Research

Posts about citation management, library guides, discovery tools such as the Catalog, betas, summer tips for B.A. writers, online portals, tools.

New Human Genome Resources site now available

The new Human Genome Resources site offers access to visualization and analysis tools available for the human genome, as well as other relevant tools like BLAST, the NCBI remapping service and databases that provide human molecular data. The resources are sorted into categories like Find, View, Download and Learn, making it easier to find what you need.

With the new site, you can:

In addition, the portal includes an extensive listing of learning resources that may help you have a better understanding of the wealth of information associated with the human genome.

DEADLINE EXTENDED Applications open for 2018 Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowship Program

Robert Platzman

Robert Platzman in 1941

Application deadline is March 19, 2018.

The University of Chicago Library invites applications for short-term research fellowships for the summer of 2018. Any visiting researcher, writer, or artist residing more than 100 miles from Chicago, and whose project requires on-site consultation of University of Chicago Library collections, primarily archives, manuscripts, rare books, or other materials in the Special Collections Research Center, is eligible. Support for beginning scholars is a priority of the program. Applications in the fields of late nineteenth- or early twentieth-century physics or physical chemistry, or nineteenth-century classical opera, will receive special consideration.

Awards will be made based on the applicant’s ability to complete the proposed on-site research successfully within the timeframe of the fellowship.  Applicants should explain why the project cannot be conducted without on-site access to the original materials and the extent to which University of Chicago Library collections are central to the research.  Up to $3,000 of support will be awarded to help cover estimated travel, living, and research expenses.  Applications from women, minorities, and persons with disabilities are encouraged. Awards may be used between June 1, 2018 and September 28, 2018.

Applicants must provide the following information:

  • A cover letter (not to exceed one page) including the project title; a brief summary; estimated dates of on-site research; and a budget for travel, living, and research expenses during the period of on-site research
  • A research proposal not to exceed three double-spaced pages. Applicants should include references to specific archival finding aids and catalog records of particular relevance to their proposed project whenever possible.
  • A curriculum vitae of no longer than two pages
  • Two letters of support from academic or other scholars. References may be sent with the application or separately.

Submit application in one electronic file to: scrcfellowship@lib.uchicago.edu

Letters of reference in electronic form are preferred; print letters of reference can be sent to:

Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships
Special Collections Research Center
The University of Chicago Library
1100 E. 57th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

For additional information contact:
Daniel Meyer, Director, Special Collections Research Center

For additional background on the Platzman Fellowship, and to see a list of last year’s recipients please see our website: http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/scrc/about/platzmanfellowships.html

Publishers require ORCID iDs for submitting authors

ORCID logoWiley, the Royal Society of Chemistry, and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) have each signed ORCID’s Open Letter and announced their new requirement of an ORCID iD for all submitting authors as part of the manuscript submission process.

An ORCID id (Open Researcher and Contributor iD), is a persistent, unique, numeric identifier for individual researchers and creators. It distinguishes individual researchers with the same (or very similar) name and supports automated linkages between a researcher and their research activities. A researcher’s ORCID record, which includes their ORCiD identifier, holds non-sensitive information such as name, organization, and research activities.

Learn more about ORCID and how to create your
own ORCID iD at http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/ORCID

New: MathSciNet on Ebscohost Platform

mathscinetThe Ebscohost platform now offers a search interface for MathSciNet.  This new interface offers some features not available on the AMS platform, particularly a more flexible search. However, some elements available on the AMS platform are lacking.  Below is a comparison of some key differences:

Simple Search

Ebscohost also a simple search box as the default search.  This search is easier to use for students less familiar with field searching and more familiar with Google.  Use the advanced search to access fields for more precise searching.

Author Search

The Ebscohost interface offers a more flexible author search than the AMS version.  Commas delineating first and last name are not necessary on the Ebscohost platform, nor is the last name first name order necessary.  The Ebscohost platform will also search for an author affiliation in the author search field.  E.g. a search for the name “Brandeis” include authors from that university.

Math Subject Classification Search (MSC)

Instead of using subject word tagging for content, MathSciNet has a unique Mathematics Subject Classification (MSC) which uses a number-letter-number code to classify subjects.  The AMS interface will search the first part of the code or the first and second together.  But Ebscohost has not adopted this search method and instead appears to search the code as a string anywhere in the MSC, returning significantly different results.

For more information, consult this in depth study of the differences between the two interfaces.

ProxyIt for mobile devices

mobile devices and coffeeHaving difficulty accessing articles, ebooks, or other library resources on your phone or tablet?  Use ProxyIt for mobile devices!  Once installed, anytime you go to a web page for one of the Library’s electronic resources, use ProxyIt! to reroute the page through the proxy server so that you may login and access the material.

More information about accessing resources while off-campus is available at: http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/off-campus.

Burst the bubble: expanding the news sources you read

Image of Facebook Screen

Facebook page” (CC BY 2.0) by reynermedia.

Over the last week, major internet companies such has Facebook and Google have been under attack for their role in the circulation of ‘fake news’. Critics assert that these platforms publicize most-clicked content as news without verifying facts and claims. Some even say that publicizing this ‘fake news’ influenced the outcome of the presidential election. In addition, news on social media tends to be shared among followers and friends, so the news you see there often aligns with the political affiliations and perspectives closest to your own. For these reasons, using social media and popular news aggregators such as Google News, can put you in what has been called a ‘filter bubble’. Library resources can help you burst that bubble.

