Workshops & Events

STATA: Getting Started: TECHB@R workshop

When: Thursday, December 4, 5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This 90 minute workshop will give you the tools to become a STATA pro. The workshop will start with an explanation of when to use STATA over other stats programs and a walk through the interface. Then, the bulk of the workshop time will be spent learning basic commands and processes. A “do file” will be provided for easy access to the commands as well as a handout for keeping track of all of them. The last part of the workshop will bring it all together, moving beyond the basics, blending the commands to create regressions and graphics. 

Be prepared for a fast paced class, some familiarity with Statistics or programming is helpful, but not necessary. 

Please feel free to bring your laptop with STATA installed to follow along. If you want to attend and follow along, but do not have STATA on your computer – then take a look the virtual lab commander is for you. If you need help setting it up, come to the Techbar at least 15 min. before the workshop and the staff can help. 

Classes are free, but registration is required. Click the website link below for more information and to register.

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
More info: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1486
Tag: WorkshopsGraduate StudentsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

EndNote Online or Zotero? Selecting the Best Citation Manager: online workshop

When: Wednesday, November 19, noon – 1 p.m.
Friday, November 21, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: online workshop
Description: Citation managers are powerful, time-saving tools that help you manage your research. They can also help you format your papers in MS Word by creating bibliographies, citations, and footnotes automatically in the style you choose, such as APA or Chicago.

This webinar will compare how EndNote Online and Zotero — two popular citation managers — allow you to save, share, and cite information. In order to provide a side-by-side comparison of tools, the format of this workshop is demonstration rather than hands-on training.

Registration is required. Please click the event URL below to learn more and register.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1455
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Graduate StudentsStaffWorkshopsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

The Library for Instructors and TAs: workshop

When: Wednesday, November 19, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Thursday, November 20, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description:

You may use the Library’s resources for your research, but do you know how the Library supports teaching? Learn about the Library services available to you as an instructor or TA for a course, including: 

• How to set up course reserves in Chalk
• Requesting Library instruction or training programs
• Setting up your Library Chalk module
• Using Special Collections for your teaching
• Reserving Library classrooms and equipment

In addition, the program will provide an overview of some little-known services available for your students, including reference consultations, statistical software support, and citation managers.

Registration is requested. Please feel free to bring your lunch.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1541
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Graduate StudentsStaffWorkshopsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Introduction to Zotero: workshop

When: Wednesday, November 12, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Thursday, November 13, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Zotero is a free citation manager that allows you to save citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in standard citation styles, including MLA, Chicago and APA. This workshop will introduce some of the key functions of Zotero such as: installing Zotero, adding citations to your Zotero library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Microsoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents. 
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1010
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Student EventsTrainingWorkshopsGraduate Students
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Introduction to Data Visualization, Nov 5, 1-3 PM

Simon Jacobs, Research Programmer, Research Computing Center

Wednesday, November 5, 2014 1:00–3:00 p.m. | Kathleen A. Zar Room, John Crerar Library

Data visualization techniques allow researchers to display their data in ways that help to communicate research results in a visually appealing manner. With the large amounts of data that are now being collected or generated, researchers’ needs quickly outgrow what is provided by Excel or Graphviz. This workshop will discuss basic principles of data visualization as applied to D3, a commonly-used Javascript framework for data visualization. In a hands-on session, participants will build several sample visualizations for an example dataset.

Prerequisites: Attendees are encouraged to bring a laptop to participate in the hands-on session. Familiarity with HTML and Javascript will be helpful, but not required.

Register here.

2014-15 Library Society Speaker Series

Rosanna Warren

Rosanna Warren

Save the date for these Library Society lectures:

  • Wednesday, November 12, 2014
    Neil Harris, Preston and Sterling Morton Professor of History and Art History Emeritus, The University of Chicago, and Dr. Teri Edelstein
  • Wednesday, March 11, 2015
    Rosanna Warren, Hanna Holborn Gray Distinguished Professor, Committee on Social Thought, The University of Chicago
  • Wednesday, May 20, 2015
    Andrew Abbott, Gustavus F. and Ann M. Swift Distinguished Service Professor, The University of Chicago

All lectures will be held in Regenstein Library Room 122 in the evening and are open to the public with registration. To register and for updates including topics and times, visit lib.uchicago.edu/e/alumnifriends/libsoc.

