Crerar Library Extended Hours March 10th and 11th

Ahead of Winter quarter finals week, Crerar Library will be open extended hours during the University’s reading period, Friday and Saturday March 10th and 11th. On both days the hours will be 8am – 12am. Service desk hours will remain the same. For hours on other dates or at other libraries, visit http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu/.

New app lets users check out Library materials with their phones

The University of Chicago Library has launched a new mobile app, Checkout UChicago, that lets users check out Library materials using their phones or tablets.

Checkout UChicago allows students, faculty members, staff, and others with borrowing privileges at the University of Chicago Library to scan an item’s barcode with their phone and instantly check it out to their Library account.

Checkout UChicago app on a phone in the bookstacks

A phone displaying the Checkout UChicago start screen

Students with lockers and faculty members with studies in Regenstein will be able to check out materials and store them without having to bring them to Circulation.

Users who want to leave the Library with their items can use the self-service Deactivation Station at the Circulation desk in Regenstein. At other campus libraries, users can bring items to Circulation staff for deactivation.

Download the app

Checkout UChicago is available for download for both iOS and Android devices.

Gift for new users

The first 100 UChicago students and faculty members to check out a book with this app will receive a $3 credit to their UChicago Card in Maroon Dollars.  They will receive an email notifying them when the credit has been applied.

Library staff, including student staff, are not eligible for this promotion.

Science Writing Prize for College Students

science writing prizeThe Science Writing Prize for College Students is accepting submissions for 2017. First prize is $1500. Second prize is $500. Third prize is $300.

Deadline for submission is April 10, 2017.

This competitive award for excellence and clarity in science writing acknowledges the ability of a University of Chicago College student to produce a paper, on a scientific topic, which is thorough in its arguments but accessible to a broad readership.

For more information please visit: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/crerar/about-crerar-library/crerar-prize/

Call for proposals – Zar Symposium 2017

Open Data: Science, Health, Community
5th Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium
April 28, 2017
The John Crerar Library
The University of Chicago

Web Page: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/conferences/zar-symposium/
Email: zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu
#zarsymposium
@CrerarLibrary

Call for proposals

The organizers of the 5th biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, Open Data: Science, Health, Community, to be held Friday, April 28, invite proposals for presentations that provide insight into open data projects and initiatives, whether established or newly created, which have an impact on science, health, or community.  The focus may be, but is not limited to, opportunities for libraries and information professionals to contribute to or play an active role in projects or initiatives.

The organizers are interested in presentations that provide examples of collaborative efforts between institutions, groups, or individuals, with a focus on practical, real use cases of using open data.  Proposals selected for full oral presentations will be eligible for travel stipend.

Proposals should be submitted online at: http://bit.do/zar2017. Proposals must include a title, author(s), and abstract (maximum 600 words).  Presentations will be 30-45 minutes. The deadline for submission is Wednesday, March 8th.

Please consider the following questions when preparing proposals:

* How has your institution or community engaged with open data?
* If you led an open data project or initiative, how and why was it initiated, and what were the results?
* What are the opportunities and challenges of using or collecting open data?
* How are responsibilities determined and distributed?
* What kinds of tools and techniques may be used?

The symposium organizers will also consider interactive alternatives to a traditional oral presentations.

The intended audience of the symposium includes all who are involved or interested in open data, with a focus on, but not limited to, academic institutions.

About the Symposium:

Open data is data that can be freely used, re-used and redistributed.   Some examples of open data resources include the Human Genome Project, the United Nations UNdata, and the City of Chicago data portal.  Open data can spur business innovation, help patients and families make better decisions about their health, or accelerate the pace of scientific discovery.  This symposium will provide participants with an understanding of what open data is, how it gets created and shared, and examples of how open data might contribute to progress in our communities.

For more information, contact the symposium organizers at: zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu

 

Join us for Love Your Data week, Feb. 12-17

The Library is celebrating international Love Your Data week, February 12-17. The purpose of the Love Your Data (LYD) campaign is to raise awareness and build a community to engage on topics related to research data management, sharing, preservation, reuse, and library-based research data services. We will share practical tips, resources, and stories to help researchers at any stage in their career use good data practices.

