Restricted access to the D’Angelo Law Library during reading period and finals

Access to the D’Angelo Law Library for non-law students will be limited from Friday, May 24 through Friday, June 7 during the Law School reading and exam periods. During this period, the library will continue to be accessible to any member of the University community who needs access to legal materials or who would like to work with one of our reference librarians. In addition, all non-law students who are taking Law School classes will have access to the library.

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library page on Access for additional information.

Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports online edition now available

We are pleased to announce that the online edition of the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports, 1941-1996 is now available to University of Chicago students, staff and faculty.  Fully searchable, this digital edition of the United States’ principal historical record of political open source intelligence for more than half a century provides insights into decades of world history. FBIS monitored and recorded intercepted radio broadcasts from foreign governments, official news services, and clandestine broadcasts from occupied territories.  Recordings were transcribed and translated into English and are a rich resource for students and scholars in international and area studies, political science and world history.

The online collection features full-text transcripts from Africa, Asia and the Pacific, China, Eastern and Western Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and the Soviet Union. This unique digital collection features individual bibliographic records for each report.

The Library gratefully acknowledges the Estate of Edward A. Allworth for helping to make the acquisition of this resource possible.

 

Maroon: UChicago Library ‘ideal place’ for collection of rare books

Alum Donates 400 Volumes to Special Collections
Chicago Maroon – May 7, 2019

Exam preparation resources at the D’Angelo Law Library

The D’Angelo Law Library provides a variety of resources to help students prepare for exams.

Past exams: Perhaps most importantly, the Library provides copies of past exams given at the Law School, in addition to model student answers and memos written by the professors where available. The exams are organized by course and faculty member. Everything we have been given permission to post is available on the Library website.

Screenshot of Law Library website

Study Supplements: Another helpful resource for preparing student outlines and studying for exams are the many study supplements, including the popular Examples & Explanations and Understanding series, that are available in the Reserve Room. Our Hornbooks & Study Supplements page provides lists of the available study supplements by course name. Students also have access to the Wolters Kluwer Online Study Aids and West Academic Study Aids e-book packages. These provide online access to many of the study supplements, including Examples & Explanations, Glannon Guides, West’s Concise Hornbook Series, the Law Stories Series, and all of the Nutshells.

The West Academic Library Mobile App also allows you to listen to West Academic audio content, such as the Law School Legends and Sum and Substance series, on your phone or to access the print e-book study aids available via West Study Aids

CALI Lessons: If you prefer something more interactive, CALI lessons might be the resource for you.  The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) provides UofC law students with access to nearly 1,000 internet-based lessons on different legal topics. Lessons range from core 1L courses (92 lessons on property, for example) to many different upper level courses. CALI lessons are often interactive and feature questions to test your knowledge as you go through them. If you have not already registered an account with CALI, you can Ask a Law Librarian to get the authorization code for the Law School.

Study Rooms: If you want to meet with a study group, the D’Angelo Law Library has seven study rooms that can be reserved online: two study rooms on each of the 4th, 5th and 6th floors, and one study room on the second floor. Law students may reserve use of a study room using the Law School’s room reservation system. For further assistance, see How to Reserve a Law Library Study Room.

Quiet Study Space: Quieter study spaces are available on the upper floors of the Law Library. Law School students are also able to study in any of the other libraries on campus. Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week. For a full list of library hours, see https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/using/libraries-hours/.

Lockers: Please remember to secure your belongings when you take breaks. You can check out a locker key from the Circulation Desk. Library lockers are located in the northeast corner of the second and third floors. Two types of lockers are available: laptop lockers, which are smaller and each equipped with an electrical outlet, and bookbag lockers, which are large enough to accommodate a bookbag and/or coat.

Good luck with exams!

Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law access over the summer

Your law student accounts for Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law can all be used over the summer, though under different terms for each service.

Westlaw

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls:

You can use Thomson Reuters products, including Westlaw and Practical Law, over the summer for non-commercial research. You can turn to these resources to gain understanding and build confidence in your research skills, but you cannot use them in situations where you are billing a client. Examples of permissible uses for your academic password include the following:

  • Summer coursework
  • Research assistant assignments
  • Law Review or Journal research
  • Moot Court research
  • Non-Profit work
  • Clinical work
  • Externship sponsored by the school

Graduating 3Ls:

Graduating students have access to Thomson Reuters products, including Westlaw and Practical Law, for six-months after graduation. Your “Grad Elite” access gives you 60-hours of usage on these products per month to gain understanding and build confidence in your research skills. While you cannot use it in situations where you are billing a client, Thomson Reuters encourages you to use these tools to build your knowledge of the law and prepare for your bar exam. In addition, you get access to job searching databases on Westlaw and TWEN for 18-months after graduation for 1-hour a month. Extend access by logging into www.lawschool.westlaw.com or at https://lawschool.westlaw.com/authentication/gradelite.

For help or more information, contact the Law School’s Westlaw Account Manager Elan Kleis at Elan.Kleis@thomsonreuters.com.

Lexis

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls:

Continuing students are welcome to use their Lexis Advance ID for academic or employment purposes during May – August.

