Law School Record now on Chicago Unbound

The D’Angelo Law Library is pleased to announce that the University of Chicago Law School Record is now available on Chicago Unbound. The Record is the Law School’s magazine for alumni and friends. The Chicago Unbound version includes full-text PDF of issues back to 1951 (volume 1, number 1). It is fully searchable via the Internet and in the CU scholarship repository.  


New Supreme Court Term

Today is the first day of the Supreme Court’s 2015 term. Follow news about the Supreme Court on United States Law Week, in the Supreme Court Today section. The new Supreme Court Today Tracker, available only on Bloomberg Law, allows you to track individual cases, or all cases on a topic of interest. The Supreme Court Brief section of the National Law Journal is another site for news about the Court.

Find briefs for cases that the Court has decided to hear at the Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases, published by the American Bar Association. The D’Angelo Law Library does not have paper briefs for pending cases. Our U.S. Supreme Court Research Guide has more information about sources of briefs, records, and information about the Court and its justices.

People Recent awards mark latest in D’Angelo’s long history of service and accolades

Significant honors that recognized members of the D’Angelo Law Library staff this year were the latest in a string of accolades for the University of Chicago’s law librarians, whose dedication to their field has long been marked by service to local and national library groups. 

Todd Ito

Todd Ito

This spring, Lorna Tang, who retired in June as the Associate Law Librarian for Technical Services after 38 years at the D’Angelo, was given the Chicago Association of Law Libraries (CALL) Outstanding Lifetime Achievement in Law Librarianship Award, and Foreign and International Law Librarian Lyonette Louis-Jacques was given the Global Legal Skills Award for Outstanding Contributions to International Legal Skills Education, as well as a top marketing award from the American Association of Law Libraries, the profession’s national association. Todd Ito, the D’Angelo’s Coordinator of Instruction and Outreach, was also elected Vice President/President-elect of Chicago Association of Law Libraries, becoming the most recent D’Angelo librarian to hold a top leadership position with the organization.

“The D’Angelo librarians have always had a strong commitment to service in professional law library associations,” said Sheri Lewis, Director of the D’Angelo Law Library. “This commitment is reflected not only in the awards bestowed on University of Chicago law librarians but in the ongoing respect from colleagues who actively seek and rely upon D’Angelo leadership in the professional community.”

Tang—who managed her staff through two major renovations of the library building, each time reorganizing work spaces and revising workflows—was the third librarian associated with the D’Angelo to win CALL’s lifetime achievement award.  The award, also given in 2013 to retired D’Angelo Law Library Director Judith M. Wright and in 2012 to former D’Angelo librarian Judith Gaskell, recognizes an “outstanding contribution to the Chicago law library community” and “consistently high levels of noteworthy professional contribution.” Tang became a member of CALL in 1977 and served on numerous committees.

Louis-Jacques received her award at the Global Legal Skills Conference, which is a leading international gathering for global skills education. She was honored for her 2013 book, International Law Legal Research, which was designed to show how to research sources of international law and help schools create stand-alone courses in international law legal research. She also won the 2015 Excellence in Marketing Award, Best Newsletter from AALL. It recognized the Chicago Association of Law Libraries’ CALL Bulletin, which Louis-Jacques co-edited.

Ito, who has been involved with CALL since he moved to Chicago in 2006 to work at the D’Angelo, also became the organization’s incoming Vice President and President-elect this spring.

“CALL has enabled me to connect with so many colleagues at other law school libraries, as well as at law firm, court, government, and public law libraries in the area,” Ito said. “Other AALL chapters are very spread out geographically, and the close proximity is a real benefit. We see each other at business meetings and other programs throughout the year, so we get more of a chance to get to know each other. That has made it easy for me to be able to reach out to another academic law librarians in the city to discuss what they’re doing with legal research instruction, or to talk to a law firm colleague about what legal research databases they’re using.”