Learn more about loving your data with events held at the John Crerar Library and on social media.

Monday, February 13: Defining Data Quality

In 2015, the popular WBEZ podcast This American Life published a message retracting an episode. The episode featured an article published in Science, a highly respected peer-reviewed journal, about the success of canvassing. However, the data in the article was falsified.

How, as researchers, can we recognize good research and bad research? The most elemental way to verify a scholar’s claim is to analyze their data. In day 1 of Love Your Data week, we’ll be sharing resources to help you define good data and spot bad data. Follow Crerar Library on Twitter (@Crerar Library) for resources and case studies in defining good data.

You can also read David Brockman’s (Stanford) claim that the original article contained fake data, or listen to This American Life’s recap of the original story and updates featuring researchers replicating the canvassing experiment.

Tuesday, February 14: Documenting, Describing, Defining

Good data documentation is important for so many reasons. Most notably, though, it makes analysis and write-up stages of your project easier and less stressful and improves the integrity of your scholarly research. On Tuesday, you can learn the basics of data documentation by attending our library workshop in the Crerar Computer Classroom from 4 to 5 p.m., or by following Crerar Library Twitter (@CrerarLibrary) for resources and horror stories on data organization gone wrong.

You can also learn more about documenting, describing, and defining by visiting the Library’s guides on Author and Research Identifiers and Data Management.

Wednesday, February 15: Good Data

When data is good, it is findable, accessible, interoperable, and re-usable (FAIR). For example, this dataset is still around and usable more than 50 years after the data were collected and more than 40 years after it was last used in a publication. Today, we’re asking you to share your favorite data set with us. How and why is it good for your project?

Try out the FAIR Principles to describe and share examples of good data for your discipline. Tell us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram (#loveyourdata)!

Thursday, February 16: Finding the Right Data

In a 2004 Science Daily News article, the National Science Foundation used the phrase “here there be data” to highlight the exploratory nature of traversing the “untamed” scientific data landscape. The use of that phrase harkens to older maps of the world where unexplored territories or areas on maps bore the warning “here, there be monsters” to alert explorers to the dangers of the unknown. While the research data landscape is (slightly) less foreboding, there’s still an adventurous quality to looking for research data. Learn the best ways to find data using library resources by attending our second library workshop in the Crerar Computer Classroom from 12:30 to 1 p.m. or by following Crerar Library on Twitter (@CrerarLibrary) to hear about our librarians’ favorite data sources.

Additionally, we invite you to explore the Library’s guide on Finding Data with library resources.

Friday, February 17: Rescuing Unloved Data

In 2015, The Atlantic published a story of a journalist, who, after being named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for a 34-part news series, lost his publication to the Internet. Digital data loss can happen instantly. However, thanks to #datarefuge and Internet Archive, websites and legacy data are being preserved.

Securing legacy data takes time, resources and expertise but is well worth the effort as old data can enable new research and the loss of data could impede future research. The library provides resources to help the campus community secure data via our institutional repository: Knowledge@UChicago. Contact us to learn more.

 

Help the Library improve services for College students by taking survey

Update: March 3 is the final day to take this survey.Complete our undergraduate survey by March 3

The University of Chicago Library is conducting a survey of currently enrolled undergraduates. The survey explores many facets of students’ experience at the University, with specific focus on the ways the Library’s collections, services, spaces, and staff contribute to students’ higher education and career goals.

Previous surveys conducted by the Library resulted in the implementation of the Library’s Scan and Deliver service, as well as the creation of new group study spaces in Regenstein Library. Results gathered from the Library’s last survey of undergraduates, conducted in February 2011, are available online.

The survey was distributed by email on February 7. Undergraduates, please check your email for a message from the University of Chicago Library with your individualized link to the survey.

For more information or to report problems with the survey, please contact the project team by email at ithaka@lib.uchicago.edu.

Exhibits Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic and Medicine

Illustration of an alchemy workshopJanuary 23 – March 4, 2017
Location: Crerar Library First Floor

The magic in J. K. Rowling’s series of Harry Potter novels is partially based on Renaissance traditions that played an important role in the development of Western science, including alchemy, astrology, and natural philosophy.  This traveling exhibit, Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine explores the intersection of these worlds, featuring highlights from the collections of the History of Medicine Division at the National Library of Medicine.

