Resources

For posts about collections and electronic resource (including items we own, items we license, and others that are freely available but recommended by our staff in topical bibliography posts, etc.), due dates (if we continue to post due dates); database trials, preservation.

New report from Mintel on recreational cannabis users

The Library has subscribed to market research from Mintel for many years. These reports focus on consumer markets in the United States and have detailed demographic information on users of products such as skin care, beverages, food, restaurants and more. Their primary customers are businesses selling products in these markets. Many of these customers wanted information on cannabis users and how they might impact their markets, despite the fact that cannabis is not legal for recreational use in most states. Mintel surveyed users and potential users in states where it is legal and produced a report last fall, which is now available to UChicago users. The report is aimed at marketers, but researchers in other disciplines may be interested in the characteristics of cannabis users that Mintel identified.

Cannabis Report Homepage

Access the report here.
You must agree to Mintel’s terms of use before you can access this report. These terms are more restrictive than our other databases and do not allow downloads of entire reports or sharing outside of the University of Chicago.

Select the Databook to download an Excel file with all survey questions and responses.

LexisNexis Digital Library

University of Chicago faculty and students now have access to the LexisNexis Digital Library. This database contains legal treatises from LexisNexis and Matthew Bender in eBook form. Until now, we have not been able to offer online access to these titles to faculty and students outside the Law School. Major treatises available include Moore’s Federal Practice, Nimmer on Copyright, and Collier on Bankruptcy. Also available are banking law handbooks and annotated codes, including the United States Code Service and the Illinois Compiled Statutes Annotated.

You can access the LexisNexis Digital Library without signing in, but if you sign in with your CNetID and password, you can download books to read offline, and save your notes and highlighting.

The similarly-named Lexis Library, which contains UK case law and commentary, is still available.

 

Courses inspire student to collect, donate rare books to UChicago Library

Bob Connors with his books

Bob Connors, a retired tax attorney and Graham School student, recently donated his collection of nearly 600 rare books to the University of Chicago Library. (Photo by Robert Kozloff)

Graham School sparks 70-year-old Bob Connors’ quest to find works dating to 15th century

Bob Connors flips open the heavy leather covers, thumbing past yellowed, worm-holed pages more than five centuries old. A few feet behind him, boxes pile up along the wall.

This collection of rare books started with a simple idea. As a student at the University of Chicago Graham School, Connors was reading texts considered the bedrock of Western Civilization. Why not find the oldest copies he could get his hands on?

An open book

The oldest book in Connors’ collection is a 1475 edition of Augustine’s Confessions, printed in Milan by Johannes Bonus. This incunable title is notable for its unusual text type, light and delicate. (Photo by Jean Lachat)

What began as a hobby for the retired tax attorney grew into a years-long odyssey—one that sent him down a rabbit hole of auctions and book dealers. Inspired by his studies, the collection of nearly 600 books is remarkable in both breadth and depth: rare editions of famous authors like James Joyce and F. Scott Fitzgerald; oversized 15th- and 16th-century volumes with original oak covers and brass clasps; and the oldest of the lot, a 1475 copy of Augustine’s Confessions.

Connors is now 70 years old. Last October, he was diagnosed with cancer. He began to think: Of all his possessions, there was one set in particular worth preserving.

“I had all these books that I collected and I valued,” said Connors, sitting in his suburban Oak Park home. “And I guess part of it is, at this point, I’m into legacy. What will be left behind? And I knew that if I didn’t do something with these books, they would be thrown out. And I couldn’t let that happen.”

He decided to donate them to UChicago Library’s Special Collections Research Center, where they now live as the Robert S. Connors Basic Program Collection.

The name is a nod to the curriculum that nurtured in Connors a fascination with the history of the printed word. Since 1946, the Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies has offered the Basic Program of Liberal Education for Adults to encourage reading and engaging with the “Great Books.” One proponent of this approach was former UChicago President Robert Maynard Hutchins, who argued that it kept one’s “intelligence on the stretch.”

“Great books teach people not only how to read them,” he wrote in 1952, “but also how to read all other books.”

An irreplaceable collection

Elizabeth Frengel, the curator of rare books at the University of Chicago Library, had expected a small collection, perhaps around two dozen books.

The dolphin-and-anchor printer's device in a book held by Connors

Bob Connors holds one of his many Aldines—books printed by Aldus Manutius’ 16th-century press. Known for producing smaller, more accessible books, Manutius adopted a distinctive dolphin-and-anchor printer’s device. (Robert Kozloff for the University of Chicago)

When they first met, Connors brought with him copies of classic British literature such as Thomas Hardy and George Eliot, enough to reveal he had “a good eye as a collector.” Then he and Frengel started talking about the Aldine Press, an early 16th-century publisher that printed smaller, portable books that were more feasible for students and scholars to acquire. The ready accessibility of these books transformed the nature of reading—and, many argue, extended the reach of the Renaissance.

