Final phase of Regenstein B Level flooring replacement begins

Beginning over winter interim, the Library will commence the final phase of a project to replace cracked and worn floor tile throughout the Regenstein B Level bookstacks. This phase replaces floor tile in the main aisles; flooring in the compact shelving book aisles was completed over the summer. Work will take place between 6 a.m. and 3 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and will involve noise and dust at times, as well as limiting access to some aisles.

The work has been planned to cause as little disruption as possible, but some main aisles will be inaccessible for two to three days at a time during all building hours. Most book aisles will remain accessible throughout the project, although users may need to use alternate routes to reach book aisles at times. A small number of book aisles will be inaccessible for short periods, but no individual book aisle will be inaccessible for more than two working days.

To request a book from an inaccessible book aisle, visit the 1st Floor Circulation Desk. Staff will page material as soon as the aisle re-opens; users will receive a notice as soon as items are available for pickup at Circulation.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your patience while this important work is completed. For updated information about this project, visit lib.uchicago.edu/e/reg/using/floorplans.

Alert Fall quarter loans to quarterly borrowers automatically extended to April 3

Items checked out by current quarterly borrowers with privileges in good standing and due January 9 will be automatically renewed by the Library for winter quarter. As of December 18, all such items will have a new due date of April 3, 2015. No action by borrowers is necessary.

The automatic renewal is being performed because the functionality to manually renew items is temporarily unavailable in the Catalog. The Library is working to restore this functionality as soon as possible.

Users may view a list of all items out, including current due dates, via My Account.

For assistance, please contact Circulation online or visit a Library circulation desk.

Ex Libris Café winter interim hours, Dec. 13 – Jan. 4

Beginning Saturday, December 13, the Ex Libris Café will have reduced service hours for the winter interim. From December 29 to January 2, only beverage service will be available, including drip coffee, espresso drinks, tea, and canned and bottled drinks. Normal hours resume Monday, January 5.

Saturday, Dec. 13 – Sunday, Dec. 14: Closed
Monday, Dec. 15 – Friday, Dec. 19: 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 20 – Sunday, Dec. 28: Closed
Monday, Dec. 29 – Wednesday, Dec. 31: 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.; beverage service only
Thursday, Jan. 1: Closed
Friday, Jan. 2: 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.; beverage service only
Saturday, Jan. 3 – Sunday, Jan. 4: Closed

As always, the seating area and vending machines will remain open during Regenstein’s building hours.

Library winter interim hours, Dec. 13 – Jan. 4

Beginning Saturday, December 13, the Library will have reduced building hours at all of its locations for the winter interim. Normal hours resume Monday, January 5.

All Locations
December 25: Closed
January 1: Closed

Crerar Library
Sunday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.
Friday – Saturday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Exceptions: December 24 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.; Jan. 4 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 a.m. 

D’Angelo Law Library Circulation
D’Angelo Law will be open with restricted access its regular hours through Dec. 16 for the Law School exam period. Interim hours take effect starting Wednesday, Dec. 17.

Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed
Exceptions: Dec. 24 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.; Dec. 31 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.; Jan. 4 noon – 9:00 p.m. 

Eckhart Library
Monday – noon – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed
Exceptions: Dec. 24 noon – 3:00 p.m. 

Mansueto Library
Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 7:45 p.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Exceptions: Dec. 24 8:00 a.m. – 2:45 p.m.; Jan. 4 10:00 a.m. – 12:45 a.m.

Regenstein Library
Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Friday – Saturday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Exceptions: Dec. 24 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.; Jan. 4 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 a.m.

Regenstein All-Night Study
Closed until January 6

SSA Library
Monday – Friday 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed
Exceptions: Dec. 24 9:00 a.m. – noon; Dec. 26 Closed; Jan. 2 Closed

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Extended Library hours December 5 – 7

To support students preparing for finals, Crerar, Mansueto and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week.

Mansueto will be open Friday, December 5 and Saturday, December 6 until 12:45 a.m. Crerar and Regenstein will be open these days until 1:00 a.m.

The Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will be open 24 hours until the end of finals on Friday, December 12.

For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

STATA: Getting Started: TECHB@R workshop

When: Thursday, December 4, 5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: This 90 minute workshop will give you the tools to become a STATA pro. The workshop will start with an explanation of when to use STATA over other stats programs and a walk through the interface. Then, the bulk of the workshop time will be spent learning basic commands and processes. A “do file” will be provided for easy access to the commands as well as a handout for keeping track of all of them. The last part of the workshop will bring it all together, moving beyond the basics, blending the commands to create regressions and graphics. 

Be prepared for a fast paced class, some familiarity with Statistics or programming is helpful, but not necessary. 

Please feel free to bring your laptop with STATA installed to follow along. If you want to attend and follow along, but do not have STATA on your computer – then take a look the virtual lab commander is for you. If you need help setting it up, come to the Techbar at least 15 min. before the workshop and the staff can help. 

