One-month trial to ASEANLEX business law database starts today

The Library has arranged a trial for ASEANLEX. The trial access starts today, October 17, lasts for a month, and covers the translated legislation currently available on the database for Indonesia, Myanmar and Cambodia. Note that, while Thailand and Lao PDR are also listed, there is not yet content for the jurisdictions in ASEANLEX. You can search or browse by jurisdiction name, practice area, or title or number of law/regulation.



New translated laws and regulations are added regularly to the database each month. Legislation selected for translation affects international business and investment in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. Per the ASEAN User Guide: “Laws and regulations added may be either from earlier years, or amending legislation, or new legislation. English translations of relevant draft legislation may also be included if the original Bahasa Indonesian, Myanmar, or Khmer text is obtainable.”

Try ASEANLEX and let us know what you think!

Microsoft Office training for Law students


Organized by the Office of the Dean of Students and the D’Angelo Law Library, this program will give Law students all of the basic Microsoft Office skills they will need during the school year, in summer employment, and as an attorney.

There is no charge for the program; Law students may attend the morning session, the afternoon session, or both. Lunch will be provided but you must bring your own laptop. The program will be applicable for both Mac and PC users.

It will be held Saturday, October 22, with Word training  from 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. and Excel & PowerPoint from 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., followed by a question and answer period.

Law Students must register in advance for this  program at RSVP by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 19.

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases now on Hein Online

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases, published by the American Bar Association, has moved to Hein Online. There are eight issues per term. The first seven issues report on oral arguments, and the eighth issue gives a roundup of the term. All published issues are available, back to the 1973 term.

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases is the best place to find the briefs of the parties, amicus briefs, and oral argument transcripts for cases from the Court’s current term. Click on the case’s docket number in the table of contents to get a list of briefs and transcripts.



Consult our Supreme Court research guide for more sources of news and information about the Court.


Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law

Hein Online has just added a new library, Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law. This library brings together “all known legal materials on slavery in the United States and the English-speaking world.” This includes every state and federal statute dealing with slavery, and every reported case dealing with slavery, including cases that arose after the abolition of slavery. The library also includes hundreds of pamphlets and trials, every legal article about slavery published before 1920, and modern histories of slavery in America. Editor-in-chief Prof. Paul Finkelman wrote his dissertation about slavery at the University of Chicago, and his published collections of primary sources on slavery and the law are included in the library.

William S. Hein & Co. is making Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law available without charge. This library will be invaluable to researchers studying slavery, and to anyone researching American history in the slavery era.

Non-law databases for law students

Legal research is becoming more and more interdisciplinary, including “Law and…”, human rights, international relations, and other law-related topics in other disciplines. Therefore, when you begin your research, you will find yourself seeking non-law databases more often than not.  If you are new to interdisciplinary research at the University, check out D’Angelo Law Library’s Finding Non-Law Journal Articles guide. These include some of the non-law databases more frequently used here at Law.

For journal articles and books from disciplines other than law, start with Articles Plus, which contains articles drawn from hundreds of databases and over 40,000 journals.

While Articles Plus seems all encompassing, it does not include ProQuest databases such as Dissertation Abstracts, ProQuest Newsstand, ABI INFORM, Early English Books Online, and Legislative Insight. Nor Factiva. So make sure to also check these if the information for which you are looking might be located in these other databases.

Articles Plus, because it covers so many disciplines, can generate overbroad search results. Therefore, for research in a particular subject, you should search databases specific to that subject.  This Research Starting Points guide provides an A to Z list of key databases arranged by subject (from African Studies to Women’s Studies). You can also locate useful databases by using topical research guides listed in our Non-Law Subjects (Subject Guides) page. You can also use Database Finder to locate Library databases in a particular subject. You can search by database title or browse by subject.

Another way to access general, non-law databases via Database Finder is to click on the “Articles, Journals & Databases” tab on the D’Angelo Law Library home page, then click on the Databases radio button to search for a database by name, platform, subject, or keyword in its description.

