Resources

For posts about collections and electronic resource (including items we own, items we license, and others that are freely available but recommended by our staff in topical bibliography posts, etc.), due dates (if we continue to post due dates); database trials, preservation.

“Library Adventures in a Digital Age” a history of medicine pop-up display

Library Adventures in a Digital Age

Join Dr. Mindy Schwartz, Professor of Medicine and Associate Program Director for Internal Medicine at the University of Chicago, in the Special Collections Research Center for a special pop-up display of rare medical history collections.

Library Adventures in a Digital Age:
Chicago Connections
Friday, October 26, 1:00 – 4:30 p.m.
Special Collections Research Center
Regenstein Library, 1st floor

View a selection of books and objects from our collections that enhance our understanding of the history of science and medicine, and learn how they can be used for research and teaching. A resource guide will be available.

For more information about the event, contact the Special Collections Research Center.

ChemDraw Prime software annual renewal

University of Chicago users of ChemDraw Prime may now download the most recent version of the software for use.  The process requires use of an @uchicago.edu email address and an in-software activation using a code provided to registered users.  Instructions for download and activation are available on the Chemistry LibGuide as a PDF file .  Users encountering any difficulties in downloading or activating the software may contact Andrea Twiss-Brooks, atbrooks@uchicago.edu or 773-702-8777 for assistance.

ChemDraw Logo

The D’Angelo Law Library welcomes students

The D’Angelo Law Library would like to take this opportunity to welcome the JD class of 2021 and the LLM class of 2019, along with all of our returning 2Ls and 3Ls!  We hope that all of you will take advantage of our vast resources and knowledgeable staff. Please remember that if you ever have any questions about the Library, please ask us!

This year, the Law Library has created a 1L Success Portal that gathers together tools, such as study supplements and past exams, for each of the required courses students will take during their 1L year. These tools should aid students in their understanding of the challenging concepts that will form the bedrock of their legal education.

1. Reference librarians are here to help.

Our reference staff is knowledgeable, helpful, and accessible by email, chat, phone, and in person. Each Bigelow section also has a Reference Librarian assigned to teach legal research sessions over the course of the year. You can consider that librarian as your point of contact in the library, although all of our librarians are available to help you. We are available seven days a week through email, chat, phone, text and in person at the Reference Desk. See our Hours page for the exact hours.

2. Start with the Law Library website.

The Library website can direct you to services and tools to help you find what you need to study law and conduct legal research. Use our website to get research help, find databases, learn library policies, and keep up with the latest library and legal research news.

3. Access information using our primary discovery tools.

Library Catalog: You can search the Library Catalog for books, electronic materials, and more. The University of Chicago Library has over 7 million books and access to hundreds of thousands of electronic resources, so if you are looking for something, you should start with the catalog, and chances are we have what you are looking for.

Databases: The Library offers access to hundreds of databases covering various subjects. To locate a database to use for your research, use Database Finder, a tool that enables you to search for a particular database by name or browse by subject to identify relevant databases. The Law Library also provides a list of the main databases used for legal research.

Access to Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis, and Westlaw is restricted to Law School students, and each law student will be supplied with an individual password. You will get this password during your library orientation. If you have any questions about these resources, please do not hesitate to Ask a Law Librarian.

Research Guides: The reference librarians have created research guides on a variety of legal topics. These guides give you starting points for doing research in particular areas of law.

4. We offer a number of on demand services.

Scan & Deliver is an electronic document delivery service that enables members of the University of Chicago community to obtain scanned portions of books or journal articles from the Library’s collections. Requests should be made online, directly from the Library Catalog. Requested documents will be scanned and delivered within four business days. We will scan chapters from books or single articles from journals, provided that the chapter(s) or article does not exceed 20% of the entire book or journal issue.

We also offer a paging service for Law School students. We will retrieve uncharged Library books located in the stacks of other libraries on campus. This service is currently available to Law School students, faculty, and staff only. Materials will generally be collected within two business days and placed on hold at the Circulation Desk or delivered to the appropriate carrel. You will receive an email when your item is available for pick-up.

