Spotlight

For any other story that doesn’t easily fit into the above categories but merits attention, e.g., BorrowDirect, UBorrow, Scan & Deliver, Platzman Fellowship, Brooker Prize, Science Writing Prize.

Library summer 2019 graduate student fellowship opportunities

Cover of pamphlet for Abraham Lincoln National Historic Site

Digitized pamphlet from the John Crerar Library collections

The University of Chicago Library is offering three fellowships for UChicago graduate students during the summer. The fellowships are designed to give graduate students opportunities to explore alternative scholarly careers and to build skills and knowledge in new areas of scholarship.

Interested graduate students are encouraged to apply by May 30, 2019, for these posted fellowships.

  • John Crerar Foundation History of Science and Medicine Fellow
    The Fellow will focus on materials from the original John Crerar Library collections that were assembled prior to its merger with the University of Chicago.  This includes history of science and technology, especially late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century materials strong in the areas of engineering, manufacturing and applied arts. Activities may include researching historical and current significance of the collections, creating collection descriptions for use on webpages, and a special project focused on digitizing pamphlet materials from the collections.
  • Library Instruction Support Services Fellow
    This fellowship will provide graduate students with hands-on experience in providing library instruction, as well as developing guides and tools to help students learn about the variety of resources available to them at the Library and beyond. In addition, the fellowship will also offer graduate students an opportunity to learn about academic libraries services and collections that may benefit their own research, along with providing an insight into careers in library and information science.
  • University Archives Fellow
    Archives today are a rapidly expanding field with increasingly broad responsibility for preserving and making accessible unique materials in all formats—traditional paper documents, photographs, and analog recordings, as well as a growing array of digital content: email, databases, digital images, audio and video media, and web sites. This fellow will develop skills and expertise in all these areas while contributing to the programs and services of the University of Chicago Archives.

Summer 2019 fellowships come with a stipend of $4000 and typically involve approximately 200 hours of effort (typically 20 hours per week for a period of 10 weeks).

For more information about individual opportunities and how to apply, visit the Library website or contact Andrea Twiss-Brooks at atbrooks@uchicago.edu.

Rafadi Hakim pointing to digital image

A graduate student examines a digitized image. (Photo by John Zich)

 

Get to know Sheri Lewis, D’Angelo Law Library Director

How long have you been at the D’Angelo Law Library?

I have been a librarian at D’Angelo since September 2001. I was the Associate Law Librarian for Public Services for nearly 12 years and then moved into my current position in the summer of 2013.  I do have a prior history working here in the 1990s.  I was a student in the masters in library science (what we call MLS) degree program at Rosary College at the time. The D’Angelo librarians first gave me an opportunity to volunteer as a student intern in 1993 and then to work on a temporary project in 1994 after I completed my MLS. I had always hoped to have a permanent position at D’Angelo and was thrilled when that opportunity arose years later. It’s a special place.

What is something that you wish more students knew about our law library?

Well, ideally I wish that they knew about every library service or resource that we offer. But mostly, I hope that they know that we are here to help them and always open to ways to be better at doing so.

In the time you’ve worked in the law library, what is the most memorable event you’ve attended?

Two events stand out for me. The Law School celebrated its centennial in 2002 and Professor David Currie gave an entertaining talk in the auditorium commemorating the event. (Ask one of our librarians to help you find his recitation of an original Law School cheer during these remarks!) The second event was President Barack Obama’s interview with David Strauss in the Green Lounge in April 2016. Our D’Angelo Wilson Reading Room was set up for overflow, ticketed viewing of the event. Imagine having to ask Secret Service personnel to enter your own office!

What activities consume most of your time as a law library director?

Meetings! But more generally, I spend much of my time working and collaborating with colleagues at the Law School and in the University libraries. We are a unique law school library that is integrated into the campus library system. One of my responsibilities is to engage in effective relationships that ensure the smooth and successful operation of our law library.

What are some of your interests outside of law libraries?

My primary interest is spending time with my husband and two daughters, one now in college and another graduating from high school this year. I also enjoy theater, travel, cooking/baking, watching a variety of sports, and long walks along the lake.

What’s the best thing you watched, listened to, and/or read recently?

I have been watching the series, The Americans, and I am now finishing the final (sixth) season (don’t tell me how it ends). It resonates with me as I studied Russian in college in the 1980s and graduated from law school just a few months before the opening of the Berlin Wall in 1989. 