The D’Angelo Law Library has a long history of high-profile accolades and appointments, for example:

  • AALL’s Marian Gould Gallagher Distinguished Service Award—one of the highest awards a law librarian can receive—has been given four times to a law librarian who has worked at the D’Angelo. Former D’Angelo librarians Nancy Johnson (2012), Adolf Sprudzs (2000), Elizabeth Benyon (1992), and Leon M. Liddell (1989) all received this honor.  
  • Five members of the AALL Hall of Fame at one time worked for the D’Angelo: Wright, Johnson, Benyon, Liddell, and Sprudzs.
  • Librarians associated with the D’Angelo have won nine major awards from the CALL, including three for lifetime achievement. Lewis also won the Agnes and Harry Reid Award for Outstanding Contribution to Law Librarianship in 2011.
  • Two D’Angelo law librarians have served as president of CALL. Margaret Schilt, the Associate Law Librarian for User Services, in 2014 – 2015, and Lewis in 2008 – 2009.
  • All of the D’Angelo librarians have held leadership positions in CALL at some point. Head of Cataloging Patricia Sayre-McCoy served on the Executive Board and has chaired several CALL committees and is now on the Local Arrangements Committee for the 2016 AALL Annual Meeting. Common Law Bibliographer Bill Schwesig led the CALL’s Internet Committee for several years. Catalog Librarian Michael D. Brown and Faculty Services Librarian Thomas Drueke have participated in CALL committees.
  • At the national level, Louis-Jacques also has been on the AALL Executive Board and she, along with Lewis, Ito, and Sayre-McCoy, have chaired AALL special interest sections and/or committees. Interim Head of Technical Services Julie Stauffer is a co-editor of the Technical Services section bulletin.
  • Reference and Virtual Access Librarian Connie Fleischer currently is serving on the Illinois Government Depository Council, an advisory group to the Illinois State Library on government information issues.
  • Sprudzs, a former D’Angelo Foreign and International Law Librarian who was instrumental in building and expanding the D’Angelo’s foreign law collection, was a founding member and former president of International Association of Law Librarians in 1959.

“Librarians are born collaborators and rely on their professional networks both to keep current on new developments in legal information but also to enhance library services. We all have many stories about impressing a faculty member or student by getting a hidden gem for them,” Lewis said. “Law library associations are part of the secret to our success—it is not only what you know but who you know.”

A University of Chicago Law School news release

Alert Quarter loans due – please return or renew

Quarter loans charged or renewed before September 21 are due Friday, October 2. Please return or renew your books. Materials may be renewed by logging into the Library Catalog via My Account.

Apply for the D’Angelo Law Library Student Advisory Board

Do you want to help shape the D’Angelo Law Library experience for you and your fellow students? If you do, consider applying for the D’Angelo Law Library Student Advisory Board. We’re looking for Law School students from all class years (including incoming 1L and LLM students) and who participate in a range of student organizations and extracurricular activities. Even if you don’t think you use the library very much, we want to hear from you, too!

The Board was started in 2012, and the students’ feedback has led to several improvements in Library services. Minutes from previous meetings are available on the Board’s webpage. The librarians look forward to receiving more valuable feedback from this year’s Board on a variety of topics, from library hours to legal research instruction in the Bigelow program to promotion of Library services like UBorrow and Scan & Deliver. The Board will meet approximately two times per quarter, with the meeting dates and times set once Board members are selected.

To apply, fill out the brief online application by Friday, October 30. For questions or additional information, please contact Todd Ito at

Student Advisory Board Application:

D’Angelo Law Library Fall Fest, Oct. 14, 1 – 4 p.m.

Law School students, mark your calendars for the D’Angelo Law Library Fall Fest on Wednesday, October 14, from 1:00-4:00 p.m.!

The Fall Fest is a fun orientation to the Law Library’s people, services, and resources, featuring games and home baked goodies made by the Library staff. We’ll have four stations on the second and third floors; each station will fill you in on an aspect of the resources available to you in the D’Angelo Law Library, including personal assistance from a reference librarian, trivia about the Law School, and great ways to relax and get away from the books. 

Every law student who visits all four stations will be entered in a drawing for a range of prizes that include signed copies of faculty books, study supplements like the Understanding series, and a special behind the scenes tour of Mansueto Library.

Faculty, staff, and other members of the University community are welcome as well, although only Law School students are eligible to win prizes. See you there!

