Recent awards mark latest in D’Angelo’s long history of service and accolades

Significant honors that recognized members of the D’Angelo Law Library staff this year were the latest in a string of accolades for the University of Chicago’s law librarians, whose dedication to their field has long been marked by service to local and national library groups. 

Todd Ito

Todd Ito

This spring, Lorna Tang, who retired in June as the Associate Law Librarian for Technical Services after 38 years at the D’Angelo, was given the Chicago Association of Law Libraries (CALL) Outstanding Lifetime Achievement in Law Librarianship Award, and Foreign and International Law Librarian Lyonette Louis-Jacques was given the Global Legal Skills Award for Outstanding Contributions to International Legal Skills Education, as well as a top marketing award from the American Association of Law Libraries, the profession’s national association. Todd Ito, the D’Angelo’s Coordinator of Instruction and Outreach, was also elected Vice President/President-elect of Chicago Association of Law Libraries, becoming the most recent D’Angelo librarian to hold a top leadership position with the organization.

“The D’Angelo librarians have always had a strong commitment to service in professional law library associations,” said Sheri Lewis, Director of the D’Angelo Law Library. “This commitment is reflected not only in the awards bestowed on University of Chicago law librarians but in the ongoing respect from colleagues who actively seek and rely upon D’Angelo leadership in the professional community.”

Tang—who managed her staff through two major renovations of the library building, each time reorganizing work spaces and revising workflows—was the third librarian associated with the D’Angelo to win CALL’s lifetime achievement award.  The award, also given in 2013 to retired D’Angelo Law Library Director Judith M. Wright and in 2012 to former D’Angelo librarian Judith Gaskell, recognizes an “outstanding contribution to the Chicago law library community” and “consistently high levels of noteworthy professional contribution.” Tang became a member of CALL in 1977 and served on numerous committees.

Louis-Jacques received her award at the Global Legal Skills Conference, which is a leading international gathering for global skills education. She was honored for her 2013 book, International Law Legal Research, which was designed to show how to research sources of international law and help schools create stand-alone courses in international law legal research. She also won the 2015 Excellence in Marketing Award, Best Newsletter from AALL. It recognized the Chicago Association of Law Libraries’ CALL Bulletin, which Louis-Jacques co-edited.

Ito, who has been involved with CALL since he moved to Chicago in 2006 to work at the D’Angelo, also became the organization’s incoming Vice President and President-elect this spring.

“CALL has enabled me to connect with so many colleagues at other law school libraries, as well as at law firm, court, government, and public law libraries in the area,” Ito said. “Other AALL chapters are very spread out geographically, and the close proximity is a real benefit. We see each other at business meetings and other programs throughout the year, so we get more of a chance to get to know each other. That has made it easy for me to be able to reach out to another academic law librarians in the city to discuss what they’re doing with legal research instruction, or to talk to a law firm colleague about what legal research databases they’re using.”

The D’Angelo Law Library has a long history of high-profile accolades and appointments, for example:

  • AALL’s Marian Gould Gallagher Distinguished Service Award—one of the highest awards a law librarian can receive—has been given four times to a law librarian who has worked at the D’Angelo. Former D’Angelo librarians Nancy Johnson (2012), Adolf Sprudzs (2000), Elizabeth Benyon (1992), and Leon M. Liddell (1989) all received this honor.  
  • Five members of the AALL Hall of Fame at one time worked for the D’Angelo: Wright, Johnson, Benyon, Liddell, and Sprudzs.
  • Librarians associated with the D’Angelo have won nine major awards from the CALL, including three for lifetime achievement. Lewis also won the Agnes and Harry Reid Award for Outstanding Contribution to Law Librarianship in 2011.
  • Two D’Angelo law librarians have served as president of CALL. Margaret Schilt, the Associate Law Librarian for User Services, in 2014 – 2015, and Lewis in 2008 – 2009.
  • All of the D’Angelo librarians have held leadership positions in CALL at some point. Head of Cataloging Patricia Sayre-McCoy served on the Executive Board and has chaired several CALL committees and is now on the Local Arrangements Committee for the 2016 AALL Annual Meeting. Common Law Bibliographer Bill Schwesig led the CALL’s Internet Committee for several years. Catalog Librarian Michael D. Brown and Faculty Services Librarian Thomas Drueke have participated in CALL committees.
  • At the national level, Louis-Jacques also has been on the AALL Executive Board and she, along with Lewis, Ito, and Sayre-McCoy, have chaired AALL special interest sections and/or committees. Interim Head of Technical Services Julie Stauffer is a co-editor of the Technical Services section bulletin.
  • Reference and Virtual Access Librarian Connie Fleischer currently is serving on the Illinois Government Depository Council, an advisory group to the Illinois State Library on government information issues.
  • Sprudzs, a former D’Angelo Foreign and International Law Librarian who was instrumental in building and expanding the D’Angelo’s foreign law collection, was a founding member and former president of International Association of Law Librarians in 1959.

