Tag Archives: SCRC

Developing assignments that use the Library: workshop

Have you found that your students aren’t using the academic sources you expect for their assignments? Do your students seem to lack basic library research skills?

A photo of a course in the Special Collections Research Center.

Library research assignments can engage students. Photo by Dan Dry.

Developing Assignments that Use the Library

Friday, January 18th
2:30 – 4:00 pm
Regenstein Library, Room 207

In this program, University of Chicago librarians will highlight ways you can integrate library research instruction into your courses to promote the acquisition of the skills necessary to complete research assignments. We’ll demonstrate ready-to-go online tools that can be integrated into your Chalk site, and discuss the different types of in-class instruction the Library can provide.

At the end of the session, we’ll work together to create some sample assignments designed to help students learn how to use the Library’s collections and online resources. 

Presenters:
Julia Gardner, Head of Reader Services, The Special Collections Research Center
Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach, Regenstein Library
Debra Werner, Librarian for Science Instruction and Outreach, Crerar Library

Faculty, instructors and graduate students interested in teaching are welcome to attend.   Registration is recommended.

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact Rebecca Starkey at 702-4484 for assistance.

Whitman manuscript now digitized

Walt Whitman signature, from letter to his publisher.

The original manuscript of Walt Whitman’s “The Bible as Poetry,” bound with related pieces of Whitmaniana, is now online.  The manuscript includes a letter sent from Whitman to his publishers,  Jeannette Leonard Gilder and Joseph B. Gilder, part of which is shown to the left.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The bulk of the manuscript consists of Whitman’s edits to his work, as seen in this example.  The complete essay was published in The Critic in 1883.

 

Special Collections holiday closure dates

The Special Collections Research Center will be closed the following dates during the Winter Interim:

December 24-25, 2012
We will be open 9:00am-4:45pm December 26-28.

January 1, 2013
We will be open 9:00am-4:45pm beginning January 2, 2013. Saturday hours (9:00am-12:45pm) will resume January 12, 2013.

Newton, Darwin manuscript material digitized

Digitized Newton Manuscript

Series II, Series IV, and Series V of the Joseph Halle Schaffner  Collection in the History of Science, may now be viewed online.  Series II contains letters to and from Charles Darwin and the Darwin family, dating from the 1860s to early 1900s.  The Sir Isaac Newton material in Series IV includes manuscripts outlining and illustrating Newton’s idea for a portable furnace,  pyrotechny, and an 1693 letter from Samuel Pepys to Newton. 

John Carver notations on Newton’s Principia

Newton’s influence carries over to Series V, which includes early nineteenth-century notes made by John Carver on mathematical and geometrical problems from Sir Isaac Newton’s Principia and other works.

Halloween research guide

"October's Bright Blue Weather, A Great Time to Read"

Albert Bender’s Illinois WPA Art Project

In celebration of Halloween, the University of Chicago Library has created a research guide that provides a lighthearted, yet informative look at some of the scary resources available to UChicago students.

A few of the featured items in this Halloween guide include:

 

 

 

 

 

Series II of International Association for Cultural Freedom Papers Temporarily Unavailable

Series II of the International Association for Cultural Freedom Papers (IACF) will be temporarily unavailable October 29 – January 1, 2013, in order to allow the material to be re-processed and re-boxed.  We regret any inconvenience caused.  If you have questions about this collection, please contact us.

 

Developing Assignments that use the Library: Workshop

 

A photo of a course in the Special Collections Research Center.

Library research assignments can engage students. Photo by Dan Dry.

Have you found that your students aren’t using the academic sources you expect for their assignments? Are you looking for ways to integrate Library research into your course?

Developing Assignments that Use the Library

Friday, October 26th
2:30 – 4:00 pm
Regenstein Library, Room 207

In this program, University of Chicago librarians will highlight ways you can integrate library research instruction into your courses to promote the acquisition of the skills necessary to complete research assignments. We’ll demonstrate ready-to-go online tools that can be integrated into your Chalk site, and discuss the different types of in-class instruction the Library can provide.

At the end of the session, we’ll work together to create some sample assignments designed to help students learn how to use the Library’s collections and online resources. 

Presenters:
Julia Gardner, Head of Reader Services, The Special Collections Research Center
Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach, Regenstein Library
Debra Werner, Librarian for Science Instruction and Outreach, Crerar Library

Faculty, instructors and graduate students interested in teaching are welcome to attend.   Registration is recommended.

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact Rebecca Starkey at 702-4484 for assistance.

New search feature added to archival finding aids

The Special Collections Research Center has recently added to the ways in which users can locate and access archival collections. In addition to standard keyword and title searches, users can now browse archival collections by subject. 

