Finals stress? Take a study break!

Study Break
Study Break
Sunday, December 6th, 6:00-8:00 p.m
Regenstein Library, A-Level

Everyone needs a break sometimes, especially when studying for finals. Join fellow students & librarians for coloring, 3-D modeling, music, and snacks. The event is free, and snacks are first-come first-serve basis. We hope to see you there!

Please let us know that you’re attending (so we have enough snacks)! Sign up for the event on Facebook.



Extended Library hours December 4 – 6

To support students preparing for finals, Crerar, Mansueto and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week.

Mansueto will be open Friday, December 4 and Saturday, December 5 until 12:45 a.m. Crerar and Regenstein will be open these days until 1 a.m.

The Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will be open 24 hours from Monday, November 30 until the end of finals on Friday, December 11.

For a full list of library hours, see

Thanksgiving week hours 2015

Hours for the University of Chicago Library over the week of Thanksgiving 2015 are as follows:

Wednesday, November 25

Crerar: 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.

D’Angelo Law: 8 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Eckhart: 9 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Mansueto: 8 a.m. – 9:45 p.m.

Regenstein: 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.

SSA: 8:30 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Thursday, November 26

All libraries are closed in observance of Thanksgiving.

Friday, November 27

Crerar: 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.

D’Angelo Law: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Eckhart is closed.

Mansueto: 8 a.m. – 10:45 p.m.

Regenstein: 8 a.m. – 11 p.m.

SSA is closed.

Saturday, November 28

Eckhart is closed. Normal hours resume for all other libraries.

Regenstein All Night Study

All Night Study closes Wednesday, November 25 at 8 a.m. and reopens at 1 a.m. on Monday, November 30.

For a complete list of Library hours, see

Current Exhibits A Philosophy of Education: An Exhibit in Memory of Philip W. Jackson (1928-2015)

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Fourth Floor
Exhibit Dates: November 12 – December 31, 2015

Jackson in his office, circa 1965

Philip W. Jackson
circa 1965. (University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center, apf1-05214)

Philip W. Jackson spent a lifetime in education; as a researcher, a philosopher and an educator. According to his former student, Catharine Bell (PhD ’07), he “believed children have the capacity to see the wonderful in the ordinary.” An exhibit containing exemplars of his work is currently on display in a single exhibit case in the Joseph Regenstein Library.

Jackson, the David Lee Shillinglaw Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in Education, Psychology and the College, received his Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from Columbia in 1955 and joined the University of Chicago faculty the following year. His first book, co-authored by Jacob Getzels, Creativity and Intelligence: Explorations with Gifted Students (1962), challenged views of intelligence by showing a link between creativity and academic intelligence. While his theories were considered groundbreaking, Jackson’s early work employed traditional qualitative research methods, a technique he was later famous among colleagues and students for referring to as “poking them with sticks.” In 1968, after adopting an anthropological approach, Jackson published his best known and most influential work, Life in Classrooms (1968), which sold more than 60,000 copies and was translated into 10 languages. In it he describes the “hidden curriculum” of classrooms; the routines and expectations that shape behavior and attitudes for better and worse.


Philip Jackson at home in retirement

Philip Jackson at home in retirement
(family photo,

In addition, Jackson was an internationally known expert on John Dewey. He credited Dewey with inspiring his initial interest in education and he authored and edited multiple books about Dewey. In the first chapter of his final book, What is Education? (2012), Jackson quotes a passage from John Dewey’s Experience and Education. Jackson admits to stumbling over this passage when he first encountered it in the late 1940s, “Why would [Dewey]…end his book by asking his readers to devote themselves ‘to finding out just what education is.’?…Surely, even neophytes already knew the answer to that question. I certainly did!…Indeed, the more I pondered Dewey’s advice, the stranger it seemed.” Jackson served as the principal of nursery school at Dewey’s Laboratory School from 1967-70 and director of the Laboratory Schools from 1970-75. He served as Chairman of the Department of Education and Dean of the School of Education at University of Chicago until 1975 and faculty in the Department of Education, until 1998.