“Librarians are born collaborators and rely on their professional networks both to keep current on new developments in legal information but also to enhance library services. We all have many stories about impressing a faculty member or student by getting a hidden gem for them,” Lewis said. “Law library associations are part of the secret to our success—it is not only what you know but who you know.”

A University of Chicago Law School news release

Alumni honor Ray Gadke with named student internship

The longtime keeper of the Library’s microforms—and longtime wearer of Hawaiian shirts—becomes the namesake for a new student internship

Ray Gadke

Ray Gadke. (Photo by Hannah Gitlin)

On a Thursday in late June, Raymond Gadke, AM’66, walked into a restaurant filled with a sea of Hawaiian shirts, and those shirts were filled with University students and alumni of different ages. When Gadke, himself dressed in a Hawaiian shirt, sat down amid this sea, John Boyer, AM’69, PhD’79, the dean of the College, presented him with a giant check for $75,000.

This was the culmination of a fundraising effort to establish an internship honoring Gadke, a longtime University of Chicago Library staff member. More than 50 alumni—many of whom were in the room, wearing those Hawaiian shirts—raised $75,000 to create the Ray Gadke Internship Fund Established by Friends of Ray to Endow Undergraduate Internships (as it says on Gadke’s plaque commemorating the occasion). The fund will be part of UChicago’s larger Metcalf Internship Program, which offers undergraduate students paid experience in their chosen field. The Metcalf program was established in 1997 by University trustee (and Gadke internship donor) Byron Trott, AB’81, MBA’82.  

Brooks Dexter, AB’79, MBA’84, led the fundraising effort for the internship honoring Gadke. Now managing director at corporate finance advising firm Duff and Phelps, Dexter was, once upon a time—like nearly all those who gave money to the internship fund—a College student working for Gadke in the Reg’s microforms library. “For more than 40 years, Ray has been helping undergraduates make the journey from College to the next step in their lives,” Dexter says. He calls Gadke a friend and a mentor. “Those of us in Ray’s employ were known as ‘Ray’s Rangers.’” For the past 15 years, Gadke has sent a daily email of “fun facts” to his network of friends and former employees, “including a happy birthday wish to any Rangers with a birthday that day,” Dexter says. (The August 3 email, which stretches to 15 pages, notes that on that day in 1492, “Christopher Columbus set sail from Palos [Spain, not Illinois] with his three ships, seeking a westward route to India and China” and that in 1946, “what some historians consider the first ‘theme park’ in the world, Santa Claus Land, opened in Santa Claus, Indiana.”)

And why the Hawaiian shirts? Because Gadke wears them just about every day, and has ever since he saw Elvis Presley in the film Blue Hawaii. “I had worn button down shirts and stuff like that, but I thought, these are nice, and I got in the habit of wearing them,” he says.

Gadke’s job title is reading room manager, but he has worn many hats during his time at the University. He arrived in the 1960s as a history graduate student, studying the role of religion in American immigrants’ assimilation, an interest that he has maintained and that inspired his sizable collection of religious figurines from shuttered Chicago-area churches. During Gadke’s academic research, he’d met a number of local priests, and when the Archdiocese of Chicago decided to close some of its churches, “one of the pastors called me and told me, ‘I’ve got a church full of statues, what can I do with them?’ And so I said, Hey, that’s kind of a neat idea,’ and so I started acquiring them.” Gadke keeps a few of these statues in his office on the third floor of the Regenstein Library, but says that walking into his apartment, which has about 45 of these statues, kind of feels like walking into a church.

In 1971 Gadke was hired to supervise the microfilms collection, which is headquartered on the third floor of the library. Later his jurisdiction grew to encompass current periodicals as well, and now his job includes care of all of the library’s reading rooms: the periodical reading room on the second floor, the reference collections throughout the library, and and, of course, the microfilms.

Microfilms have been an important method of document preservation from the early 20th century through the end of the 20th century. After that, digitization took over, but microfilms remain important because of the volume of material they still store: newspapers, magazines, photographs, and countless other documents. Creating microfilms involved sliding individual documents under a projector and taking photographs of these documents using a film camera. This process, as Gadke explains, was equivalent to today’s digitization.

