Keystone Program: Microsoft Office training

This program earned rave reviews when we offered it in the past. Organized by the Office of the Dean of Students and the D’Angelo Law Library, this Microsoft Office Training is meant to address what students will see in practice – new attorneys are expected to be able to do anything computer-related because they are generally the youngest person on the team, yet are at the bottom of the pecking order in terms of getting secretarial support. It’s really hard to teach yourself Power Point at 3 in the morning when the partner wants slides edited and the support staff have long ago gone home for the night. This program will give you the basic Microsoft Office skills you will need during the school year, in summer employment, and as an attorney.

There is no charge for the program; you can attend the morning, afternoon, or both; lunch will be provided; you must bring your own laptop; and the program will be applicable for both Mac and PC users. The program will be held Saturday, March 28th with Word training from 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. and Excel & PowerPoint from 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., followed by a question and answer period.  Students must register in advance for this  program at:http://www.law.uchicago.edu/microsoftofficetrainingRSVP. Please RSVP by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 25th.

Sponsored by the Office of the Dean of Students & the D’Angelo Law Library.

Library Catalog improvements

The Library has released a new version of its Library Catalog, offering enhancements and new features to improve your search:

  • Basic and advanced keyword search forms have merged. There is now one tab with keyword searching, with an option to switch to advanced search.
  • Improved printing and exporting, including the ability to mark multiple records.
  • Search terms are retained when switching to a new search option.
  • Vernacular character searching for languages such as Korean, Russian, or Arabic, is now available in all keyword searches. However, the vernacular must be included in the catalog record.
  • Improvements have been made to call number browse. Call number prefixes (such as f or s) are now ignored.
  • More information, including ebook platform, for full-text links in catalog records.
  • Search limits are now joined by Boolean OR rather than AND.
  • Catalog records can now be formatted into Chicago style.
  • Greatly improved Zotero support.
  • WorldCat search option added to the header of the catalog for quick access.

In the next few months, additional enhancements will be coming, including:

  • Improved access on mobile devices.
  • Catalog records details will be removed from tabs.
  • Addition of more Tables of Content to more book records.

For more information regarding the Library Catalog, view our help guide. Comments and questions about the Library Catalog can be submitted via our Catalog Feedback Form.

Alert Winter quarter loans to quarterly borrowers automatically extended to June 26

Items checked out by current quarterly borrowers with privileges in good standing and due April 3 will be automatically renewed by the Library for spring quarter. As of March 23, all such items will have a new due date of June 26, 2015. No action by borrowers is necessary.

The automatic renewal is being performed because the functionality to manually renew items is currently unavailable in the Catalog. The Library is working to restore this functionality as soon as possible.

Users may view a list of all items out, including current due dates, via My Account.

For assistance, please contact Circulation or visit a Library circulation desk.

D’Angelo Law Library spring interim hours, March 15 – 24

The D’Angelo Law Library will have reduced hours for the spring interim. Normal hours resume Wednesday, March 25.

From Monday, March 16 through Friday, March 20, we will be open from 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

We will be closed Saturday, March 21 and Sunday, March 22.

The following week, on Monday, March 23 and Tuesday, March 24, we will be open from  8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Regular hours resume on Wednesday, March 25.

‘An unbelievable success’: Chicago Unbound reaches a half-million downloads of faculty work

Last Wednesday, someone in Hamburg, Germany, downloaded a paper by Geoffrey R. Stone right around the time someone in Nairobi was accessing a paper by Aziz Huq and someone in Taipei was pulling up a paper by Richard Posner.

Law School scholarship was circling the globe in a digital flurry: an Eric Posner piece to the Bahamas; a Todd Henderson article to Ontario, Canada; a Douglas G. Baird paper to Phoenix; and a piece co-authored by Thomas J. Miles and Cass Sunstein to Rio de Janeiro. And not just the newer scholarship: in London, someone downloaded a 1975 paper by R.H. Helmholz, and in Denmark, someone grabbed a 1983 paper by William Landes.

This was typical activity for Chicago Unbound, the 14-month-old online repository that has made the faculty’s work more accessible than ever and has illustrated just how far, and how frequently, Law School scholarship travels. Still, the otherwise-ordinary day represented an important milestone: that evening “Positive and Negative Constitutional Rights,” a 1986 paper by longtime Professor David P. Currie, became the 500,000th publication downloaded from Chicago Unbound.

