Featured Electronic Resources

Redesigned research guides are easier to use and navigate

This weekend, the University of Chicago’s Library Guides were migrated to a new platform that features a number of improvements. Most notably, use of responsive design greatly improves the user’s experience on mobile devices and assistive technology, such as screen readers.

Mobile view of a Library Guide

A Library Guide as seen on a smartphone

The new platform also uses navigation menus on the left side of the screen, rather than the tabs across the top, which should make it easier and more intuitive for users to locate content in the guides.

Our librarians have created guides on a wide variety of academic subjects studied at the University. In addition, Help Guides show you how to locate specific types of material, such as newspapers, and to use Library tools and services, such as interlibrary loan.

Visit our Library Guides page for a complete list of our guides. 

 

What is the value of a brand?

Earlier this year, the question What is the value of a brand? was  answered on The Big Question, a video series created by Booth’s research magazine Capital Ideas.  An expert panel consisting of Professor Ann L. McGill and Professor Pradeep K. Chintagunta as well as Ann  Mukherjee, the president of global snacks and global insights at PepsiCo, discussed the function of brands, building a brand,  and measuring and increasing brand value.

University of Chicago researchers can learn more about brand value using the following resources:

  • eMarketer provides rankings by brand value across different different industries based on overall financial return to an organization’s investors, the brand’s influence on the generation of demand through choice, and the ability of the brand to create loyalty and keep generating demand and profit into the future.
  • Factiva allows you easily filter your search for content in the subject area of Branding.
  • Passport GMID covers a range of topics including brand divestment and provides  international brand share statistics and brand analysis.

Questions?  Ask a Librarian.

New online resource: eMarketer

University of Chicago researchers now have access to eMarketer.

emarketereMarketer is a database that provides digital market research information ranging from digital ad spend in the automotive industry to use statistics of the newest social media platforms, such as Meerkat and Periscope.  This data can be used to benchmark consumer behavior, size markets, and value initiatives.  

This resource includes articles, analysts reports and statistical tables which can be downloaded to Excel for further analysis.  Custom data dashboards can be built using thousands of eMarketer forecasts including ad spending, device and platform usage, retail and ecommerce sales, and time spent with media.  In addition to eMarketer’s own forecast estimate data, it is possible to compare estimates from other research groups and firms.  

Questions? Ask A Librarian.
 

New e-resource: IFAR’s art law and cultural property databases

If you are interested in art law research, the D’Angelo Law Library now provides e-access to the International Foundation for Art Research (IFAR)’s Art Law & Cultural Property databases. IFAR describes them as follows:

International Cultural Property/Ownership & Export Legislation (ICPOEL)

This section contains legislation governing the export and ownership of cultural property from dozens of countries. The legislation is presented in both summary form and as complete text; the latter in the original language and in translation. Selected historical legislation is also included, as, while superseded or amended, it can be useful for researchers looking for statutes applicable at the time of the acquisition, export or import of an art object. Links connect foreign legislation to relevant U.S. case law. There are also links to relevant international conventions and bilateral agreements.

Case Law & Statutes (CLS)

This section contains an extensive body of primarily U.S. case law, including both litigated cases and, notably, hard-to-find, out-of-court settlements. The material is organized under eight topics: World War II-Era/Holocaust Related Art Loss; Cultural Property (Antiquities) Disputes Over Non-United States Property; United States Cultural Property; Art Theft (other than World War II and cultural property looting); Other Ownership Title Disputes/Claims Including Conversion and Breach of Contract; Art Fraud, Attribution, Authenticity, Forgery, Libel, and Defamatory Statements; Valuation/Appraisal; and Copyright, Moral Rights and Other Issues.

Under each topic, relevant cases are summarized (where possible, with images of the art objects in question). There are also links to relevant U.S. statutes, foreign legislation and a glossary.

