Research

Posts about citation management, library guides, discovery tools such as the Catalog, betas, summer tips for B.A. writers, online portals, tools.

Knowledge@UChicago preserves and shares scholarly and creative works

The University of Chicago Library has launched a new service for the campus community that will preserve and share the digital scholarly, creative, and administrative assets of researchers, instructors, and staff at the University. Built in partnership with IT Services and the Research Computing Center, Knowledge@UChicago is available at knowledge.uchicago.edu.

Knowledge@UChicago logoThis new digital repository service addresses the pressing need for a place for sharing and preserving data sets, providing open access options for scholarly articles and dissertations, and meeting public access requirements for grant-funded research. In this initial phase, it can accept small data sets; by summer it will accept large ones. Faculty who are interested in making these scholarly resources available in Knowledge@UChicago, as well as alumni interested in sharing their dissertations, should email us at knowledge@lib.uchicago.edu.

Ultimately, Knowledge@UChicago will:

  • assist researchers with funding agency requirements for deposit of research output;
  • aggregate collections of teaching and learning resources for use in the classroom and online learning;
  • increase the global accessibility and visibility of the intellectual output of the community, including the work that has been hidden until now;
  • archive recordings, photographs, and other multimedia that document the University’s events and activities, and make them discoverable; and
  • harness the linked data capabilities of the ORCID (orcid.org) and DOI (doi.org) systems to ensure our researchers, and their work, are part of the semantic web.

Capital funding from the Provost’s IT Committee will support our longer-term goal to build an infrastructure that will integrate seamlessly with researchers’ workflows, handle large data sets, and provide a variety of publication options suited to different types of materials, from subject-based research collections to student publications to audio and video created at various events on campus.  This will allow Knowledge@UChicago to capture and share the scholarly, creative, and administrative output of the university.

The work deposited in Knowledge@UChicago will be publicly available to all: anyone with an internet connection will have access. This will increase the visibility of the work done on campus, and truly “let knowledge grow from more to more, and so be human life enriched.”

To begin sharing and preserving your work with Knowledge@UChicago, please visit  http://knowledge.uchicago.edu or email knowledge@lib.uchicago.edu.

American Chemical Society on Campus

ACS on Campus is coming to the University of Chicago on Monday, November 7 for an exciting afternoon of programming. You’ll enjoy a free lunch and learn about the scholarly publishing process and how to advance your career in the sciences.

Location: Crerar Library, Kathleen Zar Room

Featured Presenters:
Dr. Jonathan Sweedler, Editor-in-Chief, Analytical Chemistry
Dr. Stuart Rowan, Deputy Editor, ACS Macro Letters, Professor at the Institute for Molecular Engineering
Dr. Michael Jewett, Associate Editor, ACS Synthetic Biology
Agenda:
12:00 – 1:00 pm Registration and Lunch
1:00 – 1:15 pm Opening Remarks
1:15 – 2:30 pm Top Ten Tips for Preparing Your Manuscript
2:30 – 3:15 pm Peer Review: How, Why, and What Not to Do
3:15 – 4:30 pm Careers in Chemistry – Panel Discussion
4:30 pm Closing Remarks

The event is free and open to all students and researchers studying the sciences. Lunch and networking is included. Register now!

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases now on Hein Online

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases, published by the American Bar Association, has moved to Hein Online. There are eight issues per term. The first seven issues report on oral arguments, and the eighth issue gives a roundup of the term. All published issues are available, back to the 1973 term.

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases is the best place to find the briefs of the parties, amicus briefs, and oral argument transcripts for cases from the Court’s current term. Click on the case’s docket number in the table of contents to get a list of briefs and transcripts.

preview

 

Consult our Supreme Court research guide for more sources of news and information about the Court.

 

Library seeks students to provide input on new website

The University of Chicago Library seeks current students willing to participate in a usability study of the Library’s new website. Sessions will last no more than 60 minutes, and participants will receive an Amazon.com gift card with a value of $10. Sessions will be held at Regenstein Library.

Students using laptops in Ex LibrisIf interested, please contact Emma Boettcher, User Experience Resident Librarian, at ecboettcher@uchicago.edu. Please mention:

  1. Your name.
  2. Your status (undergraduate or graduate) and department or major. If you are an undergraduate, please indicate your year, and whether you have started work on your BA paper.
  3. Three hour-long time slots between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. from October 10 to October 14 that you are available to meet.

Participants must be at least 18 years of age, and may not be current Library employees.

Non-law databases for law students

Legal research is becoming more and more interdisciplinary, including “Law and…”, human rights, international relations, and other law-related topics in other disciplines. Therefore, when you begin your research, you will find yourself seeking non-law databases more often than not.  If you are new to interdisciplinary research at the University, check out D’Angelo Law Library’s Finding Non-Law Journal Articles guide. These include some of the non-law databases more frequently used here at Law.