Microsoft Excel 2010 Intermediate I: TECHB@R workshop

When: Tuesday, November 10, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Want to use Excel more efficiently and get to know it better? Sign up for this workshop and learn how to do more in fewer clicks! Topics we will cover include:
– Auto Fill Sequence Features
– Find and Replace
– Building Your Own Formulas
– Functions
– Tables
– Totaling Rows/Columns
– Copying formulas
– Hiding/Unhiding Rows/Columns
– Quickly Creating a Simple Chart
– Linking and embedding information in PowerPoint and Word
– Absolute and relative cell referencingBring your laptop (with Excel installed) to follow along. Laptops are available for lending at the TechB@r at the Regenstein Library should you need it.

The instructor will demonstrate using the Excel 2010 for Windows. But we will have a Mac at hand to answer questions about navigational differences.

Prerequisites: Working knowledge of Windows and basic knowledge of Excel.

There is no fee for training, but registration is required. Seating is limited, so sign up soon!

Contact: Academic Technologies
Tag: Workshops
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Productivity and Project Management Tools: workshop

When: Wednesday, November 11, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Organizing PDFs, using multiple devices, collaborating… how do you work efficiently? This workshop will give you tools and tips to help you fine tune your individual and group productivity needs. We will give an overview of our favorite free web tools for note taking, cloud storage, organizing and annotating articles, and managing collaborative projects.
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
Tag: Graduate Students, Staff, Workshops, Training, Research
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Exploring 125 years of history in the Archives


Janet Rowley in her laboratory. 1980s. University of Chicago Photographic Archive, apf7-01134. Copyright 2015, The Chicago Maroon. All rights reserved. Reprinted with Permission. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Celebration of the University of Chicago’s 125th Anniversary is drawing increased campus attention to the University Archives this year. The mission of the Archives is to preserve and make available materials documenting the history of the University and the work of its faculty, students, trustees, and friends. Archives collections span many formats, from official reports to publications, photographs, media, and physical artifacts. Faculty papers in the Archives include letters, diaries, field notes, manuscripts, and teaching materials. In all, the Archives collections have grown to 60,000 linear feet, or more than 73 million individual items, and digital files comprise more than 20 terabytes of records in the Library’s Digital Repository.


Bon Voyage. From the papers of Julian and Eva Overton Lewis. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Important new collections continue to enhance the Archives. Recent acquisitions include the papers of Janet Rowley, the University’s renowned geneticist and cancer researcher and Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient. Gary Becker’s papers bring manuscripts, notes, and teaching materials of the 1992 Nobel laureate in economics. The papers of Jean Elshtain document her interdisciplinary work in religion, political philosophy, and ethics. And the papers of Julian H. Lewis, the University’s first African American professor, and his wife Eva Overton Lewis, document an influential career in medical research and the lives of a leading Chicago family.

Julian H. Lewis

Julian H. Lewis, the first African American to teach at the University of Chicago. 1917. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Recent classroom teaching drawing on the Archives includes Mark Bradley’s seminar on International History. Tara Zahra brought her History Colloquium on Migration and Displacement in Twentieth- Century Europe. Daniel Webb drew on the Archives for his class on America in World Civilization, while Susan Burns brought her class on Doing History. Kathleen Conzen led classes on Chicago and Chicago’s South Side, and Katherine Taylor’s courses examined the University’s modern campus architecture.

Support for research is also central to the Archives mission. Within the past year, projects of University researchers have drawn on the records of the Robert M. Hutchins administration, the Committee on Social Thought, and the University’s Chaucer Research Project of the 1930s. Visiting researchers have examined the papers of Mircea Eliade; the papers of University administrators and faculty involved in the world government movement of the 1940s and 1950s; the field notes and data collected by Sol Tax and other faculty members of the University’s influential Department of Anthropology; and the papers of Ernest W. Burgess, Louis Wirth, Everett Hughes, and other leaders in Chicago sociology.

Sol Tax

Sol Tax, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Chicago. n.d. University of Chicago Photographic Archive, apf1-08219. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

The Library’s annual Robert Platzman Memorial Fellowships bring visiting scholars from the national and international scholarly community. This year, one Platzman Fellow from the University of Cambridge is examining the papers of Charles Merriam, Harold Gosnell, and others for a study of attitudes toward American public opinion. Using the papers of Ernest Burgess and Robert Havinghurst, a graduate student from Indiana University is researching a dissertation on the Guatemalan Indigenismo movement. A scholar from the University of Oxford is examining the papers of Louis Brownlow, Leonard White, and other faculty for a study of American political science. And a graduate student from the University of Minnesota is using the papers of faculty member A.K. Ramanujan to examine literary debates in nineteenth-century South India.