The D’Angelo Law Library welcomes new students

The D’Angelo Law Library welcomes the JD class of 2018 and the LLM class of 2016. The D’Angelo Law librarians will introduce new JD and LLM students to the Library’s resources and services during tours and presentations during orientation. We hope you will take advantage of our vast resources and knowledgeable staff. There is a great deal of new information to process, so please remember that if you ever have any questions about the Library, please ask us

We’ve gathered what we think is the most important information in the Library Guide for Law Students and in the D’Angelo Law Library organization site on Chalk, the University’s course management system, but we also wanted to highlight our Top 5 services and resources here:

1. Reference librarians are here to help.

Our reference staff is knowledgeable, helpful, and accessible by email, chat, phone, and in person. Each Bigelow section also has a Reference Librarian assigned to teach legal research sessions over the course of the year. You can consider that librarian as your point of contact in the library, although all of our librarians are available to help you. We are available seven days a week through email, chat, phone, text and in person at the Reference Desk. See our Hours page for the exact hours.

2. Start with the Law Library website.

The Library website can direct you to services and tools to help you find what you need to study law and conduct legal research. Use our website to get research help, find databases, learn library policies, and keep up with the latest library and legal research news.

3. Access information using our primary discovery tools.

Library Catalog: You can search the Library Catalog for books, electronic materials, and more. The University of Chicago Library has over 7 million books and access to hundreds of thousands of electronic resources, so if you are looking for something, you should start with the catalog, and chances are we have what you are looking for. 

Databases: The Library offers access to hundreds of databases covering various subjects. To locate a database to use for your research, use Database Finder, a tool that enables you to search for a particular database by name or browse by subject to identify relevant databases. The Law Library also provides a list of the main databases used for legal research

Access to Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis, and Westlaw is restricted to Law School students, and each law student will be supplied with an individual password. You will get this password during your library orientation. If you have any questions about these resources, please do not hesitate to Ask a Law Librarian.

Research Guides: The reference librarians have created research guides on a variety of legal topics. These guides give you starting points for doing research in particular areas of law.

4. We offer a number of on demand services.

Scan & Deliver is an electronic document delivery service that enables members of the University of Chicago community to obtain scanned portions of books or journal articles from the Library’s collections. Requests should be made online, directly from the Library Catalog. Requested documents will be scanned and delivered within four business days. We will scan chapters from books or single articles from journals, provided that the chapter(s) or article does not exceed 20% of the entire book or journal issue. 

We also offer a paging service for Law School students. We will retrieve uncharged Library books located in the stacks of other libraries on campus. This service is currently available to Law School students, faculty, and staff only. Materials will generally be collected within two business days and placed on hold at the Circulation Desk or delivered to the appropriate carrel. You will receive an email when your item is available for pick-up.

While searching the Libary Catalog, you may also occasionally come across items with the location Mansueto or one of the two D’Angelo Law Library annexes. You can request materials from these storage collections to be delivered to the Law Library. It generally takes less than 24 hours, and you will receive an email when your item is available for pick up at the Law Library circulation desk.

5. You can easily get books from other institutions.

Use Borrow Direct, UBorrow, and Interlibrary Loan if you need material that is not available here on campus.

Borrow Direct is a service that can be used to borrow books directly from libraries at the Ivy League universities plus Duke, Johns Hopkins, and MIT. Most books borrowed through Borrow Direct are available for pickup at the Law Library within four business days.

UBorrow is a similar service that can be used to borrow books directly from libraries at the Big 10 universities plus University of Chicago. Most books borrowed through UBorrow are available for pickup at the Law Library within four business days.

If the book you want is not available from Borrow Direct or UBorrow, or if you need it for an extended period of time, you should use Interlibrary Loan. Requests may be submitted online. 

If the material you are looking for is not available from any of these services, Ask a Law Librarian, and we’ll be happy to help you locate the material.

University of Chicago students in other schools and programs are welcome at the D’Angelo Law Library. If you are interested in an introductory D’Angelo tour or a research consultation with a law reference librarian, please use the Ask a Law Librarian service to schedule a time with one of us. 

Microsoft Office training for Law students, Oct. 4

The Office of the Dean of Students and the D’Angelo Law Library are sponsoring Microsoft Office Training for Law School students on Sunday, October 4. This program earned rave reviews when we offered it in the past. It is meant to address what students will see in practice – new attorneys are expected to be able to do anything computer-related because they are generally the youngest person on the team, yet are at the bottom of the pecking order in terms of getting secretarial support. It’s really hard to teach yourself Power Point at 3 in the morning when the partner wants slides edited and the support staff have long ago gone home for the night. This program will give you the basic Microsoft Office skills you will need during the school year, in summer employment, and as an attorney.

