Teaching & Learning

Summer research tips

Whether you are on campus or away from Chicago, the University of Chicago Library provides many resources and services available to help support your research during the summer.

Access to Online Resources
The Library’s electronic resources (including ebooks and ejournals) may be accessed no matter where you are located this summer. Learn how to connect to our online resources from off-campus.

Finding the Best Research Tools
Library Guides, many created by subject librarians, provide guidance on how to locate the best resources for a particular field or major. The Library also provides help guides on finding specific types of sources, such as newspapers or data.

Scan and Deliver
Do you need to read an article or essay in a book that is not available online? Use our Scan and Deliver service to request a copy be sent to you via e-mail.

Photo of a Librarian

Librarians are available during the summer to help you–in person or remotely via our Ask a Librarian service. Photo by Jason Smith.

Reciprocal Borrowing Agreements
The Library has reciprocal borrowing agreements with several academic libraries which allow UChicago students and faculty to borrow books directly from their collections. These include libraries in Borrow Direct Plus, as well as several Chicago-area institutions, including Northwestern.

Visiting Other Libraries
If you need to visit libraries and archives outside our reciprocal agreements, view our guide to doing research at other libraries before your visit. You’ll find tips on how to access different institutions, and strategies for identifying relevant collections.

Learn About Citation Managers
Summer is an ideal time to learn how citation managers can ease your research process.  Use citation managers such as Zotero or EndNote to organize your research and create footnotes and bibliographies automatically for your paper.  View our online tutorial for Zotero or guides to learn more about these tools.

Ask a Librarian/Reference Services
Librarians are on hand throughout the summer to help you with your research. Contact them directly via our Ask a Librarian service.  Or, if you are staying in Chicago, this may be a good time to schedule a consultation with a librarian who can suggest sources and research strategies for your project.

Graduating? Services and Tools to Support Your Research
Alumni can continue to visit and use our campus libraries if they live in the Chicago area. The Library and Alumni Association provide off-campus access to select research databases for alumni. For additional resources, the Library has a guide listing free online research tools that are available to anyone.

Jewish Studies Research Resources: workshop

When: Friday, May 20, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room A-11
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: A lunch hour session for graduate students with Anne Knafl, Religion & Philosophy Bibliographer, about Library resources for Jewish Studies research. Time for Q&A afterwards until 2pm…ask about anything Jewish Studies related, from computer software to journal subscriptions to special collections Can’t make it this time? There will be another session in Fall 2016. Or drop Anne an email (aknafl@uchicago.edu) and she’s happy to meet with you individually! Coffee courtesy of CCJS. BYO lunch.
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Graduate Students, Workshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Research After Graduation: workshop

When: Thursday, May 19, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Are you preparing to graduate? Leaving the University means leaving some library resources behind. This workshop will help you understand your library privileges as an alumnus, as well as introduce you to research sources outside the Reg.
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1680
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Workshops, Graduate Students, Training
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Organize It! Tools and Tricks for Managing Your Digital Documents: workshop

When: Wednesday, April 27, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Class readings, research articles, news stories, assignments….how do you keep track of it all? This workshop will give you a brief overview places to store your digital documents, as well as methods to keep it all organized. Participants will be able to see demonstrations of free cloud storage tools like Google Drive, and Box, and be introduced to key features of the tools and strategies to help you find all your stored documents with ease.
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1679
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Graduate Students, Workshops, Training
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Introduction to Zotero, Bibliography Builder: online workshop

When: Tuesday, April 19, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: Online webinar
Description: Zotero is a free bibliography builder that allows you to save citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in standard citation styles, including MLA, Chicago and APA. This workshop will introduce some of the key functions of Zotero such as: installing Zotero, adding citations to your Zotero library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Microsoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents.