“Not only is Chicago Unbound getting our scholarship out there — as seen by the half million downloads — but it’s doing it under the UChicago brand. It reinforces the connection between our scholars and the Law School,” said Deputy Dean Tom Ginsburg, Leo Spitz Professor of International Law. “It has been an unbelievable success. It is far exceeding our expectations.”

On average, about 875 works are downloaded each day from Chicago Unbound — a roughly 17 percent increase from the site’s daily average of about 750 a year ago. Users from 171 different countries have downloaded scholarship; the most frequent international visitors hail from the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, India, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Hong Kong.

“Surpassing the half-millionth download is a significant accomplishment in the life of this young repository,” said Sheri Lewis, Director of the D’Angelo Law Library. “I am extremely proud of the library’s role in this important Law School effort and of the talented staff that has made it possible.”

Chicago Unbound, developed by the D’Angelo Law Library and the Law School’s Office of Communications, contains about 5,500 works published by current faculty, as well as about 1,500 publications by select historical faculty — numbers that are growing as new works are published and older ones are scanned and added. The collection contains the complete working paper series from Law School research centers, other Law School publications, and the Crosskey and Fulton lectures. The library is working on adding the entire run of the Chicago Journal of international Law, its predecessor, the University of Chicago Roundtable, as well as the alumni publication, the University of Chicago Law School Record. Eventually, everything published in the University of Chicago Law Review and the University of Chicago Legal Forum will be added, as well as audio and visual materials from lectures and other events. Chicago Unbound also has tables of contents and citation information for the Journal of Law and Economics and the Journal of Legal Studies.

“The faculty wants their work to be read, and they want it to be as accessible as possible,” Lewis said. “Chicago Unbound accomplishes that well. It is a public site that makes the work easy to find and easy to access.”

The project began in early 2013 under former D’Angelo Law Library Director Judith M. Wright, who retired in June 2013. Since then, many of D’Angelo’s librarians have been involved in building the database and uploading new items to the collection. Chicago Unbound is built on bepress’s Digital Commons platform, which is designed to ensure that Law School faculty scholarship is easily findable when someone searches the internet for research on a particular topic.

“Because of what is sometimes referred to as ‘the Google juice’ — the search engine optimization — in the Digital Commons platform, these results tend to come to the top,” Lewis said. “We all know that the first couple of results you see on Google are the ones that get the attention.”

The New York Times has linked to Chicago Unbound when citing Law School faculty scholarship, including a January reference to a paper by Kirkland & Ellis Distinguished Service Professor of Law Eric Posner and Assistant Professor Adam S. Chilton, as well as a December 2014 reference to a 1982 Harvard Law Review paper by Professor Frank Easterbrook, a judge on the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals and a Senior Lecturer at the Law School.

The platform also allows the library to track usage, providing useful data on the reach of faculty scholarship. Chicago Unbound’s front page even offers a “real-time readership” world map that shows downloads as they happen.

For Ginsburg, who focuses on international law, Chicago Unbound gives him insight into the global reach of faculty work.

“I write on countries all over the world,” he said, “and to see that my work is having an impact all over the world is, of course, really exciting.”

A University of Chicago Law School news release

Exhibits Closeted/Out in the Quadrangles: A History of LGBTQ Life at the University of Chicago

Weddstock Protest 1992

Photograph from Weddstock protest, 1992. Chicago Maroon. University of Chicago Photographic Archive, apf7-03580-001, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library. Used with the permission of the Chicago Maroon.

Exhibition Dates: March 30 – June 12, 2015

Location: Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637

Description: From lesbian relationships in the early 1900s to the founding of Chicago Gay Liberation in 1970 to today, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning individuals have long been part of the University of Chicago’s history. More than 95 oral histories gathered from LGBTQ alumni, faculty and staff join with archival and donated materials to tell those stories in this exhibition.

The oldest material in the exhibition documents relationships between the first generation of female faculty and graduate students at the University at the start of the 20th century. The exhibition also explores the consequences faced by male instructors caught in vice raids of the 1940s, the founding of Chicago Gay Liberation in 1970, the impact of AIDS on the University of Chicago community, anti-gay violence in the 1980s, and activism for partner benefits for same-sex couples and improvements to the campus climate for queer, transgender and gender non-conforming students. As the Chicago Maroon declared in 1980, “The University of Chicago may be gayer than you think.”

