Identify Mystery Text, Win $1000

Example of Mystery Text

Example of Mystery Text

Calling all historians of cryptography and stenography, Sherlockians (see “The Dancing Men”), and other amateur detectives!  The collection of Homer editions in the Special Collections Research Center – the  Bibliotheca Homerica Langiana(BHL) – includes a copy of the rare 1504 edition of Homer’s Odyssey that contains, in Book 11 (narrating Odysseus’s journey into Hades) handwritten annotations in a strange and as-yet unidentified script.  This marginalia appears only in the pages of Book 11 of the Odyssey; nowhere else in the volume.  Although the donor of the BHL is suspicious that this odd script is a form of 19th-century shorthand (likely French), he acknowledges that this hypothesis remains unsupported by any evidence offered to date.

The donor of the BHL is offering a prize of $1,000 to the first person who identifies the script, provides evidence to support the conclusion, and executes a translation of selected portions of the mysterious marginalia.  In addition to the photographs in this post, the volume is available to consult in person in the Special Collections reading room.  Please visit the Special Collections website for information about requesting items to get started. The contest is open to all, regardless of University of Chicago affiliation. Please direct submissions to the contest, or questions, to Alice Schreyer, Assistant University Librarian, Humanities and Social Sciences and Rare Books Curator, or Catherine Uecker, Rare Books Librarian.

Mystery Text

Mystery Text

Homer. Odysseia. Venice: Aldus, 1504. PA4018.A2 1504 vol. 2

 

Developing Assignments that Use the Library: workshop

When: Monday, April 28, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A 
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: This course is designed for faculty, instructors, and graduate students interested in teaching.

Have you found that your students aren’t using the academic sources you expect for their assignments? Do your students seem to lack basic library research skills? In this program, University of Chicago librarians will highlight ways you can integrate library research instruction into your courses to promote the acquisition of the skills necessary to complete research assignments. We’ll demonstrate ready-to-go online tools that can be integrated into your Chalk site, and discuss the different types of in-class instruction the Library can provide. At the end of the session, we’ll work together to create some sample assignments designed to help students learn how to use the Library’s collections and online resources.

Presenters:
Julia Gardner, Head of Reader Services, The Special Collections Research Center
Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach, Regenstein Library
Debra Werner, Librarian for Science Instruction and Outreach, Crerar Library

Registration is recommended. To register, please select the website below.

Contact: Rebecca Starkey at rstarkey@uchicago.edu or 773-702-4484.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1248
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: StaffTrainingSeminarsWorkshopsGraduate Students
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
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EndNote Online or Zotero? Selecting the Best Citation Manager: online workshop

When: Tuesday, April 29, 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Where: Online workshop
Description: Citation managers are powerful, time-saving tools that help you manage your research. They can also help you format your papers in MS Word by creating bibliographies, citations, and footnotes automatically in the style you choose, such as APA or Chicago.

This webinar will compare how EndNote Online and Zotero — two popular citation managers — allow you to save, share, and cite information. In order to provide a side-by-side comparison of tools, the format of this workshop is demonstration rather than hands-on training.

Registration is required. Please the event URL below to learn more and register.

Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1455
Tag: WorkshopsTrainingStaffStudent Events Calendar
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
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Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awards $194,000 grant for Chicago Collections Consortium online portal

The University of Chicago Library is pleased to announce its participation in an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded project to support the development and implementation of the Chicago Portal. The $194,000 grant was awarded to the University of Illinois Board of Trustees on behalf of the Library, which is leading the project with the Chicago Collections Consortium (CCC). The University of Chicago is a member of the CCC.

L Map

Chicago Transit Authority. “‘L’ Map of Chicago.” (1933) R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company Archive, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library

The fifteen-month grant will fund the development of CCC’s major first initiative, a freely accessible, online portal to materials documenting the rich history of Chicago. The portal paves the way for CCC to fulfill its vision of connecting and preserving Chicago-focused collections, and increasing public and scholarly interest in and study of the Chicago region’s diverse history and culture.

Mary M. Case, University Librarian and Dean of Libraries at UIC, and Chair of the CCC Board of Directors, commented, “The portal will use the power of technology and the research expertise of librarians and archivists to put information about diaries, photographs, letters, and other original materials from those who shaped Chicago’s history into our hands. We are very grateful to The Mellon Foundation for making it possible for us to tangibly connect the past and present and, in this way, promote scholarship and learning.”

“We are delighted to participate in the realization of this important project,” said Judith Nadler, Director and University Librarian at the University of Chicago and a member of the consortium’s Board and Executive Committee. “Integrating our rich UChicago-based collections with the collections of the other participating members and making them available through the Chicago Portal will advance the shared awareness and use of this enormous resource.”

A venture that will benefit knowledge-seekers beyond the academic and geographic boundaries of Chicago, the portal will provide students, scholars, researchers, and citizen-historians with unprecedented access to a free database of information held by CCC member institutions. It will provide significant scholarly and educational benefit with local, national, and international impact. “The portal will permit users to discover historical resources in ways that are nearly impossible today—resources that are not meant to be contained, but imparted to the world,” remarked Jaclyn Grahl, Executive Director of the CCC, “and it is just the beginning of this terrific collaboration of Chicago institutions working together to provide first-rate programs and services that will benefit the public in exciting new ways.”

University of Chicago Contributions

Ida B. Wells with her children

Ida B. Wells-Barnett with her children, 1909, 13.7 x 9.5 cm. Ida B. Papers, Box 10, Folder 1, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library

Aspects of Chicago’s social, cultural, literary, scientific, economic, political, and architectural history are documented in archives and manuscripts in the University of Chicago Library’s Special Collections Research Center. The records and papers of early 20th-century organizations and social reformers at UChicago include those of the Committee of Fifteen, the Anti-Saloon League and the Chicago Citizens Police Committee, Ida B. Wells, Sophonisba Breckenridge, Edith Abbott, and Marion Talbot. The archives also hold the papers of a generation of University sociologists, most notably Ernest Watson Burgess and his students, who conducted studies of Chicago neighborhoods and ethnic groups.