The University was one of the very first institutions to have an academic microfilm collection. Herman Fussler, AM’41, PhD’48, the former director of the UChicago Library system, started the University’s Department of Photoduplication, which produced massive amounts of microfilm in the basement of Cobb Hall (where the coffee shop is today) until its closing in 1995. Fussler created some of the very first academic microfilm when he sailed to Paris on an ocean liner full of microfilm equipment in order to catalog French Revolutionary newspapers from 1788 to 1791—film that UChicago still has. Though the University no longer maintains the Department of Photoduplication, microfilm still contains an amazing amount of knowledge about an incredible range of topics.

And Gadke himself has an amazing amount of knowledge about an incredible range of topics. At the library he helps patrons—students, scholars, visitors—find the research they need. “Everyone’s looking for something different,” he says. “People come from all over the world to use our collection. A lot of the things that we have, we are the only place in the country that has them.” That includes original copies of Revolutionary French newspapers, old Irish newspapers obtained for a professor studying Ireland, Armenian newspapers—as well as the good old Chicago Maroon. “We have people that want to look from the glory days of Big Ten football, want to come and read about Amos Alonzo Stagg and University of Chicago football. Right where we are”—he was standing in the Regenstein Library—”were football stands that held 40,000 people, and got up to 60,000.”

Gadke is approaching his 45th year working as a full-time staff member, which means that he’s worked at the Library for longer than any other man on the staff. When I asked him how it came to pass that he ended up working at the library, he told me, “It just kinda happened. You know, I got a job that I enjoyed, and it’s where I’ve been since.”

The article originally appeared on the University of Chicago Magazine website.

Meet new Business & Economics Librarian for Instruction & Outreach Emily Treptow

Treptow Emily2014Emily Treptow joined the University of Chicago Library on June 1 as the new Business & Economics Librarian for Instruction & Outreach.  She came to us from Michigan State University where she was a Business Reference Librarian from November 2012 to May 2015.

Below, Emily has answered questions about her plans for her work at the University of Chicago 

How do you envision working with faculty and students in your new role here?

I am very excited about my new role, which is also a brand new position at the library.  It was created with leeway for me to spend time outside the library to meet with students and faculty at the locations most convenient for them.  I will be available to travel to Booth’s Harper Center and Gleacher Center and to the Economics Department in Saieh Hall to provide research assistance via office hours and instruction.  I also envision leveraging this flexibility by attending relevant discussions and workshops on campus to better equip myself to build a program of outreach that will provide the research services that faculty and students need.  I hope to be involved in orientation sessions for new Booth and Economics students, in addition to providing increased point of need services and instruction.

Do you have a sense of what you’d like to accomplish in your first year at University of Chicago?

In my first year, I would like to spend time meeting with Booth and Economics students, staff and faculty to learn more about their needs and how I can create services to meet those needs.  I would also like use social media as another means for building these connections. 

UChicago faculty and students are encouraged to contact Emily with questions or requests for assistance with business & economics research, teaching and learning. You can reach Emily at or 773.834.3415.

Meet new Science Research Services Librarian Michelle Bass

michelle bassMichelle Bass joined the University of Chicago Library on July 1 as the new Science Research Services Librarian.

Michelle has a MSI from the University of Michigan School of Information and PhD from the University of Wisconsin – Madison School of Education. Michelle held a University Library Associate, Graduate Student Assistantship position at the Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan from August 2013-June 2015.

Barbara Kern interviewed Michelle about her experiences and plans for her work at UChicago.

How do you envision working with faculty and students in your new role here?

One of my main goals in this new position is to serve as a welcoming “concierge” between faculty and students and the information professionals working in the library, particularly when it comes to data information literacy and data management services.   I want to be knowledgeable about the topics and discussions going on across departments and fields of study as they relate to research services and create opportunities for me to share and suggest new technologies and databases, software options, and trends with faculty and students.  I hope to be involved in orientation sessions for new graduate students in all science departments and continue my participation and relationship building with students and faculty throughout the year through my attendance and contributions to monthly seminars and brown-bag lunches across centers and schools.  Getting students interested and invested in the importance of data information literacy and research service best practices will be a main goal complemented by building relationships with faculty who are interested in becoming advocates and partners in sharing a passion, and respect, for research services.

Michelle, what originally got you interested in science libraries?

This is one of those times when I can say “I blame my mother” and mean it as a wonderful compliment.  My mother has worked at medical libraries for nearly forty years.  I knew that there were other kinds of libraries out there in the world beyond my local public library and school’s media center growing up.  However, my interest in science librarianship as a professional option was really cultivated over the past two years through my experiences working at the Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan and networking with many medical and science librarians at national and regional conferences.  

What are some of the highlights of your time as a Graduate Student Assistantship at the Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan?