Gay Liberation Dance poster

Gay Liberation Dance poster, 1971. Used with permission of Charles Deering McCormick Library of Special Collections at Northwestern University.

Drawing on the rich holdings of the University of Chicago Library—including the papers of Marion Talbot and Ernest Burgess, administrative records, and a multitude of campus publications—and other major archives, the exhibition displays letters, academic papers, and student newspaper articles, as well as posters, ephemera, photographs, a square of the AIDS Memorial Quilt made by UChicago students, and other visual documentation tracing this complex history. The exhibition also introduces new materials and selections from oral histories collected by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality from alumni such as James Hormel, JD’58, former dean of students of the Law School and the first openly gay U.S. ambassador; cultural anthropologist Esther Newton, AM’66, PhD’68, who wrote the first major anthropological study of a homosexual community in the U.S. while a graduate student at UChicago; and Deborah Gould, AM ’90, PhD ’00, activist, scholar, and author of the first book to analyze the emergence, development, and decline of the direct-action AIDS movement, ACT UP.

Hours: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.

Price: Free and open to the public

Presented by the University of Chicago Library and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality

Curator: Lauren Stokes, Ph.D. candidate, Department of History, The University of Chicago

Associated web exhibit (coming April 2015): lib.uchicago.edu/e/webexhibits

Facebook Event Page: Exhibit

The Closeted/Out in the Quadrangles Project

Homo t-shirt: "The University of Chicago is gayer than you think."

Ho-mo t-shirt. Donated by Scott Dennis. Closeted/Out in the Quadrangles. Collection. The University of Chicago Library.

Based on previous research into women’s history and experience at the University, students and faculty at the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality identified a pressing need to capture the history and experience of LGBTQ individuals and communities at the University of Chicago. In 2011, the CSGS launched the project Closeted/Out in the Quadrangles, documenting LGBTQ life at the University of Chicago from the early 20th century through the present day. During this time, students and staff working on the project have collected more than 95 oral histories, gathered donated materials from alumni, students and student groups, and mined the archives at the University of Chicago Library, Northwestern University, the Kinsey Institute, the Chicago History Museum, Gerber/Hart Library and Archives, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison for materials.

In addition to producing new scholarship, the Closeted/Out in the Quadrangles Project contributes to building community and expertise around the history of sexuality across disciplines by providing undergraduate and graduate students at the University space for research and intergenerational mentorship. The project has offered a yearly undergraduate course that has trained students in oral history and archival research methods and exploring LGBTQ history. The project also brings scholars of LGBTQ history working in universities and archives across the United States to campus for public lectures and student/faculty workshops.

Opening Gala

Chicago Pride Parade, 1991

Photograph from Chicago Pride Parade, 1991. Chicago Maroon, June 1991. University of Chicago Photographic Archive, apf7-03416-001, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library. Used with permission of the Chicago Maroon.

Date: April 1
Time: 6-8 p.m.
Location:
Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, The University of Chicago Library, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637
Facebook Event Page – Opening Gala

To RSVP

Celebrate the opening of the exhibition Closeted/Out in the Quadrangles: A History of LGBTQ Life at the University of Chicago. A reception and short program will mark the opening, and visitors will have the opportunity to meet researchers, oral history narrators and project organizers.  

Use of Images and Media Contact

Images from the exhibition included on this page are available for download by members of the media, and are reserved for editorial use in connection with University of Chicago Library exhibitions, programs, or related news.  For more information, contact Rachel Rosenberg at ra-rosenberg@uchicago.edu or 773-834-1519.

D’Angelo Law Library restricted access during exams

Access to the D’Angelo Law Library for non-law students will be limited from Friday, March 6 through Saturday, March 14 during the Law School reading and exam periods. During this period, the library will continue to be accessible to any member of the University community who needs access to legal materials or who would like to work with one of our reference librarians. In addition, all non-law students who are taking Law School classes will have access to the library.

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library webpage on access for additional information.