Image of databases search page

The United Nations’ redesigned treaty and documents web pages

Over the summer, the United Nations launched several webpage redesigns.  The main UN and UN Dag Hammarskjöld Library pages have changed, so check them out.

In addition, the UN Treaties Database page was redesigned so that the Status of Treaties (formerly Multilateral Treaties Deposited with the Secretary-General/MTDSG) is now under the Depositary tab. Note that there is no longer a “search for treaties by popular name” functionality. The United Nations Treaty Series (UNTS) and League of Nations Treaty Series (LNTS) are now under the Registration & Publication tab.

odsbannerAnother major change is that there’s now an Enterprise Search page for the Official Document System (ODS) of the UN powered by UNITE with a Google-like search box. If you click on “Open Advanced Search” on the right-hand side of the search box, you will have additional search options.

Image of ODS Enterprise Search

Enterprise Search (Official Document System of the United Nations)

The ODS has PDF UN official documents back to 1993, and increasingly more and more pre-1993 documents are being digitized and added.  The ODS provides access to all UN resolutions. Note that Enterprise ODS also includes League of Nations (LON) documents (to the left of the search box, under the drop-down menu that says “All ODS”, is an option to search League of Nations documents).

Finally, the blue, “classic,” and Enhanced interfaces of the Official Documents System (ODS) of the UN have morphed into this page:

Image of the new UN ODS page

Official Document System of the United Nations (new interface)

The D’Angelo Law Library welcomes new students

The D’Angelo Law Library welcomes the JD class of 2019 and the LLM class of 2017. The D’Angelo Law librarians will introduce new JD and LLM students to the Library’s resources and services during tours and presentations during orientation. We hope you will take advantage of our vast resources and knowledgeable staff. There is a great deal of new information to process, so please remember that if you ever have any questions about the Library, please ask us!

We’ve gathered what we think is the most important information in the Library Guide for Law Students and in the D’Angelo Law Library organization site on Chalk, the University’s course management system, but we also wanted to highlight our Top 5 services and resources here:

1. Reference librarians are here to help.

Our reference staff is knowledgeable, helpful, and accessible by email, chat, phone, and in person. Each Bigelow section also has a Reference Librarian assigned to teach legal research sessions over the course of the year. You can consider that librarian as your point of contact in the library, although all of our librarians are available to help you. We are available seven days a week through email, chat, phone, text and in person at the Reference Desk. See our Hours page for the exact hours.

2. Start with the Law Library website.

The Library website can direct you to services and tools to help you find what you need to study law and conduct legal research. Use our website to get research help, find databases, learn library policies, and keep up with the latest library and legal research news.

3. Access information using our primary discovery tools.

Library Catalog: You can search the Library Catalog for books, electronic materials, and more. The University of Chicago Library has over 7 million books and access to hundreds of thousands of electronic resources, so if you are looking for something, you should start with the catalog, and chances are we have what you are looking for.

Databases: The Library offers access to hundreds of databases covering various subjects. To locate a database to use for your research, use Database Finder, a tool that enables you to search for a particular database by name or browse by subject to identify relevant databases. The Law Library also provides a list of the main databases used for legal research.

Access to Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis, and Westlaw is restricted to Law School students, and each law student will be supplied with an individual password. You will get this password during your library orientation. If you have any questions about these resources, please do not hesitate to Ask a Law Librarian.

Research Guides: The reference librarians have created research guides on a variety of legal topics. These guides give you starting points for doing research in particular areas of law.

4. We offer a number of on demand services.

Scan & Deliver is an electronic document delivery service that enables members of the University of Chicago community to obtain scanned portions of books or journal articles from the Library’s collections. Requests should be made online, directly from the Library Catalog. Requested documents will be scanned and delivered within four business days. We will scan chapters from books or single articles from journals, provided that the chapter(s) or article does not exceed 20% of the entire book or journal issue.