Graduating 3Ls:

Graduating students will have their Lexis Advance IDs automatically transitioned to Graduate IDs on July 1, with access through December 31, 2018. Those graduates going to work for a 501(c)(3) can apply for an ASPIRE ID for a full year of access following graduation. Qualifying graduates can apply from this site: https://www.lexisnexis.com/grad-access/

For help or more information, contact our LexisNexis Account Executive, Carter Isham at carter.isham@lexisnexis.com.

Bloomberg Law

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls:

Bloomberg Law provides unlimited and unrestricted access over the summer. There is no need to register, as your student account will remain active and available all summer.

Graduating 3Ls:

Students graduating this spring have unlimited and unrestricted access to Bloomberg Law for six months after graduation.

For help or more information, contact our Bloomberg Law Account Manager, Chrishantha Vedhanayagam at cvedhanayagam@bna.com.

Mueller Report Available on HeinOnline

HeinOnline has the Report on the Investigation into the Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election (Redacted) in the U.S. Congressional Documents Library (see Other Works Related to Congress).  The Report is in PDF format and may be browsed or searched.

People Get to know Sheri Lewis, D’Angelo Law Library Director

How long have you been at the D’Angelo Law Library?

I have been a librarian at D’Angelo since September 2001. I was the Associate Law Librarian for Public Services for nearly 12 years and then moved into my current position in the summer of 2013.  I do have a prior history working here in the 1990s.  I was a student in the masters in library science (what we call MLS) degree program at Rosary College at the time. The D’Angelo librarians first gave me an opportunity to volunteer as a student intern in 1993 and then to work on a temporary project in 1994 after I completed my MLS. I had always hoped to have a permanent position at D’Angelo and was thrilled when that opportunity arose years later. It’s a special place.

What is something that you wish more students knew about our law library?

Well, ideally I wish that they knew about every library service or resource that we offer. But mostly, I hope that they know that we are here to help them and always open to ways to be better at doing so.

In the time you’ve worked in the law library, what is the most memorable event you’ve attended?

Two events stand out for me. The Law School celebrated its centennial in 2002 and Professor David Currie gave an entertaining talk in the auditorium commemorating the event. (Ask one of our librarians to help you find his recitation of an original Law School cheer during these remarks!) The second event was President Barack Obama’s interview with David Strauss in the Green Lounge in April 2016. Our D’Angelo Wilson Reading Room was set up for overflow, ticketed viewing of the event. Imagine having to ask Secret Service personnel to enter your own office!

What activities consume most of your time as a law library director?

Meetings! But more generally, I spend much of my time working and collaborating with colleagues at the Law School and in the University libraries. We are a unique law school library that is integrated into the campus library system. One of my responsibilities is to engage in effective relationships that ensure the smooth and successful operation of our law library.

What are some of your interests outside of law libraries?

My primary interest is spending time with my husband and two daughters, one now in college and another graduating from high school this year. I also enjoy theater, travel, cooking/baking, watching a variety of sports, and long walks along the lake.

What’s the best thing you watched, listened to, and/or read recently?

I have been watching the series, The Americans, and I am now finishing the final (sixth) season (don’t tell me how it ends). It resonates with me as I studied Russian in college in the 1980s and graduated from law school just a few months before the opening of the Berlin Wall in 1989. 

LexisNexis Digital Library

University of Chicago faculty and students now have access to the LexisNexis Digital Library. This database contains legal treatises from LexisNexis and Matthew Bender in eBook form. Until now, we have not been able to offer online access to these titles to faculty and students outside the Law School. Major treatises available include Moore’s Federal Practice, Nimmer on Copyright, and Collier on Bankruptcy. Also available are banking law handbooks and annotated codes, including the United States Code Service and the Illinois Compiled Statutes Annotated.

You can access the LexisNexis Digital Library without signing in, but if you sign in with your CNetID and password, you can download books to read offline, and save your notes and highlighting.

The similarly-named Lexis Library, which contains UK case law and commentary, is still available.

 

D’Angelo Winterfest 2019

We invite all students to stop by the D’Angelo Law Library’s Wilson Reading Room tomorrow from 1:00 – 4:00 pm for an afternoon of fun, games, refreshments and prizes! Visit all four stations, fill out your game card, and you will be entered into a drawing for fun library-themed prizes.

See you tomorrow!

Bloomberg BNA content merged into Bloomberg Law platform

Bloomberg BNA’s newsletters and resource centers have moved to the Bloomberg Law platform. The BNA resource centers, which brought together news, case law, legal analysis, primary sources, and practice tools, have been consolidated with existing Bloomberg Law practice centers. Some sixty Bloomberg BNA daily and weekly newsletters have been consolidated into twenty-two news pages on Bloomberg Law.

For the remainder of the academic year, we will have campus-wide access to the Bloomberg Law platform. Law School users with individual accounts will need to sign in to utilitize the full Bloomberg Law platform, including setting up alerts and accessing court filings from dockets.

Screenshot of Bloomberg Law interface

Global law resources at D’Angelo Law Library

The Law School’s Global Chicago Law Wine Mess is a good time to explore the diverse foreign, comparative, and international law (FCIL) resources we have at the University. Here is Lyonette “Lyo” Louis-Jacques (’86), Foreign and International Law Librarian, on FCIL databases and websites that you can access via the D’Angelo Law Library.

