Special Collections – Workshops & Events

The Art and Adventuresome Life of Cyrus LeRoy Baldridge, PhB 1911

Saturday, June 4, 2016
11 a.m. – 12 noon
Special Collections Research Center Classroom
The Joseph Regenstein Library
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

At this discussion, Jay Mulberry, AB’63, looks toward a summer Special Collections Research Center exhibition he will co-curate on the Art of Cyrus LeRoy Baldridge. Many of Baldridge’s fine book illustrations from World War I, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East are housed in the Smart Museum.

A Rare Valentine’s Treat

Historic Valentine

Historic Valentine

 

In love? Lovelorn? Bibliophilic?

The Special Collections Research Center on Wednesday, February 12th is the place to be. Join us for a Blind Date with Books; an event in celebration of Valentine’s Day featuring a rare book and archival materials display, a blindfolded book test, and light refreshment.

The event will be held in the Special Collections Research Center (on the first floor of Regenstein Library) from 2-4pm. All are welcome.

And in the meantime, discover your literary love profile with our quiz:
http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/scrc/using/literaryloveprofile/

The Homeric Library: Translations, Editions, Commentaries

When: Friday, February 14, 2014,  9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: A colloquium cosponsored by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and the University of Chicago Library
Homer - George Chapman title page

Title page. George Chapman (1559?–1634). The Whole Works of Homer. . . . London:
Printed for Nathaniell Butter, [1616]. Rare Books Collection. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Speakers will present approaches to Homer’s texts highlighting the research potential of the University of Chicago Library’s Homer collection, which stretches from the 15th century to the 21st. This colloquium is presented in conjunction with the exhibition “Homer in Print: The Transmission and Reception of Homer’s Texts” at the Special Collections Research Center, and the publication of “Homer in Print: The Bibliotheca Homerica Langiana at the University of Chicago Library (Chicago: University of Chicago Library, 2013).

9:30 – 10:15 a.m.
Guided Tour of the Exhibition

10:30 – noon
Glenn Most, University of Chicago and Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa
“How Many Homers?”

Sophie Rabau, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3
“Exploring the Bibliotheca Homerica Langiana: On the Trail of a Spurious Line”

1:30 – 4 p.m.
David Wray, University of Chicago
“Quarreling over Homer in France and England, 1711-1715”

Larry F. Norman, University of Chicago
“On Not Knowing Homer: Translation and its Discontents”

Tiphaine Samoyault, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3
“Homerinfant: On Translations and Retellings of the Odyssey for Children”

This colloquium is free and open to the public.

Cost: Free
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
More info: http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/scrc/exhibits/
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787. Information on Assistive Listening Device
   

Exhibition tour of ‘The Seminary Co-op Documentary Project’

When:

Thursday, May 9, 2013 – 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Where: Regenstein Library, Special Collections Exhibition Gallery
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description:
Seminary Co-op wooden staircase

The wooden staircase that led you in and out of the sub-basement, which was added to the bookstore in the mid 70’s. Photograph: Jasmine Kwong.

Take a tour of the exhibition The Seminary Co-op Documentary Project: Capturing the Bookstore’s Distinctive Character and History with curators Jasmine Kwong, AB’06 and and Megan E. Doherty, AM’05, PhD’10. 

Celebrating over 50 years at the center of the University of Chicago’s and Hyde Park’s intellectual and cultural life, the renowned Seminary Co-op Bookstore has moved up from its legendary basement location and into a newly transformed space designed by Chicago Architects Stanley Tigerman and Margaret McCurry. The exhibition presents documentation of the Co-op’s history through a selection of photography, interviews, artifacts and memorabilia.

This tour is free and open to the University of Chicago community and the public. Registration is required.