The Library will be offering 30-minute workshops highlighting databases available to the University of Chicago community that contain a wide variety of news sources.  Learn how to browse major dailies such as the Washington Post or New York Times in just a few clicks, search international newspapers online, and find transcripts from cable and radio news programs.

Burst Your Bubble: Making the Most of the Library’s News Databases
Regenstein Library, Room 207
Monday, November 21, 10:00–10:30 a.m.  Register Now
Tuesday, November 22, 1:30 – 2:00 p.m.  Register Now

Can’t make a workshop?  Begin exploring the news databases available to you using our research guides:

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact Rebecca Starkey at rstarkey@uchicago.edu for assistance.

Undergraduate exhibit pilot continues in Regenstein

Sana Sohail and Exhibit

Undergraduate Sana Sohail with her Spring 2016 Regenstein exhibit.

 

The undergraduate student exhibit pilot in Regenstein Library continues in Winter Quarter. The Library invites current undergraduates to submit proposals to curate a mini-exhibit focusing on a topic in the humanities or social sciences using materials found in Regenstein Library’s bookstacks.

Proposals may be submitted by individuals or small groups (including RSOs), but all group members must be undergraduates.  Exhibits are mounted a case located on the 1st floor of Regenstein Library, near the Dissertation Office.

Deadline for the Winter Quarter Exhibit:
Friday, November 18, 2016
Proposal guidelines and exhibit responsibilities

Learn more about our previous student exhibit.

For more information, contact Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach.

Knowledge@UChicago preserves and shares scholarly and creative works

The University of Chicago Library has launched a new service for the campus community that will preserve and share the digital scholarly, creative, and administrative assets of researchers, instructors, and staff at the University. Built in partnership with IT Services and the Research Computing Center, Knowledge@UChicago is available at knowledge.uchicago.edu.

Knowledge@UChicago logoThis new digital repository service addresses the pressing need for a place for sharing and preserving data sets, providing open access options for scholarly articles and dissertations, and meeting public access requirements for grant-funded research. In this initial phase, it can accept small data sets; by summer it will accept large ones. Faculty who are interested in making these scholarly resources available in Knowledge@UChicago, as well as alumni interested in sharing their dissertations, should email us at knowledge@lib.uchicago.edu.

Ultimately, Knowledge@UChicago will:

  • assist researchers with funding agency requirements for deposit of research output;
  • aggregate collections of teaching and learning resources for use in the classroom and online learning;
  • increase the global accessibility and visibility of the intellectual output of the community, including the work that has been hidden until now;
  • archive recordings, photographs, and other multimedia that document the University’s events and activities, and make them discoverable; and
  • harness the linked data capabilities of the ORCID (orcid.org) and DOI (doi.org) systems to ensure our researchers, and their work, are part of the semantic web.

Capital funding from the Provost’s IT Committee will support our longer-term goal to build an infrastructure that will integrate seamlessly with researchers’ workflows, handle large data sets, and provide a variety of publication options suited to different types of materials, from subject-based research collections to student publications to audio and video created at various events on campus.  This will allow Knowledge@UChicago to capture and share the scholarly, creative, and administrative output of the university.

The work deposited in Knowledge@UChicago will be publicly available to all: anyone with an internet connection will have access. This will increase the visibility of the work done on campus, and truly “let knowledge grow from more to more, and so be human life enriched.”

To begin sharing and preserving your work with Knowledge@UChicago, please visit  http://knowledge.uchicago.edu or email knowledge@lib.uchicago.edu.

American Chemical Society on Campus

ACS on Campus is coming to the University of Chicago on Monday, November 7 for an exciting afternoon of programming. You’ll enjoy a free lunch and learn about the scholarly publishing process and how to advance your career in the sciences.

Location: Crerar Library, Kathleen Zar Room

Featured Presenters:
Dr. Jonathan Sweedler, Editor-in-Chief, Analytical Chemistry
Dr. Stuart Rowan, Deputy Editor, ACS Macro Letters, Professor at the Institute for Molecular Engineering
Dr. Michael Jewett, Associate Editor, ACS Synthetic Biology
Agenda:
12:00 – 1:00 pm Registration and Lunch
1:00 – 1:15 pm Opening Remarks
1:15 – 2:30 pm Top Ten Tips for Preparing Your Manuscript
2:30 – 3:15 pm Peer Review: How, Why, and What Not to Do
3:15 – 4:30 pm Careers in Chemistry – Panel Discussion
4:30 pm Closing Remarks

The event is free and open to all students and researchers studying the sciences. Lunch and networking is included. Register now!

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases now on Hein Online

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases, published by the American Bar Association, has moved to Hein Online. There are eight issues per term. The first seven issues report on oral arguments, and the eighth issue gives a roundup of the term. All published issues are available, back to the 1973 term.

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases is the best place to find the briefs of the parties, amicus briefs, and oral argument transcripts for cases from the Court’s current term. Click on the case’s docket number in the table of contents to get a list of briefs and transcripts.

preview

 

Consult our Supreme Court research guide for more sources of news and information about the Court.