Resources

For posts about collections and electronic resource (including items we own, items we license, and others that are freely available but recommended by our staff in topical bibliography posts, etc.), due dates (if we continue to post due dates); database trials, preservation.

OCI Research Resources

Researching potential employers before interviews shows professionalism, sets you apart from your peers, and gives you a greater ability to hit the ground running on your first day.

To help get you started, the librarians in the D’Angelo Law Library have put together a Guide to Researching Legal Employers.

If you have questions, please stop by to chat with a reference librarian!

The cartoonists’ guide to law

The D’Angelo Law Library’s new collection of illustrated legal codes offers insight into statutes and society

Lyonette Louis-Jacques examining "Code pénal"

Lyonette Louis-Jacques examining “Code pénal”

At first glance, the cartoon in the French law book on Lyonette Louis-Jacques’ desk in the D’Angelo Law Library seems almost funny, in a banana-peel-pratfall kind of way.

For starters, there’s actually a banana peel in the picture, two slippery slivers making their mischief beneath the foot of a well-dressed redhead. She’s knocking her elbow back protectively as she tumbles—skirt lifting, purse flying—into the man beside her. Like a domino, he’s pitching forward, his hands thrust outward and his chapeau tossed upward.

Comedy, right? Except the scene is meant to depict involontairement un homicide, which means that someone is about to die—and someone else is unintentionally at fault. It seems likely that the man is the one mortally doomed; his lurch has propelled him toward a third pedestrian—and directly into the sharp tip of a walking cane. Worse, the instrument has dislodged his eye, which is now impaled on its tip like a campfire marshmallow.

drawing of a man's eye being poked out by another man's cane and a woman falling

“It took me a while to realize that this guy’s cane was poking through this other guy’s eye,” Louis-Jacques, the D’Angelo Law Library’s foreign and international law librarian, said recently, her finger grazing the page. “There’s so much going on here.”

So much, in fact, that the accident’s cause—and the proper distribution of blame—is unclear, which seems both puzzling and appropriate for a drawing that is accompanied by a French description of involuntary manslaughter and the accompanying criminal penalties.

This, of course, is part of the intrigue.

The book, published in Paris in about 1929, is an illustrated copy of the French criminal code by the early-20th-century cartoonist Joseph Hémard, who was popular at the time—and Louis-Jacques, who was drawn to the visual and humorous mode of interpreting law, had worked particularly hard to find it. It now resides in the D’Angelo’s new and growing collection of illustrated law books. The Code pénal, like other Hémard books that she’s acquired—including the Code civil, an illustrated French civil code published in 1925, and the Code général des impôts directs et taxes assimilées, a lengthy, illustrated French tax code published in 1944—is rife with nuance, social commentary, and a depiction of the law that transcends language and culture.

Title page with drawing of woman with tablets“It’s a way of telling stories about the law and opening up people’s minds,” said Louis-Jacques, who became interested in the genre when she saw a rare books display featuring some of Hémard’s work at a conference. “The illustrations are humorous, and sometimes they’re scandalous, and often they’re thought-provoking.”

She loved the idea that the illustrations might start a conversation or pique a student’s interest in an area of law, and she was intrigued by their ability to express both the happenstance of the human condition and the complexity of law.

Take, for instance, the scene with the skewered eye. Assuming the tumbling man is the one to expire, who bears responsibility for his death? The woman, for clumsily pushing him into the cane? An unknown, or unseen, banana-eater, for dropping the peel? The man with the cane, for brandishing his walking aid so recklessly?

“Look at this guy’s nose,” Louis-Jacques said, pointing to the cane-bearer’s flushed face and reddened nose. “Is he drunk? Is that why he’s unaware? And look at the woman—who’s responsible if she dies?”

And what if the scene is meant to be understood in reverse, with the cane, rather than the peel, setting everything in motion? What if the cane has propelled the injured man backward, into the woman and toward the banana peel? And what if the man with the cane is actually drunk? What if he only appears to be drunk? What if they’re all drunk?

“These illustrations do more than show the code,” Louis-Jacques said. “They take it a bit further; they show an understanding of how complicated the law can be.”

Which is what makes them such a welcome addition to the library’s collection, said D’Angelo Law Library Director Sheri Lewis.

“Understanding the story behind a legal question is essential for interpreting and applying the law,” Lewis said. “While law books are filled with such stories, they very rarely include illustrations that depict the legal situations discussed. These rare books offer a unique and colorful way for a reader to connect with the law. We are delighted to have them in our collection.”

So far, the D’Angelo’s collection of cartoon-illustrated law books is small—there are only about a dozen—because finding them isn’t always easy.