To start your FCIL research, consult “people” and print resources, but also check out the “Foreign and International Law” section of the D’Angelo Law Library Law Databases page.

Are you looking for non-U.S. constitutions? We have Constitute, Constitutions of the Countries of the World, and World Constitutions Illustrated.

Don’t know where to begin to look for sources on the law of a particular foreign jurisdiction? You can use tools such as the Foreign Law Guide, GlobaLex, and Guide to Law Online.

Want to locate statutes, codes, cases, and other primary law of foreign jurisdictions? We have ChinaLawInfo (aka LawInfoChina aka PKULaw), Manupatra and SCC Online (India), Israel Law Reports and Nevo, vLex (over 130 countries – strong for Spain and Latin American jurisdictions), WorldLII (multiple countries), and many other foreign law research tools.

Looking for treaties and other international agreements? Check out HeinOnline.

Maybe someone has written about the comparative law topic you’re researching? You can look for commentary in secondary sources such as encyclopedias, handbooks, books, journals articles, and news stories. Favorite databases for foreign corporate law research are Practical Law (global guides and cross-border resources), Getting the Deal Through (GTDT via Bloomberg Law), International Comparative Legal Guides (ICLG), and the International Encyclopaedia of Laws (IEL).

Don’t find what you’re looking for? Or have follow-up questions? Or want to arrange a library research consultation? Ask a Law Librarian!

Wright Fellowship for promising new academic law librarians

The D’Angelo Law Library at the University of Chicago is accepting applications through March 8 for the 2019 Judith M. Wright Fellowship.  Established on the occasion of Ms. Wright’s retirement as the director of the D’Angelo Law Library in 2013, the Fellowship recognizes her 40 years of service to the University of Chicago Law School and her legacy as a mentor to generations of law librarians.

Judith Wright

Judith Wright

The Wright Fellowship will develop promising new professionals in academic law librarianship by supporting a career training program at the D’Angelo Law Library. It provides $4,000 to a law school or library science student or recent graduate for a minimum of six consecutive weeks of temporary, full-time work to occur between June 10 and September 13, 2019.

The Fellowship is intended to give candidates interested in law librarianship as a career an opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge in an academic law library setting. Fellows will work in the D’Angelo Law Library under the guidance and supervision of the Law Library Director and other librarians and will learn about the overall functions, policies, and practices of the D’Angelo Law Library in both collection services and user services departments.

The primary focus of the Fellow’s work will be determined by the interests and prior experience of the Fellow and the needs of the D’Angelo Law Library. In addition to participating in the daily work of a premier academic law library, Fellows will undertake and complete a project based on the needs and capabilities of the D’Angelo Law Library.

The project for Summer 2019 will be one of the following:

  1. Chicago Unbound, the University of Chicago Law School’s institutional repository, contains the scholarship of the Law School community, providing full-text access to decades of Chicago Law faculty scholarship and the archives of many Law School journals and publications. The 2019 Wright Fellow will help develop a new Chicago Unbound collection highlighting the scholarship and service of the Law School’s deans throughout its history. The Fellow will create a space for this historical collection in Chicago Unbound and complete materials for three to five former deans. Creating the new collection will involve reviewing and selecting materials (e.g. articles, speeches, manuscripts, photographs) as well as organizing and describing the selected materials in Chicago Unbound.
  2. As part of its rare books holdings, the D’Angelo Law Library has a unique manuscript collection of portraits of justices of the United States Supreme Court and documents by and/or about them with their signatures. The manuscript materials date from the eighteenth century, beginning with the first chief justice, John Jay, and continue through Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. The collection has been digitized but not yet described or organized optimally for online research. The 2019 Wright Fellow will create a web exhibit of the United States Supreme Court Portraits and Autographs collection, including background on the justices, metadata descriptions for individual items, and references to related material.
  3. The D’Angelo Law Library has an extensive orientation and training program for University of Chicago Law School students that includes in-person tours and learning sessions, online research guides, and customized training and research support for courses and programs. The D’Angelo librarians also maintain a resource guide to the many digital tutorials created and maintained by law database vendors, including Westlaw, Lexis, Bloomberg Law and HeinOnline. The 2019 Wright Fellow will expand the learning opportunities available to UChicago law students by creating digital tutorials specific to D’Angelo services and collections.

For detailed information on eligibility, requirements, and how to apply, visit the Library website.

People Get to know Connie Fleischer, Research Services Librarian

As a continuation of the D’Angelo Interview Series that we began last year, Scott Vanderlin took a moment to catch up with our Research Services Librarian, Connie Fleischer. Connie shares highlights of her career to this point at the University of Chicago, her day-to-day life, and her interests outside of law librarianship.

How long have you been at the D’Angelo Law Library? 

I began working at the D’Angelo Law Library in 1992 as the Reference/Government Documents Librarian. My title now is Research Services Librarian. Obviously, the information landscape has changed dramatically. The work I do (helping our patrons) is basically the same, just using different tools. It is an extremely exciting and interesting time to be a law librarian. While keeping up with technology is a huge challenge, I have found it fascinating to see how legal research platforms continue to evolve.

