Research

Posts about citation management, library guides, discovery tools such as the Catalog, betas, summer tips for B.A. writers, online portals, tools.

Congratulations to Richard Thaler, Chicago Booth’s newest Nobel laureate

Richard Thaler, the Charles R. Walgreen Distinguished Service Professor of Behavioral Science and Economics at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, was awarded the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel for 2017. Thaler was recognized for his seminal research in behavioral economics, which  posits that people don’t always act in their best economic interests, a very different view from the traditional Chicago School of Economics. He popularized the idea of nudges, which use human behavior to nudge people into making better economic choices, such as making participation in retirement saving plans opt-out, rather than opt-in.

The Library maintains a selected bibliography of Professor Thaler’s publications, which can be viewed here. Most links to articles will only be accessible on campus, but our ProxyIt! tool makes it simple for current students to get access.

Many of Professor Thaler’s early articles in behavioral economics were published in the Journal of Economic Perspectives. This journal is now open access, so all articles in the journal are free to anyone. View a list of articles here.

New GIS Computers in Map Collection

The Regenstein Library Map Collection has installed three new computers to support research using GIS and spatial analysis. These computers are available for use during regular Map Collection hours.

The following software is available:

  • ArcGIS for Desktop 10.5.1
  • ArcGIS Pro 2.0.0
  • ArcGIS Maps for Office (Excel, PowerPoint)
  • GeoDa
  • QGIS
  • Google Earth Pro
  • Adobe Creative Suite 5
  • R and R Studio
  • Stata
  • vLab

Picture of all three new computers in map collectionThe computers have dual, high-resolution monitors and 32 GB RAM. Box Sync is also available on these computers for users to connect and save data between the desktop software and Box, which provides UChicago users with unlimited storage space.

Additional technology in the Map Collection includes a large format and a flatbed scanner, a microform reader, and data resources from China Data Center and Geolytics.

GIS software and support is also available in Crerar Library, where the library’s computers have ArcGIS Desktop, ArcGIS Pro, GeoDa, QGIS, and Google Earth Pro as well as a connection to vLab.

For questions about these computers or how the library supports GIS and spatial data, contact Resident Librarian for GIS Taylor Hixson (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu), or visit her in the Map Collection during walk-in GIS office hours Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. during the academic quarters.

Consult the library’s research guides for more information about getting started with GIS and finding spatial data and maps.

My Library Account improvements

The Library has released a new version of My Library Account (formerly My Account), offering enhancements and new features:

  • Displays have been improved, especially on mobile devices.
  • Checked out items are sorted by due date, so items due soon appear at the top of the list.
  • Checked out items can also be sorted by title, author, call number, loan type, etc.
  • Alerts appear for recalled items, items due soon, overdue items, etc.
  • Interlibrary loan, course reserves, and short term loans display information about their loan period and whether they are eligible for renewal.
  • Faculty can view which items on their accounts were checked out by proxy borrowers.
  • Requested items more clearly display whether they are available for pickup.
  • Quick links have been added to other Library accounts (Interlibrary Loan, Special Collections, Course Reserves).

See My Library Account Help for more information.

The new Checked out Items screen; items due soon appear at the top of the list.

The new Checked out Items screen; items due soon appear at the top of the list.

New research guide for finding maps

Screen capture of the new finding maps research guide home page.Consulting maps is often a crucial part of primary source research, but knowing how and where to locate the right maps for research can prove challenging.

The Library’s new research guide for finding maps can help demystify that process. The guide has resources to assist with:

  • searching for maps
  • finding maps at the University of Chicago
  • map resources online
  • U.S. Census maps

To learn more about the University of Chicago’s Map Collection, visit the Map Collection’s main web page or the physical collection in Regenstein Library room 370 Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday 12-5 p.m. during the academic quarter and Monday-Friday from 12-5p.m. during the interim.

Contact Sam Brown (sbb@uchicago.edu) with questions about using the map collection. Contact Taylor Hixson (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu) with comments or questions about the guide.

Tips for Fair Use Week

To celebrate Fair Use Week, the Library is sharing tips on fair use and how the principle enhances scholarship.

Have you ever . . .

  • used library course e-reserves?
  • quoted an author for a review or critique?
  • copied computer code to make a new program?
  • visited a contemporary art exhibition?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may have benefited from fair use.

Copyright law provides for the “fair use” principle that allows for the reproduction of copyright works for certain limited, educational purposes. Some people think fair use is a minor exception or marginal carve-out from the expansive protection for authors, but fair use is your fundamental right. The goal of copyright law is to foster the progress of science, the creation of culture, and the dissemination of ideas.

Fair use is crucial for academia. Scholars copy, quote, and adapt cultural and scientific material when informing their own research, or participating in the scholarly conversation:  Historians regularly quote primary sources; filmmakers reinterpret and critique copyrighted material; sociologists document culture with textual, visual, and musical examples. Much of this scholarship will count as fair use and not require permission, but each has to be evaluated individually.