The program will be held Sunday, October 4 with Word training from 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. and Excel & PowerPoint from 1:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. There is no charge for the program; you can attend the morning, afternoon, or both. Lunch will be provided. You must bring your own laptop; the program will be applicable for both Mac and PC users. 

Students must register in advance for this program at: 

Please RSVP by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, September 30.

Sponsored by the Office of the Dean of Students & the D’Angelo Law Library.

This program qualifies for up to 60 Keystone Professionalism and Leadership points in the Practical Skills category.

Investor-State Law Guide (trial continues through September 30)

Interested in investment treaty arbitration? Looking for NAFTA and ICSID Convention jurisprudence? Search the ISLG. 

The D’Angelo Law Library has arranged a month-long trial of the Investor-State LawGuide: (select “login” at the top right-hand corner of the homepage; this will automatically log you in via IP authentication. 

The Investor-State LawGuide has the following useful research components:  

  • Subject Navigator
    Navigate through an electronic directory of investment treaty law that lays out subjects in branches and sub-branches of ever increasing detail. 
  • Article Citator  
    Instantly see how specific legal instruments relevant to investment treaty law have been interpreted by investment treaty arbitral tribunals. 
  • Jurisprudence Citators 
    Instantly see how decisions and awards have been treated by subsequent investment treaty arbitral tribunals. 
  • Treaties & Rules  
    Browse the text of all legal instruments relevant to investment treaty law in both XML and PDF formats. 
  • Dispute Documents 
    View and filter all publicly available investment treaty decisions and awards. 


Labor Day: All libraries closed

In observance of the Labor Day holiday, all campus libraries will be closed on Monday, September 7.

For a full list of library hours, see

Constitute recognized as an “outstanding source” for comparing constitutions

Professor Tom Ginsburg’s collaborative research tool, Constitute: “The World’s Constitutions to Read, Search, and Compare,” has been named one of the Best Free Reference Websites of 2015! Winning sites are selected by the American Library Association Reference and User Services Association Emerging Technologies Section. Criteria for selection include quality, depth, usefulness, currency, and uniqueness of content, authoritativeness, efficiency, ease of access and use.

quill pen

The Machine-Assisted Reference Services (MARS) Best Free Reference Websites Committee, in its annotations to the list of 2015 winners, describes Constitute as follows:

[T]his site provides constitutions in force as of September 2013 from most of the world’s independent states. Constitutions are updated as they are amended. A user can browse using an alphabetical list, read in html, download in pdf, search by keyword or phrase, see where specific topics occur in each constitution, and select two to eight constitutions to compare side-by-side on a particular topic. The site has a clean, uncluttered design, with date of the constitution in effect and date of last amendment shown next to each country’s name. It is appropriate for students, scholars, and anyone interested in this topic. Constitute is an outstanding source for learning about and comparing the constitutions of most countries of the world.

Note that Constitute is a result of partnerships of the Comparative Constitutions Project with Google, Google Ideas, International IDEA, and many others. Constitute has not only an English interface (194 countries), but also an Arabic interface (54 independent states). Find out more about the project here

TRIAL (ends on September 13!): Cambridge Law Reports online

world-peace-090420jWe have a month-long trial (Aug 13-Sep 13, 2015) to a new online resource comprising the International Law Reports (ILR) and the International Convention on the Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) Reports  – the Cambridge Law Reports. The ILR has decisions of the International Court of Justice, other international tribunals, and decisions in national courts related to international law.  We also have e-access to the ILR via Justis’ International Law Reports.  And we have the ICSID Reports in print. Let us know what you think of the CLR versus Justis International Law Reports online. To access the trial please go to the following URL:



New online resource: IBISWorld

University of Chicago researchers now have access to IBISWorld.

IBISWorldIBISWorld is a database that provides comprehensive industry reports for over 700 industries ranging from biotechnology to pawn shops.  These reports provide strategic insight and analysis which can be used to gain a better understanding of market conditions and forecasts, industry supply chain, and competitive landscape.

The reports include breakdowns of industry performance, outlook, products and markets, major competitors and operation conditions.  In addition to being able to download the complete report, key statistics can be downloaded to excel and specific infographics can be downloaded and inserted into your own reports and presentations.  