We also offer a paging service for Law School students. We will retrieve uncharged Library books located in the stacks of other libraries on campus. This service is currently available to Law School students, faculty, and staff only. Materials will generally be collected within two business days and placed on hold at the Circulation Desk or delivered to the appropriate carrel. You will receive an email when your item is available for pick-up.

While searching the Libary Catalog, you may also occasionally come across items with the location Mansueto or one of the two D’Angelo Law Library annexes. You can request materials from these storage collections to be delivered to the Law Library. It generally takes less than 24 hours, and you will receive an email when your item is available for pick up at the Law Library circulation desk.

5. You can easily get books from other institutions.

Use Borrow Direct, UBorrow, and Interlibrary Loan if you need material that is not available here on campus.

Borrow Direct is a service that can be used to borrow books directly from libraries at the Ivy League universities plus Duke, Johns Hopkins, and MIT. Most books borrowed through Borrow Direct are available for pickup at the Law Library within four business days.

UBorrow is a similar service that can be used to borrow books directly from libraries at the Big 10 universities plus University of Chicago. Most books borrowed through UBorrow are available for pickup at the Law Library within four business days.

If the book you want is not available from Borrow Direct or UBorrow, or if you need it for an extended period of time, you should use Interlibrary Loan. Requests may be submitted online.

If the material you are looking for is not available from any of these services, Ask a Law Librarian, and we’ll be happy to help you locate the material.

University of Chicago students in other schools and programs are welcome at the D’Angelo Law Library. If you are interested in an introductory D’Angelo tour or a research consultation with a law reference librarian, please use the Ask a Law Librarian service to schedule a time with one of us.

People Apply for the D’Angelo Law Library Student Advisory Board

Do you want to help shape the D’Angelo Law Library experience for you and your fellow students? If you do, consider applying for the D’Angelo Law Library Student Advisory Board. We’re looking for Law School students from all class years (including incoming 1L and LLM students) and who participate in a range of student organizations and extracurricular activities. Even if you don’t think you use the library very much, we want to hear from you, too!

The Board was started in 2012, and the students’ feedback has led to several improvements in Library services. Minutes from previous meetings are available on the Board’s webpage. The librarians look forward to receiving more valuable feedback from this year’s Board on a variety of topics, from library hours to legal research instruction in the Bigelow program to promotion of Library services like UBorrow and Scan & Deliver. The Board will meet approximately two times per quarter, with the meeting dates and times set once Board members are selected.

To apply, fill out the brief online application by Friday, October 14. For questions or additional information, please contact Todd Ito at

Student Advisory Board Application: 

Library interim hours, August 27 – September 25

Beginning Saturday, August 27, the Library has reduced building hours at all of its locations for the interim. Please note that on Monday, September 5, all libraries will be closed in observance of Labor Day.  Autumn quarter hours will begin Monday, September 26.

Crerar Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Friday – Saturday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Sunday 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.

D’Angelo Law Library Circulation
Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday Closed
Sunday (August 28, Sept. 4, 11, 18) Closed
Sunday (Sept. 25) noon – 9 p.m.

Eckhart Library
Monday – Friday noon – 5 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Mansueto Library

Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 7:45 p.m.
Friday 8 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday (August 28, Sept. 4, 11, 18) Closed
Sunday (Sept. 25) noon – 4:45 p.m.

Regenstein Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Friday  – Saturday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sunday (August 28, Sept. 4, 11, 18) Closed
Sunday (Sept. 25) noon – 5 p.m.

Regenstein All-Night Study
Closed until September 27 at 12:01 a.m.

Regenstein Ex Libris Cafe
Monday — Friday (August 29 – Sept. 2) 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Monday — Friday (Sept. 5 – 16) Closed
Monday — Friday (Sept. 19 – 23) 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Saturday (August 27, Sept. 3, 10, 25) Closed
Saturday (Sept. 17) 1 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Sunday Closed

SSA Library
Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see

Updated August 31 to include Ex Libris hours.