Visit the online University of Chicago Photographic Archive at

Block group paints, 600 block of South Bowen.

Block group paints, 600 block of South Bowen. Mildred Mead, photographer. April 30, 1952. University of Chicago Photographic Archive, apf2-09636. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

A single portal to Chicago history

UChicago Library partners with 21 institutions to create a tool for exploring the history and culture of Chicago


Ida B. Wells-Barnett with her children, 1909, 13.7 x 9.5 cm. Ida B. Wells Papers, Box 10, Folder 1. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

The University of Chicago Library is a major partner in the creation of a new online portal, Explore Chicago Collections, that documents the rich history and culture of the Chicago region. Launching on October 22, the free portal helps researchers, students, and the general public to locate and access more than 100,000 maps, photos, letters, and other materials from across the city.

This portal is the cornerstone initiative of a city-wide consortium, Chicago Collections, that includes universities, museums, and organizations as diverse as the Alliance Française and the Chicago Zoological Society.

Charles Blair, Director of the University of Chicago Library’s Digital Library Development Center, has played a key role in the development of this new search tool. As Co-chair of the Chicago Collections Portal Committee he has contributed technical expertise in the underlying portal software as well as experience developing effective digital asset management and discovery tools that meet the needs of a wide variety of users. The Library will also be contributing content for the portal, including finding aids describing our Chicago-related archival and manuscript collections, as well as several thousand digitized photographs, beginning with 33 photographs of pioneering Chicago civil rights activist Ida B. Wells and more than 1,000 of Chicago neighborhoods and urban renewal by photographer Mildred Mead.

In addition to bringing resources from member organizations together into a single search interface, the consortium has been developing a wide range of outreach programs and services including an exhibition, lectures, and a Cooperative Reference Network that will provide answers to questions from researchers and the general public about Chicago history and member collections.

Access the portal at

Enabling discovery of the Saul Bellow Papers: A gift from Bob and Carolyn Nelson

2015 marks the centennial of the birth of the late Saul Bellow. The 1976 Nobel laureate in literature, Bellow taught as a member of the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago from 1962 to 1993, immortalizing Hyde Park and the city of Chicago in his novels and making a lasting impression on generations of students. Now, thanks to a generous gift from alumni Bob Nelson and Carolyn Nelson, 2015 is also the year when the processing of the University of Chicago’s Saul Bellow Papers begins.

Saul Bellow

Saul Bellow, signing copies of his book “Humboldt’s Gift” in the university bookstore. September 1975. Photographer John Vail. University of Chicago Photographic Archive, apf1-00516, Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

The Saul Bellow Papers include 145 linear feet of material dating from roughly 1940 to 2003. The collection is currently divided into 71 parts, reflecting a series of gifts, deposits, and acquisitions that began in 1963. Almost half of the Papers—a total of more than 222,000 pages—are manuscripts, letters, and other materials written by Saul Bellow himself.

Because of the generosity of the Nelsons, the Bellow Papers can now be fully reviewed, systematically rearranged into one unified collection, and described in a comprehensive manner for the first time. The collection will be organized into a single sequence of nine archival series: biographical, correspondence, writings by Saul Bellow, writings by others, honors and awards, photographs, memorabilia, oversize, and restricted private letters. After arrangement and description are completed, a guide to the collection with a comprehensive inventory of all materials will be added to the online Special Collections Finding Aid Database, where it can be searched in the context of related collections and discovered worldwide through all web search engines. The fully organized Saul Bellow Papers will be available for consultation by faculty, students, and visiting researchers and scholars in the Special Collections Research Center Reading Room.

“The Nelsons’ gift will be invaluable to scholars on campus and around the world, who will be able to discover comprehensive descriptions of the archives online,” said Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian.

The increased accessibility of the Saul Bellow Papers, and the scholarship such access will enable, are important to the Nelsons. “Bellow is acknowledged as one of the preeminent novelists of his (and our) time,” Bob wrote. “Processing his papers will advance understanding and appreciation of his work.”

