Featured Electronic Resources

Resource spotlight: Factiva

University of Chicago researchers have access to Factiva, a database of global news and business information.  Factiva provides access to thousands of domestic and international newspapers, newswires, company profiles and media programs with sources from over 100 countries in 28 languages. logo_factiva  Its powerful search engine allows for comprehensive research and the Factiva Expert Search feature has been created to simplify complex searches, including investor and news sentiment.

The News Pages section makes it easy to browse the top business publications, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and Barron’s.  Once you’ve found articles you would like to read, translations are available and the articles can be downloaded as MP3s to listen to on your commute or as you walk around campus.

Fun fact: Transcripts are available from BBC, ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, CNN and NPR.

Questions? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

The Business of China

This week’s “Black Monday” market crash clearly demonstrates how interconnected China’s economy is with the rest of the world’s economies.  The Economist‘s online article The Causes and Consequences of China’s Market Crash provides insight into what seems to have been the cause.  Chinese markets have remained volatile since the devaluation of the yuan on August 11.  The continued decline last week of the Shanghai Composite Index is suggesting that China’s industrial activity is slowing.  University of Chicago researchers interested in diving into China’s industry data to form their own analysis can do so with China Data Online.  Data for over 30 industry categories are available for general analysis going back until 1999.  Monthly statistics on output and production, top enterprises and market analysis by city and region are available as well, including statistics from 2015.

University of Chicago researchers can also search Factiva and EconLit for articles discussing business in China.


Questions? Ask a Librarian


Citation: (2015, August 24). The causes and consequences of China’s market crash.  The Economist. Retrieved from http://www.economist.com/news/business-and-finance/21662092-china-sneezing-rest-world-rightly-nervous-causes-and-consequences-chinas


New online resource: IBISWorld

University of Chicago researchers now have access to IBISWorld.

IBISWorldIBISWorld is a database that provides comprehensive industry reports for over 700 industries ranging from biotechnology to pawn shops.  These reports provide strategic insight and analysis which can be used to gain a better understanding of market conditions and forecasts, industry supply chain, and competitive landscape.

The reports include breakdowns of industry performance, outlook, products and markets, major competitors and operation conditions.  In addition to being able to download the complete report, key statistics can be downloaded to excel and specific infographics can be downloaded and inserted into your own reports and presentations.  

Questions? Ask A Librarian.

Library purchases access to Met Opera on Demand

Photograph from Les Contes d'Hoffmann

Les Contes d’Hoffmann
Abel; Morley, Gerzmava, Rice, Grigolo, Hampson

     The Metropolitan Opera was founded in 1883, with its first opera house built on Broadway and 39th Street.  One-hundred-twenty-three years after its formation, the Metropolitan entered the digital world with its 2006 release of The Met: Live in HD.  This digital transmission product now reaches 70 countries with live high definition performances.  Later, in 2008, the Metropolitan released Met Opera on Demand.  This online source, to which the Library now subscribes, includes 550 opera performances, some being varying productions of the same work.  Library users can follow the link for Met Opera on Demand to access the resource.  For the website to function properly, users must be certain their personal computers have the most recent version of Adobe Flash Player installed.

Redesigned research guides are easier to use and navigate

This weekend, the University of Chicago’s Library Guides were migrated to a new platform that features a number of improvements. Most notably, use of responsive design greatly improves the user’s experience on mobile devices and assistive technology, such as screen readers.

Mobile view of a Library Guide

A Library Guide as seen on a smartphone

The new platform also uses navigation menus on the left side of the screen, rather than the tabs across the top, which should make it easier and more intuitive for users to locate content in the guides.

Our librarians have created guides on a wide variety of academic subjects studied at the University. In addition, Help Guides show you how to locate specific types of material, such as newspapers, and to use Library tools and services, such as interlibrary loan.

Visit our Library Guides page for a complete list of our guides. 


Have an international relations research topic? Check the Chatham House Online Archive

Chatham House logoThe Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) was founded in 1920 following the Paris Peace Conference. University of Chicago researchers now have access to its archives. The  Chatham House Online Archive “provides a searchable, browsable research environment that enables users to explore approximately half a million pages and over ninety years of research, expert analysis, and commentary published in briefing papers, special reports, pamphlets, conference papers and books.”