13 scholars awarded Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships for research in Special Collections

The University of Chicago Library is pleased to announce the recipients of Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships for 2019.  Awards are being made this year to thirteen scholars who will visit the Library and consult collections during the summer from June to September.   A list of the 2019 Fellows appears below along with their academic affiliations and research topics. 

The Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowship program was established through a bequest of Professor of Geophysical Sciences George W. Platzman and is named in memory of his brother Robert L. Platzman, Professor of Chemistry and Physics.  The program provides support for visiting researchers outside the Chicago area working on projects that require on-site consultation of University of Chicago Library collections, primarily archives, manuscripts, or printed materials in the Special Collections Research Center.  

A total of 137 Fellowships have been awarded since the program began in 2006.  Further information on the Platzman Fellowships is available on the Special Collections website.


Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships Awarded for Summer 2019

Robert Bell

PhD candidate, History and Middle Eastern Studies, New York University

From Financial Missionaries and Colonial Administrators to Shirt-Sleeve Diplomats and New Deal Developers: American Influence in Iran from 1911 to 1963

 

Michael Bruschi

PhD candidate, Music Theory, Yale University

Hearing the Tonality in Microtonality:  Easley Blackwood’s Microtonal Music

 

John Carranza

PhD candidate, Education, University of Texas at Austin

Explaining Sex:  Sex Education, Normalization, and Disability in the United States from the 1960s to the 1990s

 

Claire Class

Postdoctoral Fellow, Institute für Soziologie, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

Beyond the Chicago School: Literature, Marginalization, and Sociology in Modern America

 

William Clift

PhD candidate, History, Florida State University

Race in the Prairie State:  Black Laws and African American Activism in Nineteenth Century Illinois

 

Aaron Colston

PhD candidate, History, Duke University

Read the Word, Read the World: Education for Liberation in Cold War U.S. and Brazil

 

Benjamin Daly-Jones

MPhil candidate, Early Modern History, Jesus College, University of Cambridge

Memory, Distortion, and Judicious Thought: Parrhesia and Late 16th- Early 17th-Century Diplomatic Textual Culture

 

Yuval Goldfus

PhD candidate, Philosophy, Hebrew University

Privacy, the Right to be Forgotten, and the Social Self of George Herbert Mead

 

Sören Hammerschmidt

Instructor, English, Arizona State University

Modular Pope: Portraits, Poems, and Recycled Print

 

Michael Kalisch

Post-doctoral scholar, Downing College, University of Cambridge

Glimpse, Encounter, Acquaintance, Friendship: The Literary Life of Richard Stern

 

Taushif Kara

PhD candidate, History, University of Cambridge

Abode of Peace: Islam, Empire, and the Khoja Diaspora, 1866-1972

 

Lena Leson

PhD candidate, Historical Musicology, University of Michigan

Making Balachine an American Modernist: Cold War Narratives and Construction of the Artist

 

Meghna Sapui

PhD candidate, English, University of Florida

British Poetry in/from India: Creating a New Poetic Community

Giving Day 2019

Your support makes it happen!

This April, we invite you to join the University of Chicago community as we honor the past while building the future through  Giving Day 2019.

Giving Day is a 24-hour show of united support for the University’s students, faculty, and world-changing research from noon to noon (CDT) April 9-10, 2019. This collective approach to philanthropy is a fitting way to support the University of Chicago Library, which serves as a vibrant and dynamic hub for the entire university community.

Giving Day, April 9-10, 2019 - Move UChicago ForwardWith 11.6 million electronic and print volumes spanning centuries of learning in the sciences, humanities, arts, and beyond, the University of Chicago Library stands as one of North America’s largest and most distinguished academic research libraries.

Beyond the depth and breadth of its holdings, the Library continuously builds on its vision to foster inquiry through tailored services and expert librarians. From the state-of-the-art conservation and digitization laboratories of the Joe and Rika Mansueto Library to the exquisite exhibition space highlighting works from the Special Collections Research Center, the University of Chicago Library is an intellectual epicenter for the innovative work of students, faculty, and researchers in an evolving academic environment.

To meet the ever-increasing need for data-driven services, the Library has expanded infrastructure for patrons seeking new ways to obtain, visualize, and analyze data. We are developing our Center for Digital Scholarship, honing key skills among our librarians, and advancing pivotal initiatives in the fields of geospatial analysis and data science.