This workshop is an online webinar. Click the “Register” link below to learn more and sign up.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1010
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
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Tag: Student Events, Training, Workshops, Graduate Students, Staff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Introduction to Zotero, Bibliography Builder: workshop

When: Thursday, April 14, noon –1 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Zotero is a free bibliography builder that allows you to save citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in standard citation styles, including MLA, Chicago and APA. This workshop will introduce some of the key functions of Zotero such as: installing Zotero, adding citations to your Zotero library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Microsoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents.
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1010
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Follow me on twitter Find me on facebook
Tag: Student Events, Training, Workshops, Graduate Students, Staff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

EndNote Online or Zotero? Selecting the Best Citation Manager: workshop

When: Friday, April 8, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Citation managers are powerful, time-saving tools that help you manage your research. They can also help you format your papers in MS Word by creating bibliographies, citations, and footnotes automatically in the style you choose, such as APA or Chicago.

This workshop will compare how EndNote Online and Zotero – two popular citation managers – allow you to save, share, and cite information. In order to provide a side-by-side comparison of tools, the format of this workshop is demonstration.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1455
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Workshops, Graduate Students, Staff, Training
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device

Library partners with CCT & IT Services on workshop series for instructors

The University of Chicago Library, Chicago Center for Teaching, and Academic and Scholarly Technology Services are partnering on a workshop series for graduate students and instructors on improving students’ information literacy skills.

Ruining Google and Wikipedia: Teaching Strategies That Help Students Progress from Knowledge Consumers to Knowledge Producers

In the current age of often unlimited access to information it is important for students, particularly those introductory courses, to learn how to engage with physical and online information ethically, critically, and effectively. This series of three workshops will address pedagogical approaches and considerations that can help students obtain these skills. Each workshop can be taken alone, but we encourage participation in the entire series.

Specifically, each workshop will allow instructors to reflect on the skills students need to read and consume high quality information and build information literacy, to value information and distinguish between their own work and existing work as part of academic integrity, and to engage with information in the age of digital media. Instructors will leave with assignments, resources and strategies that they can use in their classroom.

Feel free to bring your lunch. Dessert will be served.

Session 1: Building Student Information Literacy Skills Through Assignments
April 7, 12:00-1:30pm
CCT Classroom, Wieboldt 310 D/E
Register

Co-facilitated by Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction & Outreach and Deb Werner, Librarian for Science Instruction & Outreach and Biomedical Reference Librarian

You’ve created an assignment in the upcoming undergraduate course that you are teaching. Will your students know how to find the types of academic sources you expect for the assignment? If not, how do you help them obtain these skills?  While today’s students are very tech-savvy and have greater access to information than ever before, they often lack the experience needed to find, evaluate, and use scholarly resources. By the end of this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Define information literacy and explain its place in higher education
  • Identify Library services that support information literacy instruction in the classroom
  • Articulate learning outcomes that build your students’ information literacy skills for your discipline

Develop strategies for building research skills into your assignments

Session 2: Academic Integrity in the Classroom
April 14, 12:00pm-1:30pm
CCT Classroom, Wieboldt 310 D/E
Register

Co-facilitated by Joseph Lampert, CCT Associate Director and Julie Piacentine, E-Learning Librarian

How can we address academic integrity in our teaching in a way that supports student learning?  In this workshop, participants will consider this and other questions as they reflect on how to understand this central value and think about how to structure their teaching to promote an appreciation for academic integrity among their students.  During the session, participants will:

  • Discuss potential definitions of academic integrity and what they imply for one’s approach to teaching.
  • Develop strategies for addressing academic integrity in their teaching, focusing especially on structuring assignments to support proper citation of sources.
  • Learn about resources on campus that can help instructors and students promote academic integrity.

Session 3: Ruining Google & Wikipedia: Creating Critical Readers
April 21, 12:00pm-1:30pm
CCT Classroom, Wieboldt 310 D/E
Register

Co-facilitated by Cecilia Lo, Academic Technology Analyst and Kaitlin Springmier, Resident Librarian for Online Learning

Getting students to read carefully and reflectively can be a challenge. And it is often difficult to figure out how exactly students are reading and where they may have difficulty. In this workshop, participants will explore online annotation tool and how they may be used to encourage collaborative and reflective reading. We will then extend the discussion to what does it mean to engage students digitally, why, when and how to engage students digitally successfully.