 

Watch Dr. Mindy Schwartz describe an 1887 surgical kit in Special Collections

Dr. Mindy A. Schwartz, Professor of Medicine and Associate Program Director for Internal Medicine at the University of Chicago, went live on Facebook to talk about a surgical kit in the Special Collections Research Center. The kit, once owned by Dr. Thomas Burrows in 1887, is one of Dr. Schwartz’s favorite items to use when she teaches classes on the history of medicine.

Stay tuned for more videos of UChicago faculty discussing their favorite items in the Special Collections Research Center.

Dr. Mindy Schwartz discusses one of her favorite objects in Special Collections: an 1887 surgical kit.

Posted by University of Chicago Special Collections Research Center on Friday, January 20, 2017

Visible Body now available

Visible Body image of skull

Visible Body is a suite of 5 anatomy applications with interactive 3D models and animations:

  • Human Anatomy Atlas
  • Muscle Premium
  • Skeleton Premium
  • Heart & Circulatory Premium
  • Physiology Animations

It is available online and via mobile apps for iOS and Android devices.  App download instructions are here: http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/medicine/mobile

 

Exhibits Shared Past, Shared Future: The Marine Biological Laboratory and the University of Chicago – new web exhibit

Shared Past, Shared Future – web exhibit

whitman and MBL investigatorsThe recent affiliation between UChicago and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) is the latest chapter in the long, intertwined history of the two institutions. Charles Otis Whitman, the first director of the MBL, also established biology at the University. Frank Lillie, Zoology chair, became the second director and remained president of the MBL corporation until 1942. Today, as the institutions draw closer, we highlight and celebrate our shared history.

Top 100 articles of 2016 according to Altmetric

Altmetric has released its list of the top 100 articles of 2016, and the #1 article was written by a former UChicago faculty member (and soon-to-be former POTUS): Altmetric donut

Obama B. United States Health Care Reform: Progress to Date and Next Steps. JAMA. 2016;316(5):525-532. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.9797

The list is based on each article’s Attention Score, which is calculated by the conversations about the article that occur in places like news outlets, blogs, Twitter, Facebook and more.  The article above had a score of 8063; it is the number inside an Altmetric “donut” pictured here.

Read more about various research metrics on the Research Impact guide: http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/researchimpact

New Human Genome Resources site now available

The new Human Genome Resources site offers access to visualization and analysis tools available for the human genome, as well as other relevant tools like BLAST, the NCBI remapping service and databases that provide human molecular data. The resources are sorted into categories like Find, View, Download and Learn, making it easier to find what you need.

With the new site, you can:

In addition, the portal includes an extensive listing of learning resources that may help you have a better understanding of the wealth of information associated with the human genome.

Abstracts for 35th International Geological Congress available online

half-banner

The 35th International Geological Congress (IGC) took place 27 Aug – 4 Sep 2016 in Cape Town, South Africa.  Abstracts of the scientific program are available online on the American Geological Institute (AGI) website.  Other information about the IGC, including field trip descriptions and reports is available on the main conference website.

The 36th IGC will take place in New Delhi, India in 2020.

Library resources on sandhill cranes

Group of sandhill cranes taking flight

Sandhill cranes at Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Dale Garrison/USFWS

Flocks of sandhill cranes passed over Chicago yesterday during their fall migration, filling the air with their raspy, raucous calls. As  some of the largest birds in North America and with some of the widest wingspans of all the birds on the North American continent their migration is particularly striking. To learn more about sandhill cranes, check out some of the resources available from the web and in the Library.

Birds of North America / http://www.birds-of-north-america.net/cranes.html

The Sandhill Cranes / Lawrence Walkinshaw, 1949

Sandhill and whooping cranes : ancient voices over America’s wetlands / Paul A. Johnsgard, 2011
Print version also available

Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge comprehensive conservation plan / U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, 2006

Among the thousands of sandhill cranes seen over Chicago yesterday, observers also reported seeing a few whooping cranes, an endangered species.  Efforts are underway to re-establish a migratory flock of these birds.