Register:

http://rooms.lib.uchicago.edu/events

 Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685

 

 

 

 

Make-a-zine event at the Logan Center on March 7

Make-a-zine event posterMake-a-Zine at the Logan Center
Thursday, March 7
5:00 – 7:00 pm
Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Room 028

Learn to make your own zine at the University of Chicago Library’s Make-A-Zine event at the Logan Center.  We’ll supply the zine-making materials, you supply the creativity. Experienced zinesters and newbies are welcome.  A copy of each zine will be deposited into the Library’s Special Collections Research Center (where the rare books, archives, and manuscripts are housed).

Refreshments will be served. While registration is not required, RSVP’s are appreciated.

This event is held in conjunction with My Life Is an Open Book: D.I.Y. Autobiography, on exhibit now through April 13, 2013 in the Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery.

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact Debra Werner 773-702-8552.

Careers in Libraries for Humanities PhDs – panel discussion Feb. 20

The University of Chicago Career Advancement office and the Joseph Regenstein Library are co-sponsoring a panel discussion on Careers in Libraries for Humanities PhDs on February 20 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. 

The program will be moderated by:

Alice Schreyer
Assistant University Librarian for Humanities, Social Sciences, and Special Collections and Curator of Rare Books
PhD Emory University, Department of English

Featuring panelists will include:

Julia Gardner
Head of Reader Services, Special Collections Research Center
PhD University of California, Riverside

David Larsen
Head of Access Services & Assessment
PhD University of Chicago, Divinity School (History of Christianity)

Catherine Mardikes
Bibliographer for Classics, Ancient Near East, and General Humanities
PhD University of Chicago, Department of Classics

Sarah G. Wenzel
Bibliographer for Literatures of Europe and the Americas
MA University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, French Studies

The program will be held in the Special Collections Research Center Classroom in the Joseph Regenstein Library. Career Advancement Student Preparation Programs are open to all University of Chicago students and alumni. If you are interested in attending or if you have any questions, please call the Career Advancement office at 773-702-7040.

Go on a Blind Date With Books in Special Collections

The Quiver of Love

The Quiver of Love

Are you in love with books? Come to the Special Collections Research Center’s  “Blind Date With Books” event on February 13, from 4:00-6:00 pm. Light refreshments will be served.

Learn about how early books were made, and try your hand at folding a folio to make a copy of the first Shakespeare folio.  Engage in the ultimate blind date with a book, trying to identify books while blindfolded.  And be sure to take a look at the rare books and manuscripts on display, all focusing on elements of love, romance, and heartbreak, from medieval through contemporary times.

The Special Collections Research Center is located on the first floor of Regenstein Library.  Anyone needing an accommodation to attend this event should contact Julia Gardner 773-834-0627.

Developing assignments that use the Library: workshop

A photo of a course in the Special Collections Research Center.

Library research assignments can engage students.
Photo by Dan Dry.

Have you found that your students aren’t using the academic sources you expect for their assignments? Are you looking for ways to integrate Library research into your course?

Developing Assignments that Use the Library

Monday, September 17th
2:30 – 4:00 pm
Regenstein Library, Room 207

or

Friday, October 26th
2:30 – 4:00 pm
Regenstein Library, Room 207

In this program, University of Chicago librarians will highlight ways you can integrate library research instruction into your courses to promote the acquisition of the skills necessary to complete research assignments. We’ll demonstrate ready-to-go online tools that can be integrated into your Chalk site, and discuss the different types of in-class instruction the Library can provide.

At the end of the session, we’ll work together to create some sample assignments designed to help students learn how to use the Library’s collections and online resources. 

Presenters:
Julia Gardner, Head of Reader Services, The Special Collections Research Center
Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach, Regenstein Library
Debra Werner, Librarian for Science Instruction and Outreach, Crerar Library

Faculty, instructors and graduate students interested in teaching are welcome to attend.   Registration is recommended.

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact Rebecca Starkey at 702-4484 for assistance.

Rare Chinese texts spark collaboration

The United States is home to many important pre-modern Chinese texts, from the only surviving copy of some volumes of a 15th-century Encyclopedia, the Yongledadian, to the Sequel to Yuanxiang qijiu shiji, an unpublished manuscript of a poetry collection from the Qing dynasty held at the University of Chicago Library. The University of Chicago’s collection of Chinese rare books alone comprises some 10,000 volumes.