Guide to researching legal employers

To help you prepare for OCI this week, the library has created a Guide to Researching Legal Employers. It contains quick links to directories and legal news sources, as well as sources for law firm profiles and biographies for judges and attorneys. Among the many resources the Library provides access to is ALM Legal Intelligence, which includes the full-text of ALM Survey & Ranking reports, including the AmLaw 200 and the ALM Midlevel and Summer Associate Surveys.

People Judith Wright wins AALL’s highest award

Judith rectangular

Judith Wright, former Associate Dean of Library and Information Services at the D’Angelo Law Library, received the Marion Gould Gallagher Distinguished Service Award at the American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting in Chicago this week. The award recognizes extended and sustained service to law librarianship and exemplary service to the Association. During her 40-year career, Judith worked tirelessly to advance collaborative work and leadership in the law librarian community, while directing the D’Angelo Law Library with grace and formidable administrative skills. D’Angelo Law Library’s status as one of the premier law research libraries in the United States is a testament to her dedicated stewardship.

Looking for foreign laws? Start with the vLex Global database

The Library subscribes to vLex Global, a database that covers legal sources in 13 languages for 132 countries. In particular, it has codes, statutes, and other legislation, case-law/jurisprudence, books, articles, and news sources for these jurisdictions:

  1. Argentina
  2. Belgium
  3. Brazil
  4. Canada
  5. Chile
  6. Colombia
  7. France
  8. India
  9. Italy
  10. Mexico
  11. Peru
  12. Portugal
  13. Spain
  14. United Kingdom
  15. United States
  16. Venezuela

In an assessment from several years ago, there was the most content in vLex Global for these countries in the following order from most strong: Spain, Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela, Portugal, Italy, the UK, Belgium, France, and the U.S. vLex also covers primary law sources for the European Union, the Andean Community, and Mercosur.

vLex is browsable by country, type of source, and searchable by keyword. The Advanced Search has a “translate search terms” option such that the user can enter a search in English and retrieve foreign language search results. Documents retrieved can be auto-translated into Arabic, Catalan, Chinese, Dutch, English, French, Galician, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Swedish.

Note that vLex Global has a 1 simultaneous user limit, so if you are not able to access it because it is in use, please try again later.

Problem with some ebook links in the Library Catalog

There is currently an issue with the Library Catalog which affects links for some ebooks. The books are available, but the links are not displayed in the Catalog. Systems staff are working to resolve this. There are two ways to get access, in most cases.

Access from campus

When you find a book in the Library Catalog without a link, click on Staff View in the full item record. This displays the formatted catalog data.

Catalog record with staff view highlighted.

Scroll to the bottom and find the line marked 856. The link to the e-book is there. Copy this text and paste it into your browser’s address bar. This link is not formatted for off-campus access, however.Link to e-book that's been highlighted

If you are not on campus, we recommend searching in the EBSCO eBook Collection to access your book, as described below. The ProxyIt! bookmarklet will not work for these titles.

Access from off-campus

Almost all of the titles affected by this issue are provided by EBSCO. Use the EBSCO eBook Collection to find your book.

Access the EBSCO eBook Collection here

Please Ask-a-Librarian if you need further assistance

The Securities and Exchange Commission in pictures

The SEC has a Pinterest page! Great historical photos from the Securities and Exchange Commission Historical Society. Hat tip to the Conglomerate blog – until I saw their post, it had never occurred to me to think of the SEC and Pinterest in the same sentence. Enjoy, for the holiday weekend….

D’Angelo Law closing early Fri., July 1 & closed July 4

Due to the holiday weekend, the D’Angelo Law Library will close at 2 p.m. this Friday, July 1. All campus libraries will be closed on Monday, July 4, Independence Day. Regular summer hours will resume on Tuesday, July 5. For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see

Westlaw, LexisNexis, and Bloomberg Law access over the summer

Please read below for details on accessing Westlaw, Lexis, and Bloomberg Law over the summer.