Traditional health sciences library-focused highlights included instruction sessions with students in their first through fourth years of medical school and the opportunity to work with the Associate Dean of Medical Student Education to craft many of these sessions.  I was the information professional lead on a systematic review on the effects of bullying on LGBTQ students and worked with a Public Health and School of Information professor on creating a data management plan for an extensive scoping review of consumer health informatics literature.  I was also encouraged and able to take continuing education and professional development courses including PubMed for Trainers and Expert Searching.  As a member of the social committee, I was a co-organizer of the Donut Madness bracket challenge during the NCAA March Madness tournament and am proud that this delicious event is now an annual tradition at Taubman Health Sciences Library.

What are the key challenges or trends that you see in libraries today?

A key challenge facing academic libraries today is expanding the concept of what defines a library.  For me, a library is defined by the people who work in them and the skills and information they make accessible in addition to the materials they hold within their walls.  Importantly, they are not confined by the walls of their physical library spaces but rather move and travel with the services and knowledge shared by information professionals representing their library as institutions wherever they go.  With respect to the librarianship profession, I think a major opportunity is presenting itself as a generation of librarians prepare for retirement.  The curriculum of my mother’s master in library science degree and my own share few, if any, similarities beyond the fact that they are both American Library Association accredited.  It is up to both incoming professionals and long-standing pillars of the profession to proactively connect with one another to ensure institutional and professional knowledge is shared and cultivated to help rising leaders respond to the challenges ahead.

What do you like best about Chicago (the city) so far?

While Chicago definitely falls under the “big city” category, I have found that the distinct neighborhoods within the city make it much more manageable and inviting.  I decided to live in Hyde Park to be able to walk to work, and I have truly enjoyed getting to know my new neighborhood.  I’ve always lived in the suburbs and had to drive to shops and grocery stores; now, Treasure Island is a 7 minute walk and Hyde Park Produce is 15.  The Museum of Science and Industry is 2 blocks away and I’m a short(ish) bus or train ride away from the Art Institute of Chicago and the Shedd Aquarium.  So, a few weeks in, I have to say that getting to know the Hyde Park neighborhood has been the best part about Chicago, so far.

UChicago faculty and students are encouraged to contact Michelle with questions or requests for assistance with science research, teaching and learning. You can reach Michelle at or 773-702-8774.

Sandra Roscoe, Reference Librarian and Bibliographer for Current Fiction, 1947-2015

A dedicated member of the Joseph Regenstein Library’s Reference Department for 39 years, Sandra Roscoe helped generations of students and faculty members find the resources they needed. She died of a stroke on Friday, May 29 at the age of 67.

“Sandy was the consummate reference librarian,” said Jeffry Archer, Head of Reference Instruction and Outreach at Regenstein. “She was passionate about helping patrons, bringing her extensive knowledge of our institution and our print and electronic resources to bear on any question until the answer, resource, or right person was found to fulfill the patron’s need.”

Sandra Roscoe

Sandra Roscoe in 2009 (Photo by Lloyd DeGrane)

Sandy began work at the University of Chicago Library in 1975 as an Assistant Reference Librarian and was later promoted to Reference Librarian. Beginning in 1980, she had selection responsibilities for current English and American fiction.

“Sandy was such a great resource for students,” said Judith Dartt, AM’06, the Digitization Manager for the Library’s Special Collections Research Center. “When I came here as a graduate student, I always received the attention and help I needed from her. Sandy did wonderful work for Special Collections, too, during the time she provided reference support.”

Sandy received her B.A. in English Literature with distinction and honors from Mount Holyoke College.  After two years of graduate study in English at Clemson University, she went to University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where she earned her M.S. in Library Science and was elected to Beta Phi Mu, the librarians’ honor society.

During the 1990s, Sandy participated actively in the development of the library catalog Horizon and served on numerous committees including the Media Review and Implementation and Digital Resources Delivery Group.  She enjoyed writing, edited the orientation newsletter in the early 1980s, and served as the Regenstein Coordinator of Public Information in the late 1990s, helping to supply information about the Library to campus publications and other media.  She served on the Reference Advisory Subcommittee of the Virtual Access Committee, and in the early 2000’s assisted with exhibition planning and provided reference service for Reader Services in Special Collections. 

“As our colleague, Sandy infused us with her excitement, sharing questions and resources that came to her while providing reference,” said Archer. “And she made us feel special, often bringing in baked goodies like her amazing ginger cookies.”

Sandy is survived by her brother-in-law, Kent Rigsby, and her niece, Dr. Dana Gossett. 

Donations in Sandy’s memory may be made to the University of Chicago Library’s Fund for Books, which supports the purchase of print and digital resources. To make a gift, contact the Library Development Office at 773-702-7695.