The Chicago Jazz Archive and the papers of Poetry: A Magazine of Verse and of Saul Bellow—all at UChicago—document the city’s role as a center for literary and musical innovation. The archive of RR Donnelley charts the growth of this printing company from its founding in 1864 as well as the Chicago business, industrial, and graphic design communities with which it was engaged. And the Archival Photographic Files Building and Grounds Series includes images of Chicago—and especially Hyde Park—architecture.

UChicago staff contributing to the development of the project include Charles Blair, Director of the Digital Library Development Center, who has been heavily involved in planning for the technical infrastructure of the portal; Daniel Meyer, Director of the Special Collections Research Center and University Archivist, and Ashley Locke, Processing Archivist in Special Collections, who serve on the Collections Committee that is identifying the UChicago resources to be included; and Elisabeth Long, Associate University Librarian for Digital Services.

About the Chicago Collections Consortium

Fate in a Pleasant Mood album cover

Sun Ra and His Myth Science Arkestra, Fate in a Pleasant Mood, Saturn SR9956-2-B, 33 1/3 rpm, 1965, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library

The CCC is a new nonprofit organization that preserves, presents, and promotes the history and culture of the Chicago region by coordinating and leveraging the collections, programs, and expertise of its member libraries, museums, and other institutions with Chicago-focused archival materials. By promoting cooperation and collaboration across Chicago’s cultural heritage community, CCC aims to develop a robust offering of collaborative programs highlighting the unique collections that document both the history and contemporary concerns of one of North America’s largest and most complex urban communities. With the Chicago Portal as its cornerstone initiative, future projects such as citywide online and physical exhibits, neighborhood guides, curricular materials, and educational programs will be developed.

Founding members of the CCC include: Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago History Museum, Chicago Public Library, Columbia College Chicago, DePaul University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Loyola University Chicago, The Newberry Library, Northwestern University, Roosevelt University, The University of Chicago, and University of Illinois at Chicago.

Excel: Everyday Tips: TECHB@R workshop

When: Friday, April 25, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This 60-minute workshop will cover a variety of topics to help participants use Excel more efficiently. Tips to be covered include conditional formatting, keyboard shortcuts, logical formulas, absolute references, charts, formatting options, and preparing for printing.

Classes are free, but registration is required. Click the website link below for more information and to register. Workshops fill up quick so sign up today!

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1503
Tag: Graduate StudentsStaffWorkshopsTrainingStudent Career Development
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Excel: Managing Worksheets and Workbooks: TECHB@R workshop

When: Friday, April 18, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This 60-minute workshop teaches students how to manage large sets of data efficiently. Topics covered include working with multiple worksheets and workbooks, advanced formatting, consolidating and outlining data, creating subtotals, protecting worksheets, and using logical, conditional, and lookup functions. .

Please feel free to bring your laptop with Excel 2010 installed to follow along.

Classes are free, but registration is required. Click the website link below for more information and to register. Seating is limited, so sign up soon!

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
More info: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1502
Tag: Graduate StudentsWorkshopsStudent Career DevelopmentTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
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Excel: Keyboard Shortcuts: TECHB@R workshop

When: Thursday, April 24, 2014 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This workshop is intended for beginners and intermediate users and focuses on the use of keyboard shortcuts and function keys to save time when using Microsoft Excel. We will look at ways to manipulate formulas and format data in tables without using a mouse and practise using the shortcuts on a spreadsheet.

There is no fee for training, but registration is required. Please click the Event URL below to register.

Seating is limited, so sign up soon!

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
More info: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1483
Tag: WorkshopsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
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Word: Mail Merge & Track Changes: TECHB@R workshop

When: Wednesday, April 23, 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Wednesday, May 14, 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Do you ever need to create a set of name tags using labels? Or to collaborate with one of more people to create one document that everyone agrees on? 

If so, this class if for you! This 90 minute hands-on class will cover mail merges and track changes in Office 2010. During this class you will learn the tips and tricks of merging letters, labels and emails; and the advantages of using track changes to collaborate with colleagues.

Classes are free, but registration is required. Click the website link below for more information and to register.

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1154
Tag: FeaturedTrainingSeminarsWorkshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Getting Started in STATA: TECHB@R workshop

When: Tuesday, April 22, 2:30 p.m. –4:00 p.m.
Monday, May 5, 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This 90 minute workshop will give you the tools to become a STATA pro. The workshop will start with an explanation of when to use STATA over other stats programs and a walk through the interface. Then, the bulk of the workshop time will be spent learning basic commands and processes. A “do file” will be provided for easy access to the commands as well as a handout for keeping track of all of them. The last part of the workshop will bring it all together, moving beyond the basics, blending the commands to create regressions and graphics. 

Be prepared for a fast paced class, some familiarity with Statistics or programming is helpful, but not necessary. 

Please feel free to bring your laptop with STATA installed to follow along. If you want to attend and follow along, but do not have STATA on your computer – then take a look the virtual lab commander is for you. If you need help setting it up, come to the Techbar at least 15 min. before the workshop and the staff can help. 

Classes are free, but registration is required. Click the website link below for more information and to register.

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1486
Tag: WorkshopsGraduate StudentsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

InDesign: Getting Started: TECHB@R workshop

When: Friday, April 18, 9:00 a.m. –10:30 a.m.
Thursday, May 8, 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This 90 minute introduction demo workshop will give you the basics InDesign skills so you can further develop and explore InDesign on your own. During the demonstration, the instructor will create a postcard while giving an overview of the interface, document setup, color and image management, and basic text and shape tools. By the end of the workshop, we’ll have a completed postcard that is ready to send to the print shop. (We’ll even discuss data merges to personalize a message if time allows.)