 

Exam preparation resources at the D’Angelo Law Library

The D’Angelo Law Library provides a variety of resources to help students prepare for exams.

Past exams: Perhaps most importantly, the Library provides copies of past exams given at the Law School, in addition to model student answers and memos written by the professors where available. The exams are organized by course and faculty member. Everything we have been given permission to post is available on the Library website.

 

Past_Exams

Study Supplements: Another helpful resource for preparing student outlines and studying for exams are the many study supplements, including the popular Examples & Explanations and Understanding series, that are available in the Reserve Room. Our Hornbooks & Study Supplements page provides lists of the available study supplements by course name.

CALI Lessons: If you prefer something online or more interactive, CALI lessons might be the resource for you.  The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) provides UofC law students with access to nearly 1,000 internet-based lessons on different legal topics. Lessons range from core 1L courses (92 lessons on property, for example) to many different upper level courses. CALI lessons are often interactive and feature questions to test your knowledge as you go through them. If you have not already registered an account with CALI, you can Ask a Law Librarian to get the authorization code for the Law School.

Student Outlines: Student outlines for various courses taught at the Law School are made available by the UChicago Law Students Association (LSA) in an online outline bank on the LSA’s website. You will need to enter a password to access. If you do not have the password, Ask a Law Librarian. The Black Law Students Association (BLSA) also makes student outlines available on TWEN (requires Westlaw login and the password blsaoutlines). Older (pre-2010) outlines are available on the BLSA website. You will need to enter this information to access (username: blsaoutlines; password: student).

Screenshot of TWEN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screenshot of BLSA Outlines link on TWEN

Study Rooms: If you want to meet with a study group, the D’Angelo Law Library has seven study rooms that can be reserved online: two study rooms on each of the 4th, 5th and 6th floors, and one study room on the second floor. Law students may reserve use of a study room using the Law School’s room reservation system. For further assistance, see How to Reserve a Law Library Study Room.

Quiet Study Space: Quieter study spaces are available on the upper floors of the Law Library. Law School students are also able to study in any of the other libraries on campus.

Lockers: Please remember to secure your belongings when you take breaks. You can check out a locker key from the Circulation Desk. Library lockers are located in the northeast corner of the second and third floors. Two types of lockers are available: laptop lockers, which are smaller and each equipped with an electrical outlet, and bookbag lockers, which are large enough to accommodate a bookbag and/or coat. 

Good luck with exams!

Happy Lunar New Year 2015!

Lyo Chinese New Year 2015 photoChinese New Year/Spring Festival celebrations start today, February 19, 2015, and end on March 5, 2015. It’s confusing whether 2015 is the Year of the Sheep, Goat, or Ram because the character “羊” means “horned animal”. It could also be the Year of the Antelope!  :-)  Let’s celebrate anyway!

If you’re in a serious research frame of mind, you can celebrate by checking out what we have in our Chinese law collection, including our databases. Books,  journals and other law-related materials are located in the D’Angelo Law Library and in the Chinese Studies collection at Regenstein’s East Asian Library.  We subscribe to ChinaLawInfo/LawInfoChina, Westlaw China, and Wangfang Data: Policies and Laws of China (PLOC).

Infernal Affairs (movie)For fun, check out the movies in our law library DVD Collection! We have all three Infernal Affairs action flicks. 

We also own Farewell My Concubine (recommended by our LL.M.s), The Story of Qiu Ju, China: From the Inside, The People’s Court, and other movies made in China and about China.

The University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) has a film library comprising over 5,000 titles from China, Japan, and Korea. You can browse their  online film catalog. The Film Library is at Judd Hall, Room 302. It’s open Mon-Fri. 11:30am-4:30pm. Current University of Chicago students, faculty, and staff members can borrow films. 

If you don’t have a movie in mind and like romantic comedies, I’m told by Jiaxun Wu, Chinese Studies Librarian, that If You Are the One = 非誠勿擾 (2008) is great. Check it out!

You can also visit the “Chinese New Year Paintings Held in the Shanghai Library” exhibit located on the 5th floor of Regenstein Library.  Hurry!  It closes on February 28, 2015.

If you want to celebrate by going to China, we also have travel guides located in the Reserve Room – China (DK Eyewitness Travel Guide, 2012), Fodor’s China (2011), and Fodor’s Beijing (2011). Thanks to Lorna Tang, our Associate Law Librarian for Technical Services, for these guides!