In the time you’ve worked in the law library, what is the most memorable event you’ve attended?

In general, working with our amazing students and faculty over the years has been a privilege. They go on to do remarkable things! One example is the time I was pregnant with my oldest son at the same time Michelle Obama was pregnant with Malia. I would run into Barack Obama, then a Senior Lecturer at the Law School, in the Law School Café. We would exchange pleasantries about the excitement of expecting a new baby. Now those babies are in college! I was sorry to miss his most recent visit to the Law School but am looking forward to the opening of the new Obama Presidential Library.

What activities consume most of your time as a law librarian?

In addition to staffing the reference desk, I spend considerable time working with law students (as well as students in other divisions/departments on campus) on their research (for an SRP, faculty RA, or clinic work, etc.). I serve as member of the HathiTrust User Support team, which has been an amazing opportunity to learn about digital libraries.

What new services or changes to the D’Angelo Law Library are you most excited about?

The new scanner that the Library just acquired is straight out of The Jetsons! Located in the Reserve Room, it is free to UChicago patrons. Also, I couldn’t be more excited about all of the outreach (ie. Café D’Angelo/ this newsletter) that my colleague, Scott Vanderlin,  is doing to promote the vast services/people resources that the D’Angelo Law Library has to offer.

[editor’s note: duh.]

What is your favorite aspect of working with students?

Our students are so incredibly bright and intellectually curious. I love introducing them to new resources or tools that help them do their work more efficiently

What are some of your interests outside of law libraries?

I enjoy spending time with my family, playing tennis with friends, and attending estate sales.

Cert Denied Cases Now on ProQuest Supreme Court Insight

ProQuest Supreme Court Insight now includes petitions for writ of certiorari for cert denied cases, as well as for argued cases. Dockets and petition-stage briefs are also included for these cases. Coverage is from 1975 to the2017-18 term. Petitions for cert denied cases filed in forma pauperis are not present.

Cert petitions from the Supreme Court’s current term are available from the Supreme Court web site, through their Docket Search.

Restricted access to the D’Angelo Law Library during reading period and finals

Access to the D’Angelo Law Library for non-law students will be limited from Tuesday, December 4 through Thursday, December 13 during the Law School reading and exam periods. During this period, the library will continue to be accessible to any member of the University community who needs access to legal materials or who would like to work with one of our reference librarians. In addition, all non-law students who are taking Law School classes will have access to the library.

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library page on Access for additional information.

New database trials: Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports and 20th Century Global Perspectives collections

This University of Chicago Library trial is available from November 21, 2018January 12, 2019. It consists of ten different databases:

Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Reports

The FBIS Daily Reports are U.S. government publications that include translations of news from around the world (Africa, Asia, Australia/Oceania, Caribbean, Europe, Middle East/Near East, North America, South America). The FBIS Daily Reports also include translations of foreign law in English translation if included in the news sources covered.

The Readex FBIS database covers 1941-1996.

From the Readex description of the database:

“As the United States’ principal historical record of political open source intelligence for more than half a century, the Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) Daily Report is an indispensable source for insights into decades of turbulent world history. The original mission of the FBIS was to monitor, record, transcribe and translate intercepted radio broadcasts from foreign governments, official news services, and clandestine broadcasts from occupied territories. Accordingly, it provides a wealth of information from all countries outside of the U.S.—from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe….

…FBIS Daily Reports, 1941-1996 constitutes a one-of-a-kind archive of transcripts of foreign broadcasts and news that provides fascinating insight into the second half of the 20th century. Many of these materials are firsthand reports of events as they occurred. Digitized from original paper copy and high-quality microfilm, this definitive online collection features full-text transcripts from Africa, Asia and the Pacific, China, Eastern and Western Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and the Soviet Union. Fully searchable for the first time, this unique digital collection features individual bibliographic records for each report and highlighted events to assist researchers.

(more…)

Law resources for University faculty

The D’Angelo Law Library subscribes to dozens of legal databases with historical and current law and scholarly commentary to support the University of Chicago community. Legal research tools thought of as primarily for the Law School are useful for a variety of scholarship and teaching in other disciplines.

ProQuest’s Legislative Insight, Regulatory Insight and Supreme Court Insight offer efficient and comprehensive ways of exploring legal sources.  Legislative Insight organizes the legislative history of each enacted federal law.  You can search by the popular name of the statute (e.g., Americans with Disabilities Act), by citation or keyword.  Results include committee hearings and reports, congressional debates and votes, and executive signing statements.  Regulatory Insight  connects researchers with federal regulations created pursuant to congressional authority.  Supreme Court Insight, which includes opinions, dockets, oral arguments, and briefs from cases from 1975 to 2017, also facilitates understanding the judicial process.

History of Supreme Court Nominations - Volume 23 on Elena Kagan

From Hein Online’s History of Supreme Court Nominations – Volume 23 on Elena Kagan

Another core legal resource, HeinOnline, is a treasure trove, from complete back files of academic law journals to historical collections of state and territorial laws to the Pentagon Papers.  Included among the collections are Gun Regulation and Legislation in America and Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law.  HeinOnline has an impressive range: the English Reports, Full Reprint begins with 1220 while the History of Supreme Court Nominations concludes with Justice Elena Kagan.