Rising 2Ls and 3Ls: At the end of June, academic passwords for returning students will default to 40 hours for the month of July, even if a student does nothing to extend.

Westlaw does allow returning students to extend their current, unlimited access in specific instances, which you can do by going to Allowable usages for extending include:

  • Summer law school classes and study abroad programs
  • Law review or law journal work, including write-on competitions
  • Research assistant work
  • Moot court
  • Unpaid, nonprofit public-interest internship/externship pro bono work required for graduation

Graduating 3Ls: Graduating students will have full access to Westlaw through June 30, 2016. Graduating students can also continue to use Westlaw through the Graduate Elite program. Graduating students should have received an email regarding this program and can locate information about the Graduate Elite program on the homepage, or at

After completing a short survey, they receive Westlaw access: 60 hours for 6 months (June – Nov and it ends on Nov. 30th).

For help or more information, contact the Law School’s Westlaw Account Manager Dennis Elverman at


Rising 2Ls and 3Ls: Returning students will have full access to Lexis Advance during the summer without special registration.

Graduating 3Ls: Graduates have full Lexis Advance access through July 31, 2016. For help or more information, contact our LexisNexis Account Executive, Carter Mills Isham at

Bloomberg Law

Rising 2Ls and 3Ls: Bloomberg Law provides unlimited and unrestricted access over the summer. There is no need to register, as your student account will remain active and available all summer.

Graduating 3Ls: Students graduating this spring have unlimited and unrestricted access to Bloomberg Law for six months after graduation.

For help or more information, contact our Bloomberg Law Relationship Manager, Haley Harris at

Summer research tips for law students

Whether you will be on campus or away from Chicago, the D’Angelo Law Library provides many resources and services to help support your research during the summer. If you are working as a summer associate, you should review our Research Guide for Ensuring Summer Success, and if you are working as a faculty research assistant, you should consult our Library Guide for Law School Faculty Research Assistants.

Other summer research tips include:

Access to Online Resources
The Library’s electronic resources (including ebooks and ejournals) may be accessed no matter where you are located this summer. Learn how to connect to our online resources from off-campus. Returning Law School students will also continue to have full access to Bloomberg Law and Lexis Advance during the summer, while there are some restrictions on use of Westlaw. For the full details, see Westlaw, LexisNexis, and Bloomberg Law access over the summer.

Finding the Best Research Tools
D’Angelo Law librarians have created a number of online research guides on various topics. To identify a leading treatise in a particular area of law, you can also consult our Treatise Finder. The Library also provides help guides on finding specific types of sources, such as newspapers or data.

Scan and Deliver
Do you need to read a case, journal article, or book chapter that is not available online? Use our Scan and Deliver service to request a copy be sent to you via e-mail.


Librarians are available during the summer to help you–in person or remotely via our Ask a Law Librarian service.

Reciprocal Borrowing Agreements
The Library has reciprocal borrowing agreements with several academic libraries which allow UChicago students and faculty to borrow books directly from their collections. These include libraries in Borrow Direct Plus, as well as several Chicago-area institutions, including Northwestern.

Visiting Other Libraries
If you need to visit libraries and archives outside our reciprocal agreements, view our guide to doing research at other libraries before your visit. You’ll find tips on how to access different institutions, and strategies for identifying relevant collections.

Learn About Citation Managers
Summer is an ideal time to learn how citation managers can ease your research process.  Use citation managers such as Zotero or EndNote to organize your research and create footnotes and bibliographies automatically for your paper.  View the Library’s online tutorial for Zotero or guides to learn more about these tools.

Ask a Law Librarian/Reference Services
Librarians are on hand throughout the summer to help you with your research. Contact them directly via our Ask a Law Librarian service.  Or, if you are staying in Chicago, this may be a good time to schedule a consultation with a law librarian who can suggest sources and research strategies for your project.