Your support will enable the Library to continue serving as a vibrant hub for the University community, advancing the objectives of students and faculty across campus.

To make a contribution to the University of Chicago Library during Giving Day, please make a gift through our website by 12:00 p.m. on April 10.

You can make a difference for the Library today!

April 12 deadline for the Crerar Writing Prize for College students

Are you an undergraduate interested in science, medicine, and/or technology? Have you written a scientific research paper of note that would be of interest to a general audience? Consider submitting a paper for the John Crerar Foundation Writing Prize.

The annual John Crerar Foundation Science Writing Prize for College Students honors the memory of John Crerar – industrialist and philanthropist whose estate established the John Crerar Library.

This competitive award for excellence and clarity in science writing acknowledges the ability of a University of Chicago College student to produce a paper, on a scientific topic, which is thorough in its arguments but accessible to a broad readership.

Science Writing Prize organizers will present a topic on which students may submit a paper. The chosen topic will be related to the physical and biomedical sciences. We encourage and welcome submissions from all perspectives.

An important component of the paper will be the bibliography, which must include citations from a variety of sources and may be presented in a bibliographic style of the student’s choosing.

First Prize is $1500
Second Prize is $500
Third Prize is $300

Deadline: APRIL 12, 2019

“Archiving Your Story” panel and workshop sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs

Join the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs for a panel and interactive workshop on the importance, history and future of archiving for the multicultural community on campus.

Refreshments will be provided.

The event is Monday, February 18th, 4:00-6:00 PM in the Center for Identity + Inclusion’s Community Lounge at 5710 S. Woodlawn Ave.

If you have any questions or need accommodations contact OMSA at omsa@uchicago.edu or 773.702.5710

Apply now for a 2019 Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowship

The University of Chicago Library invites applications for short-term research fellowships for the summer of 2019. Any visiting researcher, writer, or artist residing more than 100 miles from Chicago, and whose project requires on-site consultation of University of Chicago Library collections, primarily archives, manuscripts, rare books, or other materials in the Special Collections Research Center, is eligible. Support for beginning scholars is a priority of the program. Applications in the fields of late nineteenth- or early twentieth-century physics or physical chemistry, or nineteenth-century classical opera, will receive special consideration.

Awards will be made based on the applicant’s ability to complete the proposed on-site research successfully within the timeframe of the fellowship.  Applicants should explain why the project cannot be conducted without on-site access to the original materials and the extent to which University of Chicago Library collections are central to the research.  Up to $3,000 of support will be awarded to help cover estimated travel, living, and research expenses.  Applications from women, minorities, and persons with disabilities are encouraged.

The deadline for applications is March 4, 2019.  Notice of awards will be made by March 29, 2019 for use between June 10, 2019 and September 27, 2019.

Applicants must provide the following information:

  • A cover letter (not to exceed one page) including the project title; a brief summary; estimated dates of on-site research; and a budget for travel, living, and research expenses during the period of on-site research
  • A research proposal not to exceed three double-spaced pages. Applicants should include references to specific archival finding aids and catalog records of particular relevance to their proposed project whenever possible.
  • A curriculum vitae of no longer than two pages
  • Two letters of support from academic or other scholars. References may be sent with the application or separately.

Submit application in one electronic file to: scrcfellowship@lib.uchicago.edu

Letters of reference in electronic form are preferred; print letters of reference can be sent to:

Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships
Special Collections Research Center
The University of Chicago Library
1100 E. 57th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

For additional information contact:
Daniel Meyer, Director, Special Collections Research Center

For additional background on the Platzman Fellowship, and to see a list of last year’s recipients please see our website: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/scrc/about/platzmanfellowships/

 

Wright Fellowship for promising new academic law librarians

The D’Angelo Law Library at the University of Chicago is accepting applications through March 8 for the 2019 Judith M. Wright Fellowship.  Established on the occasion of Ms. Wright’s retirement as the director of the D’Angelo Law Library in 2013, the Fellowship recognizes her 40 years of service to the University of Chicago Law School and her legacy as a mentor to generations of law librarians.

Judith Wright

Judith Wright

The Wright Fellowship will develop promising new professionals in academic law librarianship by supporting a career training program at the D’Angelo Law Library. It provides $4,000 to a law school or library science student or recent graduate for a minimum of six consecutive weeks of temporary, full-time work to occur between June 10 and September 13, 2019.