Carolyn and Bob Nelson

Carolyn and Bob Nelson

The Nelsons feel an enthusiasm for the Papers that harkens back to their days as students at UChicago, when they saw Bellow strolling around Hyde Park and enjoyed reading their favorite Bellow novel, Herzog. Graduates of the Humanities Division, Bob, AM’64, and Carolyn, AM’64, PhD’67, are avid collectors of literature who have assembled more than 6,000 books including approximately 300 first editions. Carolyn is a longstanding member of the Visiting Committee to the Library, serving since 2005, and Bob served on the Visiting Committee to the Division of the Social Sciences from 2005 to 2013. Carolyn, whose degrees are in English, is a distinguished bibliographer who worked at Yale University Library updating the foundational Short-Title Catalogue of Books . . . 1641-1700, and launched a groundbreaking companion catalogue, British Newspapers and Periodicals 1641-1700. The Nelsons’ support thus extends Carolyn’s lifelong commitment to enabling the study of literature in English.

Even unprocessed, scholars have begun finding gems in the collection. Benjamin Taylor makes special note of letters from Bellow’s father and John F. Kennedy in our Library’s Bellow Papers in his 2010 volume of Bellow’s selected correspondence. Zachary Leader, author of the 2015 biography The Life of Saul Bellow, relied heavily on our collection for his work. Their initial discoveries speak to the tremendous potential of the Papers as the collection becomes more widely known.

Feature Story People PhD student interns gain new perspectives at the Library

When the call went out for summer internship ideas for the University of Chicago’s Graduate Global Impact program, librarians on campus recognized a dual opportunity. PhD students could develop new perspectives on scholarship by working with librarians on important projects, while the work they accomplished could enhance the Library’s offerings for its many users.

Special Collections Intern Ellen Ambrosone with blueprints

Special Collections Intern Ellen Ambrosone with blueprints (Photo by John Zich)

Four interns—Rafadi Hakim, Ellen Ambrosone, Marco Torres, and Eric Phillips—were hired for summer 2015. Through their internships, they gained new insights into the local and global impact of librarianship and scholarship.

The skills these interns developed in the Library can help them in a wide range of environments in the future. “The primary objective of the internship program is to provide graduate students with flexible training that can help them prepare for careers in academia, nonprofits, government, and industry,” said A-J Aronstein, Associate Director of Graduate Career Development and Employer Relations. “The kind of skills that one develops in the Library—including digital skills, coding, and archival research—are just as vital for jobs on the tenure track as they are for jobs in other fields.”

Digital South Asia Library Intern Rafadi Hakim

A PhD student in Anthropology, Rafadi Hakim, was hired to help expand and enhance the presentation of data and texts in the Digital South Asia Library (DSAL). His projects ranged from writing a grant application with librarians to adding digital facsimiles to the DSAL website.

Hakim jumped at the chance to be involved in the digital humanities. “Sometimes as a student, I feel I’m spending so much time fine tuning small parts of my own paper for just a few people,” he said. But, when working on the DSAL, he explained, “It’s not just about this exclusive circle. It’s massively helpful to people in different countries.” His work this summer required thinking about how to best serve students, scholars, and others with varying degrees of fluency in South Asian languages and varying amounts of Internet bandwidth.

Hakim also appreciates the new perspectives on scholarship that he gained from working with James Nye, Bibliographer for Southern Asia, and Laura Ring, Cataloger and Assistant South Asia Librarian.   “It’s nice to get some mentoring from people in addition to the faculty in your own department,” he said.

Rafadi Hakim

Rafadi Hakim examines an image that will be added to the Digital South Asia Library. (Photo by John Zich)


Special Collections Intern Ellen Ambrosone

Over the last several years in particular, Special Collections has received an enormous influx of architectural drawings. “They’re hanging on racks; they’re in drawers; they’re in archival boxes,” said Kathleen Feeney, Head of Archives Processing and Digital Access. “Our best estimate is that there are 117,000 of them. We know we have them from the entire history of the University, from landscape drawings to electrical plans, but when we hired Ellen, we didn’t have a strong inventory.”

Ambrosone, a PhD candidate in South Asian Languages and Civilizations, welcomed the opportunity to participate in the first phase of a multi-year project to preserve and make these drawings accessible. She began the compilation of an inventory of the drawings, so that researchers can more readily understand what is available.

Processing Archivist Ashley Locke Gosselar, who helped to direct Ambrosone’s work on the project, emphasized its importance. “Our campus—and the city at large—is renowned for its architecture. What Ellen is doing is helping to preserve that legacy.”