For journal articles and books from disciplines other than law, start with Articles Plus, which contains articles drawn from hundreds of databases and over 40,000 journals.

While Articles Plus seems all encompassing, it does not include ProQuest databases such as Dissertation Abstracts, ProQuest Newsstand, ABI INFORM, Early English Books Online, and Legislative Insight. Nor Factiva. So make sure to also check these if the information for which you are looking might be located in these other databases.

Articles Plus, because it covers so many disciplines, can generate overbroad search results. Therefore, for research in a particular subject, you should search databases specific to that subject.  This Research Starting Points guide provides an A to Z list of key databases arranged by subject (from African Studies to Women’s Studies). You can also locate useful databases by using topical research guides listed in our Non-Law Subjects (Subject Guides) page. You can also use Database Finder to locate Library databases in a particular subject. You can search by database title or browse by subject.

Another way to access general, non-law databases via Database Finder is to click on the “Articles, Journals & Databases” tab on the D’Angelo Law Library home page, then click on the Databases radio button to search for a database by name, platform, subject, or keyword in its description.

Image of databases search page

Online Library orientation: Learn the basics from home

Welcome to the University of Chicago! As the heart of campus, the Library offers much more than books. The Library’s work is to provide comprehensive resources and dynamic services to support the research, teaching, and learning needs of the University community. You are invited to explore the Library’s extensive collections, services, and spaces by visiting our website, reviewing our orientation guide or watching online tutorials.

Library website

Over the summer, the University of Chicago Library launched a redesign of the Library’s website. The redesign was informed by University faculty, students, and staff, has improved navigation, and is mobile-friendly.

Learn about the site’s most notable features and improvements by watching a brief video.

After you explore the site, the Library would love to hear your feedback. Please report any issues using our feedback form.  The Library plans to continue refining the site as feedback is received and user experience testing is conducted.

Orientation guide

Librarian helps student

A librarian shows a research guide to a student. (Photo by Jason Smith)

Designed to give a preview of all the Library has to offer, the Library’s orientation guide helps new members of campus navigate the Library’s expansive collections, meet with a librarian, and reserve a study space.

The guide, while comprehensive, is no substitute for the variety of on-campus orientation sessions that the Library offers. Incoming students are invited to participate in tailored Library orientations hosted by librarians. These orientation sessions, combined with the orientation guide, provide new students with a jump-start on resources and services to help them succeed.

A listing of orientation programs can be found on the Library’s Workshop and Events Calendar. If you cannot make an orientation program, get assistance learning about the Library and conducting your research from our Ask a Librarian service, via live chat, email, phone, or in person.

Online tutorials

The University of Chicago Library has a suite of video tutorials to help you learn how to be an effective researcher. Videos cover skills such as searching the Library Catalog, requesting materials from other libraries, and accessing library resources off-campus. The Library’s video tutorials are available 24/7, allowing you to troubleshoot any issues you have day or night.

Watch all of the Library’s current videos on the Library’s YouTube channel. To learn more about the Library’s online learning initiatives, visit the Library website or contact an online learning librarian.

Exploring the new Library website

See where you can search the Library Catalog; discover a Library expert; locate journals, databases and articles; and consult research guides curated by Library subject specialists in this video exploring the new Library website.

You can also learn more about the new website on the Library News site.  Get assistance navigating the site and conducting your research from our Ask a Librarian service, via live chat, email, phone, or in person, and give us feedback on the new site design as you explore for yourself.

SCRC Request Function Temporarily Down August 16, 7am-10am

The ability to request materials from the Special Collections Research Center through our electronic request system will be temporarily unavailable for three hours on the morning of August 16 to allow for a system upgrade. The system will be unavailable from 7am CDT – 10:0am CDT.  We regret the inconvenience.

Guide to researching legal employers

To help you prepare for OCI this week, the library has created a Guide to Researching Legal Employers. It contains quick links to directories and legal news sources, as well as sources for law firm profiles and biographies for judges and attorneys. Among the many resources the Library provides access to is ALM Legal Intelligence, which includes the full-text of ALM Survey & Ranking reports, including the AmLaw 200 and the ALM Midlevel and Summer Associate Surveys.

New Science Research Guides

WeImage of scientist have two new science guides to help you gain access to valuable research and disseminate and track your own research.

The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is a part of the National Library of Medicine.  You might be familiar with the biomedical literature database, PubMed, but did you know that NCBI supports 40 other databases with biomedical and genomic information? The NCBI Resources guide has been populated with general  information about navigating NCBI resources and information about features and data sources you can find in specific databases, such as Gene and Protein.

In the Research Impact guide you’ll find an introduction to the concept, tools which measure research impact, including Scopus and Web of Science, and a description of different metrics.  These include author metrics like the h-index as well as journal level metrics like the journal impact factor.