Searching for “law” in the Library’s database finder tool produces 284 hits, from the American Civil Liberties Union Papers, 1912-1995 to WorldTradeLaw.net.  Explore!

For questions about using legal resources, Ask a Law Librarian.

Archives of two giants of economics

Gifts of the papers of George Stigler and Harry G. Johnson will expand our understanding of economics at Chicago

George Stigler in front of Rosenwald Hall and a headshot of Harry Johnson

George Stigler (left) and Harry G. Johnson (right). Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

The University of Chicago is world renowned for the “Chicago School of Economics” and the 30 Nobel laureates in economic sciences who have been UChicago faculty members, students, or researchers. Yet, among historians of economics, definitions of the “Chicago School” continue to be debated.  Three recent gifts to the University of Chicago Library—the papers of Nobel laureate George Stigler, PhD’38, the papers of international trade expert Harry G. Johnson, and funding to organize the Johnson papers and create an online finding aid—will expand scholars’ understanding of the many ways Chicago has shaped the field of economics.

The University of Chicago Library is home to collections of more than 30 economists and 21 Nobel laureates, including seven Nobel Prize-winning economists:  Gary Becker, Ronald Coase, Robert Fogel, Milton Friedman, Merton Miller, Theodore Schultz, and George Stigler.   “These three generous new gifts will enable scholars to explore the history of economics in new ways,” said Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian.  “They strengthen our University Archives and demonstrate the Library’s ongoing commitment to being a vital center of University of Chicago history and the home of Nobel Prize winners’ research.”

Nobel laureate George Stigler’s papers

Draft of Nobel Prize speech, "The Process and Progress of Economics" with edits

Draft of Nobel Prize speech, with black handwritten edits by George Stigler and red printing by Stephen Stigler, November 29, 1982. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Frequently thought of as one of the leaders of the “Chicago School,” George Stigler came to the University of Chicago as a graduate student in 1933, received his PhD in 1938 and returned to Chicago as a professor from 1958 until his death in 1991.  He was awarded the 1982 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences “for his seminal studies of industrial structures, functioning of markets and causes and effects of public regulation” and was hailed by the Journal of Law and Economics as “a towering figure in the history of law and economics” and the first to win a Nobel Prize for work in the field.

Stigler is widely known for developing the “Economic Theory of Regulation,” which argues that political and economic interest groups use the coercive and regulatory powers of government to shape laws and regulations that benefit them.  He also shaped the education of a generation of undergraduates as the author of The Theory of Price, a textbook on free market economics that places its subject in historical context.  He initiated the study of the economics of information as a field, arguing that knowledge is costly to acquire and that consumers and businesses therefore must make decisions about how much information to acquire, as they do with goods and services.

Handwritten letter from Milton Friedman to George Stigler

Letter from Milton Friedman to George Stigler, August 23, 1946. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

George Stigler’s son Stephen M. Stigler also became a faculty member at University of Chicago.  Currently the Ernest DeWitt Burton Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Statistics and the College and member of the Committee on Conceptual and Historical Studies of Science, Stephen donated his father’s papers to the University of Chicago Library, where they are available for research in the Special Collections Research Center.  A long-time supporter of the Library, chair of the faculty Board of the Library from 1986 to 1989, and chair of the University of Chicago Library Society from 2011 to 2014, Stephen said the papers clearly belonged here: “I never had a thought that they’d go anywhere else because the University of Chicago was such an important part of my father’s life.”

The papers include 70 linear feet of research and teaching materials, correspondence with economists such as Milton Friedman, photographs, and ephemera. Stephen Stigler anticipates that scholars may be particularly interested in some of the short, unpublished pieces that explore economic issues and, in some cases, politics.  “He was very interested in politics—not politics as something to push forward, but he thought when people voted a certain way or acted a certain way politically, they were furthering their own interests, and that’s not always obvious from what they did,” Stephen explained.  “People sometimes do what could at first glance look foolish, and you wonder why they did it, but if you study it enough, you can find that there is a rational story you can tell to explain what they’re doing.  You learn a lot about human behavior in the process.”

International trade expert Harry G. Johnson’s papers

Harry Johnson with others seated around a table with plates and cups

Harry G. Johnson (second from left). Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

A contemporary of George Stigler’s, Harry G. Johnson came to the University of Chicago in 1959, holding the Charles F. Grey Distinguished Service Professorship in the economics department from 1969 until his death in 1977. He was extraordinarily prolific, writing 19 books and 500 scholarly papers and editing 24 volumes before his early death due to a stroke at age 53.  Focusing primarily on international economics and economic theory, he played a leading role in the development of the Heckscher-Ohlin model of international trade.  He was known for articulating the connections between the ideas of major postwar economic innovators and, according to biographer D. E. Moggridge, defined the vital issues that “set the profession’s agenda for a generation.”  An influential editor of the Review of Economic Studies, the Journal of Political Economy, the Manchester School, and Economica, Johnson was considered so important to the field that Nobel laureate James Tobin called the third quarter of the 20th century “the age of Johnson.”