“As a group, it’s irreplaceable,” said Frengel, who oversees the University’s approximately 340,000 volumes dating back to the 15th century. “If we weren’t able to make this collection available to researchers, that would be a sad loss. You couldn’t easily recapture that sort of scholarly value.”

The donation included 11 “incunabula.” Taken from the Latin word for “swaddling clothes,” the term denotes books published in Europe between 1455 and 1501. These works, along with some 16th-century publications, illuminate the history of printing and provide insight into the evolution of the book as a material and technical object.

“The books are not going to be things that sit on a shelf and nobody really uses,” said Fred Beuttler, a Graham School associate dean who was one of the first UChicago employees to see Connors’ collection. “We’re going to make them accessible to faculty and graduate students.”

On April 9, the University will recognize Connors in a ceremony, joined by his family and members of the UChicago community.

‘More fun than golf’

The books’ new home represents a fitting coda to Connors’ journey. While working downtown in the early 1980s, he called the University of Chicago on a whim and asked about part-time course offerings.

“It was the leading university in area,” Connors said. “If I was gonna be taking classes, I might as well take it from the best.”

Whoever picked up the phone pointed him to the Graham School’s Basic Program. On the first day of class, Connors found out that he was entering the first part of a four-year sequence. His relationship with the Graham School would last even longer.

Connors received a certificate from the Basic Program in 1985, but the classes wore on him. A new job had taken him an hour north of downtown Chicago, and the evening commute back into the city left him struggling to stay awake during discussions.

So he took a break, focusing on his career until he approached retirement. He enrolled again in 2006, signing up for a course on the Roman historian Tacitus. The discussion-based nature of the classes, he said, prompted him to read more closely than he ever would on his own. Along the way, he picked up an interest in collecting.

“Something I thought would be more fun than golf, I guess,” he said.

Connors’ love for books has always been clear. Meggie, the younger of his two daughters, still remembers their nightly reading sessions—a few pages of Little House on the Prairie, or a chapter of Little Women. She doesn’t consider herself a history buff, but her father’s occasional spiels about his collection revealed his passion.

“He really latches on to information,” she said. “Especially with these books, he could remember every single detail about them.”

That impulse hasn’t waned. Even now, Connors hopes not only to continue his studies, but to keep searching for books to acquire.

Frengel understands the urge. Many of Connors’ oldest books contain hand-written notes in the margins, unique to each of their previous owners.

A manicule in a book's margin

Drawn in book margins by hand, manicules were popular among Renaissance readers as a way to mark important passages of text. (Photo by Jean Lachat)

“Collecting these kinds of books give you perhaps a more insightful understanding of how culture is transmitted—how our cultural myths, our stories, our histories are passed down to us,” she said. “You can probably access almost all of these texts online for nothing, because they’re not copyrighted. But the material object puts you in touch with that history in an entirely new way.”

Connors has compared his books to an art collection—better shared than hidden away. Though he has read translations of many, there are several that he appreciates simply as historical artifacts. They would serve little purpose locked up in someone’s basement.

“They’ve been around for a long time,” Connors said. “I’m hoping they’ll be around for a good long time further when they’re cared for by the University Library. They really belong there.”

A University of Chicago news story

Laptop and phone chargers now available at Eckhart

Laptop and phone chargers are now available for checkout at Eckhart Library.  If your device is running low, feel free to ask for one at our circulation desk.  Chargers available include ones for Macbooks, PCs, Androids, IPhones and IPads.  Each can be checked out for two hours at a time.

A full list of the chargers available is here: https://bit.ly/2RgBtoT

We also have calculators and headphones available for checkout at our circulation desk.

New marketing databases available

The Library has added access to three databases that cover consumer demographics.

The first database is a new segment of Statista, the Statista Global Consumer Survey. This covers 28 countries and has data on consumer demographics, brand share and consumer preferences. It has a built-in cross-tabulation tool, which lets users build their own reports using a wide range of demographic and market variables.
Access the Statista Global Consumer Survey here.  Click “Browse the Consumer Global Survey” to access the database

The second database is Consumer Brand Analytics, which covers brands and consumers in the U.S. It includes 19 major product categories and has detailed consumer demographics. It also features many different ways to analyze data and will soon include data on consumers switching brands within a category.
Access Consumer Brand Analytics here

The third database is Sports Market Analytics, which aggregates news and data on professional, college and recreational sports. It includes attendance figures and overall television viewership for spectator sports. It also covers participation, market and brand share for recreational sports.
Access Sports Market Analytics here.