Law.com trial

The Library has a trial of law.com, a legal news service. Law.com features news on Class Actions, Product Liability, Corporate and Securities, Appellate Practice, Intellectual Property, and Labor & Employment law, plus all the news from the American Lawyer, the National Law Journal, the New York Law Journal, the Recorder, and other legal newspapers and magazines from American Lawyer Media

The trial lasts until May 16, 2015.  The free Law.com app for iPhone and iPad lets you save stories to read offline, and set up and manage news alerts. 

 

Library Catalog improvements

The Library has released a new version of its Library Catalog, offering enhancements and new features to improve your search:

  • Basic and advanced keyword search forms have merged. There is now one tab with keyword searching, with an option to switch to advanced search.
  • Improved printing and exporting, including the ability to mark multiple records.
  • Search terms are retained when switching to a new search option.
  • Vernacular character searching for languages such as Korean, Russian, or Arabic, is now available in all keyword searches. However, the vernacular must be included in the catalog record.
  • Improvements have been made to call number browse. Call number prefixes (such as f or s) are now ignored.
  • More information, including ebook platform, for full-text links in catalog records.
  • Search limits are now joined by Boolean OR rather than AND.
  • Catalog records can now be formatted into Chicago style.
  • Greatly improved Zotero support.
  • WorldCat search option added to the header of the catalog for quick access.

In the next few months, additional enhancements will be coming, including:

  • Improved access on mobile devices.
  • Catalog records details will be removed from tabs.
  • Addition of more Tables of Content to more book records.

For more information regarding the Library Catalog, view our help guide. Comments and questions about the Library Catalog can be submitted via our Catalog Feedback Form.

The University of Chicago Library Catalog

The new version of the Library Catalog

GSA Bulletin historical issues online from 1890 to present

oahu-1

Image from C. H. Hitchcock, “Geology of Oahu,” Geological Society of America Bulletin, January 1900, v. 11, p. 15-60, doi:10.1130/GSAB-11-15

The Geological Society of America has completed digitizing the earliest years of the Geological Society of America Bulletin, extending access online back to 1890.  These historical issues are included in the Library’s subscription to th GSA Bulletin on the GeoScienceWorld publishing platform.  

University of Chicago students, faculty and staff can see a list of all the available full text PDF issues of the GSA Bulletin by visiting the GeoScienceWorld site.

 

The Stalin Digital Archive (SDA)

StalinDigitalArchiveThe Library patrons now have access to the Stalin Digital Archive (SDA), a collaborative effort between the Russian State Archive of Social and Political History (RGASPI) and Yale University Press (YUP) to create an electronic database of finding aids, to digitize documents and images, and to publish in different forms and media materials from the recently declassified Stalin archive in the holdings of RGASPI.

J. Arch Getty at UCLA in his introduction to the database writes:

Joseph Stalin’s life (1878–1953) coincided with the most momentous events of the twentieth century: two world wars, several revolutions in Russia and China, the Cold War, and the dawn of the nuclear age. Stalin was influential in the Chinese revolutions and communist victory, the Korean conflict, and the occupation of Eastern Europe. In terms of modern Russian history he played key roles in the revolutionary movement, the Bolshevik revolution of 1917, Soviet industrialization, the terror of the 1930s, World War II, and the Cold War.

It is therefore difficult to imagine a more important primary source for these events than Stalin’s personal archive, major portions of which are now declassified and available for study. Although specialists have known and used these documents for some time in the Russian State Archive of Social and Political History (RGASPI) in Moscow, the Stalin Digital Archive (SDA) will now make them available electronically, eliminating the need to travel to Moscow and rendering the documents searchable and printable, actions that are difficult even in the Moscow archive.

Moreover, the SDA will for the first time make these documents accessible to students and specialists in other fields for both research and teaching. The SDA will provide translations of hundreds of selected key documents from Russian into English. These translated documents will be accompanied by scholarly annotations.