A large group of people standing on a staircase, including Harry G. Johnson

Attendees at the International Economic Association South-East Asia Refresher Course in Economics, Singapore July – September 1956, Nanyang Siang Pau Photo Graphic Department. Harry Johnson (first row, far right). Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Professor Johnson’s papers were donated to the University of Chicago Library by his children, Karen Johnson and Ragnar Johnson.  The 100 linear feet of materials include research and teaching papers, correspondence, and photographs. An additional gift, from David Levy, AM’70, PhD’79, will support the in-depth work of organizing the papers into an archival collection that will be ready for research. Additionally, an online finding aid, or guide, to the organized papers will provide a clear understanding of the contents of the collection.  “The power of the University Archives can’t be fully appreciated without finding aids,” said David Levy, a professor at George Mason University specializing in economics and the history of economic thought.

Professor Levy recalls his UChicago graduate school days enthusiastically. George Stigler served as the chair of his thesis committee, and Johnson acted as an additional reader.  “Every time I would talk to Harry, he would remind me that his first article was on David Ricardo, and my dissertation was on David Ricardo,” he said. Levy was particularly proud when, after a painful meeting with the committee, Johnson showed confidence in him by citing a paper he wrote in The Two-Sector Model of General Equilibrium.

Folded newspaper showing article on "The consequences of Keynes" on top of folder

Harry G. Johnson, “The Consequences of Keynes,” Times Literary Supplement, February 7, 1975. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Levy expects his gift will help future scholars better understand Johnson and his impact.  “Harry is one of the most important teachers at Chicago, but he’s not considered ‘Chicago School,’ which is actually sort of a problem for the history of ideas.  He’s not noted for free market advocacy,” Levy said. “Harry helped make the distinction between Keynes and Keynesians. He would combat myths wherever he saw them.  From my point of view, that’s his greatest contribution.”

A conference on “The Legacy of Chicago Economics” held at the University of Chicago in 2015 made it clear that the common perception of the “so-called Chicago School” has changed over time. At its origins in the 1930s, economics at the University of Chicago was not focused on promoting a single point of view or ideology, but rather about “finding an approach to studying economics.”  The gifts that make the archives of George Stigler and Harry G. Johnson part of the Library’s collections have the potential to change future researchers’ understandings of what the “Chicago School” was and how the University of Chicago—in the broadest sense—influences the future of economics.

People Get to know Margaret Schilt, Associate Law Librarian for User Services

As a continuation of the D’Angelo Interview Series that we began last year, Scott Vanderlin took a moment to pick the brain of Margaret Schilt, Associate Law Librarian for User Services.  Margaret gives us a glimpse at her career at the University of Chicago, her day-to-day life, and her interests outside of law librarianship.

How long have you been at the D’Angelo Law Library?

I started as an intern in January 2000. In August of that year, I was lucky enough to become the Faculty Services Librarian.

In the time you’ve worked in the law library, what is the most memorable event you’ve attended?

There have been so many memorable events. President Obama’s appearance here in 2017; Geof Stone, doing a Chicago Best Ideas talk about the history of the Vietnam War and the antiwar movement in this country; and many Thursday faculty Work in Progress lunches.

What activities consume most of your time as a law librarian?

One of the best parts of my job is that it is so varied. One day I might be working on library statistics; another day advising faculty on learning management software issues; handling reference and research requests; coordinating the work of the departments I’m responsible for, teaching legal research in the Bigelow program and in the writing and research course for the L.L.M. students. Each day has its own priorities.

What are some of your interests outside of law libraries?

I am a quilter/fabric artist. The quilts I make range from small wall hangings to bed-size quilts, using traditional and modern techniques. I am also a singer – have sung in the DePaul Community Chorus for many years – and a hockey fan. I’m grateful that it’s hockey season again and hope the Hawks do better this year!

What’s the best thing you watched, listened to, and/or read recently?

The best things are two podcasts I have been listening to: The History of English, and the History of England. It’s the only way to cope with Lake Shore Drive construction! Both are obsessively detailed (I’m barely up to Chaucer after 113 episodes in History of English) and David Crowther in the History of England has a rollicking sense of humor. Making the Plantagenets very entertaining…

People D’Angelo librarians honored for leadership and service in ‘Celebrating Diversity’ publication

Two D’Angelo librarians, Todd Ito and Lyonette Louis-Jacques, along with retired D’Angelo librarian Lorna Tang, have been honored for their leadership in the American Association of Law Libraries. Each was profiled in an organization publication, “Celebrating Diversity: A Legacy of Minority Leadership in the American Association of Law Libraries.”

Ito, a lecturer in law and the D’Angelo’s head of instruction and outreach, has been involved in numerous AALL committees, including as chair of the AALL Placement Committee. He also has been a leader in AALL’s regional chapter, the Chicago Association of Law Libraries (CALL) and has served on that organization’s executive board as an at-large director and as its president. Ito has also worked as the coordinator of the Illinois State Working Group for AALL’s National Inventory of Primary Legal Materials. He first became interested in working as a law librarian when he was a student reference assistant while in law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Louis-Jacques, a lecturer in law and the D’Angelo’s foreign and international law librarian, has been frequently recognized as one of the most respected foreign, comparative, and international law (FCIL) librarians in the country. In 2014, she received the Dan Wade Outstanding Service Award, which honors contributions in the FCIL area, and in 2015 she received an award for co-authoring the book International Law Legal Research. She is a prolific author and speaker, and has been active in numerous organizations, including the International Association of Law Libraries, the Chicago Association of Law Libraries, the Chinese and American Forum on Legal Information and Law Libraries, the American Society of International Law, and AALL. She served on AALL’s executive board for three years, and has been a mentor to other FCIL librarians.