Alice Schreyer, Associate University Librarian for Area Studies and Special Collections, leaves UChicago

Alice Schreyer will be leaving the University of Chicago Library to join the Newberry Library as the Roger and Julie Baskes Vice President for Collections and Library Services on August 24. Alice’s last day at UChicago will be July 17.

Alice Schreyer

Alice Schreyer

“Alice has accomplished a tremendous amount for the Library since her arrival in 1991,” said Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian at the University of Chicago. Serving initially as Curator and then Director of Special Collections through 2011, she fundamentally reconceived and expanded collections, programs, and spaces to emphasize and encourage the use of rare and unique materials by faculty and students at all levels. Among the collections added to the Library during Alice’s tenure are the Saul Bellow Papers, the Barbara and Bill Yoffee Collection of African-American Children’s Literature, the Bibliotheca Homerica Langiana, and the Daniel Clowes Archive. Alice supported the retrospective conversion of Special Collections catalog records, the encoding of archives and manuscript finding aids in EAD, and the launch of the Aeon online request circulation system. An early champion of digitization of Special Collections materials, Alice led several grant-funded projects and helped guide the development and expansion of Library digital collections as co-chair of the Digital Collections Steering Committee. She also oversaw a transformative series of construction projects, including the reconfiguration that shifted Special Collections from three floors to two and created new stack and staff spaces on A-Level; the Rosenthal Seminar Room project that produced the Library’s first smart classroom; the HVAC project that addressed environmental needs of the collections; and the recently completed construction project that reshaped Special Collections’ first floor and created its new public face on the Mansueto pathway. She also directed Preservation from 2007-2011 as the Mansueto Library, with its new Conservation and Digitization Laboratories, was being planned and constructed.

Since 2011, the Library has benefitted from Alice’s leadership in a number of roles. She served as Assistant University Librarian for Humanities, Social Sciences and Special Collections from January 2012 to June 2014, creating the Library’s first unified humanities, social sciences, and area studies division; as Interim Library Director and Associate University Librarian for Area Studies and Special Collections from July to December 2014; and as Associate University Librarian for Area Studies and Special Collections and Curator of Rare Books since January 2015.  

Alice has also played a vital role in shaping special collections librarianship throughout the country. Before joining us, she worked at Columbia University’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library, the Library of Congress, and the University of Delaware Library. She was the founding editor of the ACRL journal Rare Books & Manuscripts from 1988 to 1993 and a member of the ARL Task Force on Special Collections (2002-2006), for which she wrote “Education and Training for Careers in Special Collections Librarianship; A White Paper” (November 2004). Book collectors and librarians continue to refer to Alice’s essay, Elective Affinities: Private Collectors & Special Collections in Libraries (Chicago: University of Chicago Library, 2001), originally delivered at the Library of Congress and published by the University of Chicago Library Society. In addition to teaching courses on special collections librarianship from 2001-2012, she has served on the Board of Directors of the Rare Book School at the University of Virginia since 2004, as Secretary from 2009 through 2014, and as Chair since January 2014.

“We will miss Alice greatly but are pleased to know that she will be nearby and that we will have the opportunity to collaborate with her as she takes on her new role at the Newberry,” Johnson said.

Tsuen-hsuin Tsien, Curator Emeritus of the East Asian Collection, 1909-2015

Tsuen-hsuin (T.H.) Tsien, Curator Emeritus of the East Asian Collection of the Joseph Regenstein Library and Professor Emeritus of Far Eastern Languages and Civilizations (now East Asian Languages and Civilizations) of the University of Chicago, passed away in Chicago on April 9, 2015, at the age of 105.

Dr. Tsuen-hsuin Tsien (center) with Professor Edward Shaughnessy (right) and Mary Tsien Dunkel (left) at the conference “Texting China—Composition, Transmission, Preservation of Pre-modern Chinese Textual Materials” at the University of Chicago Library in 2012. (Photo by Jason Smith)

Dr. Tsuen-hsuin Tsien (center) with Professor Edward Shaughnessy (right) and Mary Tsien Dunkel (left) at the conference “Texting China—Composition, Transmission, Preservation of Pre-modern Chinese Textual Materials” at the University of Chicago Library in 2012. (Photo by Jason Smith)