Graduating? Services and Tools to Support Your Research
Alumni can continue to visit and use our campus libraries if they live in the Chicago area. The Library and Alumni Association provide off-campus access to select research databases for alumni. Graduating Law School students will also have some degree of access to Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis, and Westlaw after graduation. For the full details, see Westlaw, LexisNexis, and Bloomberg Law access over the summer.

D’Angelo Law Library summer hours

Beginning June 11, 2016, the D’Angelo Law Library will be on our summer schedule. The Circulation Desk and Reserve Room will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and the Reference Desk will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Law Library will be closed Saturdays and Sundays during the summer. We will resume regular hours in September before the start of Autumn Quarter.

New online resource: Brill’s Encyclopedia of Law and Religion

Encyclopedia of Law and Religion Online logoThe D’Angelo Law Library has subscribed to the online version of the Encyclopedia of Law and Religion (Gerhard Robbers and W. Cole Durham eds., Leiden: Brill, [2015- ]). Unique in its breadth and global coverage, the Encyclopedia covers Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, Oceania, international organizations and special territories (e.g. Gibraltar, Greenland).  Each article provides social facts, historical background, the position of religion in the legal system, individual religious freedoms, active religious communities, including legal status and labor law, and religious assistance in public institutions, legal position of religious personnel and members of religious orders, matrimonial and familial laws, religious and criminal laws, and country-specific issues.

New Library website launches July 5

Update: The Library will be launching the new website described below starting at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 5. Site visitors should expect service interruptions throughout the evening, and, because the changes will take time to propagate over the internet, some users may be unable to reach the site through July 6.

Access to resources outside of the main Library website should continue uninterrupted during this time. These include:

Thank you for your patience as we roll out these changes.


The University of Chicago Library will launch a new website over the summer.  The new site’s improved navigation and mobile-friendly design will provide faculty and students with ready access to curated, scholarly information and research expertise.

Changes to the design and structure of the new Library website are being made in response to the needs and feedback of UChicago faculty, students, and staff. The new site will be optimized for both desktop and mobile use, with a modern look and feel. It is being made easier to browse and navigate by

  • providing streamlined access to search tools for articles, journals, and databases;
  • providing more consistent navigation across the top of the site’s pages;
  • reorganizing information into categories developed directly from user input;
  • making it easier to find information about distinctive collections, exhibitions, study spaces, hours, and locations; and
  • connecting related collections, tools, and experts, making it easier for users to take advantage of the wealth of information and services offered by the Library.

In addition, Library news will be presented in a more engaging way on the site, and pages will be optimized for discovery via Google or other search engines.

The current Library Catalog, launched in 2014, is not being redesigned as a part of this project.

The new Library website will first go live in mid-summer and will be further refined in the weeks leading up to fall orientation.  During this period, if you have any difficulty finding the information you are looking for, librarians will be happy to assist you via our Ask a Librarian service.

The University of Chicago Library website serves as a gateway to UChicago collections and licensed resources; the online Ask a Librarian service, including live chat; Library staff with expertise in a wide range of subjects; research guides in numerous fields; and videos and guides explaining how to conduct research using library resources.

D’Angelo Law Library Memorial Day hours

On Monday, May 30, the D’Angelo Law Library will be open from 10 am – 6 pm. This includes the Reserve Room and the Circulation Desk. The Reference Desk will be closed.

Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein libraries will be open during their regular building hours. The All-Night Study Space on the 1st Floor of Regenstein will also remain open.

Eckhart and SSA libraries will be closed for the Memorial Day holiday.

Restricted access to D’Angelo during reading period and finals

Access to the D’Angelo Law Library for non-law students will be limited from Friday, May 20 through Monday, June 6 during the Law School reading and exam periods. During this period, the library will continue to be accessible to any member of the University community who needs access to legal materials or who would like to work with one of our reference librarians. In addition, all non-law students who are taking Law School classes will have access to the library.

Consult the D’Angelo Law Library webpage on access for additional information.