There are no easy, clear cut rules to determine whether something is fair use, and there have certainly been some high-profile cases contesting the matter. While using only a small amount of a work can often weigh in the favor of fair use, in a case about the Gerald Ford diaries, even a short quotation was counted as violation because it revealed the “heart of the book” and the diaries were as yet unpublished. In another case, three academic publishers filed suit against Georgia State University for “pervasive, flagrant, and ongoing unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials” through the the library’s e-reserve system, and yet the court found that 94 of the 99 instances did fall under fair use and were not a violation.

To determine that the use is “fair,” judges tend to ask two key analytical questions:

  • Did the use “transform” the material taken from the copyrighted work by using it for a broadly beneficial purpose different from that of the original, or did it just repeat the work for the same intent and value as the original?
  • Was the material taken appropriate in kind and amount, considering the nature of the copyrighted work and use?

These two questions effectively summarize the four factors of fair use: purpose, nature, amount, and effect. Before assuming your use is fair, consider these four factors.

The Library, in collaboration with IT Services, the Provost’s Office, and the Office of Legal Counsel have developed a website to help you understand copyright, its intricacies, and fair use. Importantly, the website includes a Fair Use Checklist to help you navigate the four factors.

The Library also invites you to visit our guide on fair use to learn more and see how you can take advantage of fair use in your classroom.

This news story has been informed by the Fair Use Fundamentals infographic, as well as the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries.

Top 100 articles of 2016 according to Altmetric

Altmetric has released its list of the top 100 articles of 2016, and the #1 article was written by a former UChicago faculty member (and soon-to-be former POTUS): Altmetric donut

Obama B. United States Health Care Reform: Progress to Date and Next Steps. JAMA. 2016;316(5):525-532. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.9797

The list is based on each article’s Attention Score, which is calculated by the conversations about the article that occur in places like news outlets, blogs, Twitter, Facebook and more.  The article above had a score of 8063; it is the number inside an Altmetric “donut” pictured here.

Read more about various research metrics on the Research Impact guide: http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/researchimpact

New Human Genome Resources site now available

The new Human Genome Resources site offers access to visualization and analysis tools available for the human genome, as well as other relevant tools like BLAST, the NCBI remapping service and databases that provide human molecular data. The resources are sorted into categories like Find, View, Download and Learn, making it easier to find what you need.

With the new site, you can:

In addition, the portal includes an extensive listing of learning resources that may help you have a better understanding of the wealth of information associated with the human genome.

Publishers require ORCID iDs for submitting authors

ORCID logoWiley, the Royal Society of Chemistry, and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) have each signed ORCID’s Open Letter and announced their new requirement of an ORCID iD for all submitting authors as part of the manuscript submission process.

An ORCID id (Open Researcher and Contributor iD), is a persistent, unique, numeric identifier for individual researchers and creators. It distinguishes individual researchers with the same (or very similar) name and supports automated linkages between a researcher and their research activities. A researcher’s ORCID record, which includes their ORCiD identifier, holds non-sensitive information such as name, organization, and research activities.

Learn more about ORCID and how to create your
own ORCID iD at http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/ORCID

New: MathSciNet on Ebscohost Platform

mathscinetThe Ebscohost platform now offers a search interface for MathSciNet.  This new interface offers some features not available on the AMS platform, particularly a more flexible search. However, some elements available on the AMS platform are lacking.  Below is a comparison of some key differences:

Simple Search

Ebscohost also a simple search box as the default search.  This search is easier to use for students less familiar with field searching and more familiar with Google.  Use the advanced search to access fields for more precise searching.

Author Search

The Ebscohost interface offers a more flexible author search than the AMS version.  Commas delineating first and last name are not necessary on the Ebscohost platform, nor is the last name first name order necessary.  The Ebscohost platform will also search for an author affiliation in the author search field.  E.g. a search for the name “Brandeis” include authors from that university.

Math Subject Classification Search (MSC)

Instead of using subject word tagging for content, MathSciNet has a unique Mathematics Subject Classification (MSC) which uses a number-letter-number code to classify subjects.  The AMS interface will search the first part of the code or the first and second together.  But Ebscohost has not adopted this search method and instead appears to search the code as a string anywhere in the MSC, returning significantly different results.

For more information, consult this in depth study of the differences between the two interfaces.

ProxyIt for mobile devices

mobile devices and coffeeHaving difficulty accessing articles, ebooks, or other library resources on your phone or tablet?  Use ProxyIt for mobile devices!  Once installed, anytime you go to a web page for one of the Library’s electronic resources, use ProxyIt! to reroute the page through the proxy server so that you may login and access the material.

More information about accessing resources while off-campus is available at: http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/off-campus.