Questions? Ask A Librarian.

D’Angelo Law librarians at OCI

D’Angelo Law librarians would like to help make on-campus interviewing a little less stressful! If you have last minute reference or research questions about the firm you are interviewing with, we are there for you. Literally there – from 10:00 AM to 12:00 noon each day of OCI, there will be a D’Angelo Law librarian sitting outside the student lounge area in the Booth interviewing suite. We know that things come up, last minute changes in schedules happen, and you may have research questions but no time to come back to the Library. We hope this will be helpful to you. In the meantime, be sure to consult our guide on Researching Legal Employers for tools and suggestions. Good luck!

Redesigned research guides are easier to use and navigate

This weekend, the University of Chicago’s Library Guides were migrated to a new platform that features a number of improvements. Most notably, use of responsive design greatly improves the user’s experience on mobile devices and assistive technology, such as screen readers.

Mobile view of a Library Guide

A Library Guide as seen on a smartphone

The new platform also uses navigation menus on the left side of the screen, rather than the tabs across the top, which should make it easier and more intuitive for users to locate content in the guides.

Our librarians have created guides on a wide variety of academic subjects studied at the University. In addition, Help Guides show you how to locate specific types of material, such as newspapers, and to use Library tools and services, such as interlibrary loan.

Visit our Library Guides page for a complete list of our guides. 


Have an international relations research topic? Check the Chatham House Online Archive

Chatham House logoThe Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) was founded in 1920 following the Paris Peace Conference. University of Chicago researchers now have access to its archives. The  Chatham House Online Archive “provides a searchable, browsable research environment that enables users to explore approximately half a million pages and over ninety years of research, expert analysis, and commentary published in briefing papers, special reports, pamphlets, conference papers and books.”

The archive includes the full text of Chatham House’s flagship publication, International Affairs, a leading academic journal on international relations (IR) topics, as well as audio recordings of Chatham House lectures, with searchable transcripts. 

You can explore the Chatham House Online Archive by region or by subject: 

  • Business and Trade
  • Communications and Media
  • Energy, Environment and Resources
  • Health and Population
  • International Economics, Finance and Investment
  • International Law
  • International Politics, Ideology and Diplomacy
  • International Security, War and Conflict
  • United Nations and UN Bodies

ChathamHouseOnlineArchive browse screenshot



Lorna Tang receives lifetime achievement award

Lorna Tang retired from the D’Angelo Law Library on June 30, 2015, after 38 years as a law librarian. She began her law library career at the D’Angelo Law Library (then called the University of Chicago Law Library) in 1977 as a law cataloger and has been an outstanding technical services librarian ever since. In 1980 she became the Cataloging Supervisor and in 1984 became the Associate Law Librarian for Technical Services.

Lorna Tang accepts CALL award (photo by Emily Barney)

Lorna Tang accepting the CALL Lifetime Achievement Award
(photo by Emily Barney)

In this position, she guided the department through two major renovations of the library building, each time reorganizing work spaces and revising workflows, and three Integrated Library Systems use and migration. Two of these ILSs were development partnerships between the vendors and the University of Chicago Library, and therefore Lorna participated in the design of the system as well.

She was an outstanding representative of the D’Angelo Law Library with colleagues in the university library system and has ensured that the unique requirements of legal materials are accommodated in their ILS platforms.

Lorna has been a member of CALL since 1977 and quickly began her service to CALL and to Chicago area librarians by becoming a member of the CALL Foreign Law Holdings Committee from 1978-1980. Over the years, Lorna has had a long history of service to CALL including membership on other CALL committees, such as the Membership/Directory Committee which she has served on twice, and chaired from 1982-1983; the Placement & Recruitment Committee (twice); and the CALL Meetings Committee (also twice).

(Republished from the CALL Bulletin)

Read more at:…

Trial for Malaysian law database, Current Law Journal, ends July 20th

The D’Angelo Law Library has arranged a two-week free trial of Current Law Journal (CLJ) which ends July 20, 2015. The CLJ database includes Malaysian cases, articles, practice notes, legislative forms, precedents, sample agreements, and legislation. There is also a Shariah law reports component. Find out more at and

If you have a current University of Chicago ID and are interested in trying out the database, contact Lyonette Louis-Jacques, Foreign and International Law Librarian, at for login information.