Introduction to Library Research – SSA: workshop

When: Monday, November 10, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: School of Social Service Administration, Room E-I 
969 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: Workshop for SSA students on Library Databases: how to find the most appropriate databases for your research and how to take advantage of all the bells and whistles built into them. Plus, time for questions and answers about any Library matters you would like to discuss. 
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1562
Contact: Paul Belloni
Social Service Administration Librarian
Bibliographer for Psychology, Education, & Social Service Administration
Tag: WorkshopsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Introduction to EndNote (Online Version): workshop

When: Wednesday, November 5, noon – 1 p.m.
Thursday, November 6, noon – 1 p.m.
Tuesday, November 11, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: Crerar Library, Computer Classroom (November 5)

TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160 (November 6 & 11)

Description: EndNote offers an online version of its popular citation manager that is available to the University of Chicago community freely through the Library. The online version offers the key features of the popular EndNote software, but with added enhancements of cloud storage, syncing, and the ability to easily share and collaborate. Come to this workshop and see if EndNote’s online version works for you.
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1339
Contact: John Crerar Library
773-702-7715

Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685

Tag: WorkshopsTrainingGraduate Students
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Fall Fest offers behind-the-scenes look at D’Angelo

Dan Scime, ’17, had just finished a round of Law School Jeopardy! in the D’Angelo Law Library conference room, correctly guessing which park was the site of the 1893 Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition.

“I’ll take ‘Around Town’ for 500,” he told law librarians Lyonette Louis-Jacques and Bill Schwesig, before reading the question on the screen and asking, “What is Jackson Park?”

It was a sight probably familiar to second- and third-year students: The library’s fourth annual Fall Fest, an afternoon of games, trivia, and homemade baked goods designed to introduce new Students play Jeopardy game at Fall Feststudents to the library’s staff and resources. As part of this year’s event, students played “Name that Tune” in the Fulton Reading Room; tossed beanbags at wood UChicago cornhole platforms; tried their hands at a mini-golf putting green; and sampled cupcakes, cookies, chocolate-covered pretzels, and other treats made by library staff. (A particularly popular item: Margaret Schilt’s pumpkin cupcakes. Find the recipe in the right column). Todd Ito, Coordinator of Instruction and Outreach and a reference librarian, organized this year’s Fest and also planned and staffed the “Name that Tune” station with librarian Thomas Drueke. 

Students also talked to Lorna Tang, Associate Law Librarian for Technical Services, about the library’s Chicago Collection, which consists of five shelves of about 250 books — ranging from Jean F. Block’s Hyde Park Houses to Erik Larson’s Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness in the Fair that Changed America — as well as DVDs about Chicago. The collection was first set up with funds donated in memory of Thomas Owens, who worked at the library’s circulation desk for more than 40 years. He was fond of law students — and they were fond of him — and he loved Chicago.

“Many new students don’t come from Chicago, and this collection will give them a little flavor,” Tang said.

The event gave many of the nearly 130 students who attended a closer look at the 695,083-volume library, which was named for alumnus Dino D’Angelo, ‘44, an attorney, real estate owner, patron of the arts, and philanthropist. Students who took time to chat up some of the library’s 25 full-time staff might have learned which librarian brews his own beer, why there’s a chevron “crack” in the floor behind the reference desk, and how the library acquires the nodding justices in its U.S. Supreme Court bobblehead collection.

Didn’t have time to ask those questions? In honor of Fall Fest, we’ve compiled some of our favorite lesser-known facts about the library and its staff.

The library’s staff speaks or reads 16 languages: American Sign Language, Catalan, Chinese, Dutch, English, French, German, Haitian Creole, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Provençal, Spanish, Romanian, and Russian. “It keeps things interesting,” said Louis-Jacques, who speaks Haitian Creole, French, Spanish, and “a little German.”

The most popular of the 1,643 titles in the library’s DVD collection is the television series “The Wire.” Also popular: The Godfather, China Town, Fight Club, and The Godfather Part II.

Edward H. Levi, ’35, started out in the library, and he wasn’t paid very well. Rather than hire him as a full-time professor in 1936, the Law School made him a law librarian and an assistant professor, paying him a total of $3,000 — $125 less than the most junior member of the faculty made at the inception of the Law School in 1902. His library assignment, which accounted for one-third of his original salary, lasted only a year. In 1937, he was hired as a full-time professor and his salary went up accordingly. Levi, of course, went on to serve as Dean of the Law School, President of the University, and Attorney General of the United States.