Publishers require ORCID iDs for submitting authors

ORCID logoWiley, the Royal Society of Chemistry, and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) have each signed ORCID’s Open Letter and announced their new requirement of an ORCID iD for all submitting authors as part of the manuscript submission process.

An ORCID id (Open Researcher and Contributor iD), is a persistent, unique, numeric identifier for individual researchers and creators. It distinguishes individual researchers with the same (or very similar) name and supports automated linkages between a researcher and their research activities. A researcher’s ORCID record, which includes their ORCiD identifier, holds non-sensitive information such as name, organization, and research activities.

Learn more about ORCID and how to create your
own ORCID iD at http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/ORCID

Map Collection extends hours, GIS assistance

The Regenstein Library Map Collection has extended its hours Monday through Thursday: now opening at 10 a.m.

In addition to regular Map Collection use, between 10 a.m. and 12 p.m. Monday through Thursday during the academic quarter, GIS Resident Librarian Taylor Hixson will offer walk-in GIS assistance to patrons.

Taylor can assist walk-in patrons by:

  • identifying spatial data resources
  • helping organize, format, and join spatial datasets
  • finding journal articles, books, and other research about GIS
  • providing basic instruction for desktop GIS and web mapping tools
  • consulting with patrons about planning and managing spatial data research
  • linking patrons with advanced spatial analysis and computing centers at the university

Taylor is also available for scheduled GIS consultations in Crerar Library. To schedule a GIS consultation, e-mail her at taylorhixson@uchicago.edu.

The Map Collection is located on the third floor of Regenstein Library, and during the academic quarters its hours of operation are Monday-Thursday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday 12 -5 p.m.  Hours during interims are Monday-Friday 12-5 p.m.

Extended Library hours Dec. 2–4

Mansueto Library at sunsetTo support students preparing for finals, Crerar, Mansueto and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week.

Mansueto will be open Friday, December 2 and Saturday, December 3 until 11:45 p.m. Crerar and Regenstein will be open these days until midnight.

The Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will be open 24 hours from Monday, November 28 until the end of finals on Friday, December 9.

For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

New: MathSciNet on Ebscohost Platform

mathscinetThe Ebscohost platform now offers a search interface for MathSciNet.  This new interface offers some features not available on the AMS platform, particularly a more flexible search. However, some elements available on the AMS platform are lacking.  Below is a comparison of some key differences:

Simple Search

Ebscohost also a simple search box as the default search.  This search is easier to use for students less familiar with field searching and more familiar with Google.  Use the advanced search to access fields for more precise searching.

Author Search

The Ebscohost interface offers a more flexible author search than the AMS version.  Commas delineating first and last name are not necessary on the Ebscohost platform, nor is the last name first name order necessary.  The Ebscohost platform will also search for an author affiliation in the author search field.  E.g. a search for the name “Brandeis” include authors from that university.

Math Subject Classification Search (MSC)

Instead of using subject word tagging for content, MathSciNet has a unique Mathematics Subject Classification (MSC) which uses a number-letter-number code to classify subjects.  The AMS interface will search the first part of the code or the first and second together.  But Ebscohost has not adopted this search method and instead appears to search the code as a string anywhere in the MSC, returning significantly different results.

For more information, consult this in depth study of the differences between the two interfaces.

NLM Webinar Series: “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed”

Beginning November 30, 2016, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) will present the three-part Webinar series “Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data: EDirect for PubMed”.

This series of workshops will introduce new users to the basics of using EDirect to access exactly the PubMed data you need, in the format you need. Over the course of three 90-minute sessions, students will learn how to use EDirect commands in a Unix environment to access PubMed, design custom output formats, create basic data pipelines to get data quickly and efficiently, and develop simple strategies for solving real-world PubMed data-gathering challenges. No prior Unix knowledge is required; novice users are welcome!

This series of classes involves hands-on demonstrations and exercises, and we encourage students to follow along. Before registering for these classes, we strongly recommend that you:

  • Watch the first Insider’s Guide class “Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed,” or be familiar with the basic concepts of APIs and E-utilities
  • Be familiar with structured XML data (basic syntax, elements, attributes, etc.)
  • Have access to a Unix command-line environment on your computer. For more information, see our Installing EDirect page.
  • Install the EDirect software. For more information, see our EDirect installation page.

