People Judith Wright wins AALL’s highest award

Judith rectangular

Judith Wright, former Associate Dean of Library and Information Services at the D’Angelo Law Library, received the Marion Gould Gallagher Distinguished Service Award at the American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting in Chicago this week. The award recognizes extended and sustained service to law librarianship and exemplary service to the Association. During her 40-year career, Judith worked tirelessly to advance collaborative work and leadership in the law librarian community, while directing the D’Angelo Law Library with grace and formidable administrative skills. D’Angelo Law Library’s status as one of the premier law research libraries in the United States is a testament to her dedicated stewardship.

Looking for foreign laws? Start with the vLex Global database

The Library subscribes to vLex Global, a database that covers legal sources in 13 languages for 132 countries. In particular, it has codes, statutes, and other legislation, case-law/jurisprudence, books, articles, and news sources for these jurisdictions:

  1. Argentina
  2. Belgium
  3. Brazil
  4. Canada
  5. Chile
  6. Colombia
  7. France
  8. India
  9. Italy
  10. Mexico
  11. Peru
  12. Portugal
  13. Spain
  14. United Kingdom
  15. United States
  16. Venezuela

In an assessment from several years ago, there was the most content in vLex Global for these countries in the following order from most strong: Spain, Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela, Portugal, Italy, the UK, Belgium, France, and the U.S. vLex also covers primary law sources for the European Union, the Andean Community, and Mercosur.

vLex is browsable by country, type of source, and searchable by keyword. The Advanced Search has a “translate search terms” option such that the user can enter a search in English and retrieve foreign language search results. Documents retrieved can be auto-translated into Arabic, Catalan, Chinese, Dutch, English, French, Galician, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Swedish.

Note that vLex Global has a 1 simultaneous user limit, so if you are not able to access it because it is in use, please try again later.

Problem with some ebook links in the Library Catalog

There is currently an issue with the Library Catalog which affects links for some ebooks. The books are available, but the links are not displayed in the Catalog. Systems staff are working to resolve this. There are two ways to get access, in most cases.

Access from campus

When you find a book in the Library Catalog without a link, click on Staff View in the full item record. This displays the formatted catalog data.

Catalog record with staff view highlighted.

Scroll to the bottom and find the line marked 856. The link to the e-book is there. Copy this text and paste it into your browser’s address bar. This link is not formatted for off-campus access, however.Link to e-book that's been highlighted

If you are not on campus, we recommend searching in the EBSCO eBook Collection to access your book, as described below. The ProxyIt! bookmarklet will not work for these titles.

Access from off-campus

Almost all of the titles affected by this issue are provided by EBSCO. Use the EBSCO eBook Collection to find your book.

Access the EBSCO eBook Collection here

Please Ask-a-Librarian if you need further assistance

The Securities and Exchange Commission in pictures

The SEC has a Pinterest page!  Great historical photos from  the Securities and Exchange Commission Historical Society. Hat tip to the Conglomerate blog – until I saw their post, it had never occurred to me to think of the SEC and Pinterest in the same sentence.  Enjoy, for the holiday weekend….

D’Angelo Law closing early Fri., July 1 & closed July 4

Due to the holiday weekend, the D’Angelo Law Library will close at 2 p.m. this Friday, July 1. All campus libraries will be closed on Monday, July 4, Independence Day. Regular summer hours will resume on Tuesday, July 5. For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Westlaw, LexisNexis, and Bloomberg Law access over the summer

Please read below for details on accessing Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law over the summer.

Westlaw

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls: At the end of June, academic passwords for returning students will default to 40 hours for the month of July, even if a student does nothing to extend.