“They aren’t always described in a way we can easily call up,” Louis-Jacques said. “They aren’t usually listed as ‘Cartoon-illustrated law codes.’ There is the subheading ‘Caricatures and cartoons’, but that is rarely added to law books in the library catalog unless expressly requested.”

Law books, she added, aren’t generally illustrated so it’s easy to overlook the illustrations unless they are well integrated into the text, as the Hémard books are.

Drawing of one man chasing another

Right now, the collection is anchored by the Hémard volumes, although Louis-Jacques has also acquired a French traffic code, the Code de la route, and a French tax code, the Code des impôts, both published in the late 1950s and illustrated by Albert Dubout, as well as more recent volumes like Le nouveau code pénal illustré (The New Illustrated Penal Code), which was illustrated by Francis Le Gunehec and published in 1996. There’s also a 1944 volume illustrated by Hémard and authored by the celebrated French writer Honoré de Balzac, titled the Code des gens honnêtes, ou l’art de ne pas être dupe des fripons (roughly translated as the Code of Honest People, or The Art of Not Being Tricked By Swindlers).

 “That’s not a law code—it’s a behavior code aimed at gentlemen of the time,” Louis-Jacques said. “Balzac wrote it in 1845 and then Hémard illustrated it in 1944. There were only 800 copies made and the D’Angelo has one of them.”

There are many others Louis-Jacques hopes to acquire—an illustrated Brazilian penal code and an illustrated French tourism code among them—and she enjoys blending her language and research skills to hunt for the volumes, waiting to see if one ends up listed on a library sale or an estate auction.

Eventually, she hopes to create an exhibit that offers additional context for the volumes, including historical information about the illustrators and the time periods in which they were published. She’s curious whether Hémard’s own biases and prior experiences—and even his lack of legal training—might have influenced his interpretation of the law and his artistic choices.

Drawing of man reaching for woman held back by another woman

The works, she notes, make the law accessible by appealing to universal themes. In the Code civil, there’s a cartoon depicting a woman trying hard to keep a man from running toward another woman; one doesn’t need to read French to recognize the depiction of marital infidelity. In the tax code book—the volume for which Hémard was most famous—a worried-looking man runs from a judge.

“This is tax law in France, but there are the same sort of issues and the same sort of attempts to avoid paying taxes,” Louis-Jacques said with a laugh.

And then there’s simply the ability of the books to lure one into thinking about the law.

Louis-Jacques held up a plain book and a copy of the Code pénal, which features on its cover a colorful cartoon of a man with an axe in his head pointing at a man with a smoking gun who appears to be fleeing winged creatures, one of whom is carrying the scales of justice.

“If I showed you both of these,” she said, displaying both, “which one are you more likely to open?”

Originally published by the University of Chicago Law School

Knowledge@UChicago featured research: Code for a simple model of evolution of melt pond coverage on Arctic sea ice

July’s featured research in Knowledge@UChicago, the University of Chicago’s open access digital repository, is code by graduate student Predrag Popović and associate professor Dorian Abbot of the Department of Geological Sciences. The code, made available in 2017, supports their model for understanding the evolution of melt pond, or “pools of melted snow and ice,” coverage on Arctic sea ice. Popović and Abbot report on this model in their 2017 article in the open access journal The Cryosphere and point readers to their code in Knowledge@UChicago.

 

Image of Arctic Ocean taken during Office of Naval Research-sponsored study of the changing sea ice, ocean and atmosphere. (US Navy, Image by John F. Williams)

Journal publishers are increasingly requiring or recommending the open availability of research files associated with an accepted publication. For example, Copernicus Publications, the publisher of The Cryosphere, states that the “the output of research is not only journal articles but also data sets, model code, samples, etc. Only the entire network of interconnected information can guarantee integrity, transparency, reuse, and reproducibility of scientific findings.” As a condition of publishing in The Cryosphere, researchers like Popović and Abbot are “are required to provide a statement on how their underlying research data can be accessed” and are encouraged to make these research materials available in an open access repository. 

Knowledge@UChicago is a service that can help researchers meet requirements or expectations from journals like The Cryosphere, Nature Research, Science, and a growing number of others. Researchers can currently deposit small datasets in Knowledge@UChicago and permanent identifiers (DOIs) will be assigned to these deposits, assisting with discoverability and citation. Later this year, new features, including integration with GitHub, will be rolled out. We encourage our research community to make use of this service and to contact knowledge@lib.uchicago.edu for assistance.