Please Note: This is a demonstration or BYOL (Bring Your Own Laptop) workshop. No computers are not provided. If you have a laptop with InDesign Creative Suite 5 or higher installed, feel free to bring it and follow along. (Files provided on request.) The workshop will be demonstrated using the latest version of InDesign in Adobe Creative Cloud. 

There is no fee for training, but registration is required. Please click the URL below to register.

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1088
Tag: TrainingWorkshopsGraduate Students
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Updated April 15, 2014 to include May 8 session.

Alert B Level construction April 11-18

alert symbolWork is currently underway to install new flooring in two areas of the B Level Bookstacks. This will briefly impact users’ access to some books in those areas, and will create some noise and dust due to construction. Work will take place Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. and some books may be inaccessible during additional hours over the coming week. We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate our users’ patience as we complete this important work

This work involves the installation of several different flooring materials in the aisles of two bays of compact shelving to test possible options for a larger project to replace all flooring on the B Level over the coming summer. 

Users may request any books that are temporarily unavailable due to this work by visiting the Regenstein Circulation desk. Staff will page the material and make it available as soon as possible.

For detailed information about call number ranges affected by this work on a given day, see the Regenstein Floorplans & Call Number Guide.

Imaging/Imagining the Human Body

Imaging Imagining exhibition - 3 images of handsThree-venue exhibition at the University of Chicago examines anatomical representation from artistic and scientific perspectives throughout history

March 25–June 20, 2014

A multi-venue exhibition curated by two physicians at the University of Chicago explores the history of anatomical representation and the evolving relationship between the arts and medical science. On view from March 25–June 20, Imaging/Imagining the Human Body in Anatomical Representation is jointly presented in three parts by the Special Collections Research Center (The Body as Text), Smart Museum of Art (The Body as Art), and The John Crerar Library (The Body as Data) in collaboration with the UChicago Arts|Science Initiative. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

The exhibition includes over 60 works in a variety of media—drawings, rare manuscripts, sculptures, engravings, and radiographic images—dating from the Renaissance to today. It features both imaginative depictions of the human figure made by artists as well as scientific images of the body, and traces the interplay of artistic and medical imaging throughout history.

“In popular perception, the artist depicts the human figure for aesthetic or expressive purposes, while scientific images of the body lay claim to objective representation,” write the curators, Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Mindy Schwartz, MD, Professor of Medicine, at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine. “In fact, the story of anatomical representation is far more complex.”

As Imaging/Imagining reveals, early anatomical illustrations required close collaboration between anatomists and artists, illustrators, and engravers. These images reflected scientific conventions but were also weighted with aesthetic, social, political, and religious meaning. As anatomical images became more medicalized, the disciplines diverged. Following the advent of the X-ray at the turn of the twentieth century, the divide widened as new imaging technologies allowed medical practitioners to visualize the body as never before. At the same time, modernism and abstraction radically transformed artistic practice, which had for centuries emphasized the centrality of the well-drawn figure. Today, modern medical imaging continues to inform artists’ perceptions of the body while still relying in part on the subjective hand of an expert to manipulate and reinterpret layers of data into a visual form.

“A project like Imaging/Imagining transcends traditional disciplinary boundaries in a way that enriches our understanding,” said Julie Marie Lemon, Program Director and Curator of the Arts|Science Initiative in the Office of the Provost at the University of Chicago. “The exhibition is an example of the sort of sustained dialogue the Arts|Science Initative seeks to foster between artistic and scientific forms of inquiry within the University and beyond.”

The exhibition’s themes will be explored in greater depth through several public programs, notably the talk on Thursday, April 17 at 5 pm, “Seeing Into and Seeing Through: The Promise and Peril of Imaging” by Dr. Richard B. Gunderman, Professor of Radiology, Pediatrics, Medical Education, Philosophy, Liberal Arts, and Philanthropy, and Vice Chair of Radiology at Indiana University.

Exhibition Sections

Imaging/Imagining runs concurrently across three venues, each with a dedicated section that contributes to the larger themes of the exhibition.

Imaging/Imagining: The Body as Text

March 25–June 20, 2014
Special Collections Research Center, Joseph Regenstein Library, The University of Chicago, 1100 E. 57th Street
Monday–Friday, 9 am–4:45 pm; Saturdays, 9 am–12:45 pm (when University of Chicago classes are in session); closed Sunday

The Body as Text explores the history of anatomical representation from the Renaissance to the turn of the twentieth century. It features illustrated anatomic texts, like Vesalius’s De humani corporis fabrica and Henry Gray’s Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical, that map the body’s complex systems and functions, as well as prints, paintings, sculptures, drawings, and radiographs. The objects on view are drawn from the holdings of the Special Collections Research Center and the Smart Museum of Art.

Together, the works prompt viewers not only to examine the intent of the image makers and the intended function of the image but also to explore our contemporary understanding of the human body in the context of a broad history of anatomical representation and scientific progress.

The Body as Text is curated by Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Mindy Schwartz, MD, Professor of Medicine, at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine, in collaboration with Catherine Uecker, Rare Books Librarian, Special Collections.

Imaging/Imagining: The Body as Art

March 25–June 22, 2014
Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, 5550 S. Greenwood Avenue
Tuesday–Sunday, 10 am–5 pm; Thursday until 8 pm; closed Monday

The Body as Art gathers images of the body from a range of historical periods and considers the extent to which they conform to established representational conventions or seem instead to reflect the artist’s own observations or expressive goals. It features works drawn from the Smart’s collection and the holding of the Special Collections Research Center. Highlights include figurative etchings; sculpture by Edgar Degas, Henry Moore, and Jacques Lipchitz; a cubist portrait by Jean Metzinger; prints by Otto Dix; and a sketchbook of watercolor drawings by Ivan Albright.

This section of the exhibition asks visitors to consider the enduring role of figure drawing in academic art study; the relation between artistic and scientific abstraction; the depiction of bodily suffering in wartime; and what art and medicine have to offer each other in the pursuit of accuracy, humanity, and empathy, when it comes to representing the body.