While searching the Library Catalog, you may also occasionally come across items with the location Mansueto or one of the two D’Angelo Law Library annexes. You can request materials from these storage collections to be delivered to the Law Library. It generally takes less than 24 hours, and you will receive an email when your item is available for pick up at the Law Library circulation desk.

University of Chicago students in other schools and programs are welcome at the D’Angelo Law Library. If you are interested in an introductory D’Angelo tour or a research consultation with a law reference librarian, please use the Ask a Law Librarian service to schedule a time with one of us.

New interface Westlaw Edge

On Monday, August 27, the University of Chicago Law School will switch over to the new Westlaw platform called Westlaw Edge. Law School users with current Westlaw accounts should be automatically switched over to the new platform and will not have to take any action to update their accounts.

What’s new and different about Westlaw Edge? Well, the first thing you’ll notice is that the home page is now blue. Other than that, it mostly functions the same way as Westlaw, but includes four major new features:

  • An enhanced version of the KeyCite citator that provides warnings that cases may no longer be good law, even though they have not been expressly overruled;
  • Litigation analytics that provide detailed docket analytics covering judges, courts, attorneys, and law firms, for both federal and state courts;
  • Statutes Compare, a tool that allows researchers to compare different versions of the same statute; and
  • WestSearch Plus, an AI-driven legal research tool that provides answers to specific legal questions.

To learn more about Westlaw Edge, you can visit the Thomson Reuters website, as well as detailed reviews from LawSites, Legaltech news, and the Dewey B Strategic blog. As always, Ask a Law Librarian if you have any questions or concerns about Westlaw Edge.

New online resource: ProQuest Regulatory Insight

Logo for ProQuest Regulatory Insight

ProQuest Regulatory Insight organizes the regulatory histories associated with Public Laws and Executive Orders from 1936-present, compiling Federal Register (FR) articles, proposed and final rules, and comments associated with them, organized by the Public Law to which they relate, the agency making the rule, and Regulation Identifier Number (RIN), and docket numbers.

General searching is by keyword, or Public Law Number, Popular Name of the statute, Statutes at Large (Stat.) citation, U.S. Code citation, RIN, and Agency Docket numbers. A special “Search Comments” page enables searching Regulatory Insight‘s extensive archive of comments by keyword, docket, RIN, and Comment ID number, and the following fields: Agency, Country, Organization, Submitter.

A fully-indexed Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) from 1938-present is included with browse and search options.

Regulatory Insight is a new addition to the Library’s other ProQuest subscriptions – Congressional, Legislative Insight, Supreme Court Insight (1975-2016). We welcome your feedback on its usefulness for your research. Contact us and let us know what you think!

New Elgar online law databases

Cover of Elgar Encyclopedia of Law and Economics bookUniversity researchers now have access to the following new Elgar online resources via the D’Angelo Law Library’s subscription:


Campus users can also search full texts of recent handbooks, monographs, commentaries, and research reviews via the Elgaronline Law-Academic platform. Individual books can also be located via the library catalog. Great ways to find ebooks on all types of topics, including foreign, comparative, and international law.

Elgaronline complements our other law ebook collections: Oxford Scholarship Online: Law, Oxford Handbooks Online in Law, Oxford Scholarly Authorities in International Law (OSAIL), PLI Plus, SpringerLink, Recueil des cours = Collected Courses (Hague Academy of International Law), and various The Making of Modern Law and HeinOnline modules.

 

Roundup of new guides to archives and manuscripts collections

Archivists in the Special Collections Research Center were hard at work arranging and describing archival collections this past fiscal year. 38 collections comprising 1,064 linear feet of material – that’s the length of more than 3.5 football fields! – are now available for research. 475 linear feet of collections (approximately 1.5 football fields of material) were also reviewed and their online guides updated.

You are invited to explore the following new guides and visit us to see the collections in person. The Special Collections Research Center is open to anyone – students, faculty, staff, and the general public.

Amberg, Alan. Gay History Collection

The materials in this collection were gathered by Alan Amberg as well as his partner, the late Jerry Cohen. Materials cover a wide range of gay and lesbian subject matter, including the beginnings of the Gay Pride Movement in Chicago in the early 1970s.