Westlaw does allow returning students to extend their current, unlimited access in specific instances, which you can do by going to http://lawschool.westlaw.com/registration/SummerExtension.aspx. Allowable usages for extending include:

  • Summer law school classes and study abroad programs
  • Law review or law journal work, including write-on competitions
  • Research assistant work
  • Moot court
  • Unpaid, nonprofit public-interest internship/externship pro bono work required for graduation

Graduating 3Ls: Graduating students will have full access to Westlaw through June 30, 2016. Graduating students can also continue to use Westlaw through the Graduate Elite program. Graduating students should have received an email regarding this program and can locate information about the Graduate Elite program on the lawschool.westlaw.com homepage, or at https://lawschool.westlaw.com/registration/gradelite.aspx.

After completing a short survey, they receive Westlaw access: 60 hours for 6 months (June – Nov and it ends on Nov. 30th).

For help or more information, contact the Law School’s Westlaw Account Manager Dennis Elverman at dennis.elverman@thomsonreuters.com.

LexisNexis

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls: Returning students will have full access to Lexis Advance during the summer without special registration.

Graduating 3Ls: Graduates have full Lexis Advance access through July 31, 2016. For help or more information, contact our LexisNexis Account Executive, Carter Mills Isham at carter.mills@lexisnexis.com.

Bloomberg Law

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls: Bloomberg Law provides unlimited and unrestricted access over the summer. There is no need to register, as your student account will remain active and available all summer.

Graduating 3Ls: Students graduating this spring have unlimited and unrestricted access to Bloomberg Law for six months after graduation.

For help or more information, contact our Bloomberg Law Relationship Manager, Haley Harris at hHarris@bna.com.

Summer research tips for law students

Whether you will be on campus or away from Chicago, the D’Angelo Law Library provides many resources and services to help support your research during the summer. If you are working as a summer associate, you should review our Research Guide for Ensuring Summer Success, and if you are working as a faculty research assistant, you should consult our Library Guide for Law School Faculty Research Assistants.

Other summer research tips include:

Access to Online Resources
The Library’s electronic resources (including ebooks and ejournals) may be accessed no matter where you are located this summer. Learn how to connect to our online resources from off-campus. Returning Law School students will also continue to have full access to Bloomberg Law and Lexis Advance during the summer, while there are some restrictions on use of Westlaw. For the full details, see Westlaw, LexisNexis, and Bloomberg Law access over the summer.

Finding the Best Research Tools
D’Angelo Law librarians have created a number of online research guides on various topics. To identify a leading treatise in a particular area of law, you can also consult our Treatise Finder. The Library also provides help guides on finding specific types of sources, such as newspapers or data.

Scan and Deliver
Do you need to read a case, journal article, or book chapter that is not available online? Use our Scan and Deliver service to request a copy be sent to you via e-mail.

lyo

Librarians are available during the summer to help you–in person or remotely via our Ask a Law Librarian service.

Reciprocal Borrowing Agreements
The Library has reciprocal borrowing agreements with several academic libraries which allow UChicago students and faculty to borrow books directly from their collections. These include libraries in Borrow Direct Plus, as well as several Chicago-area institutions, including Northwestern.

Visiting Other Libraries
If you need to visit libraries and archives outside our reciprocal agreements, view our guide to doing research at other libraries before your visit. You’ll find tips on how to access different institutions, and strategies for identifying relevant collections.

Learn About Citation Managers
Summer is an ideal time to learn how citation managers can ease your research process.  Use citation managers such as Zotero or EndNote to organize your research and create footnotes and bibliographies automatically for your paper.  View the Library’s online tutorial for Zotero or guides to learn more about these tools.

Ask a Law Librarian/Reference Services
Librarians are on hand throughout the summer to help you with your research. Contact them directly via our Ask a Law Librarian service.  Or, if you are staying in Chicago, this may be a good time to schedule a consultation with a law librarian who can suggest sources and research strategies for your project.

Graduating? Services and Tools to Support Your Research
Alumni can continue to visit and use our campus libraries if they live in the Chicago area. The Library and Alumni Association provide off-campus access to select research databases for alumni. Graduating Law School students will also have some degree of access to Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis, and Westlaw after graduation. For the full details, see Westlaw, LexisNexis, and Bloomberg Law access over the summer.