The Body as Art is curated by Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Mindy Schwartz, MD, Professor of Medicine, at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine, in collaboration with Anne Leonard, Smart Museum Curator and Associate Director of Academic Initiatives.

The Body as Art is made possible by Smart Museum’s Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Endowment.

Imaging/Imagining: The Body as Data

March 25–June 20, 2014
The John Crerar Library, The University of Chicago, 5730 S. Ellis Avenue
Monday—Saturday, 9 am–4:30 pm; closed Sunday

The Body as Data examines the data revolution of modern medical imaging that has transformed anatomical representation and how we view the body. This data revolution occurred when the basic concepts behind x-ray technology combined with the capabilities of computers. The result is imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans that produce vast amounts of data which is then processed into modern anatomical representations.

These images often claim scientific neutrality and are viewed with a clinical gaze, yet they are more than objective and unaltered pictures of the body. They represent the body broken apart into bits of data that are then manipulated to produce a myriad of visually interpretable images. These images have in turn informed artists’ perceptions of the body and further pushed the boundaries of how we view the human form.

The Body as Data is curated by Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Mindy Schwartz, MD, Professor of Medicine, at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine in collaboration with Stephen Thomas, MD, Assistant Professor of Radiology, and Adam Schwertner, fourth year medical student at the Pritzker School of Medicine, The University of Chicago.

Related Programs

Family Day: Ultrasounds, Exquisite Corpses

Saturday, April 5, 1–4 pm
Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, 5550 S. Greenwood Avenue

Drop by the Smart for an afternoon of family-friendly art activities. Combine ultrasounds with the ultimate Surrealist parlor game to make exquisite corpse drawings from ultrasound images of your internal structures. The ultrasound machine will be operated by Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine and co-curator of the exhibition Imaging/Imagining.*

Free. All materials provided. Activities are best for kids ages 4–12, accompanied by an adult.

*The purpose of the ultrasound demonstration at the Smart’s Family Day is educational only. The ultrasound machine is not being used for any medical or diagnostic purpose.

The Body in 3D

Thursday, April 17, 3–5 pm
The John Crerar Library, The University of Chicago, 5730 S. Ellis Avenue, Kathleen A. Zar Room

Drop by Crerar Library and watch a 3D video tour of the human body including the brain and other internal organs. Using images captured with contemporary medical scanning technologies this looping film will run every 5-10 minutes. 3D glasses will be provided.

Lecture: “Seeing Into and Seeing Through: The Promise and Peril of Imaging”

Thursday, April 17, 5 pm
Regenstein Library, The University of Chicago, 1100 E. 57th Street, room 122

Dr. Richard B. Gunderman, author of X-Ray Vision: The Evolution of Medical Imaging and its Human Significance, will explore the exhibition’s themes in a free public lecture. Dr. Gunderman is Professor of Radiology, Pediatrics, Medical Education, Philosophy, Liberal Arts, and Philanthropy, and Vice Chair of Radiology at Indiana University.

Free. Seating will be available on a first come, first served basis.

How to Draw Hands

Thursday, April 17, 5:30–7:30 pm
Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, 5550 S. Greenwood Avenue

The human hand is notoriously hard to draw. Learn some tricks and techniques during a fun and supportive sketching session.

Free. All materials provided. Open to adults of all skill levels.

Drawing the Body with the Body

Thursday, May 15, 5:30–7:30 pm
Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, 5550 S. Greenwood Avenue

Enjoy a performance by Mordine & Co. Dance Theater and take part in a gesture drawing and sketching program. The dance, choreographed by Shirley Mordine, is inspired by works on view in Imaging/Imagining. Performing Artists: Simone Baechle, Danielle Gilmore, Joseph Hutto, Emily Lukasewski, Michael O’Neil, and Melissa Pillarella.

Free. All materials provided. Open to adults of all skill levels.

About

Imaging/Imagining is curated by Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Mindy Schwartz, MD, Professor of Medicine, at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine. It is presented by the Special Collections Research Center, Smart Museum of Art, and The John Crerar Library in collaboration with the UChicago Arts|Science Initiative. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

Images (from left to right): Detail from Henry Gray’s Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical, 1858, Rare Book Collection, The University of Chicago Library.

Walker Evans, Untitled (Two hands), n.d., printed by the Chicago Albumen Works in 1980, Gelatin silver print. Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, Gift of Arnold H. Crane, 1980.107.

X-ray of a hand holding a feather duster from Walter König’s 14 Photographien mit Röntgen-Strahlen, 1896. John Crerar Collection of Rare Books in the History of Science and Medicine, The University of Chicago Library.

Media Images

Download high-resolution images on Dropbox.

Media Contacts

C.J. Lind, Associate Director, Communications, Smart Museum of Art, 773.702.0176, cjlind@uchicago.edu

Rachel A. Rosenberg, Director of Communications, The University of Chicago Library, 773.834.1519, ra-rosenberg@uchicago.edu

2014 Platzman Fellowships awarded

The Special Collections Research Center of the University of Chicago Library is pleased to announce the recipients of the Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowships for 2014. 

Established by bequest of George W. Platzman (1920-2008), Professor Emeritus in Geophysical Sciences at the University, the fellowships are named in memory of George’s brother Robert Platzman (1918-1973), who was Professor of Chemistry and Physics and worked for the Metallurgical Laboratory at the University of Chicago during World War II. The Platzman Fellowship program provides funds for visiting researchers whose projects require on-site consultation of University of Chicago Library collections, primarily but not exclusively materials in Special Collections. Support for beginning scholars is a priority of the program, as are projects that cannot be conducted without onsite access to the original materials, and where University of Chicago Library collections are central to the research.