New online resource:

The D’Angelo Law Library recently added to its collection of useful databases for researching international commercial arbitration. Check out ArbitrationLaw (Juris).  This database includes arbitration law journal articles, ebooks, treatises, handbooks, yearbooks, and practice guides.  It has reports of arbitral awards and court decisions, arbitration rules, laws, and treaties. 

You can access the full text online to the World Arbitration Reporter, the Encyclopedia of International Arbitration Law and Practice, titles in the ASA (Swiss Arbitration Association) and IAI (International Arbitration Institute) book series, and AAA/ICDR (American Arbitration Association/International Center for Dispute Resolution) handbooks and  yearbooks.  The ArbitrationLaw database is particularly useful for researching arbitration law practice and procedure in Asia and Central and Eastern Europe.  It specifically has commentary on arbitration practice in Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, Korea, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey.

ArbitrationLaw also contains the following journals: The American Review of International Arbitration (ARIA) 1990- ; Dispute Resolution Journal (DRJ) 1965- ; European International Arbitration Review (EIAR); Journal of American Arbitration (JAA); Journal of Damages in International Arbitration (JDIA); Journal of Technology in International Arbitration; Stockholm Arbitration Report (SAR) 1999-2003; Stockholm International Arbitration Review (SIAR) 2004-2009; World Arbitration and Mediation Review (WAMR) 1990- .

D’Angelo Law Library July 4th weekend hours

The D’Angelo Law Library will close at 2:00 PM on Thursday, July 2, 2015 and will remain closed July 3, 4, and 5 for the holiday weekend.  The Library will reopen Monday morning, July 6 for regular summer hours, 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM Monday through Friday.  Happy Fourth of July!

New online resource: eMarketer

University of Chicago researchers now have access to eMarketer.

emarketereMarketer is a database that provides digital market research information ranging from digital ad spend in the automotive industry to use statistics of the newest social media platforms, such as Meerkat and Periscope.  This data can be used to benchmark consumer behavior, size markets, and value initiatives.  

This resource includes articles, analysts reports and statistical tables which can be downloaded to Excel for further analysis.  Custom data dashboards can be built using thousands of eMarketer forecasts including ad spending, device and platform usage, retail and ecommerce sales, and time spent with media.  In addition to eMarketer’s own forecast estimate data, it is possible to compare estimates from other research groups and firms.  

Questions? Ask A Librarian.

Alert Fri., July 3 & Sat., July 4: all libraries closed

All campus libraries will be closed on Friday, July 3, a University holiday, and Saturday, July 4, Independence Day.  Regular summer hours will resume on Sunday, July 5.

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see

New online resource: ProQuest Legislative Insight

We are happy to announce that the Library now has access to ProQuest Legislative Insight, a research tool for federal legislative history research. It brings together various legislative history documents for federal laws passed since 1929, including the public law, all bill versions, floor debate from the Congressional Record, committee reports, committee hearings, presidential signing statements, CRS reports, and other miscellaneous congressional publications. All documents are full-text, searchable PDFs. In addition to searching by keyword and popular name, users can search Legislative Insight by Public Law Number, Statutes at Large citation, or enacted bill number.

Once you select the appropriate law, you can keyword search within the full text of all the related documents to find specific words or phrases. Search results can be displayed by publication type or by date. Legislative Insight also includes the Legislative Process outline, which allows you to choose only those documents created during a given phase of the legislative process.


Spring quarter loans to quarterly borrowers automatically extended to October 2

Items checked out by current quarterly borrowers with privileges in good standing and due June 26 have been automatically renewed by the Library for summer quarter. As of June 15, all such items have a new due date of October 2, 2015. No action by borrowers is necessary.

The automatic renewal is being performed because the functionality to manually renew items is currently unavailable in the Catalog.

Users may view a list of all items out, including current due dates, via My Account.

For assistance, please contact Circulation or visit a Library circulation desk.

D’Angelo Law Library summer hours

Beginning June 16, 2015, the D’Angelo Law Library will be on our summer schedule. The Circulation Desk and Reserve Room will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and the Reference Desk will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Law Library will be closed Saturdays and Sundays during the summer. We will resume regular hours in September before the start of Autumn Quarter.