Detail from “Xing jun ji xiang yi tu,” roughly translated as “Prophecies for Success in Military Campaigns,"

“Xing jun ji xiang yi tu,” roughly translated as “Prophecies for Success in Military Campaigns,” was written and drawn in the Ming dynasty (1368-1644). It is held at the University of Chicago Library. (Photo by Sherry Byrne)

Yet not enough is known about how scholars use these collections, the preservation needs of the materials, or what preservation efforts are under way across the country. According to Yuan Zhou, curator of the Library’s East Asian Collection, scholars from China and the West need more ways to share expertise and to learn from each other.

So this May, Zhou and Prof. Edward Shaughnessy organized a conference at the University of Chicago’s Mansueto Library to provide a forum for scholars, collection curators, and preservation specialists from China and the West to collaborate and share their knowledge of pre-modern Chinese materials. “Texting China—Composition, Transmission, Preservation of Pre-modern Chinese Textual Materials” also provided a rare opportunity for scholars of Chinese texts to present alongside library curators and preservation specialists from leading institutions in China, Taiwan, the United States, Canada, and Europe.

The Mansueto Library was an especially fitting choice of location for the conference, according to Library Director Judith Nadler. The new library, with its cutting-edge preservation facilities, Nadler said, “is both a symbol and the realization of the commitment to preservation and access to global resources that support scholarship worldwide.”

The event was held in honor of Tsuen-Hsien (T.H.) Tsien, Professor Emeritus in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, who made what Nadler described as a “remarkable contribution to the study and preservation of China’s literary heritage” during his lengthy career at UChicago. The event was a reunion of sorts for Tsien and several of his students, who now head the East Asia collections at top universities throughout the United States and returned to Chicago to celebrate the work of their former teacher.

“A needed collaboration”

“I went into this conference thinking there were major differences in the things that needed to be done with Chinese books and with Western books,” says Shaughnessy, the Lorraine J. and Herlee G. Creel Distinguished Service Professor in Early Chinese Studies. He was encouraged to discover that the knowledge gap was significantly smaller than he initially thought.

A Dunhuang manuscript scroll that contains three fragments of Buddhist sutras was initially appraised by the UChicago Library and determined to date back to the ninth century. An expert from the National Library of China, who has studied numerous similar pieces at his own institution, examined the manuscript during the conference. He has suggested the piece dates back to the seventh century. (Photo by Michael Kenny)

The fundamentals of preserving and conserving Western and Chinese materials are very similar, although early Chinese materials often use types of paper and ink, and binding methods that are less familiar to conservators trained in the West. “Even though the science is the same, the format is different,” explains Shaughnessy.

Preservation of early texts is vital to the work of scholars like Shaughnessy, who studies the cultural and literary history of the early Zhou period. He is currently at work on a survey of recently excavated examples of the Yi Jing (Book of Changes) an ancient Chinese text used for divination.

During the conference, all participants reaped the benefits of their counterparts’ expertise. For example, the Library holds a Dunhuang manuscript scroll that contains three fragments of Buddhist sutras, thought to date back to the 9th century. An expert from the National Library of China, who has studied numerous similar pieces at his own institution, examined the manuscript and suggested the piece was even older than it was initially appraised by the Library. Judging from the paper and calligraphy, he dated the piece to the seventh century.

In addition, Zhou and a delegation of experts from the National Library of China visited the Field Museum to examine a Song Dynasty (960-1279 A.D.) rubbing of the Lanting Xu, a collection of poetry inscribed by master calligrapher Wang Xishi. Based on his expertise with early royal families and collectors’ seals, Zhang Zhiqing, deputy director of the National Library of China, was able to verify the authenticity of the rubbing, and proposed that it may be the oldest existing copy of the Lanting Xu.

