Science News & Announcements

Duke collections can now be borrowed rapidly through BorrowDirect

Duke University Libraries has joined the BorrowDirect partnership, expanding the number of research libraries that provide rapid access to their circulating collections to University of Chicago faculty, students and staff.

BorrowDirect logoBorrowDirect enables UChicago users to search the library catalogs of Brown, University of Chicago, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Duke, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, MIT, University of Pennsylvania, Princeton and Yale, a collection of more than 60 million volumes.  Users can directly request expedited delivery of circulating items.

For more information about how to use BorrowDirect, visit guides.lib.uchicago.edu/borrowdirect.

Redesigned research guides are easier to use and navigate

This weekend, the University of Chicago’s Library Guides were migrated to a new platform that features a number of improvements. Most notably, use of responsive design greatly improves the user’s experience on mobile devices and assistive technology, such as screen readers.

Mobile view of a Library Guide

A Library Guide as seen on a smartphone

The new platform also uses navigation menus on the left side of the screen, rather than the tabs across the top, which should make it easier and more intuitive for users to locate content in the guides.

Our librarians have created guides on a wide variety of academic subjects studied at the University. In addition, Help Guides show you how to locate specific types of material, such as newspapers, and to use Library tools and services, such as interlibrary loan.

Visit our Library Guides page for a complete list of our guides. 

 

Meet new Science Research Services Librarian Michelle Bass

michelle bassMichelle Bass joined the University of Chicago Library on July 1 as the new Science Research Services Librarian.

Michelle has a MSI from the University of Michigan School of Information and PhD from the University of Wisconsin – Madison School of Education. Michelle held a University Library Associate, Graduate Student Assistantship position at the Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan from August 2013-June 2015.

Barbara Kern interviewed Michelle about her experiences and plans for her work at UChicago.

How do you envision working with faculty and students in your new role here?

One of my main goals in this new position is to serve as a welcoming “concierge” between faculty and students and the information professionals working in the library, particularly when it comes to data information literacy and data management services.   I want to be knowledgeable about the topics and discussions going on across departments and fields of study as they relate to research services and create opportunities for me to share and suggest new technologies and databases, software options, and trends with faculty and students.  I hope to be involved in orientation sessions for new graduate students in all science departments and continue my participation and relationship building with students and faculty throughout the year through my attendance and contributions to monthly seminars and brown-bag lunches across centers and schools.  Getting students interested and invested in the importance of data information literacy and research service best practices will be a main goal complemented by building relationships with faculty who are interested in becoming advocates and partners in sharing a passion, and respect, for research services.

Michelle, what originally got you interested in science libraries?

This is one of those times when I can say “I blame my mother” and mean it as a wonderful compliment.  My mother has worked at medical libraries for nearly forty years.  I knew that there were other kinds of libraries out there in the world beyond my local public library and school’s media center growing up.  However, my interest in science librarianship as a professional option was really cultivated over the past two years through my experiences working at the Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan and networking with many medical and science librarians at national and regional conferences.  

What are some of the highlights of your time as a Graduate Student Assistantship at the Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan?

Traditional health sciences library-focused highlights included instruction sessions with students in their first through fourth years of medical school and the opportunity to work with the Associate Dean of Medical Student Education to craft many of these sessions.  I was the information professional lead on a systematic review on the effects of bullying on LGBTQ students and worked with a Public Health and School of Information professor on creating a data management plan for an extensive scoping review of consumer health informatics literature.  I was also encouraged and able to take continuing education and professional development courses including PubMed for Trainers and Expert Searching.  As a member of the social committee, I was a co-organizer of the Donut Madness bracket challenge during the NCAA March Madness tournament and am proud that this delicious event is now an annual tradition at Taubman Health Sciences Library.

What are the key challenges or trends that you see in libraries today?

A key challenge facing academic libraries today is expanding the concept of what defines a library.  For me, a library is defined by the people who work in them and the skills and information they make accessible in addition to the materials they hold within their walls.  Importantly, they are not confined by the walls of their physical library spaces but rather move and travel with the services and knowledge shared by information professionals representing their library as institutions wherever they go.  With respect to the librarianship profession, I think a major opportunity is presenting itself as a generation of librarians prepare for retirement.  The curriculum of my mother’s master in library science degree and my own share few, if any, similarities beyond the fact that they are both American Library Association accredited.  It is up to both incoming professionals and long-standing pillars of the profession to proactively connect with one another to ensure institutional and professional knowledge is shared and cultivated to help rising leaders respond to the challenges ahead.