Bachner, Rudolph. Papers

Rudolph Bachner (1905-1997) was a German-born writer and chemist. The collection contains three typescripts of Bachner’s work, including two novels and an unpublished memoir.

Baily, Walter. Papers

Walter Lewis Baily Jr. (1930-2013) was a mathematician and professor at The University of Chicago. During his career, Baily made numerous contributions to algebraic geometry, the most important of which is known as the Baily-Borel Compactification.

Baptist Divinity House. Records

The Baptist Divinity House assisted with funding, housing, career placement and other means of support for students pursing Baptist ministry at the University of Chicago Divinity School.

Bill, Charles A. Collection of Yousuf Karsh. Photographs

This collection contains photographs by Yousuf Karsh (1908-2002), collected by Charles Anton Bill. Yousuf Karsh, is best known for his portrait photographs of significant cultural and political figures. This collection contains Karsh’s silver gelatin prints of Winston Churchill, Pope John XXIII, and John F. Kennedy.

Brannen, Noah S. Papers

Noah Samuel Brannen (1924-2013) was an ordained minister, missionary, translator, and professor. The collection contains correspondence, notes, drafts, manuscripts, and publications pertaining to Brannen’s translations of and writings on the works of various Japanese authors, especially Rinzo Shiina.

Braude, Lee. Papers

Lee Braude, sociologist, University of Chicago A.M. 1954, PhD, 1964.

Camp Farr Collection

Camp Farr was a fresh-air children’s summer camp near Chesterton, Indiana, established by the University of Chicago Settlement League.

Chandrasekhar, S. Papers (Addenda)

The Special Collections Research Center’s collection of Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar‘s personal papers has more than doubled in size.

Elshtain, Jean Bethke. Papers

Jean Bethke Elshtain (1941-2013) was a political theorist, ethicist, author, and public intellectual. She was the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Professor of Social and Political Ethics with joint appointments at the Divinity School, the Department of Political Science, and the Committee on International Relations at the University of Chicago.

Hamilton, Alfred Starr. Papers

Alfred Starr Hamilton (1914-2005) poet. The collection contains biographical information, personal belongings, correspondence, , book reviews, newspaper clippings with interviews and biographies, poetry journals and magazines, books, and Hamilton’s unpublished poetry manuscripts.

Historical Manuscripts Collection (Addenda)

The Historical Manuscripts Collections contains correspondence and other brief manuscripts documenting personal, scholarly, business, government, and religious affairs, written by an array of authors, primarily from North America and Western Europe. The manuscripts date from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries.

Irene Tufts Mead, Collection of Alice Boughton. Photographs

Alice Boughton was a member of the Photo-Secession movement. All of the images date to 1904. Subjects include George Herbert Mead, Alice Chipman Dewey, Lucy Dewey, Evelyn Dewey, and Sabino Dewey.

Isaacs, Roger, Collection of Bud Freeman Papers

Lawrence “Bud” Freeman (1906-1991) was a jazz tenor saxophonist from Chicago, Illinois, who lived and played all over the world. Freeman was a leader of the “Chicago style” of jazz.

Kraus, Paul. Papers

Paul Kraus (1904-1944) was a scholar of Semitic languages and medieval Islamic science and philosophy.

Landahl, Karen. Papers

Karen Landahl (1951-2003) was a linguist who taught at the University of Chicago, in the Department of Linguistics, from 1982 to 2003. She was also the Academic Director of the Language Labs and Archives and the Language Faculty Resource Center, and the Associate Dean for Computing and Language Technologies at the University.

Language Laboratories and Archives. Records

The Language Laboratories and Archives at the University of Chicago, and its current iteration, the Center for the Study of Language, provide language learning services and facilities for both faculty and students. This collection contains records of the various iterations of the lab, from 1952 to 2006.

Leites, Nathan. Papers

Nathan Leites (1912-1987) was a political scientist who applied the tools of psychoanalysis to the study of culture and politics, with particular specialization in the Soviet politburo.