Additional information on the Platzman Fellowship program is available on the Special Collections web site:  http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/scrc/about/platzmanfellowships.html

Robert L. Platzman Memorial Fellowship Recipients for 2014

 D. Trevor Burrows, PhD candidate, History, Purdue University; drawing on the Hyde Park and Kenwood Interfaith Council Records, student organization records, and faculty papers for a study of “Social Reform and Religious Renewal: Religion and Student Activism in the Long 1960s”

Ben Glaser, Assistant Professor of English, Yale University; examining the Poetry Records, Harriet Monroe Papers, and William Vaughan Moody papers, for a project on “Modernism’s Metronome: Metrical Vestiges, Historical Prosody, and American Poetry, 1910-1930”

Jordan Grant, PhD Candidate, History, American University; researching the William H. English Papers, Stephen A. Douglas Papers, and Lincoln Collection for a study of “Catchers and Kidnappers: Slave-Hunting in Early America”

Camden Hutchison, PhD candidate, History, University of Wisconsin-Madison; consulting the Henry C. Simons Papers and other faculty collections for a project titled “The Efficiency Norm and U.S. Legal-Economic Policy, 1969-1992”

Karina Jannello, PhD candidate, History, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, Argentina; reviewing the International Association for Cultural Freedom Records for a study of “The Cultural Cold War in the Southern Cone: Intellectuals, Magazines, and Publishing Networks in the Congress for Cultural Freedom in Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay, 1950-1970”

Brian Lefresne, PhD Candidate, Literary Studies, University of Guelph, Ontario; researching the Alton Abraham Collection of Sun Ra for a dissertation titled “Sun Ra at the Crossroads of Jazz and Performance”

Martin Nekola, PhD, Political Science, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic; examining the Archive of the Czechs and Slovaks Abroad for materials on a study of “Czechs in Chicago”

Melanie Newport, PhD candidate, History, Temple University; researching the American Civil Liberties Union, Illinois Division Records and faculty papers for a project on “Cook County Jail and the Local Origins of Mass Incarceration, 1836-1995”

Daniel Royles, PhD, History, Temple University; consulting the ACT UP Chicago Records for a study titled “Don’t We Die Too? The Political Culture of African American AIDS Activism”

Adam Smith, Senior Lecturer, History, University College London; examining the Stephen A. Douglas Papers for a project titled “The Stormy Present: Conservatism in American Politics in an Age of Revolution, 1848-1876”

Leif Tornquist, PhD candidate, Religious Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; reviewing the Shailer Mathews Papers for a study titled “Evolving the Divine: Eugenics, Embodied Perfectionism, and the Evolutionary Theology of Shailer Mathews”

Tobias Warner, Assistant Professor of French, University of California-Davis; consulting the International Association for Cultural Freedom Records for a study of “The Role of the Congress for Cultural Freedom in Shaping the Politics of Language in African Literature”

Michael Woods, Assistant Professor of History, Marshall University; to research the Stephen A. Douglas Papers for a book titled “Arguing until Doomsday: Stephen Douglas, Jefferson Davis, and the Struggle for American Democracy”

Dissertation Procedures for Staff: workshop

When: Monday, April 14, 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Spring 2014 doctoral candidates will use a web-based interface for online submission, review, and publication of dissertations. In this session, we will review the administrator’s role in helping students file their dissertations electronically. New graduate program administrators as well as experienced staff who would like a refresher are welcome to attend. Please feel free to bring your questions to this information session. If you would like to review the ETD interface, please visit: http://www.etdadmin.com/uchicago

To register, click the link below.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=730
Contact: Dissertation Office 
(773) 702-7404
Tag: TrainingMeetingsWorkshopsStaff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
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Dissertation Procedures for Students: workshop

When: Thursday, April 10, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday, April 15, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Thursday, April 17, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Are you a Ph.D. student planning to graduate in June 2014? Spring 2014 doctoral candidates will use a web-based interface for online submission, review, and publication of dissertations. In this session, we will review the procedures for submitting your dissertation electronically. Please feel free to bring your questions to the session. If you would like to review the ETD interface, visit: http://www.etdadmin.com/uchicago

To register, click on the link below.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=731
Contact: Dissertation Office 
(773) 702-7404
Tag: Student EventsTrainingMeetingsWorkshopsGraduate Students
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
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Scopus Training – Humanities and Social Sciences: workshop

When: Thursday, April 10, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room A-11 
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: Learn how to use Scopus, an interdisciplinary, bibliographic database from Elsevier that indexes the contents of more than 21,000 publications. Scopus also features cited references and can be searched for articles that cite a specific article. This program will focus on using Scopus for research in the Humanities and Social Sciences. The training will be conducted by Rachel McCullough, Regina Heuglas, and Steve Quinlivan from Elsevier. Lunch will be provided by Elsevier.
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1481
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: TrainingGraduate StudentsStaffWorkshopsFree FoodStudent Events Calendar
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Writing Trans-regional Intellectual History & the Rediscovery of Early Modern Indo-Persian Philology: workshop

When: Tuesday, April 1, 2:00 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B 
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: A workshop to introduce the online corpus of South Asian commentaries about polymath Abd al-Rahman Jāmī (1414-1492), and to discuss a new handbook on the origin and reception of Jāmī’s works during the early modern period.

Hosted by Thibaut d’Hubert (University of Chicago) and Alexandre Papas (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris). Discussant: Sunil Sharma (Boston University).

This workshop is presented by the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society in association with the project, A Worldwide Literature: Jāmī (1414-1492) in the Dar al-Islam and Beyond. Cosponsored by the Franke Institute for the Humanities.

RSVP and Agenda at >> http://neubauercollegium.uchicago.edu/events/uc/worldwide_literature_jami/

Contact: Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society 
(773) 834-8936
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More info: http://neubauercollegium.uchicago.edu/events/uc/worldwide_literature_jami/
Tag: ConferencesDiscussionsMeetingsWorkshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
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Ex Libris cafe spring interim hours, March 22 – 30

Beginning Saturday, March 22, the Ex Libris Café will have reduced service hours for the winter interim. In addition, the café will be closed Monday through Wednesday for scheduled renovations to the kitchen area. Regular hours will resume Monday, March 31.