 

Bloomberg BNA content merged into Bloomberg Law platform

Bloomberg BNA’s newsletters and resource centers have moved to the Bloomberg Law platform. The BNA resource centers, which brought together news, case law, legal analysis, primary sources, and practice tools, have been consolidated with existing Bloomberg Law practice centers. Some sixty Bloomberg BNA daily and weekly newsletters have been consolidated into twenty-two news pages on Bloomberg Law.

For the remainder of the academic year, we will have campus-wide access to the Bloomberg Law platform. Law School users with individual accounts will need to sign in to utilitize the full Bloomberg Law platform, including setting up alerts and accessing court filings from dockets.

Screenshot of Bloomberg Law interface

Global law resources at D’Angelo Law Library

The Law School’s Global Chicago Law Wine Mess is a good time to explore the diverse foreign, comparative, and international law (FCIL) resources we have at the University. Here is Lyonette “Lyo” Louis-Jacques (’86), Foreign and International Law Librarian, on FCIL databases and websites that you can access via the D’Angelo Law Library.

To start your FCIL research, consult “people” and print resources, but also check out the “Foreign and International Law” section of the D’Angelo Law Library Law Databases page.

Are you looking for non-U.S. constitutions? We have Constitute, Constitutions of the Countries of the World, and World Constitutions Illustrated.

Don’t know where to begin to look for sources on the law of a particular foreign jurisdiction? You can use tools such as the Foreign Law Guide, GlobaLex, and Guide to Law Online.

Want to locate statutes, codes, cases, and other primary law of foreign jurisdictions? We have ChinaLawInfo (aka LawInfoChina aka PKULaw), Manupatra and SCC Online (India), Israel Law Reports and Nevo, vLex (over 130 countries – strong for Spain and Latin American jurisdictions), WorldLII (multiple countries), and many other foreign law research tools.

Looking for treaties and other international agreements? Check out HeinOnline.

Maybe someone has written about the comparative law topic you’re researching? You can look for commentary in secondary sources such as encyclopedias, handbooks, books, journals articles, and news stories. Favorite databases for foreign corporate law research are Practical Law (global guides and cross-border resources), Getting the Deal Through (GTDT via Bloomberg Law), International Comparative Legal Guides (ICLG), and the International Encyclopaedia of Laws (IEL).

Don’t find what you’re looking for? Or have follow-up questions? Or want to arrange a library research consultation? Ask a Law Librarian!

Cert Denied Cases Now on ProQuest Supreme Court Insight

ProQuest Supreme Court Insight now includes petitions for writ of certiorari for cert denied cases, as well as for argued cases. Dockets and petition-stage briefs are also included for these cases. Coverage is from 1975 to the2017-18 term. Petitions for cert denied cases filed in forma pauperis are not present.

Cert petitions from the Supreme Court’s current term are available from the Supreme Court web site, through their Docket Search.

New guide to papers of demographer Donald Bogue

The Donald J. Bogue Papers are now open for research. Donald Bogue (1918-2014) was a demographer and longtime University of Chicago Professor of Sociology. Upon earning his PhD from the University of Michigan in 1949, he joined the faculty at Miami University and then joined the University of Chicago in 1954. He remained at UChicago for the rest of his career. He was affiliated with the National Opinion Research Center and was responsible for founding and leading several population research centers at the University.

Bogue founded Demography, the Journal of the Population Association of America in 1964 and served as its first editor from 1964 to 1969. His interest in family planning made him a major force in the worldwide movement for population control. He directed USAID and Ford Foundation-funded contracts to improve the evaluation of family planning programs’ impact on fertility in low-income countries and also trained demographers and clinicians through international workshops on the use of mass communications in family planning programs. The Donald J. Bogue Papers document his life in Chicago and his international work in Latin American, Asian, and African countries.

Black and white Donald Bogue portrait, undated. Bogue, Donald J. Papers, Box 24, Folder 8, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

Front cover of “Relevant Posters for Family Planning,” by B. Berndtson, D.J. Bogue, and G. McVicker, 1975. Bogue, Donald J. Papers, Box 7, Folder 8, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

Donald Bogue and Indonesian delegation at a summer workshop at the University of Chicago, 1970. Bogue, Donald J. Papers, Box 23, Folder 3, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

Issues of ‘Medicine on the Midway’ available on UChicago Campus Publications

Medicine on the Midway, Vol. 1, No. 1, December 1944 (previously titled Bulletin of the Medical Alumni Association, University of Chicago)

Issues of Medicine on the Midway from 1944 to 1981 have been digitized and are now available on The University of Chicago Campus Publications website. Formerly titled Bulletin of the Medical Alumni Association, this periodical was published by the School of Medicine at the University of Chicago.

University of Chicago Campus Publications is a digital collection of publications documenting the history of the University of Chicago and the work of its faculty, students, and alumni; read more about its launch.

New issues of Medicine on the Midway are available at UChicago Medicine.