Ambrosone expects to use the skills she developed in her own work, and to share her knowledge with others. “Having a working knowledge of archiving and processing the collection makes me a more well-rounded scholar,” she said. “I’m thinking about how I can incorporate this experience into my teaching to show students how the work scholars do is often built on work done by library professionals.”

Citation Analysis Intern Marco Torres

History PhD candidate Marco Torres joined the Library this summer to analyze citations used in recent UChicago Latin American studies dissertations. “One of the goals of the project is to help us make decisions about what resources should be purchased in the future based on the type of materials PhD students are using,” explained Ellen Bryan, Reference Librarian and Head of the Dissertation Office.

Torres’s own dissertation proposal was approved shortly before his internship began. He plans to go to Mexico City to do research on the labor movement in the late 1930s and its role in Mexican politics. He particularly valued the opportunity to discover the kinds of sources recent graduates used in studying Mexico.

“A lot of what we do as scholars is to look at bibliographies and see patterns in them,” Torres said. “Getting that recent bibliography is not so easy, sometimes.” One unexpected trend he observed was that recent political science bibliographies cite trade publications outside the social sciences, in fields such as medicine.

ACASA Intern Eric Phillips

History PhD student Eric Phillips first met June Farris, the Library’s Bibliographer for Slavic, East European & Eurasian Studies, when consulting the Library’s Archives of Czechs & Slovaks Abroad (ACASA) for a seminar paper on the transformation of Pressburg into Bratislava, the capital of the Slovak half of newly independent Czechoslovakia in post-World War I Europe. He is studying the Czech language and preparing to write his dissertation on the economic history of interwar Czechoslovakia and Austria.

Eric Phillips

ACASA Intern Eric Phillips (Photo by John Zich)

Farris mentioned to Phillips some time ago that ACASA needed to be reorganized. New materials were waiting to be integrated into the original schema devised by early collector Zdenek Hruban, and old materials needed to be rehoused to make room for them. During his internship, Phillips immersed himself in this project. He was delighted to be the first to go through Professor Hruban’s papers and fascinated to see a copy of the Nuremberg testimony of Petr Zenkl, a mayor of Prague, who was sent by the Nazis to Buchenwald concentration camp.

“For the last two summers, I’ve been going to the archives in Prague and trying to navigate them. It’s been a challenging experience,” Phillips said in August. “Now I’m on the other side, learning how archives are organized.”

“Being a historian, archival research is the ultimate goal, so the more you do of it, the more competent a researcher you are, and the more it can help you develop themes in your area,” said Farris.

Hakim, Torres and Phillips’s internships were sponsored by the Division of the Social Sciences Emerging Leaders Initiative. Ambrosone’s internship was sponsored by UChicago GRAD.

Library Reception for MAPH / MAPSS / CIR / MLA Students: event

When: Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. – 6 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: Mix and mingle at the Library reception for students in MAPH, MAPSS, CIR, and MLA. Meet your subject librarians and learn about the resources available to you. Wine and cheese will be served. Please RSVP if you are able to attend by visiting the website linked below.

Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
Tag: Graduate Students, Receptions
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Apply for the Library Student Advisory Group

The Library is currently seeking representatives for the Library Student Advisory Group (LSAG) from the following Divisions and Schools:

  • The College (Class of 2019)
  • Chicago Booth School of Business
  • Harris School of Public Policy
  • Physical Sciences Division
  • School of Social Service Administration

The Library Student Advisory Group serves as a formal channel of communication between students and the Library administration.  The LSAG discusses the collections and services provided through all of the University’s campus libraries — Crerar, D’Angelo, Eckhart, Mansueto, Regenstein, and SSA — and the present and future needs of the student community.  The Group assists in making specific recommendations to improve the Library and considers proposals for future changes in services.  Finally, members of the LSAG discuss how the Library can raise awareness of its offerings among students, and how students can communicate their wishes, needs, and concerns to the Library.

If you are interested in serving, please complete the online application by October 25, 2015.  If you would like additional information about the Library Student Advisory Group or would like to apply via e-mail, please contact Rebecca Starkey at

Regenstein 420, the Art Reading Room, now open more hours

Beginning today, Regenstein Room 420, the Art Reading Room, which houses the 6,000-volume non-circulating East Asia Art Collection, is open 113 hours per week, all of the hours Regenstein Library is open. This is twice as many hours as the room had previously been open.