Saturday 3/22 and Sunday 3/23:

closed

Monday 3/24 – Wednesday 3/26:

closed for kitchen renovation

Thursday 3/27 and Friday 3/28:

9:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Saturday 3/29 and Sunday 3/30:

closed

As always, the seating area and vending machines will remain open during Regenstein’s building hours.

Feature Story Library Director Judith Nadler to retire

After a distinguished 48-year career, Library Director and University Librarian Judith Nadler, who oversaw the planning and construction of the Joe and Rika Mansueto Library, will retire on June 30, 2014. A national search is underway to identify her successor.

Under Nadler’s leadership, the University of Chicago Library flourished as a prized and effective research tool for students and faculty. With its 11.9 million volumes, noted collections in fields ranging from sociology to the history of science, rich selection of non-English holdings and commitment to keeping its collection on campus, the Library has become a destination for scholars and a model for other institutions worldwide.  

Judith Nadler

Judith Nadler, Director and University Librarian (Photo by Dan Dry)

A frequently consulted expert on library science, Nadler is known for her broad expertise, unlimited energy, conceptual acuity and deep devotion to both the Library and the University of Chicago.

“Judi has tirelessly pursued new opportunities, enhanced every aspect of the Library and demonstrated continuously expert and nimble leadership,” Provost Thomas F. Rosenbaum wrote in a message to faculty on March 17. “We are indebted to Judi for her keen judgment and generosity of spirit while she served as the Library’s guide, administrator and strategic planner.”

“I feel deeply privileged to have served the University and the Library for almost five decades and grateful for the opportunities given to me to serve it well. I cannot think of an environment that is more inspirational and more conducive to enabling success,” Nadler said.

“Among the achievements I am most proud of are the lasting impact of the Mansueto Library, the sustained confidence and support of the faculty, and the evidenced quality and achievements of the library staff. More than what we have done in the past, it’s about what we have built for the future, and that is what I would like to be remembered for,” she added.

The Mansueto Library, one of the crowning achievements of Nadler’s two terms as director, houses cutting-edge facilities for book preservation and digitization, as well as a high-density underground storage system with the capacity to hold 3.5 million volume equivalents. The library was designed to fulfill scholars’ needs for easy access to print resources at a time when many other research universities are moving their collections to off-site storage.

The library is named in honor of Joe Mansueto, AB’78, and MBA’80, and Rika Yoshida, AB’91, who gave a $25 million gift to the University in 2008. Architect Helmut Jahn designed the facility’s iconic glass dome, which encloses a light-filled reading room and an underground storage system that descends 50 feet below ground.

‘Nationally recognized and locally treasured’

Andrew Abbott, the Gustavus F. and Ann M. Swift Distinguished Service Professor in Sociology, worked closely with Nadler during the planning process for Mansueto. He described working with Nadler as “one of the greatest pleasures of my career. Her breadth of expertise, her commitment to the life of the mind, her ability to innovate boldly while maintaining traditional library values and practices: These unique qualities have led to the creation of a research library unmatched in the world. It has been an honor to work with her as a colleague and a friend.”

During her 10 years as director, Nadler also maintained six on-site libraries, built collections, explored and implemented digitization techniques, amassed electronic assets and automating services to optimize the preservation and access of vital resource materials, while cultivating a robust relationship between the Library and University faculty.

Diane Lauderdale, professor of Health Studies and chair of the Library’s faculty board, praised Nadler’s leadership and vision for the Library.

“Judi’s retirement is an occasion to celebrate her achievements and the health of the University’s library,” Lauderdale said. “Her wise leadership and understanding of research libraries are nationally recognized and locally treasured. Judi has expertly navigated the Library through changes that ensure its continued centrality to the intellectual life of the University by strengthening its staff, collections and physical environment.”

Nadler joined UChicago in 1966 as a cataloger in the Foreign Language Section of the Library’s Cataloging Department. She was successively promoted to head of the Social Sciences Section, head of the Cataloging Department, assistant director for Technical Services and then associate director of the Library.

In addition to her duties as director, Nadler currently serves as chief selector for the Library’s Judaica Collection, having raised much of the funding to build this collection.

Nadler studied history and comparative linguistics at the University of Cluj in Romania, earned an undergraduate degree in English and Romance Studies from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, a master’s degree in library science from the Israel Graduate School and pursued graduate studies in comparative literature at Hebrew University.

The search committee is chaired by Deputy Provost for Research Roy Weiss and includes Andrew Abbott, Elizabeth Asmis, Michael Geyer, Klara Jelinkova, Garrett Kiely, Diane Lauderdale, Randal Picker and James Vaughan.

A University of Chicago news release

 

Library spring interim hours, March 22–30

Beginning Saturday, March 22, the Library will have reduced building hours at all of its locations for the spring interim. Normal hours resume Monday, March 31.

Crerar Library
Sunday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.
Friday – Saturday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

D’Angelo Law Library Circulation
D’Angelo’s spring interim hours began March 15; normal hours resume March 26.
Saturday, March 22 & Sunday, March 23,  Closed
Monday – Tuesday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 29, 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Sunday, March 30, noon – 9:00 p.m.

Eckhart Library
Monday – Friday noon – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Mansueto Library
Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 7:45 p.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday, March 23, 10:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday, March 30, 10:00 a.m. – 12:45 a.m.

Regenstein Library
Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sunday, March 23, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sunday, March 30, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 a.m.

Regenstein All-Night Study
Closed until April 1 at 1:00 a.m.

SSA Library
Monday – Friday 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Feature Story Essential Skills Graduate Workshop Series

Librarian teaching a class

Photo by Jason Smith.

Graduate students!  Are you on campus during Spring Break?  Use the break in classes to gain essential skills for academic and professional success. The University of Chicago Library and IT Services are offering a series of workshops designed for graduate students March 24- 28. 

All programs will be held in Regenstein Library.  There is no fee for training, but space is limited and registration is required.   Sign up today!