D’Angelo Law Library summer hours

Beginning June 11, 2016, the D’Angelo Law Library will be on our summer schedule. The Circulation Desk and Reserve Room will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and the Reference Desk will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Law Library will be closed Saturdays and Sundays during the summer. We will resume regular hours in September before the start of Autumn Quarter.

New online resource: Brill’s Encyclopedia of Law and Religion

Encyclopedia of Law and Religion Online logoThe D’Angelo Law Library has subscribed to the online version of the Encyclopedia of Law and Religion (Gerhard Robbers and W. Cole Durham eds., Leiden: Brill, [2015- ]). Unique in its breadth and global coverage, the Encyclopedia covers Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, Oceania, international organizations and special territories (e.g. Gibraltar, Greenland).  Each article provides social facts, historical background, the position of religion in the legal system, individual religious freedoms, active religious communities, including legal status and labor law, and religious assistance in public institutions, legal position of religious personnel and members of religious orders, matrimonial and familial laws, religious and criminal laws, and country-specific issues.

New Library website launches July 5

Update: The Library will be launching the new website described below starting at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 5. Site visitors should expect service interruptions throughout the evening, and, because the changes will take time to propagate over the internet, some users may be unable to reach the site through July 6.

Access to resources outside of the main Library website should continue uninterrupted during this time. These include:

Thank you for your patience as we roll out these changes.

____________________

The University of Chicago Library will launch a new website over the summer.  The new site’s improved navigation and mobile-friendly design will provide faculty and students with ready access to curated, scholarly information and research expertise.

Changes to the design and structure of the new Library website are being made in response to the needs and feedback of UChicago faculty, students, and staff. The new site will be optimized for both desktop and mobile use, with a modern look and feel. It is being made easier to browse and navigate by

  • providing streamlined access to search tools for articles, journals, and databases;
  • providing more consistent navigation across the top of the site’s pages;
  • reorganizing information into categories developed directly from user input;
  • making it easier to find information about distinctive collections, exhibitions, study spaces, hours, and locations; and
  • connecting related collections, tools, and experts, making it easier for users to take advantage of the wealth of information and services offered by the Library.

In addition, Library news will be presented in a more engaging way on the site, and pages will be optimized for discovery via Google or other search engines.

The current Library Catalog, launched in 2014, is not being redesigned as a part of this project.

The new Library website will first go live in mid-summer and will be further refined in the weeks leading up to fall orientation.  During this period, if you have any difficulty finding the information you are looking for, librarians will be happy to assist you via our Ask a Librarian service.

The University of Chicago Library website serves as a gateway to UChicago collections and licensed resources; the online Ask a Librarian service, including live chat; Library staff with expertise in a wide range of subjects; research guides in numerous fields; and videos and guides explaining how to conduct research using library resources.

D’Angelo Law Library Memorial Day hours

On Monday, May 30, the D’Angelo Law Library will be open from 10 am – 6 pm. This includes the Reserve Room and the Circulation Desk. The Reference Desk will be closed.

Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein libraries will be open during their regular building hours. The All-Night Study Space on the 1st Floor of Regenstein will also remain open.

Eckhart and SSA libraries will be closed for the Memorial Day holiday.

Restricted access to D’Angelo during reading period and finals

Access to the D’Angelo Law Library for non-law students will be limited from Friday, May 20 through Monday, June 6 during the Law School reading and exam periods. During this period, the library will continue to be accessible to any member of the University community who needs access to legal materials or who would like to work with one of our reference librarians. In addition, all non-law students who are taking Law School classes will have access to the library.

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library webpage on access for additional information.

Law School exam preparation resources

As students prepare for Spring Quarter exams, we wanted to remind you of the many resources the D’Angelo Law Library provides to help students prepare for exams. Also, on Saturday, May 28, enjoy free coffee and small snacks near the Reference Desk in the D’Angelo Law Library, from noon until 2:00 p.m. or whenever the coffee runs out.