The archive includes the full text of Chatham House’s flagship publication, International Affairs, a leading academic journal on international relations (IR) topics, as well as audio recordings of Chatham House lectures, with searchable transcripts. 

You can explore the Chatham House Online Archive by region or by subject: 

  • Business and Trade
  • Communications and Media
  • Energy, Environment and Resources
  • Health and Population
  • International Economics, Finance and Investment
  • International Law
  • International Politics, Ideology and Diplomacy
  • International Security, War and Conflict
  • United Nations and UN Bodies

ChathamHouseOnlineArchive browse screenshot



What is the value of a brand?

Earlier this year, the question What is the value of a brand? was  answered on The Big Question, a video series created by Booth’s research magazine Capital Ideas.  An expert panel consisting of Professor Ann L. McGill and Professor Pradeep K. Chintagunta as well as Ann  Mukherjee, the president of global snacks and global insights at PepsiCo, discussed the function of brands, building a brand,  and measuring and increasing brand value.

University of Chicago researchers can learn more about brand value using the following resources:

  • eMarketer provides rankings by brand value across different different industries based on overall financial return to an organization’s investors, the brand’s influence on the generation of demand through choice, and the ability of the brand to create loyalty and keep generating demand and profit into the future.
  • Factiva allows you easily filter your search for content in the subject area of Branding.
  • Passport GMID covers a range of topics including brand divestment and provides  international brand share statistics and brand analysis.

Questions?  Ask a Librarian.

New online resource: eMarketer

University of Chicago researchers now have access to eMarketer.

emarketereMarketer is a database that provides digital market research information ranging from digital ad spend in the automotive industry to use statistics of the newest social media platforms, such as Meerkat and Periscope.  This data can be used to benchmark consumer behavior, size markets, and value initiatives.  

This resource includes articles, analysts reports and statistical tables which can be downloaded to Excel for further analysis.  Custom data dashboards can be built using thousands of eMarketer forecasts including ad spending, device and platform usage, retail and ecommerce sales, and time spent with media.  In addition to eMarketer’s own forecast estimate data, it is possible to compare estimates from other research groups and firms.  

Questions? Ask A Librarian.

New e-resource: IFAR’s art law and cultural property databases

If you are interested in art law research, the D’Angelo Law Library now provides e-access to the International Foundation for Art Research (IFAR)’s Art Law & Cultural Property databases. IFAR describes them as follows:

International Cultural Property/Ownership & Export Legislation (ICPOEL)

This section contains legislation governing the export and ownership of cultural property from dozens of countries. The legislation is presented in both summary form and as complete text; the latter in the original language and in translation. Selected historical legislation is also included, as, while superseded or amended, it can be useful for researchers looking for statutes applicable at the time of the acquisition, export or import of an art object. Links connect foreign legislation to relevant U.S. case law. There are also links to relevant international conventions and bilateral agreements.

Case Law & Statutes (CLS)

This section contains an extensive body of primarily U.S. case law, including both litigated cases and, notably, hard-to-find, out-of-court settlements. The material is organized under eight topics: World War II-Era/Holocaust Related Art Loss; Cultural Property (Antiquities) Disputes Over Non-United States Property; United States Cultural Property; Art Theft (other than World War II and cultural property looting); Other Ownership Title Disputes/Claims Including Conversion and Breach of Contract; Art Fraud, Attribution, Authenticity, Forgery, Libel, and Defamatory Statements; Valuation/Appraisal; and Copyright, Moral Rights and Other Issues.

Under each topic, relevant cases are summarized (where possible, with images of the art objects in question). There are also links to relevant U.S. statutes, foreign legislation and a glossary.

Law.com trial

The Library has a trial of law.com, a legal news service. Law.com features news on Class Actions, Product Liability, Corporate and Securities, Appellate Practice, Intellectual Property, and Labor & Employment law, plus all the news from the American Lawyer, the National Law Journal, the New York Law Journal, the Recorder, and other legal newspapers and magazines from American Lawyer Media

The trial lasts until May 16, 2015.  The free Law.com app for iPhone and iPad lets you save stories to read offline, and set up and manage news alerts.