Due to the nature of this class, registration will be limited to 50 students per offering.

Registration is currently open for the November/December 2016 series:

  • Part 1: Getting PubMed Data: Wednesday, November 30, 1:00 – 2:30 PM EST
  • Part 2: Extracting Data from XML: Wednesday, December 7, 1:00 – 2:30 PM EST
  • Part 3: Building Practical Solutions: Wednesday, December 14, 1:00 – 2:30 PM EST

Students are expected to attend Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 in a single series.

To register, and for more information, visit: https://dataguide.nlm.nih.gov/classes.html#edirect-for-pubmed

ProxyIt for mobile devices

mobile devices and coffeeHaving difficulty accessing articles, ebooks, or other library resources on your phone or tablet?  Use ProxyIt for mobile devices!  Once installed, anytime you go to a web page for one of the Library’s electronic resources, use ProxyIt! to reroute the page through the proxy server so that you may login and access the material.

More information about accessing resources while off-campus is available at: http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/off-campus.

All About EndNote (Desktop Version) Monday, Nov 21, 12-1 PM

When: Monday, November 21, 2016 12:001:00 p.m.
Where: Crerar Library, Computer Classroom
5730 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL
Description: EndNote is a reference manager used to manage citations, PDFs, and create formatted bibliographies as you write your paper. In this workshop, learn how to use the desktop version of EndNote. Topics covered include: creating and managing citation libraries, importing citations from online databases and other sources, importing and managing PDFs and creating bibliographies. Registration is required.
Register: http://rooms.lib.uchicago.edu/event/2959806
Contact: John Crerar Library
773-702-7715
Tag: Graduate Students, Workshops, Training, Staff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Webinar: PubMed for Clinicians

PubMed logoOn November 9th, NCBI staff will show health care professionals how to search PubMed for the most relevant and recent literature, explore specific clinical research areas, set up email alerts, and more.

Date and time: Wednesday, November 9, 2016 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM CST

Registration URL: http://bit.ly/2feyobc

After registering for the webinar, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the webinar. After the live presentation, the webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. Any related materials will be accessible on the Webinars and Courses page; you can also learn about future webinars on this page.

Advancing digital scholarship

Researchers across the University of Chicago and their collaborators around the world are engaging in a rapidly expanding range of digital research and teaching projects.  The Library has already worked with faculty members on digital projects ranging from the management of archeological information from the site of ancient Ashkelon to the search for and discovery of the Higgs boson. We would like to invite additional faculty members to think of us as partners in digital scholarship and to contact us to discuss how we can collaborate to identify, obtain, disseminate, and preserve digital data.

Brenda L. Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian (Photo by John Zich)

Brenda L. Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian (Photo by John Zich)

Earlier this year, we released Library Strategic Directions, 2016-2019: Inquiry, Innovation, and Impact [PDF].  In it, we defined five directions that will guide the library’s efforts as we continue critical commitments and assume new roles that are vital to research, innovation, and learning at UChicago.  One of those directions focuses on advancing digital scholarship.  The Library is committed to increasing the scholarly impact of the University by building robust services and technology infrastructures to support emerging modes of research, innovation, and scholarship.

What does that mean for faculty and students at the University of Chicago?

A hub for digital scholarship

The Library will be a hub for digital scholarship by providing faculty and students with tools and services that strengthen the impact and visibility of their research and creative endeavors.

Today’s researchers and funders are increasingly interested in transparency, accessibility, and the reproducibility of data sources.  The Library can help you to save and publicly share data in ways that meet these growing demands.  Our new digital repository service for the campus community, Knowledge@UChicago (knowledge.uchicago.edu), is our first major step in that direction.  Built in partnership with IT Services and the Research Computing Center, Knowledge@UChicago can now accept finished research products and small data sets for archiving and sharing. We are currently developing Knowledge@UChicago into a more robust system and are eager to hear from researchers to ensure that we develop functionality that meets your needs.  I encourage you to read more about Knowledge@UChicago and to contact Amy Buckland (knowledge@lib.uchicago.edu) to discuss ways that this digital repository can serve you now and in the future.