Maloof, John. Collection of Vivian Maier

This collection contains photographic prints, ephemera, and artifacts belonging to photographer Vivian Maier. It includes black-and-white and color prints taken by Maier, most of which are street photographs of Chicago and New York City from the 1950s-1970s.

Maser, Edward. Papers

Edward Andrew Maser (1923-1988) was an Art Historian, a museum curator, and an art collector. From 1961 to 1964, he served as the chairman of the University of Chicago’s Department of Art History, and in 1974 he became the inaugural director of the Smart Museum.

Mason, Max. Papers

Charles Max Mason (1877-1961) mathematician, President of the University of Chicago (1925-1928), and President of the Rockefeller Foundation (1929-1936). The collection primarily documents Mason’s work for the National Research Council during World War One, where he developed a submarine detection device that was in regular use on destroyers by the summer of 1918. The device was a precursor to the sonar devices of the 1940s.

McQuown, Norman. Papers

Norman A. McQuown (1914-2005) was an anthropologist and linguist best known for his efforts to document and study indigenous languages in Mexico and Central America and for his work in the field of non-verbal communication.

Mirsky, Marvin. Papers

Marvin Mirsky (1923-1914) was a scholar of literature and longtime faculty member at the University of Chicago.

Moore, Carl R. Papers

Carl Richard Moore (1892-1955) was a Professor of Zoology and endocrinologist. Moore made significant contributions to the field of mammalian endocrinology; he was part of the team of University of Chicago researchers that first isolated testosterone in 1920. With fellow researcher Dorothy Price, he theorized the “push-pull” interactions between the pituitary gland and sex glands, which provided insight into the complexities of fertility in mammals.

Perlberg, Mark. Papers

Mark Perlberg (1929- 2008) was a poet, journalist, editor, and educator. In 1968, he co-founded the Poetry Center of Chicago.

Perrin, Norman. Papers

Norman Horace Perrin (1920-1976) was an associate professor of New Testament Studies at the University of Chicago.

Roman Weil Collection of Boris Artzybasheff

This collection contains illustrations by the Russian-American artist Boris Artzybasheff (1899-1965) produced from 1929 to 1965, and collected by Roman Weil. The material in the collection ranges from magazine covers, industrial advertisements, a map, large advertising poster prints, and a woodblock print. The images describe foreign leaders, American political leaders, anthropomorphized machinery, descriptive maps, technological innovations, political satire, and poetic figurations.

Sherer, Albert. Papers

Albert Sherer (1884-1973) was a senior student at the University of Chicago who was shot near campus in 1905. The collection contains a letter from University President William Rainey Harper to Sherer, Sherer’s police reports, newspaper accounts, a record of the 1934 University of Chicago’s Board of Trustees, and the bullets that were extracted from Mr. Sherer.

Silbert, Layle. Papers (Addenda)

Layle Silbert (1913-2003) was a photographer and writer. Noted for her portraits of authors, Silbert also wrote poetry, essays and fiction.

Swerdlow, Noel. Papers

Noel M. Swerdlow (1941-) emeritus professor in the Departments of History and Astronomy and Astrophysics. The collection includes documents collected by Swerdlow related to the non-reappointment of sociology professor Marlene Dixon, and the subsequent student sit-ins in 1969.

Teichmann, Emil. Papers

Emil Teichmann (1845-1924) was a British fur trader sent to investigate possible illicit Russian fur trade in North America in 1868. The collection contains his original journal from 1868, correspondence, sketches, contracts, photographs, notes, and other memorabilia. The papers primarily document his trading negotiations, and photographic and illustrated scenes of landscape and cities like San Francisco and Sitka, Alaska.

University of Chicago. Dept of Anthropology. Chiapas Project. Records

The Department of Anthropology Chiapas Project records document the University of Chicago Department of Anthropology’s research projects in the Mexican state of Chiapas in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The projects aimed to investigate the language, culture, environment, and history of local Maya communities.

University of Chicago. Department of History. Records

This collection contains records from the Department of History at the University of Chicago. The collections contains correspondence, memoranda, minutes, letters of recommendation, examinations, reports, proposals, student lists and student evaluations.