The room is no longer staffed by student monitors, a change necessary to help the Library reduce its overall costs in the context of a reduced budget for this fiscal year.

GRAD Writing Room opens in Regenstein Room 464

Elevated view of the Regenstein Library, from the University of Chicago architectural guidebook titled Building Ideas, published summer of 2013. (Photo by Tom Rossiter)

The Joseph Regenstein Library.

The GRAD Writing Room—a quiet space where graduate students and postdocs can focus on academic writing projects—has been relocated to Regenstein 464 from its original test location on the Regenstein A Level. A joint offering of UChicago GRAD and the Library, it is open all of the hours that Regenstein is open.

Graduate students and postdocs are eligible to use this space if they have attended previous UChicago GRAD write-ins or Writing Program events or have consulted Graduate Writing Consultants. Access to the room is controlled electronically and managed by UChicago GRAD. Visit the UChicago GRAD website for more information and contact to request access.

Finding your course reserves

The University of Chicago Library is dedicated to helping students achieve academic excellence. A primary way the Library does so is by providing course reserves. This service allows instructors to make books and other items in the Library’s collections such as articles, CDs, and DVDs available for your class. Course reserves may be available online or in one of the campus library locations.

To learn more about accessing your course reserves, please watch this short tutorial or visit the guide on finding course reserves.

Alert Quarter loans due – please return or renew

Quarter loans charged or renewed before September 21 are due Friday, October 2. Please return or renew your books. Materials may be renewed by logging into the Library Catalog via My Account.

Construction begins on Regenstein A Level collaborative learning center

Work has begun to transform the Regenstein A Level Reading Room into an inviting and attractive collaborative learning center where students, faculty, academic technologists, and librarians can interact. Responding to increased user demand for such spaces, librarians have worked with Woodhouse Tinucci Architects to create a new design that will transform the floor into a vibrant laboratory of interactive learning. 

Plans for the reconceived A Level feature a new 72-foot glass wall that will provide a view of the Jean Block Garden and bring daylight deep inside the room. A broad open area at the center of the floor will allow groups to gather around movable whiteboards, and a 36-person digital classroom for active learning will be available for library workshops and spontaneous use by students. The central zone will be lined with a variety of collaborative spaces, including a high work bar, conference tables, and lounge chairs, as well as café tables along the large glass wall. Video monitors will be available, and an easy-to-operate “one button” video production studio will enable students to create video essays and rehearse presentations. On the east side of the floor, a technology zone will include studio space for creating web tutorials, producing webinars, and delivering online instruction.

Work on the A Level is occurring in three phases, as funding becomes available. The first phase has begun with the installation of the glass wall on the north side of the building. Berglund Construction Company will be working between 7:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. Mondays through Friday through November. The Library apologizes for the noise and inconvenience caused by this work.

The second phase, beginning in 2016, will focus on the center open area and collaborative spaces on three sides. The third and final phase, focusing on the active learning classroom and the east side of the central zone, is likely to be completed in fiscal year 2017.

Current Exhibits Poetic associations and the Wachs collection

Illustration by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828-1882). “The Poems of Dante Gabriel Rossetti: With Illustrations from His Own Pictures and Designs.” Edited with an introduction and notes by W. M. Rossetti. London: Ellis and Elvey, 1904. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library. Gift of Deborah Wachs Barnes, Sharon Wachs Hirsch, Judith Pieprz, and Joel Wachs, AB’92. Detail from the first edition of Rossetti’s poems illustrated with his own pictures.

Exhibition–Poetic Associations: The 19th-Century English Poetry Collection of Dr. Gerald N. Wachs

Dates: September 21 – December 31, 2015

In the period between the French Revolution and the start of World War I, often called “the long 19th century,” English poetry enjoyed enormous popularity and respect. The Romantics and the Victorians, as we know them today, were celebrities and, often, close friends, part of a literary community that influenced their professional and personal lives. Dr. Gerald N. Wachs (1937-2013), working closely with his friend, bookseller Stephen Weissman of Ximenes Rare Books, collected their works over a period of 40 years starting in 1970, using as their guidebook the Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature. They sought the finest copies, whenever possible ones that were presented by the author to other writers, friends, or family members. Books selected for the Wachs collection are nearly all “special”: in splen­did condition, often one of very few known copies, and many with extraordinary inscriptions that illustrate per­sonal and poetic associations. The resulting collection of nearly 900 titles illuminates the life and works of these enduring poets.