The Fellowship is intended to give candidates interested in law librarianship as a career an opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge in an academic law library setting. Fellows will work in the D’Angelo Law Library under the guidance and supervision of the Law Library Director and other librarians and will learn about the overall functions, policies, and practices of the D’Angelo Law Library in both collection services and user services departments.

The primary focus of the Fellow’s work will be determined by the interests and prior experience of the Fellow and the needs of the D’Angelo Law Library. In addition to participating in the daily work of a premier academic law library, Fellows will undertake and complete a project based on the needs and capabilities of the D’Angelo Law Library.

The project for Summer 2019 will be one of the following:

  1. Chicago Unbound, the University of Chicago Law School’s institutional repository, contains the scholarship of the Law School community, providing full-text access to decades of Chicago Law faculty scholarship and the archives of many Law School journals and publications. The 2019 Wright Fellow will help develop a new Chicago Unbound collection highlighting the scholarship and service of the Law School’s deans throughout its history. The Fellow will create a space for this historical collection in Chicago Unbound and complete materials for three to five former deans. Creating the new collection will involve reviewing and selecting materials (e.g. articles, speeches, manuscripts, photographs) as well as organizing and describing the selected materials in Chicago Unbound.
  2. As part of its rare books holdings, the D’Angelo Law Library has a unique manuscript collection of portraits of justices of the United States Supreme Court and documents by and/or about them with their signatures. The manuscript materials date from the eighteenth century, beginning with the first chief justice, John Jay, and continue through Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. The collection has been digitized but not yet described or organized optimally for online research. The 2019 Wright Fellow will create a web exhibit of the United States Supreme Court Portraits and Autographs collection, including background on the justices, metadata descriptions for individual items, and references to related material.
  3. The D’Angelo Law Library has an extensive orientation and training program for University of Chicago Law School students that includes in-person tours and learning sessions, online research guides, and customized training and research support for courses and programs. The D’Angelo librarians also maintain a resource guide to the many digital tutorials created and maintained by law database vendors, including Westlaw, Lexis, Bloomberg Law and HeinOnline. The 2019 Wright Fellow will expand the learning opportunities available to UChicago law students by creating digital tutorials specific to D’Angelo services and collections.

For detailed information on eligibility, requirements, and how to apply, visit the Library website.

March 8 deadline to apply for a Brooker Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting

Three people view case of books

Anna Wood (left) and Clare Kemmerer (right) view selections from their collections with Mr. Brooker (center). Photo by Klehr + Churchill

Second- and fourth-year College students at the University of Chicago with a theme-focused book collection are invited to apply for the T. Kimball Brooker Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting. The University of Chicago Library is pleased to sponsor this prize, which was established by Mr. Brooker, PhD’96, to foster a love of the book and to encourage book collecting among undergraduates. Applications are due on March 8, 2019.

Prizes include $1,000 for a second-year student and $2,000 for a fourth-year student.

Applicants for the prize are not expected to have collections that are large, valuable in monetary terms, or complete. Rather, the competition emphasizes thoughtfulness and intent in building a collection around the collector’s interests. Collections may focus on a topic, the work of one or more authors, or physical features such as illustrations and bindings. In addition to books, collections of musical scores and printed maps may be entered into the prize competition.

Past winners have collections focused on subjects that range from mathematical treatises to feminist zines, from cover art to Latin American poetry. A selection of books from prize recipients’ collections is highlighted in the annual Brooker Prize Web Exhibit.

Learn more about the Prize and how to apply at www.lib.uchicago.edu/brooker.

Books on display

Books that were part of winning Brooker Prize collections in 2018. Photo by Klehr + Churchill

The Scholarly Environment at the University of Chicago Library

Welcoming, Comfortable, Respectful to All

Welcome to the University of Chicago Library.  As the new academic year begins, we would like to greet all new and returning faculty, students, and staff.

The Library’s mission is to provide comprehensive resources and services in support of the research, teaching, and learning needs of the University community.  We hope that you will get to know some of the many librarians who are here to help you and to take full advantage of our offerings.

The University of Chicago Library is the heart of a University that seeks to enrich human life through the growth of knowledge. For the pursuit of knowledge to flourish, the Library is committed to maintaining an environment for users that is supportive of study, research, reflection, and scholarly collaboration; welcoming; safe; respectful of all; and comfortable, with spaces for quiet individual study, research, and reflection and designated areas for collaborative work.