Classes are free, but registration is required. Click the website link below for more information and to register.

Contact: Academic Technologies
773-702-9944
More info: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1486
Tag: WorkshopsGraduate StudentsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Thanksgiving week hours 2014

Hours for the University of Chicago Library over the week of Thanksgiving 2014 are as follows:

Wednesday, November 26

Crerar is open 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.

D’Angelo Law is open 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Eckhart is open 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Mansueto is open 8:00 a.m. – 9:45 p.m.

Regenstein is open 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.

SSA is open 8:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Thursday, November 27

All libraries are closed in observance of Thanksgiving.

Friday, November 28

Crerar is open 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.

D’Angelo Law is open 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Eckhart is closed. 

Mansueto is open 8:00 a.m. – 10:45 p.m.

Regenstein is open 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m.

SSA is closed.

Saturday, November 29

Eckhart is closed. Normal hours resume for all other libraries.

Regenstein All Night Study

All Night Study closes Wednesday, November 26 at 8:00 a.m. and reopens at 1:00 a.m. on Monday, December 1.

For a complete list of Library hours, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

EndNote Online or Zotero? Selecting the Best Citation Manager: online workshop

When: Wednesday, November 19, noon – 1 p.m.
Friday, November 21, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: online workshop
Description: Citation managers are powerful, time-saving tools that help you manage your research. They can also help you format your papers in MS Word by creating bibliographies, citations, and footnotes automatically in the style you choose, such as APA or Chicago.

This webinar will compare how EndNote Online and Zotero — two popular citation managers — allow you to save, share, and cite information. In order to provide a side-by-side comparison of tools, the format of this workshop is demonstration rather than hands-on training.

Registration is required. Please click the event URL below to learn more and register.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1455
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Graduate StudentsStaffWorkshopsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

The Library for Instructors and TAs: workshop

When: Wednesday, November 19, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Thursday, November 20, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description:

You may use the Library’s resources for your research, but do you know how the Library supports teaching? Learn about the Library services available to you as an instructor or TA for a course, including: 

• How to set up course reserves in Chalk
• Requesting Library instruction or training programs
• Setting up your Library Chalk module
• Using Special Collections for your teaching
• Reserving Library classrooms and equipment

In addition, the program will provide an overview of some little-known services available for your students, including reference consultations, statistical software support, and citation managers.

Registration is requested. Please feel free to bring your lunch.

Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1541
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Graduate StudentsStaffWorkshopsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Introduction to Zotero: workshop

When: Wednesday, November 12, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Thursday, November 13, noon – 1:00 p.m.
Where: TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160
Description: Zotero is a free citation manager that allows you to save citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in standard citation styles, including MLA, Chicago and APA. This workshop will introduce some of the key functions of Zotero such as: installing Zotero, adding citations to your Zotero library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Microsoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents. 
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1010
Contact: Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685
Tag: Student EventsTrainingWorkshopsGraduate Students
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Chinese New Year paintings held in the Shanghai Library

Exhibit Location:  The Joseph Regenstein Library, Fifth Floor
Exhibit Dates: October 31, 2014 – February 28, 2015 

The children of a wealthy family are playing drums and suona to celebrate the New Year. In the background the grandfather scold a naughty child.

The children of a wealthy family are playing drums and suona to celebrate the New Year. In the background the grandfather attends to his grandchild.

Chinese New Year painting is a unique and fascinating  genre of Chinese painting.   Customarily, these paintings are often posted by Chinese people in their homes to celebrate the New Year, offering hopes and blessings for an auspicious and happy New Year.

A family is celebrating the Lantern Festival.

A family reunion during the Lantern Festival. The peonies and plum blossoms in the vase indicate the season and create a festive atmosphere.

Over the years, the Shanghai Library has collected over 4,000 New Year paintings produced from the end of the Qing Dynasty to the early years of the Republican Period. This exhibition displays 10 replicas of New Year paintings selected by the Shanghai Library from their collection, which focus on local products and cover eight topics including, for example, “Good Fortune,” “Happy Family,” “Auspicious New Year”, “Celebrating the Lantern Festival,” and “Children at Play.”

The three gods, Fu, Lu and Shou (good fortune, prosperity,and longevity) are pictured.

Good fortune, prosperity, longevity and happiness (fu lu shou xi) are words commonly used in traditional Chinese customs for good wishes. The three gods, Fu, Lu and Shou, are pictured.

BorrowDirect is back, now with on-site borrowing and access to Johns Hopkins collections

BorrowDirect is available once again to University of Chicago faculty, students, and staff, both through the new Library Catalog as well as lib.uchicago.edu/h/borrowdirect. BorrowDirect offers faculty, students, and staff at Ivy League and other partner institutions unmediated requesting and expedited delivery of items from a combined collection of over 50 million volumes. Since its inception in 1999, BorrowDirect has successfully filled almost 2 million user requests with book delivery in three to five days. The University of Chicago joined the BorrowDirect partnership in June 2013.