George Gordon, Lord Byron."She Walks in Beauty."

George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824). “Hebrew Melodies.” London: Printed for John Murray, 1815. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library. Gift of Deborah Wachs Barnes, Sharon Wachs Hirsch, Judith Pieprz, and Joel Wachs, AB’92. This was the first title acquired for the Wachs collection.

It is difficult to single out representative examples from such a rich assemblage. The exhibition includes 104 items. Some are little-known works by famous authors. For example, Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s first book, The Battle of Marathon; A Poem (1820), privately print­ed in an edition of 50 copies, of which only 15 copies are known to survive. Others are the first appearance of fa­mous works that differ considerably from the version we have come to know, such as Tennyson’s The Charge of the Light Brigade.

After Dr. Wachs’s death, and thanks to the great generosity of the Wachs family (Deborah Wachs Barnes, Sha­ron Wachs Hirsch, Judith Pieprz, and Joel Wachs, AB’92), more than 600 titles have been donated to the University of Chicago. This magnificent gift will create entirely new areas of depth to the Library’s collection, for example Anglo-Indian poetry, and add many works previously not in the collection or with features of great interest to researchers.

Location: Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637

Hours: Monday–Friday: 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.; Saturdays: 9 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. when classes are in session. Consult hours for the Special Collections Research Center at

The exhibition is free and open to the public.

Curators: Catherine Uecker, Alice Schreyer, Sarah G. Wenzel, and Eric Powell 

Associated web exhibit:


Use of Images and Media Contact

Images from the exhibition included on this page are available for download by members of the media, and are reserved for editorial use in connection with University of Chicago Library exhibitions, programs, or related news.  For more information, contact Rachel Rosenberg at or 773-834-1519.



New food and drink policy provides Library patrons with more options

New Library food polciesAs the result of a new Library food policy, hungry patrons are now free to eat snacks in many campus Library spaces and have additional designated space for eating meals in Regenstein.

The new policy has been approved by the faculty Board of the Library and the Library Student Advisory Group and permits patrons to eat snacks in most parts of the Library, with the exception of a few designated food-free spaces. Meals and messy or smelly foods will still be permitted only in designated Meal Zones. The policy applies to the Crerar, Eckhart, Mansueto, Regenstein, and SSA libraries, as well as the D’Angelo Law Library, which has had a similar policy in place since 2008.

In Regenstein, where the Ex Libris Café is often fully occupied at peak meal times, the A Level has been designated an additional Meal Zone.

To help protect Library collections and to provide spaces for users who wish to avoid the presence of food entirely, a few areas have been designated food-free, including the Mansueto Grand Reading Room, the Regenstein bookstacks, and the Crerar Lower Level West compact shelving. In addition, no food or drink is allowed in the Special Collections Research Center. Covered drinks will continue to be allowed everywhere except Special Collections.

The new food policy is designed to help the Library maintain an environment that is welcoming and comfortable, as well as supportive of study, research, reflection, and scholarly collaboration.

Patrons are strongly encouraged to take an active role in making the new policy a success. This includes cleaning up and disposing of their own food waste in appropriate trash receptacles and notifying staff of spills, as well as asking others to abide by Library policies or reporting violations to Library staff.

See the Library’s food and drink policy for more information, including a complete list of Library spaces where snacks or meals are allowed.

Updated September 17, 2015

Students in Ex Libris

Students in Regenstein’s Ex Libris Cafe (Photo by Jason Smith)

Alert Access to books during Regenstein B Level repairs

Several aisles of compact shelving on Regenstein’s B Level West are inaccessible due to mechanical damage caused by a water leak. None of the Library’s collections were damaged as a result of this incident.

Work has begun to repair the mechanical systems in these aisles and restore patron access as soon as possible. It is currently estimated that repairs will be completed before the start of Winter Quarter.

Patrons are asked to request books from inaccessible aisles by clicking on the “Can’t find it?” link in the book’s full record in the Library Catalog. Library staff will retrieve books on a daily basis Sunday through Friday and place them on hold for pickup at Regenstein Circulation by the next business day.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your patience while this important work is completed.

For updated information, including a list of call number ranges currently inaccessible, visit

Updated October 19, 2015.