Past exams: Perhaps most importantly, the Library provides copies of past exams given at the Law School, in addition to model student answers and memos written by the professors where available. The exams are organized by course and faculty member. Everything we have been given permission to post is available on the Library website.

Past_Exams

Study Supplements: Another helpful resource for preparing student outlines and studying for exams are the many study supplements, including the popular Examples & Explanations and Understanding series, that are available in the Reserve Room. Our Hornbooks & Study Supplements page provides lists of the available study supplements by course name. This year, we’ve also added the online West Academic Study Aids package. This package provides online access to many of the study supplements, including West’s Concise Hornbook Series, the Law Stories Series, and all of the Nutshells. To access the study supplements, you will need to go to http://lawschool.westlaw.com and click the link for “Study Aids Subscription.” The first time you log in, you will need to create an account with West Academic, but from then on, you should be able to log in with your OnePass username and password.

CALI Lessons: If you prefer something more interactive, CALI lessons might be the resource for you.  The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) provides UofC law students with access to nearly 1,000 internet-based lessons on different legal topics. Lessons range from core 1L courses (92 lessons on property, for example) to many different upper level courses. CALI lessons are often interactive and feature questions to test your knowledge as you go through them. If you have not already registered an account with CALI, you can Ask a Law Librarian to get the authorization code for the Law School.

Student Outlines: Student outlines for various courses taught at the Law School are made available by the UChicago Law Students Association (LSA) in an online outline bank on the LSA’s website. You will need to enter a password to access. If you do not have the password, Ask a Law Librarian.

Study Rooms: If you want to meet with a study group, the D’Angelo Law Library has seven study rooms that can be reserved online: two study rooms on each of the 4th, 5th and 6th floors, and one study room on the second floor. Law students may reserve use of a study room using the Law School’s room reservation system. For further assistance, see How to Reserve a Law Library Study Room.

Quiet Study Space: Quieter study spaces are available on the upper floors of the Law Library. Law School students are also able to study in any of the other libraries on campus. Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week. On Monday, May 30, Eckhart and SSA libraries will be closed for the Memorial Day holiday, and the Law Library will be open from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Lockers: Please remember to secure your belongings when you take breaks. You can check out a locker key from the Circulation Desk. Library lockers are located in the northeast corner of the second and third floors. Two types of lockers are available: laptop lockers, which are smaller and each equipped with an electrical outlet, and bookbag lockers, which are large enough to accommodate a bookbag and/or jacket.

Good luck with exams!

External DVD drives for checkout

In recognition of the fact that many laptops no longer come with CD/DVD drives, D’Angelo Law Library has acquired two external DVD drives for checkout.

DLL external DVD drive

They will circulate for 4 hours. Ask for them at the D’Angelo Circulation Desk!

People HeinOnline blog spotlights Law Library Director Sheri Lewis

A recent HeinOnline blog post features D’Angelo Law Library Director, Sheri H. Lewis. She was selected to be interviewed as part of Hein’s “An Oral History of Law Librarianship” series. Here is an excerpt from the article:

Sheri H. Lewis is currently the Director of the D’Angelo Law Library at the University of Chicago in Chicago, IL. She received her B.A. from Northwestern University and is a graduate of New York University School of Law. After graduating from Law School, Lewis served as a clerk to the Hon. Robert L. Miller Jr., Northern District of Indiana, and then practiced with the firm of Lord, Bissell and Brook in Chicago. She became the director of the D’Angelo Law Library in 2013. Previously she served for 12 years as an Associate Law Librarian for Public Services. Lewis is also a member of the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and the Chicago Association of Law Libraries (CALL). Check out her full video below!