Services for the life cycle of research data

The Library will develop an array of services to support the life cycle of research data from assistance with writing a data plan to managing, sharing, and preserving data.

ATLAS cavern at CERN Large Hadron Collider

View of the ATLAS cavern taken during technical stop. ATLAS is one of two general-purpose detectors at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Librarians from UChicago and Notre Dame are collaborating with physicists to explore key issues that must be solved to preserve LHC data, software, and algorithms. (CERN-EX-1209198-02, courtesy of CERN).

The end of a digital project is not the only time librarians can assist you.  The Library is supporting faculty needs for research data management services through programs that include workshops on granting agency requirements and best practices for describing and managing research data.

The Library can be a particularly good partner for faculty involved in cross-disciplinary and inter-institutional projects. Librarians are skilled in determining how to make data interoperable, so that the data you have collected for one purpose can be reused by other researchers asking different questions or can be aggregated with colleagues’ data to reveal a larger picture.  The Library can also work with inter-institutional projects to determine sustainable long-term solutions for sharing and preserving their publications and data, engaging library partners as appropriate.

We are already working in this area.  For example, as part of the Data and Software for Open Science project, librarians from UChicago and Notre Dame are collaborating with physicists from around the world who are working with data produced by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Together, we are exploring the key issues that must be solved to provide preservation solutions not just for the high energy physics data, but also the software and algorithms associated with that data.

Elisabeth Long and colleagues (digitalscholarship@lib.uchicago.edu) can consult with you as you begin to write a data management plan or at various stages of your research as you consider sustainable data management practices, inter-operability, and long-term access and preservation.

Advancing open scholarship

The Library will take a leadership role in advancing open scholarship at the University by supporting and promoting open access, open data, open educational resources, and other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment.

In addition to developing Knowledge@UChicago to support sharing of UChicago research, the Library has long supported open scholarship by digitizing items in our collections and making them freely available online.  The recently completed Goodspeed Manuscript project is one of many examples.  We also collaborate with libraries around the world on open access projects such as the South Asia Materials Project’s Open Archives Initiative.

If you are interested in making your research or course materials openly available, starting an open access journal, or working with the Library to make resources openly available, please contact Amy Buckland (open@lib.uchicago.edu).

Looking to the future

In the coming years, the Library seeks to make its digital scholarship services increasingly robust, ensuring students and faculty have access to spaces, technologies, and consultation services that support their exploration of new methodologies, analysis of complex data, and sharing of their research and creative endeavors through new publishing models.

There are many ways we can pursue this goal.  I look forward to learning more about how we can collaborate with you on digital scholarship.

 

Knowledge@UChicago preserves and shares scholarly and creative works

The University of Chicago Library has launched a new service for the campus community that will preserve and share the digital scholarly, creative, and administrative assets of researchers, instructors, and staff at the University. Built in partnership with IT Services and the Research Computing Center, Knowledge@UChicago is available at knowledge.uchicago.edu.

Knowledge@UChicago logoThis new digital repository service addresses the pressing need for a place for sharing and preserving data sets, providing open access options for scholarly articles and dissertations, and meeting public access requirements for grant-funded research. In this initial phase, it can accept small data sets; by summer it will accept large ones. Faculty who are interested in making these scholarly resources available in Knowledge@UChicago, as well as alumni interested in sharing their dissertations, should email us at knowledge@lib.uchicago.edu.

Ultimately, Knowledge@UChicago will:

  • assist researchers with funding agency requirements for deposit of research output;
  • aggregate collections of teaching and learning resources for use in the classroom and online learning;
  • increase the global accessibility and visibility of the intellectual output of the community, including the work that has been hidden until now;
  • archive recordings, photographs, and other multimedia that document the University’s events and activities, and make them discoverable; and
  • harness the linked data capabilities of the ORCID (orcid.org) and DOI (doi.org) systems to ensure our researchers, and their work, are part of the semantic web.