Labor Day: All libraries closed

In observance of the Labor Day holiday, all campus libraries will be closed on Monday, September 7.

For a full list of library hours, see

Ex Libris Café closed September 4 – September 20

Ex Libris Café will close Friday, September 4 at 4 p.m. and reopen Monday, September 21 with interim hours of Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. Regular hours will resume Monday, September 28. 

The seating area and vending machines in Ex Libris will remain open during Regenstein’s regular building hours.

Library interim hours, August 29 – September 27

Beginning Saturday, August 29, the Library will have reduced building hours at all of its locations for the interim. Please note that on Monday, September 7, all libraries will be closed in observance of Labor Day.  Autumn quarter hours will begin Monday, September 28.

Crerar Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Friday – Saturday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Sunday (August 30, Sept. 6, 13, 20)  8 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Sunday (Sept. 27)  8 a.m. – 1 a.m.

D’Angelo Law Library Circulation
Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday Closed
Sunday (August 30, Sept. 6, 13, 20) Closed
Sunday (Sept. 27) noon – 9 p.m.

Eckhart Library
Monday – Friday noon – 5 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Mansueto Library

Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 7:45 p.m.
Friday 8 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday (August 30, Sept. 6, 13) Closed
Sunday (Sept. 20) noon – 5 p.m.
Sunday (Sept. 27) 10 a.m. – 1 a.m.

Regenstein Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Friday  – Saturday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sunday (August 30, Sept. 6, 13) Closed
Sunday (Sept. 20) noon – 5 p.m.
Sunday (Sept. 27) 10 a.m. – 1 a.m.

Regenstein All-Night Study
Closed until September 29 at 1 a.m.

SSA Library
Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see

Lactation room construction in Regenstein

Regenstein Room B51, located on the building’s B Level, is being renovated into an ADA-accessible lactation room for use by students, faculty, and staff. The work, scheduled for completion by Winter Quarter, will take place between the hours of 6 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The Library apologizes for any inconvenience created by this work.

Updated November 17, 2015.

Exhibits Journeys to the West: An Exhibit in memory of Anthony C. Yu, 1934-2015

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Fourth Floor
Exhibit Dates: August 14 – September 30, 2015

Anthony C. Yu at the Divinity School

Anthony C. Yu at the Divinity School (University of Chicago Photographic Archive, [apf7-01650], Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library, date unknown)

As a small child, Anthony Yu first learned from his grandfather the story of a wise monk who travels from China to India with his companions, Monkey and Pig. The stories came from the classical Chinese epic The Journey to the West. Yu was fascinated with the epic from then on. As an adult, he embarked on a scholarly journey in the field of comparative religions and literatures, bridging the Eastern and Western literary religious traditions. This one-case, memorial exhibit is centered on Professor Anthony C. Yu’s magnum opus, his four volume translation of The Journey to the West into English.

Anthony C. Yu (1938-2015) was the Carl Darling Buck Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in the Humanities and the Divinity School at the University of Chicago. Margaret M. Mitchell, former dean of the Divinity School, eulogized Professor Yu as “an outstanding scholar, whose work was marked by uncommon erudition, range of reference and interpretive sophistication.” Yet he was also “a person of inimitable elegance, dignity, passion and the highest standards for everything he did.”

Book cover of The Journey to the West

Book cover of the 2012 revised edition of The Journey to the West, volume 2.

Professor’s Yu own life journey (1938-2015) resonates in many ways with the Chinese epic that he translated. Journeying to the West to pursue his vocation, Professor Yu spent 16 years of his life, just like the traveling monk from the story, working on the 1800+ pages of the English translation. David Lattimore (Brown University), writing in The New York Times Book Review, noted that Professor Yu’s translation “does full justice to the adventure, lyricism and buffoonery of The Journey to the West,” while remaining “completely sensitive to the spiritual content of the text, as well.” Not only was The Journey to the West the first unabridged translation into English, but it withstood the test of time and is now considered the definitive translation.

The exhibit itself is set up to invite search and discovery. You will encounter prior translations of the classical Chinese epic, together with Yu’s own definitive translation, an abridged edition and even some surprises related to the afterlife of Yu’s translation. Please stop by Regenstein Library’s 4th floor and discover for yourself the fascinating journey to the West, facilitated by our eminent scholar, beloved professor, and magnificent translator. Your journey will be worth it!