And this Sunday at 1pm, there’s a Lunar New Year Parade in Chinatown!

University of Chicago Library Graduate and Professional School Survey

This is a reminder! Please fill out the University of Chicago Library Graduate and Professional School Survey. Emails with links to the survey were sent on February 4, 2015. D’Angelo Law Library is hoping to get some good feedback from the survey – results will be sortable by division and degree program. We are looking forward to hearing from you.  

Final days: Library asks graduate and professional school students to complete survey by March 4

The University of Chicago Library is conducting a survey of all currently enrolled graduate and professional school students. This survey is being offered in partnership with Graduate Student Affairs, and the findings will be used to inform decisions about future University and Library services.

The survey was distributed by email on February 4. Graduate and professional school students, please check your email for a message from the University of Chicago Library with an individualized link to the survey. Participants who complete the survey will have the opportunity to enter a drawing for a number of prizes, including:

  • A dedicated faculty study at Regenstein Library or Crerar Library for one year.
  • Locker rental at Regenstein Library for one year.
  • Gift cards for Amazon.com, the Seminary Co-op, or the University of Chicago Bookstore.

Previous surveys conducted by the Library resulted in the implementation of the Library’s Scan and Deliver service, as well as the creation of new group study spaces in Regenstein Library. Results gathered from the Library’s last survey of graduate and professional school students, conducted in February 2010, are available online.

For more information or to report problems with the survey, please contact the project team by email at ithaka@lib.uchicago.edu.

Corporate and Securities Law Research, Tuesday, Feb. 3, 12:15 PM in Classroom A

Interested in learning how to research a business, a company or an industry?  We have tools to help! Join Reference Librarians Bill Schwesig and Margaret Schilt for a presentation on Corporate and Securities Law Research Tuesday, February 3, 2015, 12:15 – 1:15 PM in Classroom A.  Lunch will NOT be provided but feel free to bring your own.  Earn 10 Keystone points in the Legal Research category for attending this presentation.

New Westlaw OnePass security requirements

Earlier this month, all Westlaw users should have received an email informing them that they need to update their OnePass password. The password updates are to ensure security and privacy. You may change your password at any time, but if you do not change your password by February 1, you will be prompted to change your password when you log in and will not be able to access Westlaw until you do.  

To get started, follow the steps below:

1. Within lawschool.westlaw.com or TWEN, click on your name in the top right corner and select Manage Account.

Screenshot of Manage Account screen

2. Click on Manage OnePass Profile.

*If a new page does not display, check your pop-up blocker. 

3. Scroll down to the password section, enter a new password and confirm it.

4. Click on Save.

If you run into trouble during the process, contact the Westlaw technical support line at 1-800-934-9378. Reference “OnePass” when prompted.

Further information is also available at: http://legalsolutions.thomsonreuters.com/law-products/videos/onepass-password-support

Substantial Paper Success: Thursday, Jan. 22, 12:15 pm in Room A

Are you writing a substantial paper this quarter? If so, you might want to attend the D’Angelo Law Library Workshop, “Substantial Paper Success,” on Thursday, January 22, at 12:15 pm in Room A. Come learn how to select a topic and do research for your substantial paper! Feel free to bring your lunch. If you cannot attend, you can still check out the Library’s Researching and Writing Substantial Papers guide online, or make an appointment to meet with a reference librarian.

D’Angelo Law Library’s new standing desk

Standing desks have been praised for increasing physical activity, burning more calories, and elevating energy levels – all great outcomes! The D’Angelo Law Library was persuaded and has installed a standing desk for student use in the northwest corner of the second floor Reading Room. Please try it out! We hope it will be used and if it is popular, we can endeavor to match demand with additional supply. Let us know what you think – at the Circulation or Reference Desks or through Ask-a-Law Librarian.

New Library Director and University Librarian arrives on campus

Brenda Johnson

Brenda Johnson

Dear University of Chicago Faculty, Students and Staff,

As I begin my second week on campus, I would like to say how very happy I am to have arrived at the University of Chicago. The warm welcome I have received from so many of you in the last few days has made me feel immediately at home.