D’Angelo Law Library now has bookstands

You can now check out a bookstand from the D’Angelo Law Library. Several students, including members of our D’Angelo Law Library Student Advisory Board, have suggested to us that bookstands are extremely useful for studying, especially given the characteristically large casebooks used for most courses in the Law School. We currently have two styles of bookstand available: one is larger and more sturdy, while the other one is more portable.

wood bookstandplastic bookstand

 

Stop by the Circulation Desk and choose the one that suits your needs. You can check them out for 4 hours at a time, and they can be renewed. Let us know what you think of them!

Brief Formatting Classes for 1L Students: Monday, April 18 and Tuesday April 19

First year law school students may attend one of two sessions on formatting for the Bigelow appellate brief assignment:

  • Monday, April 18 at 4:00 PM in classroom II
  • Tuesday, April 19 at 4:00 PM in classroom II

The training will focus on Microsoft Word and cover formatting the cover page and generating a table of contents and a table of authorities.  Students are welcome to attend either session.

Celebrate National Library Week by sharing your #shelfie

The University of Chicago Library invites you to celebrate National Library Week April 10-16. National Library Week, sponsored by the America Library Association, is a time to celebrate the contributions of our nation’s libraries and librarians.

National Library Week - Libraries TransformWhile we always appreciate hearing your #librarylove, we invite you to share your appreciation during the national campaign. Celebrate with us by:

  • Taking a #shelfie of your favorite place in a UChicago Library and tagging us on Instagram (@UChicagoLibrary)
  • Checking out a book from the UChicago Library bookmobile on National Bookmobile Day (April 13). Updates on the bookmobile’s location can be found on library social media pages.

The library works hard to make sure its spaces, people, and services grow and evolve with the University’s needs. We appreciate your love and acknowledgement of our work this National Library Week.

 

Prepare to Practice legal research workshop, May 20

The Law Library has organized a series of legal research workshops focused on getting students ready for their summer work. On Friday, April 8, from 3:30 – 5:00 pm, in Room IV, we will be hosting a Keystone program featuring representatives from Bloomberg Law, Lexis, and Westlaw, who will talk about using these services in practice, from how to be cost-effective to how to do transactional law research.

Following the April 8 program, there will be further legal research workshops on the following days:

  • Lexis: Prepare to Practice – Monday, April 18, 12:15 pm, in Room F
  • Bloomberg Law: Prepare to Practice (register here) – Thursday, April 21, 12:15 pm, in Room E
  • Westlaw: Prepare to Practice (sign up here) – Friday, April 22, 12:15 pm, in Room F
  • Bloomberg Law: Prepare to Practice (register here) – Wednesday, April 27, 12:15 pm, in Room E
  • Lexis: Prepare to Practice – Wednesday, May 18, 12:15 pm, in Room F
  • Prepare to Practice: Beyond Bloomberg Law, Lexis, & Westlaw (register here)- Friday, May 20, 12:15 pm, in Room F

Magazines in the Fulton Room: An Assessment

The D’Angelo Law Library subscribes to a number of periodicals for students to read that locate in the Fulton Room (at the west end of the 3rd floor). We are concerned that some of these periodicals have not found an audience. We want to be sure we are putting our efforts into titles that are valued and will be read.

Consequently, we are conducting an assessment activity. There is a clipboard in the Fulton Room. Please write on it the titles of magazines that you like having in the Fulton Room. Even one vote may save a title from cancellation! If there are magazines you’d like to see in the Fulton Room that are not there, we’d like to know that, too.

We are more confident about the newspapers than the magazines. You do not need to write in, e.g., the Wall Street Journal, or the Financial Times, to avoid their cancellation.

The ultimate goal of this effort is to have a smaller, but more active, collection of periodicals for your enjoyment. Help us achieve that goal! Thanks to those who have already written on the clipboard – we look forward to hearing from others.

D’Angelo Law Library spring interim hours, Mar. 14 – 26

Beginning Monday, March 14, the D’Angelo Law Library will have reduced building hours for Spring Break. The Library will be open from 8 am – 5 pm Monday through Friday and closed on the weekends. Normal hours resume Sunday, March 27.