This is a hands-on workshop, please bring a laptop/tablet. Equipment is available for check-out at the Techbar in Regenstein Library should you need one.

 

Unrequired reading at the Library

Miss reading for fun? Having trouble finding unrequired reading in the libraries’ collections? With over 11 million print & electronic books, it can be hard to browse the library collections to find reading for fun. But have no fear, librarians are here! Read on to learn about specific collections at University of Chicago Libraries dedicated to leisure reading and top tips to find your next favorite fun read.

D'Angelo Law LIbrary Book Display

Books on display at the D’Angelo Law Library

Tip #1: Visit D’Angelo Law Library. The D’Angelo law library collects novels, mysteries, science fiction,  humor, science, history, and biography (Supported by the Alison T. Dunham Memorial Fund). Find authors such as Jonathan Franzen, Chuck Palahniuk, Jennifer Weiner, and many more! The collection is easy to locate and recently purchased titles can be found on display on the fourth floor.

Tip #2: Browse the Reg’s Young Adult Fiction. In 2015, College student Maya Handa won an Uncommon Fund grant to buy young adult fiction for the Reg’s collections. You can view some of the purchased book covers on display next to the dissertation office or browse for yourself by visiting the PZ call numbers on the 3rd floor. You’re invited to celebrate the collection by attending a launch party on March 10 from 6-7 pm in Regenstein Room 122.

Tip #3: Check out the Class of 2000 Books. As its gift to the University, the Class of 2000 has established a book fund for the purchase of popular fiction and media for Regenstein. The gift is intended to provide students with mysteries, science fiction, other contemporary fiction, and media that would not ordinarily be purchased by the Library.

via GIPHY

Tip #4: Search the library catalog. The library has a lot of great books for you to read, but you have to know what you’re looking for. Find new book recommendations by browsing book recommendation engines like:

Selection of Class of 2000 Books

A few books purchased using the Class of 2000 fund. Photo by Rebecca Starkey.

  • Amazon: The online shopping giant pulls purchase histories from users. Usually browsing the “Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought…” section brings up great recommendations. It has allowed readers to review books for over 20 years, making the site a massive resource for book recommendations.
  • GoodReads: Described as the ‘Netflix for Books,’ GoodReads has a recommendation engine that uses a reported 20 billion data points to give suggestions tailored to your literary preferences. GoodReads also allows you to create your own virtual library, connect with friends, and create wishlists.
  • WhatShouldIReadNext: Just type in a book or author you enjoyed and see your recommendations flow in. The site’s recommendation inventory is less expensive when compared to Amazon or GoodReads, but the nice thing about this resource is that you can also browse recommendations by subject. Really enjoyed Americanah? See all other books about Nigeria!

Once you find a book that you want to read, just type it into the catalog to find it in the library. If it’s not here, remember that you can also browse search in Big 10 university libraries and Ivy League libraries through UBorrow and BorrowDirect.

Tip #5: As always, if you are having trouble finding a book in the collections, or have any questions, Ask a Librarian!

Creative Assignments with blogs, wikis, discussion boards, and Google Docs: TECHB@R workshop

When: Tuesday, February 23, – 4 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Coming up with creative assignments that excite students and help them achieve learning goals can be a challenge. In this workshop, we will explore how to design creative assignments with technologies such as blogs, wikis, discussion tools, and Google Apps (Docs, Spreadsheet, Forms, Lucidchart, etc.) and foster collaborative learning during and between class meetings. We will consider the characteristics of these collaborative technologies, the type of assignments they are appropriate for and how to use them effectively. We will examine a few examples of effective use of these technologies and we will do a small group hands-on exercise to develop an assignment using one of these technologies. Bring your laptop or tablet for a taste in using technology for collaborative learning.

This course is open to all faculty, instructors, teaching assistants and graduate students.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1642
Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
Tag: Workshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Device