This year, we’re highlighting examples of research shared in Knowledge@UChicago, the University’s open access digital repository. By spotlighting items, we hope to illustrate the variety of research that you can find and that UChicago researchers can make available in the repository. University researchers are invited to log in to Knowledge@UChicago and share articles, book chapters, conference materials, datasets, and other scholarly work.  See more digital scholarship news from the Library, including previous featured research on our news site.  

New guide to papers of historian Maria Elena Martinez

The Maria Elena Martinez Papers are now open for research.

Dr. Martinez (1966-2014) was an historian of colonial Mexico. She received her PhD in History from The University of Chicago in 2002 and taught as an associate professor of history and American studies and ethnicity at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences until her death from cancer in 2015.

Martinez’s first book, Genealogical Fictions: Limpieza de Sangre, Religion, and Gender in Colonial Mexico was well-reviewed by the academic community upon publication and received numerous accolades. This collection contains her academic and professional work, personal correspondence, and teaching and research notes. Her extensive archive of photocopied probanzas – proofs of the blood lineage of Spaniards in colonial Mexico – from libraries and archives in the United States, Mexico, and Spain may be of particular interest to researchers.

“Photographs from vacation to Mexico, circa 2000,” Maria Elena Martinez Papers, Box 8, Folder 16.

Photocopied probanza from the Archivo General de Indias: Petición (Dispensa) de Don Joseph y Basilio Manuel de Aquillada (Colegio de Abajados) (1814). Maria Elena Martinez Papers, Box 11, Folder 4.

Marie Tharp: Pioneering Oceanographer – new web exhibit

A pioneer in her field, renowned cartographer Marie Tharp created the first scientific maps of the Atlantic Ocean floor with her partner Bruce Heezen. Her observations showed the topography and geographical landscape of the ocean bottom and were crucial to the development of the theories of plate tectonics and continental drift in the earth sciences. 

A new web exhibit is now available about her work with images of some of her maps, many of which are available in the Library’s map collection.

Exhibit: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/collex/exhibits/marie-tharp-pioneering-oceanographer/

 

 

Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports online edition now available

We are pleased to announce that the online edition of the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports, 1941-1996 is now available to University of Chicago students, staff and faculty.  Fully searchable, this digital edition of the United States’ principal historical record of political open source intelligence for more than half a century provides insights into decades of world history. FBIS monitored and recorded intercepted radio broadcasts from foreign governments, official news services, and clandestine broadcasts from occupied territories.  Recordings were transcribed and translated into English and are a rich resource for students and scholars in international and area studies, political science and world history.

The online collection features full-text transcripts from Africa, Asia and the Pacific, China, Eastern and Western Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and the Soviet Union. This unique digital collection features individual bibliographic records for each report.

The Library gratefully acknowledges the Estate of Edward A. Allworth for helping to make the acquisition of this resource possible.

 

Exam preparation resources at the D’Angelo Law Library

The D’Angelo Law Library provides a variety of resources to help students prepare for exams.

Past exams: Perhaps most importantly, the Library provides copies of past exams given at the Law School, in addition to model student answers and memos written by the professors where available. The exams are organized by course and faculty member. Everything we have been given permission to post is available on the Library website.

Screenshot of Law Library website

Study Supplements: Another helpful resource for preparing student outlines and studying for exams are the many study supplements, including the popular Examples & Explanations and Understanding series, that are available in the Reserve Room. Our Hornbooks & Study Supplements page provides lists of the available study supplements by course name. Students also have access to the Wolters Kluwer Online Study Aids and West Academic Study Aids e-book packages. These provide online access to many of the study supplements, including Examples & Explanations, Glannon Guides, West’s Concise Hornbook Series, the Law Stories Series, and all of the Nutshells.

The West Academic Library Mobile App also allows you to listen to West Academic audio content, such as the Law School Legends and Sum and Substance series, on your phone or to access the print e-book study aids available via West Study Aids

CALI Lessons: If you prefer something more interactive, CALI lessons might be the resource for you.  The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) provides UofC law students with access to nearly 1,000 internet-based lessons on different legal topics. Lessons range from core 1L courses (92 lessons on property, for example) to many different upper level courses. CALI lessons are often interactive and feature questions to test your knowledge as you go through them. If you have not already registered an account with CALI, you can Ask a Law Librarian to get the authorization code for the Law School.

Study Rooms: If you want to meet with a study group, the D’Angelo Law Library has seven study rooms that can be reserved online: two study rooms on each of the 4th, 5th and 6th floors, and one study room on the second floor. Law students may reserve use of a study room using the Law School’s room reservation system. For further assistance, see How to Reserve a Law Library Study Room.