Tang, the D’Angelo’s former associate law librarian for technical services, has been active in both AALL and CALL, serving on nearly two dozen committees over the past five decades. Tang, who retired in 2015, guided the D’Angelo’s technical services department through two major building renovations. She has published numerous articles on technical services, cataloguing, electronic resources acquisition, and vendor relations and received CALL’s Outstanding Lifetime Achievement in Law Librarianship Award.

“The service to our profession from these three librarians has been extraordinary,” said Sheri Lewis, director of the D’Angelo Law Library. “Involvement in associations is not only personally fulfilling but contributes to our library’s success supporting the University of Chicago community.”

The D’Angelo Law Library welcomes students

The D’Angelo Law Library would like to take this opportunity to welcome the JD class of 2021 and the LLM class of 2019, along with all of our returning 2Ls and 3Ls!  We hope that all of you will take advantage of our vast resources and knowledgeable staff. Please remember that if you ever have any questions about the Library, please ask us!

This year, the Law Library has created a 1L Success Portal that gathers together tools, such as study supplements and past exams, for each of the required courses students will take during their 1L year. These tools should aid students in their understanding of the challenging concepts that will form the bedrock of their legal education.

1. Reference librarians are here to help.

Our reference staff is knowledgeable, helpful, and accessible by email, chat, phone, and in person. Each Bigelow section also has a Reference Librarian assigned to teach legal research sessions over the course of the year. You can consider that librarian as your point of contact in the library, although all of our librarians are available to help you. We are available seven days a week through email, chat, phone, text and in person at the Reference Desk. See our Hours page for the exact hours.

2. Start with the Law Library website.

The Library website can direct you to services and tools to help you find what you need to study law and conduct legal research. Use our website to get research help, find databases, learn library policies, and keep up with the latest library and legal research news.

3. Access information using our primary discovery tools.

Library Catalog: You can search the Library Catalog for books, electronic materials, and more. The University of Chicago Library has over 7 million books and access to hundreds of thousands of electronic resources, so if you are looking for something, you should start with the catalog, and chances are we have what you are looking for.

Databases: The Library offers access to hundreds of databases covering various subjects. To locate a database to use for your research, use Database Finder, a tool that enables you to search for a particular database by name or browse by subject to identify relevant databases. The Law Library also provides a list of the main databases used for legal research.

Access to Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis, and Westlaw is restricted to Law School students, and each law student will be supplied with an individual password. You will get this password during your library orientation. If you have any questions about these resources, please do not hesitate to Ask a Law Librarian.

Research Guides: The reference librarians have created research guides on a variety of legal topics. These guides give you starting points for doing research in particular areas of law.

4. We offer a number of on demand services.

Scan & Deliver is an electronic document delivery service that enables members of the University of Chicago community to obtain scanned portions of books or journal articles from the Library’s collections. Requests should be made online, directly from the Library Catalog. Requested documents will be scanned and delivered within four business days. We will scan chapters from books or single articles from journals, provided that the chapter(s) or article does not exceed 20% of the entire book or journal issue.

We also offer a paging service for Law School students. We will retrieve uncharged Library books located in the stacks of other libraries on campus. This service is currently available to Law School students, faculty, and staff only. Materials will generally be collected within two business days and placed on hold at the Circulation Desk or delivered to the appropriate carrel. You will receive an email when your item is available for pick-up.

While searching the Library Catalog, you may also occasionally come across items with the location Mansueto or one of the two D’Angelo Law Library annexes. You can request materials from these storage collections to be delivered to the Law Library. It generally takes less than 24 hours, and you will receive an email when your item is available for pick up at the Law Library circulation desk.

University of Chicago students in other schools and programs are welcome at the D’Angelo Law Library. If you are interested in an introductory D’Angelo tour or a research consultation with a law reference librarian, please use the Ask a Law Librarian service to schedule a time with one of us.

New interface Westlaw Edge

On Monday, August 27, the University of Chicago Law School will switch over to the new Westlaw platform called Westlaw Edge. Law School users with current Westlaw accounts should be automatically switched over to the new platform and will not have to take any action to update their accounts.

What’s new and different about Westlaw Edge? Well, the first thing you’ll notice is that the home page is now blue. Other than that, it mostly functions the same way as Westlaw, but includes four major new features:

  • An enhanced version of the KeyCite citator that provides warnings that cases may no longer be good law, even though they have not been expressly overruled;
  • Litigation analytics that provide detailed docket analytics covering judges, courts, attorneys, and law firms, for both federal and state courts;
  • Statutes Compare, a tool that allows researchers to compare different versions of the same statute; and
  • WestSearch Plus, an AI-driven legal research tool that provides answers to specific legal questions.

