professor in Urban Policy at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, presented his preliminary research on soda tax and soda price in Mexico as part of the Becker Brown Bag Series.  Mexico’s nine percent soda tax took effect on January 1, 2014.  In addition to taxing soda, fruit juices and waters with added sugars are also being taxed.  The Mexico soda tax is a straightforward example of price theory.  The tax raises the price and the higher price lowers consumption.  The lower consumption then ideally leads to lower weight and less chronic disease.

Professor Grogger’s research strives to answer two key questions that aren’t addressed by the theory:

  1. How much do prices rise?
  2. What happens if consumers substitute other caloric drinks for sodas?

Interested in exploring this topic further? View Professor Grogger’s presentation and his slides.

University of Chicago researchers also have access to Euromonitor data through Passport GMID.  Euromonitor’s category briefing on sugar confectionery in Mexico discusses the effect of the tax.  Consumption data is also available, although Professor Grogger noted in his presentation that consumption data varied greatly across different sources.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

 

 

A single portal to Chicago history

UChicago Library partners with 21 institutions to create a tool for exploring the history and culture of Chicago

IdaBWells-asas-00054_400p

Ida B. Wells-Barnett with her children, 1909, 13.7 x 9.5 cm. Ida B. Wells Papers, Box 10, Folder 1. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

The University of Chicago Library is a major partner in the creation of a new online portal, Explore Chicago Collections, that documents the rich history and culture of the Chicago region. Launching on October 22, the free portal helps researchers, students, and the general public to locate and access more than 100,000 maps, photos, letters, and other materials from across the city.

This portal is the cornerstone initiative of a city-wide consortium, Chicago Collections, that includes universities, museums, and organizations as diverse as the Alliance Française and the Chicago Zoological Society.

Charles Blair, Director of the University of Chicago Library’s Digital Library Development Center, has played a key role in the development of this new search tool. As Co-chair of the Chicago Collections Portal Committee he has contributed technical expertise in the underlying portal software as well as experience developing effective digital asset management and discovery tools that meet the needs of a wide variety of users. The Library will also be contributing content for the portal, including finding aids describing our Chicago-related archival and manuscript collections, as well as several thousand digitized photographs, beginning with 33 photographs of pioneering Chicago civil rights activist Ida B. Wells and more than 1,000 of Chicago neighborhoods and urban renewal by photographer Mildred Mead.

In addition to bringing resources from member organizations together into a single search interface, the consortium has been developing a wide range of outreach programs and services including an exhibition, lectures, and a Cooperative Reference Network that will provide answers to questions from researchers and the general public about Chicago history and member collections.

Access the portal at explore.chicagocollections.org.

Resource spotlight: Factiva

University of Chicago researchers have access to Factiva, a database of global news and business information.  Factiva provides access to thousands of domestic and international newspapers, newswires, company profiles and media programs with sources from over 100 countries in 28 languages. logo_factiva  Its powerful search engine allows for comprehensive research and the Factiva Expert Search feature has been created to simplify complex searches, including investor and news sentiment.

The News Pages section makes it easy to browse the top business publications, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and Barron’s.  Once you’ve found articles you would like to read, translations are available and the articles can be downloaded as MP3s to listen to on your commute or as you walk around campus.

Fun fact: Transcripts are available from BBC, ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, CNN and NPR.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

The Business of China

This week’s “Black Monday” market crash clearly demonstrates how interconnected China’s economy is with the rest of the world’s economies.  The Economist‘s online article The Causes and Consequences of China’s Market Crash provides insight into what seems to have been the cause.  Chinese markets have remained volatile since the devaluation of the yuan on August 11.  The continued decline last week of the Shanghai Composite Index is suggesting that China’s industrial activity is slowing.  University of Chicago researchers interested in diving into China’s industry data to form their own analysis can do so with China Data Online.  Data for over 30 industry categories are available for general analysis going back until 1999.  Monthly statistics on output and production, top enterprises and market analysis by city and region are available as well, including statistics from 2015.

University of Chicago researchers can also search Factiva and EconLit for articles discussing business in China.

 

Questions? Ask a Librarian

 

Citation: (2015, August 24). The causes and consequences of China’s market crash.  The Economist. Retrieved from http://www.economist.com/news/business-and-finance/21662092-china-sneezing-rest-world-rightly-nervous-causes-and-consequences-chinas

 

New online resource: IBISWorld

University of Chicago researchers now have access to IBISWorld.

IBISWorldIBISWorld is a database that provides comprehensive industry reports for over 700 industries ranging from biotechnology to pawn shops.  These reports provide strategic insight and analysis which can be used to gain a better understanding of market conditions and forecasts, industry supply chain, and competitive landscape.

The reports include breakdowns of industry performance, outlook, products and markets, major competitors and operation conditions.  In addition to being able to download the complete report, key statistics can be downloaded to excel and specific infographics can be downloaded and inserted into your own reports and presentations.  

Questions? Ask A Librarian.
 

Library purchases access to Met Opera on Demand

Photograph from Les Contes d'Hoffmann

Les Contes d’Hoffmann
Abel; Morley, Gerzmava, Rice, Grigolo, Hampson

     The Metropolitan Opera was founded in 1883, with its first opera house built on Broadway and 39th Street.  One-hundred-twenty-three years after its formation, the Metropolitan entered the digital world with its 2006 release of The Met: Live in HD.  This digital transmission product now reaches 70 countries with live high definition performances.  Later, in 2008, the Metropolitan released Met Opera on Demand.  This online source, to which the Library now subscribes, includes 550 opera performances, some being varying productions of the same work.  Library users can follow the link for Met Opera on Demand to access the resource.  For the website to function properly, users must be certain their personal computers have the most recent version of Adobe Flash Player installed.

Redesigned research guides are easier to use and navigate

This weekend, the University of Chicago’s Library Guides were migrated to a new platform that features a number of improvements. Most notably, use of responsive design greatly improves the user’s experience on mobile devices and assistive technology, such as screen readers.

Mobile view of a Library Guide

A Library Guide as seen on a smartphone

The new platform also uses navigation menus on the left side of the screen, rather than the tabs across the top, which should make it easier and more intuitive for users to locate content in the guides.

Our librarians have created guides on a wide variety of academic subjects studied at the University. In addition, Help Guides show you how to locate specific types of material, such as newspapers, and to use Library tools and services, such as interlibrary loan.

Visit our Library Guides page for a complete list of our guides.