Quiet Study Space: Quieter study spaces are available on the upper floors of the Law Library. Law School students are also able to study in any of the other libraries on campus. Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week. For a full list of library hours, see https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/using/libraries-hours/.

Lockers: Please remember to secure your belongings when you take breaks. You can check out a locker key from the Circulation Desk. Library lockers are located in the northeast corner of the second and third floors. Two types of lockers are available: laptop lockers, which are smaller and each equipped with an electrical outlet, and bookbag lockers, which are large enough to accommodate a bookbag and/or coat.

Good luck with exams!

Book display and guide for Asian American Pacific Heritage Month

For Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month, visit the new book display on Regenstein Library’s first floor created by our Research Services Support Fellow, Juno Dong:

The books on display can give you a glance at our collections on the history, social image, economic status, and political engagement of the Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the States. While “Asian Pacific” is a broad umbrella term that covers many ethnically distinct groups, their shared existence as underrepresented minorities enables a collective identity to emerge from a wide range of personal experiences each individual has as an American of Asian and Pacific Islander descent in this country.

These selected books are located near collections highlighting this year’s UChicago Common Book, The Best We Could Do, by Thi Bui. All books on display are available for checkout.

Not on campus? Visit our accompanying Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month Guide, also created by Juno, as well as our guide on the UChicago Common Book.  If you need help locating research materials on Asian and Pacific Islander Americans, please feel free to ask a librarian.

Book Display

Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month Book Display

Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law access over the summer

Your law student accounts for Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law can all be used over the summer, though under different terms for each service.

Westlaw

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls:

You can use Thomson Reuters products, including Westlaw and Practical Law, over the summer for non-commercial research. You can turn to these resources to gain understanding and build confidence in your research skills, but you cannot use them in situations where you are billing a client. Examples of permissible uses for your academic password include the following:

  • Summer coursework
  • Research assistant assignments
  • Law Review or Journal research
  • Moot Court research
  • Non-Profit work
  • Clinical work
  • Externship sponsored by the school

Graduating 3Ls:

Graduating students have access to Thomson Reuters products, including Westlaw and Practical Law, for six-months after graduation. Your “Grad Elite” access gives you 60-hours of usage on these products per month to gain understanding and build confidence in your research skills. While you cannot use it in situations where you are billing a client, Thomson Reuters encourages you to use these tools to build your knowledge of the law and prepare for your bar exam. In addition, you get access to job searching databases on Westlaw and TWEN for 18-months after graduation for 1-hour a month. Extend access by logging into www.lawschool.westlaw.com or at https://lawschool.westlaw.com/authentication/gradelite.

For help or more information, contact the Law School’s Westlaw Account Manager Elan Kleis at Elan.Kleis@thomsonreuters.com.

Lexis

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls:

Continuing students are welcome to use their Lexis Advance ID for academic or employment purposes during May – August.

Graduating 3Ls:

Graduating students will have their Lexis Advance IDs automatically transitioned to Graduate IDs on July 1, with access through December 31, 2018. Those graduates going to work for a 501(c)(3) can apply for an ASPIRE ID for a full year of access following graduation. Qualifying graduates can apply from this site: https://www.lexisnexis.com/grad-access/

For help or more information, contact our LexisNexis Account Executive, Carter Isham at carter.isham@lexisnexis.com.

Bloomberg Law

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls:

Bloomberg Law provides unlimited and unrestricted access over the summer. There is no need to register, as your student account will remain active and available all summer.

Graduating 3Ls:

Students graduating this spring have unlimited and unrestricted access to Bloomberg Law for six months after graduation.

For help or more information, contact our Bloomberg Law Account Manager, Chrishantha Vedhanayagam at cvedhanayagam@bna.com.

New report from Mintel on recreational cannabis users

The Library has subscribed to market research from Mintel for many years. These reports focus on consumer markets in the United States and have detailed demographic information on users of products such as skin care, beverages, food, restaurants and more. Their primary customers are businesses selling products in these markets. Many of these customers wanted information on cannabis users and how they might impact their markets, despite the fact that cannabis is not legal for recreational use in most states. Mintel surveyed users and potential users in states where it is legal and produced a report last fall, which is now available to UChicago users. The report is aimed at marketers, but researchers in other disciplines may be interested in the characteristics of cannabis users that Mintel identified.

Cannabis Report Homepage

Access the report here.
You must agree to Mintel’s terms of use before you can access this report. These terms are more restrictive than our other databases and do not allow downloads of entire reports or sharing outside of the University of Chicago.

Select the Databook to download an Excel file with all survey questions and responses.