To learn more about Westlaw Edge, you can visit the Thomson Reuters website, as well as detailed reviews from LawSites, Legaltech news, and the Dewey B Strategic blog. As always, Ask a Law Librarian if you have any questions or concerns about Westlaw Edge.

New online resource: ProQuest Regulatory Insight

Logo for ProQuest Regulatory Insight

ProQuest Regulatory Insight organizes the regulatory histories associated with Public Laws and Executive Orders from 1936-present, compiling Federal Register (FR) articles, proposed and final rules, and comments associated with them, organized by the Public Law to which they relate, the agency making the rule, and Regulation Identifier Number (RIN), and docket numbers.

General searching is by keyword, or Public Law Number, Popular Name of the statute, Statutes at Large (Stat.) citation, U.S. Code citation, RIN, and Agency Docket numbers. A special “Search Comments” page enables searching Regulatory Insight‘s extensive archive of comments by keyword, docket, RIN, and Comment ID number, and the following fields: Agency, Country, Organization, Submitter.

A fully-indexed Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) from 1938-present is included with browse and search options.

Regulatory Insight is a new addition to the Library’s other ProQuest subscriptions – Congressional, Legislative Insight, Supreme Court Insight (1975-2016). We welcome your feedback on its usefulness for your research. Contact us and let us know what you think!

New Elgar online law databases

Cover of Elgar Encyclopedia of Law and Economics bookUniversity researchers now have access to the following new Elgar online resources via the D’Angelo Law Library’s subscription:


Campus users can also search full texts of recent handbooks, monographs, commentaries, and research reviews via the Elgaronline Law-Academic platform. Individual books can also be located via the library catalog. Great ways to find ebooks on all types of topics, including foreign, comparative, and international law.

Elgaronline complements our other law ebook collections: Oxford Scholarship Online: Law, Oxford Handbooks Online in Law, Oxford Scholarly Authorities in International Law (OSAIL), PLI Plus, SpringerLink, Recueil des cours = Collected Courses (Hague Academy of International Law), and various The Making of Modern Law and HeinOnline modules.

 

People June Pachuta Farris, Bibliographer for Slavic and East European Studies, 1947-2018

June Pachuta Farris was valued and recognized by scholars and librarians throughout the world for her expertise as a bibliographer in Slavic and East European Studies and for the generosity she demonstrated throughout her decades of service to the profession.  She died on July 27 after a short illness at age 70.

June Pachuta Farris
(Photo by John Zich)

June served the University of Chicago for more than three decades, most recently holding the title of Bibliographer for Slavic and East European Studies and General Linguistics.  “We are deeply saddened by June’s passing,” said Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian at the University of Chicago.  “June was a dedicated librarian who built one of the finest Slavic and East European Studies collections in the world.  She was a wonderful colleague, both to us at Chicago and to the Slavic librarian community.”

In 2012, the Association for Women in Slavic Studies (AWSS), an affiliate of the Association for Slavic, East European & Eurasian Studies (ASEEES), recognized June with its Outstanding Achievement Award. “The entire profession has been enriched by June’s unassuming yet dedicated commitment to helping scholars wherever they work—whether formally, through her many published bibliographies on subjects as diverse as Dostoevsky and Czech and Slovak émigrés, or informally through her willingness to respond to countless queries from individuals,” the Association noted.  June was widely known for her quarterly and annual “Current Bibliography on Women and Gender in Russia and Eastern Europe,” which began appearing in the AWSS newsletter in 1999.  She also collaborated with Irina Livezeanu, Christine Worobec, and Mary Zirin, on a two-volume publication, Women and Gender in Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Eurasia: A Comprehensive Bibliography (2007), considered an invaluable resource in the field. Earlier this year, June learned that she is to be further recognized by the ASEEES at its December meeting as the 2018 recipient of the Distinguished Service Award from its Committee on Libraries and Information Resources.

June earned a BA in Russian and French from Case Western Reserve University; an MA in Russian Language and Literature from Ohio State University, writing a thesis on “The Concepts of Metaphysical Rebellion and Freedom in Dostoevsky and Camus,” and an MA in Library Science from University of Denver.  She served as Slavic Reference Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Administration at the University of Illinois, before coming to Chicago in 1986.

June spoke French, Russian, and Czech fluently and was conversant with most Slavic languages as well as Greek.  She also had a great love of musical theater and had memorized all the lyrics to a large number of shows, both old and new.

Sandra Levy, Associate Slavic Librarian, who worked closely with June for the 28 years since she was hired at Chicago in 1989, first met June even earlier, in the 1970s, when Sandra was a graduate student visiting the University of Illinois, where June was beginning her library career.  June began answering reference questions and mentoring Sandra even then.  “It’s who she was,” Sandra said.  “It wasn’t just that she was a mentor to me—she was a mentor to everyone.”  Sandra has received an outpouring of tributes from Slavic librarians who shared this experience: “June would tackle each and every reference question as if it were the most important question in the world.”

Colleagues are invited to send tributes and stories about June and her impact to junefarrismemories@lib.uchicago.edu.  These will be collected, shared with June’s family, and deposited in the University Archives.