Library Assistant Steve Coats was a U.S. diplomat in Mexico during the Clinton administration. He worked for several years in the early 1990s in the cultural and press section of the American embassy in Mexico City and the American consulate in Tijuana.

The zig-zagging fissure that runs along the floor behind the reference desk marks the division between the old library and the 1987 expansion. The renovation, which preserved the architectural integrity of Eero Saarinen’s original design, expanded the building by forty-five feet to the south.

The staff has nearly 350 years of combined library experience.

The collection includes about 1,500 books written by alumni. Those titles range from legal practice materials to fiction.

Library Director Sheri Lewis greets students at Fall FestD’Angelo Library Director Sheri Lewis owns two guinea pigs. They are named Gwendolen and Cecilyafter characters in Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest.

The library has 10 SCOTUS bobbleheads: James Iredell, Benjamin Curtis, Harry A. Blackmun, William H. Rehnquist, John Paul Stevens, Sandra Day O’Connor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony M. Kennedy, David H. Souter, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. “The Green Bag issues the dolls and doesn’t ship them,” said Patricia Sayre-McCoy, Head of Cataloging and Serials. “We have to find someone in Washington, D.C., who can pick them up for us and either send them or bring them back to the library.”

Sayre-McCoy is a science-fiction/fantasy writer. She’s been writing stories for about 30 years and has sold two of them to Sword and Sorceress, a series of fantasy anthologies. 

The library’s staff manually counts heads five times a day so they know exactly how patrons use the facility. At opening, in the morning, afternoon, evening and at closing, a staff member spends about 15 minutes walking through the library counting the number of people in different locations, including at window tables and center tables, in carrels and conference rooms, and on black sofas and low shelf seating. The counter uses a special form that has a box for each of the six floors and places to record the date, time, day of the week, and academic quarter.

Drueke brews his own craft beer. He particularly likes making low-alcohol English “session” beers.

The Law School was re-created in 800 Legos by Zach Mayo, ’14. It is displayed on the library’s reference desk.

Six members of the library staff have JDs, and all 11 librarians have masters degrees in library science.

Margaret Schilt is an art quilter. The Associate Law Librarian for User Services, who also teaches Writing and Research in the United States Legal System, has been making the quilted hangings for about eight years. There is one in her office now that depicts white cemetery crosses stitched into a backdrop of green panels, and one solitary cross against a red backdrop in the upper-right corner. She calls it “War and Peace.”

The library’s entire sixth floor is devoted to foreign, comparative, and international law. It has a strong collection from the European Union, especially Germany.

Eight members of the library staff have attended the University of Chicago, either the college or one of the graduate schools.

The framed cross-stitch hanging on the third floor was made by Diane Wood, Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and a senior lecturer at the Law School.

Binding Assistant John Mulholland used to be in the Peace Corps, working as a teacher in Swaziland, Africa, from January 1969 to March 1975. He is also the longest-serving member of the library staff, having started in 1976.

The most popular places to sit are at the window tables on the second and third floors. (Remember the head count? That’s how they know).

Senior Acquisitions Assistant Sheila Ralston has more than 10,000 books in her home. About 500 of them are hers—mostly mysteries and English literature (her college major), true crime, and knitting books—and the rest belong to her husband, a game designer and writer who has been collecting books since childhood. The books are stored in bookcases throughout their home.

Julie Stauffer, Head of Acquisitions and Electronic Resources, is an accomplished knitter who first picked up the craft from a “Coats and Clark’s Learn How” pamphlet as a child. She’s not the only avid knitter, either: a group of Law School knitters meets once a week in Library Conference Room 211A.

The library is busiest at the beginning of Autumn Quarter and during Winter Quarter finals. Students check out the most items between 11 a.m. and noon, 2:30 p.m. and 3 p.m., and two hours before closing. The library space is most crowded between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

A University of Chicago Law School news release

Introduction to EndNote Online Version: workshop

When: Friday, October 17, 2014 12:001:00 PM
Where: Crerar Library, Computer Classroom
5730 South Ellis Avenue
Description: EndNote offers an online version of its popular citation manager that is available to the University of Chicago community freely through the Library. The online version offers the key features of the popular EndNote software, but with added enhancements of cloud storage, syncing, and the ability to easily share and collaborate. Come to this workshop and see if EndNote’s online version works for you.
Contact: John Crerar Library
773-702-7715
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1339
Tag: Workshops, Training, Graduate Students
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
Information on Assistive Listening Device