Capital funding from the Provost’s IT Committee will support our longer-term goal to build an infrastructure that will integrate seamlessly with researchers’ workflows, handle large data sets, and provide a variety of publication options suited to different types of materials, from subject-based research collections to student publications to audio and video created at various events on campus.  This will allow Knowledge@UChicago to capture and share the scholarly, creative, and administrative output of the university.

The work deposited in Knowledge@UChicago will be publicly available to all: anyone with an internet connection will have access. This will increase the visibility of the work done on campus, and truly “let knowledge grow from more to more, and so be human life enriched.”

To begin sharing and preserving your work with Knowledge@UChicago, please visit  http://knowledge.uchicago.edu or email knowledge@lib.uchicago.edu.

Feature Story Embedded librarians support faculty, students where they work

Many faculty and students know that they can get help from librarians through online Ask a Librarian services, or inside Crerar, D’Angelo, Eckhart, Mansueto, Regenstein, and SSA libraries.  Increasingly, librarians are also providing customized on-site research and teaching services. From hospitals to classrooms, and legal clinics to a business incubator, University of Chicago librarians are using their expertise to support faculty, students, residents, and entrepreneurs where they work.

Librarians at the Hospital

Biomedical librarian with faculty physicians and medical student

Biomedical librarian Debra Werner (second from right) provides research support to faculty physicians, including (from left) Dr. Lolita Alkureishi, Dr. Nicola Orlov, and (right) medical student Riley Brian. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

Librarian Debra Werner joins the internal medicine team at UChicago Medicine’s Bernard Mitchell Hospital for patient rounds once a week, to provide research support as faculty, residents, and medical students develop a treatment plan for patients. Her iPad at the ready, she obtains rapid answers to patient-related clinical questions ranging from the side effects of pharmaceuticals to the evidence for selecting one treatment option over another for a specific patient.

Dr. Vineet Arora, Associate Professor and Assistant Dean for Scholarship and Discovery, as well as a member of the Board of the Library, is one of the attending physicians who brings Werner on rounds.   “I think that a librarian helps to promote greater awareness of the importance of clinical questions and evidence in patient care,” she explained. “It also helps us to understand when there is no data—and you realize that some of medicine is informed by your intuition or gestalt and not by evidence.”

Werner, who is Librarian for Science Instruction & Outreach and Biomedical Reference Librarian, is working with medical student Riley Brian and Dr. Lolita Alkureishi on a research project to assess the impact of having a biomedical reference librarian on the internal medicine and pediatrics inpatient clinical teams. They describe Werner as “a great addition to the team” and have found her research support invaluable. One study by Grefsheim et al. “showed that 97% of physicians who worked with clinical librarians would recommend working with them to other physicians,” they quoted. “Having a clinical librarian on rounds once or twice a week provides a bedside resource for complicated cases, can make patients feel like they are getting the most up to date and informed care, and can help team members learn how to approach answering difficult clinical questions.”

Biomedical Librarian Ricardo Andrade, who, like Werner, is based at the John Crerar Library, also goes weekly to the medical center.  At the request of Dr. Keith Ruskin and Dr. Jeffrey Apfelbaum, he provides on-site office hours for Anesthesiology physicians in the Center for Care and Discovery physician lunchroom, answering questions and raising awareness of research services he can provide.  “Being there, putting a face and a name to the Library, they can see me as their librarian,” Andrade explained.  Topics he has discussed with physicians run the gamut from how they can gain access to specific titles to the future of libraries.

Andrade and Werner both take advantage of their locations on-site to make UChicago faculty and residents aware of the support they can provide to those conducting systematic literature reviews for medical journals.  As medical librarians, they can bring their research expertise to bear by working with physicians as they develop a focused question, by constructing and documenting relevant, replicable searches across multiple medical databases, and by provide citations in the style required by chosen journals.

Librarians in the Classroom

Librarians and bibliographers have long supported a wide range of classes at the University by providing one-time training sessions to students in connection with research assignments. In recent years, they have been expanding the range and depth of their support for classroom teaching by developing tailored instruction with interested faculty.

For example, Nancy Spiegel, Rebecca Starkey, and Julia Gardner have worked closely with Professors Kathleen Belew and Susan Burns from the History Department to develop assignments and teach students information literacy and more advanced research skills as part of the course Doing History, which introduces first- and second-year students to how historians do their work.