Law School exam preparation resources

As students prepare for Spring Quarter exams, we wanted to remind you of the many resources the D’Angelo Law Library provides to help students prepare for exams. Also, on Saturday, May 28, enjoy free coffee and small snacks near the Reference Desk in the D’Angelo Law Library, from noon until 2:00 p.m. or whenever the coffee runs out.

Past exams: Perhaps most importantly, the Library provides copies of past exams given at the Law School, in addition to model student answers and memos written by the professors where available. The exams are organized by course and faculty member. Everything we have been given permission to post is available on the Library website.


Study Supplements: Another helpful resource for preparing student outlines and studying for exams are the many study supplements, including the popular Examples & Explanations and Understanding series, that are available in the Reserve Room. Our Hornbooks & Study Supplements page provides lists of the available study supplements by course name. This year, we’ve also added the online West Academic Study Aids package. This package provides online access to many of the study supplements, including West’s Concise Hornbook Series, the Law Stories Series, and all of the Nutshells. To access the study supplements, you will need to go to and click the link for “Study Aids Subscription.” The first time you log in, you will need to create an account with West Academic, but from then on, you should be able to log in with your OnePass username and password.

CALI Lessons: If you prefer something more interactive, CALI lessons might be the resource for you.  The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) provides UofC law students with access to nearly 1,000 internet-based lessons on different legal topics. Lessons range from core 1L courses (92 lessons on property, for example) to many different upper level courses. CALI lessons are often interactive and feature questions to test your knowledge as you go through them. If you have not already registered an account with CALI, you can Ask a Law Librarian to get the authorization code for the Law School.

Student Outlines: Student outlines for various courses taught at the Law School are made available by the UChicago Law Students Association (LSA) in an online outline bank on the LSA’s website. You will need to enter a password to access. If you do not have the password, Ask a Law Librarian.

Study Rooms: If you want to meet with a study group, the D’Angelo Law Library has seven study rooms that can be reserved online: two study rooms on each of the 4th, 5th and 6th floors, and one study room on the second floor. Law students may reserve use of a study room using the Law School’s room reservation system. For further assistance, see How to Reserve a Law Library Study Room.

Quiet Study Space: Quieter study spaces are available on the upper floors of the Law Library. Law School students are also able to study in any of the other libraries on campus. Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week. On Monday, May 30, Eckhart and SSA libraries will be closed for the Memorial Day holiday, and the Law Library will be open from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. For a full list of library hours, see

Lockers: Please remember to secure your belongings when you take breaks. You can check out a locker key from the Circulation Desk. Library lockers are located in the northeast corner of the second and third floors. Two types of lockers are available: laptop lockers, which are smaller and each equipped with an electrical outlet, and bookbag lockers, which are large enough to accommodate a bookbag and/or jacket.

Good luck with exams!

External DVD drives for checkout

In recognition of the fact that many laptops no longer come with CD/DVD drives, D’Angelo Law Library has acquired two external DVD drives for checkout.

DLL external DVD drive

They will circulate for 4 hours. Ask for them at the D’Angelo Circulation Desk!

People HeinOnline blog spotlights Law Library Director Sheri Lewis

A recent HeinOnline blog post features D’Angelo Law Library Director, Sheri H. Lewis. She was selected to be interviewed as part of Hein’s “An Oral History of Law Librarianship” series. Here is an excerpt from the article:

Sheri H. Lewis is currently the Director of the D’Angelo Law Library at the University of Chicago in Chicago, IL. She received her B.A. from Northwestern University and is a graduate of New York University School of Law. After graduating from Law School, Lewis served as a clerk to the Hon. Robert L. Miller Jr., Northern District of Indiana, and then practiced with the firm of Lord, Bissell and Brook in Chicago. She became the director of the D’Angelo Law Library in 2013. Previously she served for 12 years as an Associate Law Librarian for Public Services. Lewis is also a member of the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and the Chicago Association of Law Libraries (CALL). Check out her full video below!