All About EndNote
Thursday, March 27 from 11:00 – Noon in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
Learn about the popular desktop citation management software, EndNote. In this class, you will learn to how to use EndNote, including how to create and manage libraries, import references from online databases, and create formatted bibliographies and citations in Microsoft Word.

BrowZine
Thursday, March 27 from 2:30-3:30 p.m.  in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160  – Register Now
Do you own an iPad or Android?  Then the BrowZine app might be a great tool for you!  BrowZine assists users by presenting open access and Library-subscribed journals on a common newsstand.  The result is an easy and familiar way to browse, read and monitor scholarly journals across the disciplines or to have a convenient list of favorite journals titles at your fingertips.  Join us in the workshop to learn how to install and use this app.

EndNote or Zotero?  Selecting the Best Citation Manager
Monday, March 24 from 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
Citation managers are powerful, time-saving tools that help you manage your research. They can also help you format your papers in MS Word by creating bibliographies, citations, and footnotes automatically in the style you choose, such as APA or Chicago.  This workshop will compare how EndNote and Zotero – two popular citation managers – allow you to save, share, and cite information. In order to provide a side-by-side comparison of tools, the format of this workshop is demonstration rather than hands-on training.

Excel 2010: Skills for the Workplace
Friday, March 28 from 1:00-2:30 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160 Register Now
Do you need to know the basics of Excel 2010 for an internship, job interview, or for a class? During this 90 minute demonstration session, you will learn the Excel 2010 basics plus tips to make your work in Excel more efficient. We’ll create a workbook that uses the autofill handle, conditional formatting, relative and absolute references, automatic formatting, and create a chart to represent data. Please feel free to bring your laptop with Excel 2010 installed to follow along. There will be a few laptops available to borrow if you do not have a laptop and would like to follow along.

Excel 2010: Tools to Organize Data
Friday, March 28 from 3:00-4:30 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160 Register Now
Do you need to organize and summarize data sets in Excel? This 90 minute session will demonstrate how to navigate data sets, create pivot tables, use conditional formatting, and take advantage of useful data ribbon features including goal seek and data validation. After this class you should have a full set of tools to use with your own data. Please note, this class is for people who are familiar with Excel 2010. Please feel free to bring your laptop with Excel 2010 installed to follow along. There maybe a few laptops available to borrow if you do not have a laptop and would like to follow along.

Following the Citation Trail
Monday, March 24 from 10:30-11:30 a.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
Thursday, March 27 from 1:00-2:00 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
This workshop will discuss methods for building your bibliography with special emphasis on citation linking: tracking resources that cite a specific article, book or essay.

Getting Started with STATA
Monday, March 24 from 12:30-2:00 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
Tuesday, March 25 from 1:00-2:30 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
This 90-minute workshop will give you the tools to become a STATA pro. The workshop will start with an explanation of when to use STATA over other stats programs and a walk through the interface. Then, the bulk of the workshop time will be spent learning basic commands and processes. A “do file” will be provided for easy access to the commands as well as a handout for keeping track of all of them. The last part of the workshop will bring it all together, moving beyond the basics, blending the commands to create regressions and graphics. Be prepared for a fast paced class, some familiarity with Statistics or programming is helpful, but not necessary. (Also, if you want to attend, but do not have STATA on your computer, take a look at commander.uchicago.edu. If you need help setting it up, come to the Techbar at least 15 min. early and the staff can help.) 

I Want My NYT! Full-Text News Databases
Friday, March 28 from 10:00-10:30 a.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
Did you know that you can access current newspapers online through the Library’s subscriptions? In this program, you’ll learn about Library databases like ProQuest Newsstand, LexisNexis, Factiva, and Eureka that provide access to hundreds of U.S. and international newspapers.

Introduction to EndNote (Online Version)
Wednesday, March 26 from 1:00-2:00 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
EndNote offers an online version of its popular citation manager that is available to the University of Chicago community through the Library.  The online version offers the key features of the popular EndNote software, but with added enhancements of cloud storage, syncing, and the ability to easily share and collaborate.  Come to this workshop and see if EndNote’s online version it works for you.

Introduction to Using Special Collections
Tuesday, March 25 from 3:00-4:00 p.m. in the Special Collections Research Center, Regenstein Library – Register Now
Learn about the rare book and archival collections housed in the library and how to incorporate these materials in your research and teaching. This session will cover the fundamentals of requesting and using rare and archival materials as well as hands-on time with the collections and a special focus on innovative strategies to enhance teaching.  

Introduction to Zotero
Tuesday, March 25 from 11:30-12:30 p.m in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
Zotero is a free citation manager that allows you to save citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in standard citation styles, including MLA, Chicago and APA. This hands-on workshop will introduce some of the key functions of Zotero such as: installing Zotero, adding citations to your Zotero library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Microsoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents.

Search Alerts and RSS
Wednesday, March 26 from 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160  - Register Now
How do you stay current in your field? Do you review the latest issues of core journals? Do you regularly visit society and association websites? Do you search databases for the latest information on your area of research? Do you follow key authors in your field? Would it be helpful if all of this information came to you, instead of you finding it? With alerts and RSS feeds, you can automate various modes of information gathering and save valuable time.

Using the UChicago Wiki
Tuesday, March 25 from 10:00 -11:00 a.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160 – Register Now
What are Wikis and how do you use them effectively? This 60 minute workshop will introduce you to the UChicago Wiki as a tool for collaboration. By the end of the workshop you will be able to create and customize wiki spaces, add and edit pages, and invite other users to work together.Please bring your laptop with internet access for some hands-on experience. Free laptop lending for students, staff and faculty is available (on a first come, first served basis) at the TECHB@R.

 

There is no fee for training, but space is limited and registration is required.   All programs will be held in Regenstein Library. 

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact Rebecca Starkey at rstarkey@uchicago.edu or 773-702-4484.

Extended Library hours March 14 – 16

To support students preparing for finals, Crerar, Mansueto and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours Friday, March 14 and Saturday, March 15.