The University of Chicago’s status as one of the world’s premier academic and research institutions and its Library’s role in fueling intellectual inquiry and a transformative education are well known internationally. As the year unfolds, I look forward to learning much more about your work; about the ways you rely on the Library to support your research, teaching and study; and about the ways you see your needs evolving as you break new scholarly ground or advance in your education.

It will be my great pleasure to meet many more of you and to discuss these matters with you in the coming months.

With warm regards,

Brenda L. Johnson
Library Director and University Librarian
The University of Chicago Library

MLK Day, Monday, Jan. 19: D’Angelo Law closed, other campus libraries remain open

On Monday, January 19, the D’Angelo Law Library will be closed in observance of the Martin Luther King Day holiday. Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein libraries will be open during their regular building hours. The All-Night Study Space on the 1st Floor of Regenstein will also remain open.

“Batman Returns” and other unexpected Christmas movies

If you’re marathoning Christmas movies during the holidays, check out some films with unexpected Christmas scenes and songs. Gizmodo’s Darren Orf has a great list of atypical Christmas movies including Batman Returns, Rare Exports, and Die Hard 2 (the original film starring Bruce Willis, Die Hard, tops our D’Angelo Law Library staff list of favorite Christmas movies).

Other movies that have surprise Christmas scenes in them: Lethal Weapon, The Apartment, Auntie Mame (and Mame, the musical), Gremlins, Edward Scissorhands, Trading Places, Look Who’s Talking Now, Rocky IV, Brazil (?!), Meet Me in St. Louis (Judy Garland sings “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas“), and About a Boy. Some of them are listed in Empire magazine’s The 30 Best Christmas Movies Ever. And for a festive change of pace, have a very Bollywood Christmas!

Alert Fall quarter loans to quarterly borrowers automatically extended to April 3

Items checked out by current quarterly borrowers with privileges in good standing and due January 9 will be automatically renewed by the Library for winter quarter. As of December 18, all such items will have a new due date of April 3, 2015. No action by borrowers is necessary.

The automatic renewal is being performed because the functionality to manually renew items is temporarily unavailable in the Catalog. The Library is working to restore this functionality as soon as possible.

Users may view a list of all items out, including current due dates, via My Account.

For assistance, please contact Circulation online or visit a Library circulation desk.

UChicago users now have access to Law360.com

University of Chicago users now have access to the popular legal news service Law360 through the Law360.com platform. Law360 publishes breaking news and analysis with a focus on major litigation across more than 35 practice areas. This content is read by over 100,000 law firm and business professionals, including litigators, corporate counsel, and transactional attorneys. Law360 content has been available in the Legal News section within Lexis Advance since earlier this year, but now UChicago users can take advantage of all of the features of the Law360.com platform, including signing up for email newsletters in specific practice areas, industries, and jurisdictions. To sign up for Law360 newsletters, click in the upper right hand corner where it says, “University of Chicago Law S…” and then enter your email address and select the newsletter(s) you wish to receive.

Screenshot of Law360 front page

Exam preparation resources at the D’Angelo Law Library

The D’Angelo Law Library provides a variety of resources to help students prepare for exams.

Past exams: Perhaps most importantly, the Library provides copies of past exams given at the Law School, in addition to model student answers and memos written by the professors where available. The exams are organized by course and faculty member. Everything we have been given permission to post is available on the Library website.

Screenshot of D'Angelo Law Library Website

Study Supplements: Another helpful resource for preparing student outlines and studying for exams are the many study supplements, including the popular Examples & Explanations and Understanding series, that are available in the Reserve Room. Our Hornbooks & Study Supplements page provides lists of the available study supplements by course name.

CALI Lessons: If you prefer something online or more interactive, CALI lessons might be the resource for you.  The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) provides UofC law students with access to nearly 1,000 internet-based lessons on different legal topics. Lessons range from core 1L courses (92 lessons on property, for example) to many different upper level courses. CALI lessons are often interactive and feature questions to test your knowledge as you go through them. If you have not already registered an account with CALI, you can Ask a Law Librarian to get the authorization code for the Law School.