In the past year, there has been graffiti found on Library walls that has been drawn to our attention and has disturbed some members of our community.  We ask that you join us in creating and sustaining a scholarly environment at the Library by notifying Library staff when you find such graffiti so that it can be removed and by reading and acting upon our complete statement of User Rights and Responsibilities for Creating and Sustaining a Scholarly Environment, and our policy on Maintaining a Scholarly Environment below.

Please contact us at scholarly-environment@lib.uchicago.edu if you have any questions about these policies or our scholarly environment.

Creating and Sustaining a Scholarly Environment

Library users and staff share responsibility for creating and sustaining an environment supportive of scholarship. To ensure this environment,

  • You have the responsibility to treat others with dignity and respect.
  • You have the responsibility to refrain from engaging in behavior that creates a disturbance, interferes with the right of others to use the Library for research and study, or otherwise detracts from a scholarly environment.
  • You have the responsibility to learn about and comply with Library policies for maintaining this environment.

These responsibilities come with the following rights:

  • You have a right to ask others to end conversations, lower their voices, or maintain an environment supportive of scholarship.
  • You have a right to request and receive assistance from a Library staff member in maintaining an environment supportive of scholarship.
  • You have a right to expect that in addressing problems, Library staff will take measured steps to restore a scholarly environment.

Maintaining a Scholarly Environment

All Library users and staff share in the responsibility for maintaining an environment supportive of scholarship. These responsibilities include the following:

  1. Exhibiting conduct appropriate to research and study by
    • maintaining quiet in all individual study areas and in the stacks
    • conducting group study and quiet conversations only in Library-designated areas
    • refraining from loud or boisterous behavior
    • silencing cell phones, laptops, and electronic devices when in Library spaces
    • restricting cell phone conversations, with care taken to avoid disturbing others, to Library designated spaces

2. Helping to preserve library collections by

    • following the Library’s Food & Drink Policy
    • not writing in, underlining, highlighting or otherwise damaging library materials

3. Helping to sustain the library’s physical spaces by

    • not smoking inside, or within 15 feet of entrances of, Library buildings (in accordance with University policy and City of Chicago ordinance); including not using electronic cigarettes or other such delivery systems
    • not bringing animals into the Library, except service animals assisting those with disabilities (in accordance with University policies for Service Animals and Assistance Animals)
    • securing bicycles only to official racks outside of the Library
    • not using scooters, skateboards, rollerblades, skates or other conveyances (except those assisting persons with disabilities), within the Library or near Library entrances
    • not posting signs, notices, or other material except in designated locations or with special permission, in accordance with the Library’s Policy on Promotional Activities

4. Creating a comfortable and supportive environment for other Library users and staff by

    • wearing clothing, including shirts and shoes
    • not exposing others to pornographic or obscene images
    • using Library spaces only for the purposes for which they are intended

5. Complying with Library and University policies, which ensure a safe and respectful community for all by

    • presenting appropriate identification when asked to do so by Library staff or University officials who have also identified themselves
    • leaving Library spaces at closing
    • not entering Library staff areas without permission
    • closely supervising children brought with you to the Library
    • not taking photographs of others for personal use without permission of the individual(s); not filming or taking photographs of Library spaces and users for publication or commercial purposes without permission of Library administration
    • not soliciting or conducting surveys without advance Library approval
    • not using Library space for political fundraising or any other partisan political campaign activities, in accordance with University policies regarding political activity

Prohibited actions that are illegal, endanger safety or are considered serious violations include:

  1. Engaging in criminal activity, including theft, battery, or assault
  2. Vandalizing or defacing of Library material, equipment, collections, furniture, or facilities (including creating graffiti)
  3. Stalking, harassing, or making unwanted sexual advances
  4. Engaging in sexual activities or indecently exposing oneself
  5. Violating the University’s Policy on Harassment, Discrimination, and Sexual Misconduct (including but not limited to sexual harassment, sexual abuse, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking) or denigrating individuals on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, veteran status, or any protected classes under the law
  6. Bringing firearms of any kind, explosives, or other dangerous objects or materials into the Library
  7. Violating the University’s Drug and Alcohol Policies
  8. Violating the University’s Policy on Information Technology Use and Access or the Library’s Policy on Acceptable Use of Electronic Resources

The above lists of responsibilities and prohibited actions are not to be taken as exhaustive.