 

We have coded hundreds of finding aids with a specific subject tag that allows users to browse a list of collections under a specific topic. The subjects are now listed on this page of the SCRC website. Topics are wide-ranging and include everything from anthropology and ethnology, to jazz, visual arts, Mathematics, and the Manhattan Project. This process was an invaluable exercise to gain a better understanding of the collection strengths of the Library’s rare and archival material. We were surprised when we finished coding the finding aids to learn that the topic with the most collections is medicine. Next to each subject a number in parenthesis indicates the number of collections categorized under a specific topic. 

 

 The links take users to a page that lists collection names and provides a brief abstract on the scope and content of the materials.  

 Special Collections created an online tutorial demonstrating how to use the new feature, which can be viewed on the Library’s YouTube channel: How to search archival collections by topic

Go directly to the list of topics: http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/scrc/findingaids/topics.php

Calling all students and alumni! We Are Chicago is back!

The Special Collections Research Center is pleased to announce a web exhibition version of We Are Chicago: Student Life in the Collections of the University of Chicago Archives.  

The We Are Chicago exhibition originally opened in the Special Collections Research Center Gallery in the winter 2012. The show highlighted student experiences over a span of 120 years and drew on the historical collections of the University Archives and featured recent donations as well as rarely seen materials from the University’s past. Costumes, photographs, T-shirts, letters, posters, publications, and memorabilia combined to make this the largest and most inclusive exhibition in the ongoing Special Collections archival series, Discover Hidden Archives Treasures.

The web exhibition includes images of the original exhibition design as well as images of specific pieces that had been on display. The web exhibition also includes reproductions of cards from the interactive comment board that allowed students, alumni and visitors to post a memory about their time here on campus.

Tracking student life on campus is an archival challenge. More than 300 Registered Student Organizations exist at the University.  Understanding the history of student life is equally complex. Since the university’s founding in 1892, students have organized an amazing array of social, academic, cultural, residential, athletic, literary, and political groups.

The University Archives welcomes donations from alumni, students, and community neighbors who have historical materials on student life that can be preserved and made available to the students and researchers of the future.

View the online exhibition here: http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/webexhibits/wearechicago/

Swiss Treasures: From Biblical Papyrus and Parchment to Erasmus, Zwingli, Calvin, and Barth

Exhibition Dates: September 21 – December 14, 2012

Situated in the heart of Europe, Switzerland has long been a center for Biblical studies and transformative contributions to Judeo-Christian culture. This exhibition explores the importance of Swiss religious influences across a range of traditions and historical personalities, among them Erasmus, Zwingli, John Calvin, and Karl Barth. Papyri, parchments, first editions, early printings, and modern manuscripts represent treasures in Swiss institutions that link these and other religious thinkers to the philosophical, theological, and political movements that have shaped the modern world.

The rare historical treasures displayed in this exhibition have been gathered from seven distinguished Swiss archives and libraries: Basel University Library (Basel), State and University Library (Fribourg), Abbey Library of St. Gall (St. Gall), Central Library (Zurich), the Martin Bodmer Foundation (Cologny), Karl Barth Archive (Basel), and Library of Geneva (Geneva). The exhibition also displays a rare volume from the Special Collections Research Center of the University of Chicago Library.   

This unique display of rare historical treasures from Swiss institutions has been brought together to mark the joint annual meetings in Chicago of the Society of Biblical Literature and the American Academy of Religion in November 2012.

At the Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago
Hours: Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m.; Saturdays: 9:00 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
when classes are in session

Curator: Dr. Gabriella Gelardini, University of Basel, Switzerland

Use of Images

These images from the exhibition are available for members of the media, and are reserved for editorial use in connection with the University of Chicago Library exhibitions, programs, or related news.  Email Rachel Rosenberg (phone: 773-834-1519) or Joseph Scott (phone: 773-702-6655)  to request high-resolution images. 

Liber Psalmorum, Medieval Bible in Latin and German

Liber Psalmorum, Medieval Bible in Latin and German, ca. 1200. Courtesy of Martin Bodmer Foundation in Cologny (Geneva)

 

Novum Instrumentum Omne

Novum Instrumentum Omne, first printed Greek New Testament edited by Erasmus, 1516. Courtesy of Basel University Library – Öffentliche Bibliothek der Universität Basel

 

Papyrus fragments of Psalms 33 and 34, Greek Old Testament

Papyrus fragments of Psalms 33 and 34, Greek Old Testament, 3rd to 4th century. Courtesy of Martin Bodmer Foundation in Cologny (Geneva)