Student Outlines: Student outlines for various courses taught at the Law School are made available by the UChicago Law Students Association (LSA) in an online outline bank on the LSA’s website. You will need to enter a password to access. If you do not have the password, Ask a Law Librarian. The Black Law Students Association (BLSA) also makes student outlines available on TWEN (requires Westlaw login and the password blsaoutlines). Older (pre-2010) outlines are available on the BLSA website. You will need to enter this information to access (username: blsaoutlines; password: student).

Screenshot of TWEN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screenshot of BLSA Outlines link on TWEN

Conference Rooms: If you want to meet with a study group, the D’Angelo Law Library has seven conference rooms that can be reserved online: two conference rooms on each of the 4th, 5th and 6th floors, and one conference room on the second floor. Law students may reserve use of a conference room using the Law School’s room reservation system. For further assistance, see How to Reserve a Law Library Conference Room.

Quiet Study Space: Quieter study spaces are available on the upper floors of the Law Library.

Lockers: Secure your belongings when you take breaks! You can check out a locker key from the Circulation Desk. Library lockers are located in the northeast corner of the second and third floors. Two types of lockers are available: laptop lockers, which are smaller and each equipped with an electrical outlet, and bookbag lockers, which are large enough to accommodate a bookbag and/or coat. 

Good luck with exams!

Limited access to D’Angelo Law Library during reading and exam periods

Access to the D’Angelo Law Library for non-law students will be limited from Friday, December 5 through Tuesday, December 16 during the Law School reading and exam periods. During this period, the library will continue to be accessible to any member of the community who needs access to legal materials or who would like to work with one of our reference librarians. In addition, all non-law students who are taking Law School classes will have access to the library.

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library webpage on access for additional information.

Thanksgiving week hours 2014

Hours for the D’Angelo Law Library over the week of Thanksgiving 2014 are as follows:

Wednesday, November 26

8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Thursday, November 27

All libraries are closed in observance of Thanksgiving.

Friday, November 28

10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Saturday, November 29

Normal hours resume for all libraries.

Regenstein All Night Study

All Night Study closes Wednesday, November 26 at 8:00 a.m. and reopens at 1:00 a.m. on Monday, December 1.

For a complete list of Library hours, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Start your international law research with the World Treaty Library via HeinOnline

Are you researching an international law topic for your substantial research paper? For a journal comment or article? For a clinic or center research project? For your B.A. paper? Make sure you look for a related treaty or international agreement on the topic. The D’Angelo Law Library has subscribed to a new database that you can use. It’s available via HeinOnline and called the World Treaty Library (WTL).

World Treaty Library via HeinOnline (screencap)

Covering 1648 to the present, the WTL provides searching across major treaty sources (indexes and full-text compilations in PDF), including:

  • de Clercq’s Recueil des traités de la France (1864-1917)
  • Dumont’s Corps universel diplomatique du droit des gens (1726-1739)
  • Hein’s U.S. Treaty Index (1776-current)
  • League of Nations Treaty Series (L.N.T.S., 1920-1946)
  • Martens’ Treaties (Nouveau recueil général de traités, etc., 1817-1944)
  • Multilateral Treaties Deposited with the Secretary-General (United Nations’ MTDSG, 1981-2009)
  • Multilateral Treaty Calendar, 1648-1995 (Christian L. Wiktor)
  • United Nations Treaty Series (U.N.T.S., 1946-current)
  • United States Treaties and Other International Agreements (U.S.T.)
  • Peter Rohn’s World Treaty Index (WTI, 1900-1980)

The World Treaty Library includes other treaty publications and related works, a Bibliography, and scholarly articles.

Check it out!

We have a 10-day trial to the new World Treaties Library via HeinOnline

Test Hein’s new database, the World Treaty Library via HeinOnline,  and let us know what you think.  The WTL includes the digitized version of Peter H. Rohn’s 5-volume World Treaty Index covering 1900-1980, and collects treaties dating back to 1648, so great for historical treaty research.  It also comprises major treaty series, collections, and indexes such as Marten’s and Wiktor’s Multilateral Treaty Calendar. More information re WTL contents is available via Hein’s brochure.

You can view a YouTube video on how to use and search the World Treaty Library via HeinOnline. 

World Treaty Library (screen capture)

The D’Angelo Law Library is also considering subscribing to the new Oxford Historical Treaties database which includes the Consolidated Treaties Series (C.T.S.) in PDF.