Mansueto will be open all weekend until 12:45 a.m.; Crerar and Regenstein will be open until 1:00 a.m.

The Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will be open 24 hours until the end of finals on Friday, March 21.

For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Cancelled – Scopus Training – Humanities and Social Sciences: workshop

This workshop has been cancelled.

When: Thursday, March 13, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room A-11 
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description:

Learn how to use Scopus, an interdisciplinary, bibliographic database from Elsevier that indexes the contents of more than 21,000 publications. Scopus also features cited references and can be searched for articles that cite a specific article. This program will focus on using Scopus for research in the Humanities and Social Sciences. The training will be conducted by Rachel McCullough, Regina Heuglas, and Steve Quinlivan from Elsevier.

Lunch will be provided by Elsevier.

Please register by Tuesday, March 11.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1481
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Graduate StudentsStaffWorkshopsSeminarsTrainingFree Food
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
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Updated March 11, 2014.

Norman Maclean Papers available for research

Norman Maclean

Norman Maclean

Author and University of Chicago professor Norman Maclean’s papers are available for research in the Special Collections Research Center.  Raised in Montana, Maclean earned his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1940 and taught English until he retired at age 70. He then began writing, and  achieved national fame for works he wrote after his retirement, including the novel, A River Runs Through It. The collection includes correspondence, administrative and teaching materials from the University of Chicago, materials related to the creation and publication of his writings, and an array of additional materials. Maclean died in 1990. 

Maclean’s distinguished teaching career at the University of Chicago began when he accepted a graduate assistantship in English at the University in 1928. He was promoted to instructor in 1930. Maclean earned his Ph.D. in English literature in 1940 with a dissertation on lyric poetry, and was made an assistant professor in 1941. He was promoted to associate professor in 1944, and attained a full professorship in 1954.

Maclean’s gift for teaching was recognized multiple times throughout his career. He won a teaching award early on in 1932, and was awarded the Llewellyn John and Harriet Manchester Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in 1941 and again in 1973. Quantrell recipients are nominated by students and the award is a high honor for faculty. Though tough, Maclean’s courses were popular among students. His demand for excellence was tempered by a keen sense of fairness and a generosity of spirit toward the students he mentored. In 1962 he was installed as the William Rainey Harper Professor of English Literature, a position he held until his retirement in 1972.

Upon retirement, Maclean embarked on a second career as a writer. He eased into authorship with two well-received critical essays published in 1952, and a handful of autobiographical and witty essays published in the early 1970s. His most significant work of fiction, A River Runs Through It, was published in 1976 by the University of Chicago Press – the first work of new fiction ever published by the Press. A River Runs Through It consists of a novella of the same title and two short stories. The book was a critical success, a popular bestseller, and a contender for the 1977 Pulitzer Prize. Multiple filmmakers and production companies vied for the film rights to the book, and it was eventually adapted for film in 1992 under the direction of Robert Redford.

The University of Chicago named an undergraduate dormitory for Maclean — Maclean House — in 1991. Every year, residents celebrate “Maclean Day,” during which the House president gives a speech that celebrates Norman Maclean and the House community. In 1997 the University’s alumni association established the Norman Maclean Faculty Award which recognizes emeritus or senior faculty members who have made outstanding contributions to teaching and student life on campus.

 

 

Women’s Work: Scholarship by Women at UChicago

The careers of selected past and present University of Chicago women composers, philosophers, and scholars are presented in this group of coordinated mini-exhibits in Regenstein Library. The exhibits are organized in conjunction with International Women’s Day at the University of Chicago.

Exhibit Series Dates: March 3 to June 16, 2014.

2nd Floor: Academic Activism: Insights from the Social Sciences

Academic Activism word cloudSocially engaged scholarship is a long-standing tradition at the University of Chicago. This exhibit focuses on recent work by women in three disciplines–sociology, history and political science–and their participation as public intellectuals in civil society.

Organized by Sarah Hogan, Bibliographer for Sociology, Political Science, International Relations, and Public Policy; Julia Gardner, Bibliographer for Gay & Lesbian Studies and Women’s Studies; and Nancy Spiegel, Bibliographer for Art, History, and Cinema and Media Studies.

3rd Floor: Three Women Composers

Three UChicago composers

From left: Shulamit Ran, Marta Ptaszyńska, and Augusta Read Thomas

Three of the world’s most notable women composers teach in the Music Department at the University of Chicago: Shulamit Ran, Marta Ptaszyńska, Augusta Read Thomas. This exhibit will serve to celebrate these three women through handwritten manuscripts, passages from published scores, discographies and sound recordings, photos, news clippings, and reviews.

Organized by Scott Landvatter, Bibliographer for Music.

4th floor: Women and Philosophy at the University of Chicago

Pseudo-Sappho

So-called Sappho: woman with a wax tablet and a stylus. 1st c. CE Pompeii. Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli.Wikimedia Commons

Why are there so few women philosophers? Why does it matter? This exhibit responds to the ongoing underrepresentation of women within the field of Philosophy by highlighting the work of three University of Chicago faculty members: Hannah Arendt, Marjorie Grene, and Martha Nussbaum. Selections from their work will be juxtaposed with materials that reflect the historical and contemporary influence of women and gender tensions on the study of Philosophy at the University.

Organized by Anne Knafl, Bibliographer for Religion; Julie Huh, Philosophy, Class of 2014; and Alaina Bompiedi, Philosophy, Class of 2015.

5th floor: Maureen L. P. Patterson: Bibliographer, Scholar, Spy

Patterson I.D. card

Maureen L. P. Patterson’s Office of Strategic Services I.D. card. The University of Chicago Library.

Maureen L. P. Patterson, 1923-2012, was a scholar and pioneer in the field of South Asian librarianship, developing groundbreaking resources and building the University of Chicago’s world-renowned collection. She also led another, secret life as a member of World War II’s famed intelligence organization, the O.S.S.

Organized by Laura Ring, Assistant South Asia Librarian, and James Nye, Bibliographer for Southern Asia.