The importance of Stalin’s archive might be seen in two ways, external and internal.Stalin Externally, Stalin’s papers provide us with unparalleled information on the development of key historical events from the point of view of a participant. Obviously, because he was a dictator, everything of importance came across his desk. For example, these materials fully document Soviet industrialization and agricultural collectivization from the late 1920s. There is practically a full series of economic reports to and orders from Stalin over many years. Foreign relations, both with Germans and potential allies in the 1930s and with Cold War opponents in the 1940s, received his close attention. It will be possible to rewrite and restudy the histories of such important events of a violent century.

One of the differences between the Nazi and Soviet regimes is the level of sensitive documentation. Although the Nazis were meticulous in keeping some kinds of records, at the top we have practically nothing in writing about many kinds of decisions. We have almost no “smoking gun” documents about the decision to exterminate Jews and others, and not much about the inner politics of Hitler’s court and the bureaucratic empires of his courtiers. In short, Hitler did not write much down, nor was he interested in documenting his decisions.

The Stalinists, on the other hand, were not ashamed of or worried about recording their most sensitive (and evil) decisions. During the Stalinist terror of the 1930s, we have Stalin’s correspondence with his secret police chiefs N. I. Ezhov and L. P. Beria in which he ordered the arrest, torture, and execution of various people. When in 1940 Stalin and the Politburo decided to shoot more than 20,000 captured Polish officers at Katyn, they recorded their decisions in memos and resolutions, complete with justifications. Compared with that of the Nazis, the documentation on Soviet repression is full and rich, and some of the most important elements of it came from Stalin’s desk and trademark blue pencil.

In addition to enhancing our ability to study major events of the twentieth century with new materials, Stalin’s archive also has a fascinating internal, personal component. It shows us the nature and evolution of Stalin’s own thought, opinions, and decision-making process.

Consider, for example, the more than 300 books in his personal library. Stalin once told his lieutenants that if they weren’t reading several hundred pages a week, they were illiterate. The record shows that Stalin was a voracious reader of a wide variety of subjects who made detailed notations in the margins of what he read. His opinions about political, literary, and philosophical works are fascinating and revealing about how he thought.

Similarly, the archive contains hundreds of manuscripts sent to Stalin by others for his corrections and comments. He often answered them in written letters, but just as often he made detailed marginalia that show his reactions. Both types of reactions are preserved in his archives. Similarly, although most of his articles and speeches have been published, the drafts and rewrites of them are in his archive and show the evolution of his thinking as well as his consideration of word choice and discursive strategy.

The archive contains a wealth of Stalin’s correspondence with his lieutenants on important and secret subjects. These letters and telegrams show Stalin’s opinions of Lenin, other Bolshevik leaders, and world figures as well as his reflections on policy choices. When writing to his closest Politburo assistants, he was informal and often quite unguarded.

We have nothing like this level of documentation for Hitler or other twentieth-century dictators, and the scope of SDA documents is comparable with the archival source bases we have for world leaders in more-open societies. It is probably not an exaggeration to say that study of these documents will enrich, if not revolutionize, our understanding of the Soviet Union.

 

Access American Mathematics Society journals off campus with mobile pairing

American Math Society LogoThe AMS now offers mobile pairing, a way for users to “pair” their various web browsing devices (smartphones, tablets, laptops, desktops) with the University of Chicago network.  Once you have paired your device you can access AMS electronic products the Library subscribes to easily whether or not you are connected to our network.

Pair your device at ams.org/pairing/pair_my_device.html when you are on campus. 

Your pairing will last for 90 days and you can renew it as many times as you like.  More information is available here: http://ams.org/publications/mobilepairing.

PubMed now able to sort by relevance

PubMed recently rolled out a new relevancy sort feature, available from the “Display Settings” drop-list. Sort order is calculated based on an algorithm in which the frequency of search terms in citations and fields in which they appear are weighted, as well as the citation’s recency.  Read more at the NLM.

HHow to access relevance sort.

How to access relevance sort.