Starkey and Spiegel began by teaching research fundamentals, such as how to use subject headings in the Library Catalog, find articles, and use databases to find primary sources.  As the course progressed, they provided support for assignments that required students to use scholarly articles, evaluate historical publications, analyze the contemporary reception of events, and study world history.  In the Special Collections Research Center, Gardner, who is SCRC Head of Reader Services, led multiple sessions that allowed students to interact with early manuscript material, learn about rare book printing, and gain experience using archival collections. With the help of librarians in a wide range of specialties, students’ final assignment was to develop an “archive” of historical materials exploring topics ranging from the relationship between bodegas and immigration patterns in Brooklyn to the role of historians in the making feature films.

Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach, and Spiegel, Bibliographer for Art and Cinema and Bibliographer for History, expressed great satisfaction with the growth they have seen in students’ research skills over the quarter.  Students reported in course evaluations that they ended the class feeling increased confidence in their ability to use the library and their pride in their growth as budding historians.  “Then we see them over and over again doing work for other classes” Spiegel said.  “They’re really engaged with the library.  They ask good questions. They don’t just stop with Google or Google Scholar, and they’re a lot more independent.”

Starkey encourages faculty to contact librarians to discuss the many ways they can support coursework—not only through assignments and classroom instruction, but also via online help guides and tutorials.  “We can work with you to develop students’ skills over time based on the specific needs of your course,” she said.

Librarians support faculty who are teaching courses in disciplines across the University and at the graduate and professional as well as the undergraduate level.  For example, Emily Treptow, Business and Economics Librarian for Instruction and Outreach, recently supported faculty in the development and teaching of two new courses: Trustee Thomas Cole’s seminar for the College on Leading Complex Organizations, and Professor Stephen Fisher’s Chicago Booth School of Business course Marketing and Managing Luxury.

Librarians in a Business Incubator and Legal Clinics

Librarian Emily Treptow (left) shows business resources to entrepreneur Andrew Kim, President of HaulHound.com, at the Polsky Innovation Exchange. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

Librarian Emily Treptow (left) shows business resources to entrepreneur Andrew Kim, President of HaulHound.com, at the Polsky Innovation Exchange. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

This summer, Business and Economics librarians Jeffry Archer, Greg Fleming, and Emily Treptow began working with colleagues at UChicago’s Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, which helps scholars and entrepreneurs translate their ideas and new technologies into start-up businesses and products. Archer, Fleming, and Treptow go to the Polsky Exchange office on 53rd Street monthly to advise UChicago faculty, students, and staff, as well as community members, on how to access the market, industry, and product research they need to develop their business plans.

On the other side of the Midway, D’Angelo Law Library staff provide support for a wide range of legal clinics that give law students hands-on experience addressing real-world legal issues.  The Law School’s Kirkland & Ellis Corporate Lab, for example, gives students the opportunity to develop practical legal and business skills through classroom instruction and work on cutting-edge projects with multinational corporations.

At the beginning of the year, D’Angelo provides a presentation on legal research process for all of the Corporate Lab students.  Then, D’Angelo librarians are assigned as liaisons to each project team, familiarize themselves with the teams’ projects, and meet with the teams at the beginning of the quarter to provide research assistance.  The liaison librarians function as resources for the project teams as they work throughout the year.

“The D’Angelo law librarians (most of whom are former practicing attorneys) are key to the success of our clinical program,” explains David Zarfes, Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Corporate Lab Programs. “Certainly, they teach our students the skills necessary to research, analyze, and evaluate the accuracy, strength, and appropriateness of sources.   But their value extends beyond this. Fundamentally, the D’Angelo law librarians teach effective and innovative problem solving and communication skills that help our students navigate the path from law school to law practice.”

D’Angelo librarians also work closely with other clinics, including the Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights, the International Human Rights Clinic, the Abrams Environmental Law Clinic, and the Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship.  Increasing the level of support D’Angelo offers to all legal clinics is an ongoing goal for D’Angelo reference staff.

UChicago faculty in all disciplines are encouraged to speak with librarians about their particular research and teaching objectives to learn how a librarian may be able to support them in their work.