T.H. lived a long and extraordinarily full life. He liked to say that he was born under the last emperor of China, in 1909, in Taixian (today’s Taizhou City), Jiangsu, China. In 1927, before entering university, he participated in the Northern Expedition, a military effort of the Nationalist government of China that resulted in the unification of China. In 1928, T.H. entered Jinling University (the precursor of Nanjing University), from which he was graduated in 1932 with a degree in Library Science. After graduation, he worked first in Shanghai at the Jiaotong University Library, and then in Nanjing at the Nanjing Branch of the Peking Library (the forerunner of the National Library of China). In December, 1941, he was personally responsible for shipping rare books from the library to the United States Library of Congress for safe-keeping during the war, arranging for 2,720 individual titles in some 30,000 volumes to be crated for shipment. The books left the port of Shanghai, then still an open city, just days before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and made it safely to Washington. After the conclusion of the war, T.H. went to Washington to arrange for the return of the books. However, the outbreak of civil war in China made their return at the time impossible, and T.H. remained in America together with the books. In 1947, Herrlee G. Creel (1905-1994; Martin A. Ryerson Professor Emeritus of Chinese Studies at the University) invited T.H. to the University of Chicago to manage the Far Eastern Library (now East Asian Collection). T.H. remained in Chicago thereafter.

It is no exaggeration to say that T.H. Tsien was the most influential Chinese librarian in America. Not only did he develop one of the country’s greatest East Asian libraries at the University of Chicago, but he also trained a generation of students for East Asian libraries around the country including those who went on to head the East Asian libraries at Harvard and Princeton. In addition, his published scholarship continues to have a profound influence on the fields of Chinese bibliography, paleography, and science and technology. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1957; his dissertation, published by the University of Chicago Press in 1962 as Written on Bamboo and Silk: The Beginnings of Chinese Books and Inscriptions, is still regarded as a classic in the field. In 1978, after retiring from his position as Curator of the East Asian Collection, T.H. accepted an invitation from Joseph Needham to participate in Needham’s great Science and civilisation in China project. In 1984, T.H. contributed Vol. 5.1: Paper and Printing, the first volume in the series to be published under a name other than Needham’s. After this time, he remained active. In 2011, his book Collected Writings on Chinese Culture, was published by the Chinese University of Hong Kong Press. It includes thirty essays on “Ancient Documents and Artifacts,” “Paper, Ink, and Printing,” “Cultural Exchange and Librarianship,” “Biographies of Eminent Scholars,” “Memoir of a Centenarian,” and “Essays about the Author.” The volume also contains prefaces by Edward L. Shaughnessy and Anthony C. Yu, his colleagues at the University of Chicago, relating many more of his contributions to the University and to scholarship.

T.H. Tsien has now rejoined his beloved wife Wen-ching Hsu, who was one of the first instructors of Chinese at the University, and his eldest daughter Ginger, both of whom passed away in 2008. He is survived by two other daughters, Mary Tsien Dunkel and Gloria Tsien, as well as by his nephew Xiaowen Qian, Assistant to the Curator for the East Asian Collection of the Regenstein Library. He has established a legacy that will endure as long as scholars continue to value books.

Updated 9/16/15

Fall Fest offers behind-the-scenes look at D’Angelo

Dan Scime, ’17, had just finished a round of Law School Jeopardy! in the D’Angelo Law Library conference room, correctly guessing which park was the site of the 1893 Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition.

“I’ll take ‘Around Town’ for 500,” he told law librarians Lyonette Louis-Jacques and Bill Schwesig, before reading the question on the screen and asking, “What is Jackson Park?”

It was a sight probably familiar to second- and third-year students: The library’s fourth annual Fall Fest, an afternoon of games, trivia, and homemade baked goods designed to introduce new Students play Jeopardy game at Fall Feststudents to the library’s staff and resources. As part of this year’s event, students played “Name that Tune” in the Fulton Reading Room; tossed beanbags at wood UChicago cornhole platforms; tried their hands at a mini-golf putting green; and sampled cupcakes, cookies, chocolate-covered pretzels, and other treats made by library staff. (A particularly popular item: Margaret Schilt’s pumpkin cupcakes. Find the recipe in the right column). Todd Ito, Coordinator of Instruction and Outreach and a reference librarian, organized this year’s Fest and also planned and staffed the “Name that Tune” station with librarian Thomas Drueke. 

Students also talked to Lorna Tang, Associate Law Librarian for Technical Services, about the library’s Chicago Collection, which consists of five shelves of about 250 books — ranging from Jean F. Block’s Hyde Park Houses to Erik Larson’s Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness in the Fair that Changed America — as well as DVDs about Chicago. The collection was first set up with funds donated in memory of Thomas Owens, who worked at the library’s circulation desk for more than 40 years. He was fond of law students — and they were fond of him — and he loved Chicago.

“Many new students don’t come from Chicago, and this collection will give them a little flavor,” Tang said.

The event gave many of the nearly 130 students who attended a closer look at the 695,083-volume library, which was named for alumnus Dino D’Angelo, ‘44, an attorney, real estate owner, patron of the arts, and philanthropist. Students who took time to chat up some of the library’s 25 full-time staff might have learned which librarian brews his own beer, why there’s a chevron “crack” in the floor behind the reference desk, and how the library acquires the nodding justices in its U.S. Supreme Court bobblehead collection.