University of Chicago. Department. of Sociology. Records

The Department of Sociology at the University of Chicago was founded in 1892 and was the first academic department of sociology in the United States. This collection contains materials related to the administration of the Department such as meeting minutes, student rosters, examinations, materials relating to the passing of Louis Wirth, and materials relating to the non-reappointment of sociology professor, Marlene Dixon. It also contains programs, brochures, and photographs related to the Centennial Conference, 1892-1992 as well as a map depicting East and West Garfield Park (1924).

University of Chicago. Midway Studios. Records

Midway Studios has been the fine arts studios of the Art Department at the University of Chicago since the mid-1940s, and was founded by sculptor Lorado Taft in 1906. This collection contains correspondence, newspaper clippings, drawings, photographs, academic journals, notes, brochures, and exhibit signs. Materials document Taft’s work and legacy, and the later history of the studio, particularly the work of Director Harold Haydon.

Worner, Ruby K. Papers

Ruby Kathryn Worner (1900-1995) was a chemist who specialized in the textile industry. Worner studied at the University of Chicago where she earned her Bachelor’s, Masters and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry (1921, 1922, and 1925). Worner worked for the United States Bureau of Home Economics as well as Southern Regional Laboratories, making numerous advancements in textile production.

New guide to papers of Quincy Wright, pioneer in international law and international relations

A new guide to the personal papers of Quincy Wright (1890-1970) is now available online. Wright was a political scientist and University of Chicago professor known for his work on war, international relations, and international law.

Wright joined the political science faculty at the University of Chicago in 1923, and was a professor of international law at the University from 1931 to 1956. He guest lectured at universities all over the world, and consulted for the government of the United States, including the U.S. Navy Department and the Department of State. He was also a technical advisor to the International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg in 1945, and a consultant to the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization in 1949. In addition to his teaching and consulting responsibilities, Wright authored dozens of books and hundreds of articles, among them A Study of War (1942) and The Study of International Relations (1955).

The papers document Wright’s interests in war, international law, world organization, and international cooperation, as well as the numerous organizations with which he was associated.

Parker Solar Probe named after UChicago physicist

space probe

Rendering of Parker Solar Probe. Credits: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

NASA has named its latest mission, the Parker Solar Probe, after UChicago physicist Eugene Parker, the S. Chandrasekhar Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in Physics.

According to the NASA website, the probe is “about the size of a small car and will travel directly into the Sun’s atmosphere about 4 million miles from the star’s surface. The primary science goals for the mission are to trace how energy and heat move through the solar corona and to explore what accelerates the solar wind as well as solar energetic particles. The mission will revolutionize our understanding of the Sun, where changing conditions can spread out into the solar system, affecting Earth and other worlds.”

Read one of Parker’s books or articles to learn more about his work.  Learn more about Parker and listen to him discuss his research on solar wind on the UChicago News site.

And on a related note, a large addition to the papers of Nobel laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar are now available for research in the Special Collections Research Center.

The John F. Kennedy Assassination Collection: New database from HeinOnline

HeinOnline has recently added the John F. Kennedy Assassination Collection. For those of you who have always wondered about the grassy knoll, but never had the time, energy, or resources to delve into the conspiracy theories, conflicting statements, and governmental records surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy, this collection offers all U.S. government documents relating to the assassination, including state and local law enforcement materials. The President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992 directed the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) to create the collection and provided that release of the documents begin in 2017, 25 years after the law was enacted. In October, 2017, the first set of 50,000 documents were released. 18,000 more documents were released and added to the database in April of 2018, and further documents will be added until the last set, which is scheduled to be declassified in 2021.

HeinOnline has organized and indexed the documents to make them easy for scholars to research. Approximately 58% of the documents from NARA came from the CIA, and another 37% from the FBI, according to the Data Visualization Charts that introduce the collection. HeinOnline has added to the documents a collection of books, hearings, scholarly articles, and other related works, to create a database that promises to be a rich resource for scholarship for years to come.