What do you like best about Chicago (the city) so far?

While Chicago definitely falls under the “big city” category, I have found that the distinct neighborhoods within the city make it much more manageable and inviting.  I decided to live in Hyde Park to be able to walk to work, and I have truly enjoyed getting to know my new neighborhood.  I’ve always lived in the suburbs and had to drive to shops and grocery stores; now, Treasure Island is a 7 minute walk and Hyde Park Produce is 15.  The Museum of Science and Industry is 2 blocks away and I’m a short(ish) bus or train ride away from the Art Institute of Chicago and the Shedd Aquarium.  So, a few weeks in, I have to say that getting to know the Hyde Park neighborhood has been the best part about Chicago, so far.

UChicago faculty and students are encouraged to contact Michelle with questions or requests for assistance with science research, teaching and learning. You can reach Michelle at mbbass@uchicago.edu or 773-702-8774.

All About Endnote (Desktop Version), Tuesday, July 28, 12-1 PM

Endnote imageLocation: Crerar Library Computer Classroom.

Learn how to use the bibliographic software EndNote.  Topics covered include creating and managing libraries, importing references from online databases, importing and managing PDFs and creating formatted bibliographies and citations in Microsoft Word. Registration is required.  Register for this section.

Fri., July 3 & Sat., July 4: all libraries closed

All campus libraries will be closed on Friday, July 3, a University holiday, and Saturday, July 4, Independence Day.  Regular summer hours will resume on Sunday, July 5.

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Spring quarter loans to quarterly borrowers automatically extended to October 2

Items checked out by current quarterly borrowers with privileges in good standing and due June 26 have been automatically renewed by the Library for summer quarter. As of June 15, all such items have a new due date of October 2, 2015. No action by borrowers is necessary.

The automatic renewal is being performed because the functionality to manually renew items is currently unavailable in the Catalog.

Users may view a list of all items out, including current due dates, via My Account.

For assistance, please contact Circulation or visit a Library circulation desk.

John Crerar Foundation Science Writing Prize winners announced

John Crerar Foundation Science Writing Prize for College Students

Congratulations to Xavier Zahnle, Stephanie Bi, and Haozhe Shan, the winners of the 2015 John Crerar Foundation Science Writing Prize for College Students.

1st place winning paper
A Glimpse Into Our Future’s Past: Plastic Debris In the Stratigraphic Record by Xavier Zahnle

2nd place winning paper
Migrant Mysteries: An Elucidation of the Hispanic Health Paradox by Stephanie Bi

3rd place winning paper
Social Rejection and Health by Haozhe Shan

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The Studio in the Field: Exhibit Reception and Film Screening

The Studio in the Field: Techniques of Early Wildlife Photography. Reception and Film Screening Reception and Screening: May 27th, 5:00-5:30 pm in the John Crerar Library's Kathleen A. Zar Room.

Reception and Screening, May 27th, 5:00-5:30 pm

Location: The John Crerar Library, Kathleen A. Zar Room.
Time: May 27th, 5:00-7:30 pm.

In conjunction with its current exhibit, The Studio in the Field: Techniques in Early Wildlife Photography, the John Crerar Library will be hosting a reception and film screening on May 27th, from 5:00 pm-7:30 pm. A guest lecture and introduction to the exhibit and films will be provided by Carl Fuldner, Department of Art History.

Refreshments to be served.

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Library Catalog & BorrowDirect offline, 6 a.m. – 8 a.m. Wed., 4/29

The Library Catalog and BorrowDirect will be unavailable between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. on Wednesday, April 29 due to scheduled systems maintenance.

The Library Catalog will allow searches, but holdings and item availability information will not be displayed, nor will service links associated with holdings and items. My Account will also be unavailable.

Direct searches of the BorrowDirect catalog will also be unavailable while maintenance is underway.

UBorrow will remain accessible during this time.

Celebrating Earth Day

The first Earth Day celebration, which took place 45 years ago, marked a turning point in American environmental consciousness. The environment’s inextricable tie to public health became increasingly evident throughout the 1960’s, and several events throughout the decade— including the the 1962 publication of Rachel Carson’s Silent Springthe 1969 Santa Barbara Oil Spill, and the 1969 People’s Park protests at Berkeley—prompted U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson and several activists and labor organizations to raise funds for a nationwide day of awareness¹. Since the first celebration in 1970, Earth Day has grown into a worldwide celebration and day of awareness. By its 30th anniversary, over 180 nations and 500 million people participated in Earth Day celebrations¹.

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