Didn’t have time to ask those questions? In honor of Fall Fest, we’ve compiled some of our favorite lesser-known facts about the library and its staff.

The library’s staff speaks or reads 16 languages: American Sign Language, Catalan, Chinese, Dutch, English, French, German, Haitian Creole, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Provençal, Spanish, Romanian, and Russian. “It keeps things interesting,” said Louis-Jacques, who speaks Haitian Creole, French, Spanish, and “a little German.”

The most popular of the 1,643 titles in the library’s DVD collection is the television series “The Wire.” Also popular: The Godfather, China Town, Fight Club, and The Godfather Part II.

Edward H. Levi, ’35, started out in the library, and he wasn’t paid very well. Rather than hire him as a full-time professor in 1936, the Law School made him a law librarian and an assistant professor, paying him a total of $3,000 — $125 less than the most junior member of the faculty made at the inception of the Law School in 1902. His library assignment, which accounted for one-third of his original salary, lasted only a year. In 1937, he was hired as a full-time professor and his salary went up accordingly. Levi, of course, went on to serve as Dean of the Law School, President of the University, and Attorney General of the United States.

Library Assistant Steve Coats was a U.S. diplomat in Mexico during the Clinton administration. He worked for several years in the early 1990s in the cultural and press section of the American embassy in Mexico City and the American consulate in Tijuana.

The zig-zagging fissure that runs along the floor behind the reference desk marks the division between the old library and the 1987 expansion. The renovation, which preserved the architectural integrity of Eero Saarinen’s original design, expanded the building by forty-five feet to the south.

The staff has nearly 350 years of combined library experience.

The collection includes about 1,500 books written by alumni. Those titles range from legal practice materials to fiction.

Library Director Sheri Lewis greets students at Fall FestD’Angelo Library Director Sheri Lewis owns two guinea pigs. They are named Gwendolen and Cecilyafter characters in Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest.

The library has 10 SCOTUS bobbleheads: James Iredell, Benjamin Curtis, Harry A. Blackmun, William H. Rehnquist, John Paul Stevens, Sandra Day O’Connor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony M. Kennedy, David H. Souter, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. “The Green Bag issues the dolls and doesn’t ship them,” said Patricia Sayre-McCoy, Head of Cataloging and Serials. “We have to find someone in Washington, D.C., who can pick them up for us and either send them or bring them back to the library.”

Sayre-McCoy is a science-fiction/fantasy writer. She’s been writing stories for about 30 years and has sold two of them to Sword and Sorceress, a series of fantasy anthologies. 

The library’s staff manually counts heads five times a day so they know exactly how patrons use the facility. At opening, in the morning, afternoon, evening and at closing, a staff member spends about 15 minutes walking through the library counting the number of people in different locations, including at window tables and center tables, in carrels and conference rooms, and on black sofas and low shelf seating. The counter uses a special form that has a box for each of the six floors and places to record the date, time, day of the week, and academic quarter.

Drueke brews his own craft beer. He particularly likes making low-alcohol English “session” beers.

The Law School was re-created in 800 Legos by Zach Mayo, ’14. It is displayed on the library’s reference desk.

Six members of the library staff have JDs, and all 11 librarians have masters degrees in library science.

Margaret Schilt is an art quilter. The Associate Law Librarian for User Services, who also teaches Writing and Research in the United States Legal System, has been making the quilted hangings for about eight years. There is one in her office now that depicts white cemetery crosses stitched into a backdrop of green panels, and one solitary cross against a red backdrop in the upper-right corner. She calls it “War and Peace.”

The library’s entire sixth floor is devoted to foreign, comparative, and international law. It has a strong collection from the European Union, especially Germany.

Eight members of the library staff have attended the University of Chicago, either the college or one of the graduate schools.

The framed cross-stitch hanging on the third floor was made by Diane Wood, Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and a senior lecturer at the Law School.

Binding Assistant John Mulholland used to be in the Peace Corps, working as a teacher in Swaziland, Africa, from January 1969 to March 1975. He is also the longest-serving member of the library staff, having started in 1976.

The most popular places to sit are at the window tables on the second and third floors. (Remember the head count? That’s how they know).

Senior Acquisitions Assistant Sheila Ralston has more than 10,000 books in her home. About 500 of them are hers—mostly mysteries and English literature (her college major), true crime, and knitting books—and the rest belong to her husband, a game designer and writer who has been collecting books since childhood. The books are stored in bookcases throughout their home.