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Supreme Court Sluggers at D’Angelo Law Library

From the Green Bag, creators of the Supreme Court bobblehead dolls, come the newest Supreme Court collectibles, the Supreme Court slugger “baseball” cards—and ours have been added to the Law Library collection just in time for opening day of baseball season in April. These cards, which are modeled after baseball cards, have a picture of each justice as a baseball player and are complete with their Supreme Court “player” statistics. There are currently 8 cards available, of past and present Justices of the Supreme Court. Each card has a Justice in an appropriate position on the baseball team, and features paintings by John Sargent or Alec Spangler, based on paintings in the collection of the Supreme Court. Instead of RBIs, hits and errors, the statistics include Supreme Court opinions each justice was involved in, both before and during his/her tenure on the Supreme Court, in a number of statistical categories. Each card is accompanied by a pink “Thought Bubble Gum” magnet , completing the baseball card theme.

Photo of Justice Antonin Scalia's baseball card, with thought bubble gum.

Justice Antonin Scalia, Supreme Court Slugger

Details about the statistical methods are included in an article by Law School alum, Ross Davies (JD ’97) and Craig Rust, about the first card for Chief Justice John G. Roberts, “Supreme Court Sluggers: Behind the Numbers” [PDF]. Scans of all available cards with statistics and pictures are available at the Green Bag “Sluggers: Cards & Stats” page.

Currently, the D’Angelo Law Library has 5 cards: Justices Samuel A. Alito, Abe Fortas, James Iredell, John G. Roberts, and Antonin Scalia. The cards are not sold, but made available to subscribers of the Green Bag journal, and are picked up in person by a friend of D’Angelo Law Library. Each card is cataloged separately and they can all be located in the online catalog by searching the series “Supreme Court sluggers.” The cards are stored in a baseball card collectors box in the Law Rare Book Room, along with the Supreme Court bobblehead dolls.

D’Angelo Law Library restricted access during exams

Access to the D’Angelo Law Library for non-law students will be limited from Friday, March 4 through Saturday, March 12 during the Law School reading and exam periods. During this period, the library will continue to be accessible to any member of the University community who needs access to legal materials or who would like to work with one of our reference librarians. In addition, all non-law students who are taking Law School classes will have access to the library.

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library webpage on access for additional information.

Coffee break & Law School exam preparation resources

As students prepare for Winter Quarter exams, we wanted to remind you of the many resources the D’Angelo Law Library provides to help students prepare for exams. Also, on Saturday, March 5, enjoy free coffee and small snacks near the Reference Desk in the D’Angelo Law Library, from noon until 2:00 p.m. or whenever the coffee runs out.

Past exams: Perhaps most importantly, the Library provides copies of past exams given at the Law School, in addition to model student answers and memos written by the professors where available. The exams are organized by course and faculty member. Everything we have been given permission to post is available on the Library website.

Past_Exams

Study Supplements: Another helpful resource for preparing student outlines and studying for exams are the many study supplements, including the popular Examples & Explanations and Understanding series, that are available in the Reserve Room. Our Hornbooks & Study Supplements page provides lists of the available study supplements by course name. This year, we’ve also added the online West Academic Study Aids package. This package provides online access to many of the study supplements, including West’s Concise Hornbook Series, the Law Stories Series, and all of the Nutshells. To access the study supplements, you will need to go to http://lawschool.westlaw.com and click the link for “Study Aids Subscription.”

CALI Lessons: If you prefer something more interactive, CALI lessons might be the resource for you.  The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) provides UofC law students with access to nearly 1,000 internet-based lessons on different legal topics. Lessons range from core 1L courses (92 lessons on property, for example) to many different upper level courses. CALI lessons are often interactive and feature questions to test your knowledge as you go through them. If you have not already registered an account with CALI, you can Ask a Law Librarian to get the authorization code for the Law School.

Student Outlines: Student outlines for various courses taught at the Law School are made available by the UChicago Law Students Association (LSA) in an online outline bank on the LSA’s website. You will need to enter a password to access. If you do not have the password, Ask a Law Librarian.