Edward Shaughnessy, the Lorraine J. and Herlee G. Creel Distinguished Service Professor in Early Chinese Studies, speaks at the “Texting China” international symposium at the University of Chicago’s Regenstein Library Special Collections Research Center held in May. (Photo by Jason Smith)

This kind of interchange is exactly what the conference was designed to promote. “Everyone agreed it was a needed collaboration,” Zhou says. In fact, the conference was the first of its kind in the United States that brought together an international assemblage of scholars who use the entire span of pre-modern Chinese written materials in their research with librarians who care for these materials to discuss their making, dissemination, and preservation.

“Texting China” also came in the midst of significant efforts to broaden the study of China at the University of Chicago. In addition to the creation of the University’s Center in Beijing and the Confucius Institute, two leading experts on China, historian Kenneth Pomeranz and comparative literature scholar Haun Saussy, have joined the faculty as University Professors.

“A legendary figure”

The conference provided an opportunity to honor Tsien, whom Zhou described as a “legendary figure” in his field. Tsien, 102, came to the University in 1947 and went on to become the curator of the East Asian collection. He also taught at UChicago’s former library school and in East Asian Languages and Civilizations.

The “Texting China” international symposium celebrated the life’s work of Tsuen-Hsien (T.H.) Tsien, Professor Emeritus in East Asian Languages and Civilizations. Library Director Judith Nadler described Tsien’s work as a “remarkable contribution to the study and preservation of China’s literary heritage.” (Photo by Jason Smith)

In addition to his work at Chicago, Tsien is known for his heroic efforts to protect China’s literary heritage in World War II. During the Japanese occupation of China, Tsien risked his life to help smuggle more than 100 wooden crates of rare books from the National Library of China to the United States.

The fruits of Tsien’s effort to protect Chinese rare books were on display at the conference, as scholars from UChicago and elsewhere discussed their work on pre-modern Chinese texts. Donald Harper, the Centennial Professor of Chinese Studies, discussed his study of the provenance of the Chu Silk Manuscript, now held by the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C. Yuming He, Assistant Professor in East Asian Languages and Civilizations, presented her work on global consciousness in the Ming Period.

Only a beginning

During this two-and-half-day conference, 23 presentations were delivered, followed by two roundtable panel discussions. The scholars and librarians from China and the West exchanged their research findings in studying pre-modern Chinese texts, shared their experience in preserving and conserving these materials, and discussed issues of mutual concern.

Yuan Zhou

Yuan Zhou, curator of the Library’s East Asian Collection, and co-organizer of the “Texting China” symposium. (Photo by Jason Smith)

In an era when many are forecasting the death of the physical book, Shaughnessy found it especially meaningful to have scholars present alongside the librarians who care for the materials they study. “As the significance of the digital age has really dawned on scholars of all stripes, I think it’s impressed itself upon them that we really need to know [about] the media that carries this information,” he says.

Zhou says he was heartened by the collaboration that took place at the event. In this regard, “this conference is only a beginning,” Zhou says. He and Shaughnessy hope to eventually develop an exchange program with the National Library of China that would allow preservation specialists in the East and West to work together. Other conference participants proposed assessing the preservation needs of pre-modern Chinese texts, creating an international digital registry of these materials, undertaking more collaborative digitization projects, assessing educational needs and developing a curriculum to meet them, and fundraising to support preservation efforts.

“These materials need to be preserved,” Zhou says. “The conference brought people a higher awareness of such need, and [it] shows that colleagues from the West and China are very willing to work together and pursue this shared goal.”

A University of Chicago news release

May 10 Jerome McGann lecture, ‘Philology in a New Key’

The Nicholson Center for British Studies is pleased to present Jerome McGann speaking on “Philology in a New Key” on May 10 at 5 p.m. in the Special Collections Research Center, 1100 East 57th Street.

McGann is the John Stewart Bryan University Professor at University of Virginia.

This lecture celebrates the re-opening of the Special Collections Research Center.  It is lecture is free and open to the public, with a reception following the lecture.

Persons who require assistance to participate fully in this event should contact Jeanne Fitzsimmons at fitzsimmons@uchicago.edu in advance.