Julie Stauffer, Head of Acquisitions and Electronic Resources, is an accomplished knitter who first picked up the craft from a “Coats and Clark’s Learn How” pamphlet as a child. She’s not the only avid knitter, either: a group of Law School knitters meets once a week in Library Conference Room 211A.

The library is busiest at the beginning of Autumn Quarter and during Winter Quarter finals. Students check out the most items between 11 a.m. and noon, 2:30 p.m. and 3 p.m., and two hours before closing. The library space is most crowded between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

A University of Chicago Law School news release

Deb Werner recognized as Rising Star by the Medical Library Association

Deb Werner, Librarian for Science Instruction and Outreach, has been recognized as a 2014-2015 Rising Star by the Medical Library Association (MLA). The MLA Rising Star Program, now in its fourth year, is a one-year leadership development program designed to identify emerging leaders within its members of health sciences librarians and provide leadership opportunities. Those selected to participate are paired with experienced mentors who guide the mentee through the design and implementation of a project.

Deb’s project is to create and disseminate a Public Policy Toolkit for MLA members. The Toolkit will be a roadmap that members may use to 1) understand the public policy issues important to the health sciences library profession, 2) learn the various ways to become involved in advocacy, and 3) appreciate the effects of advocacy on the health sciences library community.

Deb has been paired with four mentors: the co-chairs of the Joint MLA/AAHSL Legislative Task Force, the chair of MLA’s Government Relations Committee, and MLA’s Director of Information Issues and Policy. Respectively, they are: Linné Girouard, Hospital Librarian and Director, Professional Education Center, Houston Methodist Hospital; Cynthia L. Henderson, Executive Director, Louis Stokes Health Sciences Library, Howard University; Linda Hasman, Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) Liaison Services Librarian, Edward G. Miner Library, University of Rochester; and Mary M. Langman, Director, Information Issues and Policy, Medical Library Association.

They have already begun work, attending the Joint MLA/AAHSL Legislative Task Force annual meeting in Washington D.C. in June and making congressional visits on Capitol Hill. At the Task Force meeting, members discussed legislative priorities, met with government relations colleagues from the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), and spoke with the Betsy Humphreys, Deputy Director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM). On the following day, Task Force members and their ‘Rising Star’ went to Capitol Hill to meet with congressional staff to discuss issues related MLA’s legislative priorities, such as the importance of NIH funding and the role of the NLM in disseminating health information.



Charles T. Payne, leader in library automation, 1925–2014

Charles T. Payne, former Assistant Director for Systems, used the skills he developed as an engineer at the University of Chicago Library to pioneer the library automation process. He died of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma on August 1 at the age of 89.

Charles Payne

Charles Payne (Archival Photographic Files. Addenda, Box 3, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.)

In 1964, Payne joined the Library as its first Systems Librarian, with a “short-term” assignment from Director Herman Fussler to examine and apply computer technology to libraries. Beginning with a full systems analysis of Library operations, Payne led the creation and implementation in 1974 of the Library Data Management System (LDMS), one of the first library automated systems.

Payne’s work made Chicago a leader in the emerging field of library automation. While LDMS was specifically tailored for Chicago’s needs, its design principles influenced systems at many other libraries. Payne and other Library staff were also early contributors to the MARC format for cataloging records, the national and international standard for storing bibliographic data in electronic form.

In addition to his work with LDMS and MARC, Payne was involved in setting many national standards for cataloging. He was Chair of the American Library Association’s MARBI (Machine-Readable Bibliographic Information) standards committee, the MARBI Character Set Task Force, and the American National Standards Institute/National Information Standards Organization Z39 Subcommittee N, Character Sets. His expertise was recognized by the profession in 1990 when he was one of eight librarians nationally asked to contribute to the MARC XX Oral History Project. Payne retired from the Library in 1995 after 31 years of service.

“Charles was a visionary who saw the potential of automation and standardization for streamlining and sharing library processes. He was also a man of great intelligence, passion, and quiet humor,” said Alice Schreyer, Interim Library Director and Associate University Librarian for Area Studies and Special Collections. “He was a leader and a mentor to many staff members.”

Payne was born in central Kansas and served in the U.S. Army during World War II, working on communication systems and helping to liberate Ohrduf, a subcamp of the Buchenwald concentration camp. After the war, he earned a B.S. in chemical engineering from Kansas State University and worked as a chemical engineer before enrolling in the University’s Graduate Library School in 1960. Prior to his work as Systems Librarian, Payne held positions as Reference Librarian and Research Associate in the Industrial Relations Center at the University.

In addition to his wife Melanie, Payne is survived by his son Richard, his brother Jon V. Payne and additional family including President Barack Obama, his grandnephew.