Study Rooms: If you want to meet with a study group, the D’Angelo Law Library has seven study rooms that can be reserved online: two study rooms on each of the 4th, 5th and 6th floors, and one study room on the second floor. Law students may reserve use of a study room using the Law School’s room reservation system. For further assistance, see How to Reserve a Law Library Study Room.

Quiet Study Space: Quieter study spaces are available on the upper floors of the Law Library. Law School students are also able to study in any of the other libraries on campus. Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week. Mansueto will be open Friday, March 11 until 12:45 a.m., and Crerar and Regenstein will be open until 1 a.m. The Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will be open 24 hours from Monday, March 7 until the end of finals. For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Lockers: Please remember to secure your belongings when you take breaks. You can check out a locker key from the Circulation Desk. Library lockers are located in the northeast corner of the second and third floors. Two types of lockers are available: laptop lockers, which are smaller and each equipped with an electrical outlet, and bookbag lockers, which are large enough to accommodate a bookbag and/or coat.

Unrequired reading at the Library

Miss reading for fun? Having trouble finding unrequired reading in the libraries’ collections? With over 11 million print & electronic books, it can be hard to browse the library collections to find reading for fun. But have no fear, librarians are here! Read on to learn about specific collections at University of Chicago Libraries dedicated to leisure reading and top tips to find your next favorite fun read.

D'Angelo Law LIbrary Book Display

Books on display at the D’Angelo Law Library

Tip #1: Visit D’Angelo Law Library. The D’Angelo law library collects novels, mysteries, science fiction,  humor, science, history, and biography (Supported by the Alison T. Dunham Memorial Fund). Find authors such as Jonathan Franzen, Chuck Palahniuk, Jennifer Weiner, and many more! The collection is easy to locate and recently purchased titles can be found on display on the fourth floor.

Tip #2: Browse the Reg’s Young Adult Fiction. In 2015, College student Maya Handa won an Uncommon Fund grant to buy young adult fiction for the Reg’s collections. You can view some of the purchased book covers on display next to the dissertation office or browse for yourself by visiting the PZ call numbers on the 3rd floor. You’re invited to celebrate the collection by attending a launch party on March 10 from 6-7 pm in Regenstein Room 122.

Tip #3: Check out the Class of 2000 Books. As its gift to the University, the Class of 2000 has established a book fund for the purchase of popular fiction and media for Regenstein. The gift is intended to provide students with mysteries, science fiction, other contemporary fiction, and media that would not ordinarily be purchased by the Library.

via GIPHY

Tip #4: Search the library catalog. The library has a lot of great books for you to read, but you have to know what you’re looking for. Find new book recommendations by browsing book recommendation engines like:

Selection of Class of 2000 Books

A few books purchased using the Class of 2000 fund. Photo by Rebecca Starkey.

  • Amazon: The online shopping giant pulls purchase histories from users. Usually browsing the “Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought…” section brings up great recommendations. It has allowed readers to review books for over 20 years, making the site a massive resource for book recommendations.
  • GoodReads: Described as the ‘Netflix for Books,’ GoodReads has a recommendation engine that uses a reported 20 billion data points to give suggestions tailored to your literary preferences. GoodReads also allows you to create your own virtual library, connect with friends, and create wishlists.
  • WhatShouldIReadNext: Just type in a book or author you enjoyed and see your recommendations flow in. The site’s recommendation inventory is less expensive when compared to Amazon or GoodReads, but the nice thing about this resource is that you can also browse recommendations by subject. Really enjoyed Americanah? See all other books about Nigeria!

Once you find a book that you want to read, just type it into the catalog to find it in the library. If it’s not here, remember that you can also browse search in Big 10 university libraries and Ivy League libraries through UBorrow and BorrowDirect.

Tip #5: As always, if you are having trouble finding a book in the collections, or have any questions, Ask a Librarian!