Visit our Library Guide for more information about how to use BorrowDirect.

On-site borrowing added through new BorrowDirect Plus agreement

UChicago faculty, students, and staff can now obtain on-site borrowing privileges at BorrowDirect institutions and Duke University as a result of the new BorrowDirect Plus agreement. The BorrowDirect partnership includes Brown, Chicago, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, MIT, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, and Yale.

BorrowDirect logoUChicago faculty, students, and staff who have home library accounts in good standing will have access to selected circulating materials in many of the library collections at the BorrowDirect partner institutions. When visiting one of these libraries, UChicago users will need to show their UChicago Card and log into UChicago’s BorrowDirect web page at lib.uchicago.edu/h/borrowdirect; once logged in, the user will need to click on the My Account link in BorrowDirect. A staff member will verify that a user is able to access My Account as authorization for borrowing privileges.

Availability of specific items and collections and participation of specific campus libraries vary by institution. The lending library’s policies and loan periods apply to UChicago borrowers. It is recommended that users considering a visit to another library view their policies in advance by consulting www.borrowdirect.org/on-site-borrowing. Borrowed items may be returned at either the lending library or UChicago campus libraries.

For the most part, these same materials are already available through BorrowDirect, the rapid online book request and delivery system used by all of the participating institutions with the exception of Duke. The new agreement expands the system to include this in-person component.

Johns Hopkins joins BorrowDirect library partnership

In September, Johns Hopkins University joined the 10 existing BorrowDirect partner libraries to engage in resource sharing and other collaborative library projects. Johns Hopkins University was founded in 1876 and provides information services to more than 21,000 graduate and undergraduate students, 7,000 faculty, 10 divisions, and a wide range of academic and research programs. The Johns Hopkins Libraries contain more than 4.3 million volumes with collection strengths in German and Romance languages, philosophy, the ancient Near East, biomedical engineering, chemistry, and environmental engineering.

Feature Story French illustrators at war: An interview with the curators

Harris and Edelstein explore WWI illustrations in a Special Collections exhibition

Neil Harris and Teri J. Edelstein

Neil Harris and Teri J. Edelstein

En Guerre: French Illustrators and World War I runs through January 2, 2015, in the Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery at the University of Chicago Library. In this edited interview, co-curators Neil Harris, Preston and Sterling Morton Professor of History and Art History Emeritus, and Dr. Teri J. Edelstein speak with Rachel Rosenberg about the role of French illustrators in World War I, the satiric and surprising aspects of their art, and the origins of the exhibition.

What role did French illustrators play in World War I, and how would you say that affects their illustrations?

Sur le pont

Louis Lefèvre. “Sur le pont.” Rondes glorieuses. [S.l.: s.n., n.d.]. 1ière série. On loan from a private collection.

HARRIS: The French had a very well developed illustrated tradition by the time the war began, and that was one of their assets in the war. They recognized this on a whole series of levels. A number of the illustrations are funny. That is, they’re satirical—they’re pointed. These artists were aware of the ironies of war and are part of a long French tradition of political caricature. Many illustrations in this show are by artists who were—I wouldn’t say twisting the knife in the back of the government, but skeptical about official wisdom. They glorified ordinary people as best they could while raising questions about the war’s logic. The illustrations convey a more complicated set of messages than the propaganda posters of the time.

EDELSTEIN: The posters, by and large, were made officially by government or quasi-government agencies. They were recruitment posters. They urged people to buy national bonds. The illustrations in this exhibition reflect a much more nuanced and personal take on the war. Many of the illustrators were motivated by patriotism, and many of these artists served in the war.

HARRIS: Many were wounded. There was a total mobilization in France, so almost all of their artists who were fit and of age—and who were not foreign nationals, like Picasso—went to war. Many went to the front. They were wounded—in some cases, killed. The enemy was demonized by many of the artists. The Germans, and the Austro-Hungarians, and the Turks were caricatured mercilessly—particularly the leadership. So that wasn’t nuanced. But what was more nuanced was the way French illustrators presented the experiences of the war and focused on the poilu—the ordinary French soldier— who was a key figure in every history of the war.

Conte de fées

Lucien Laforge. “Conte de fées.” Paris: Librairie Lutetia, [n.d.]. World War I Printed Media and Art Collection, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books & Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania.

Is there a particular example of a satiric or subtle illustration that stands out for you?

HARRIS: One is by Lucien Laforge, a socialist, an anarchist, who worked for left-wing journals. He did a broadside called Conte de fées that tells a story of the war as a fairytale. The German ogre is beheaded by three little girls playing in a garden. Figuring out what he meant by this is difficult. Was it an implied critique of what the French referred to as the bourrage de crâne, the war fever that overtook people’s minds? Is it satirical? Is Laforge poking fun at the reductionist character of the war? Or is he, in fact, endorsing the war? It’s hard to say.

Are there aspects of the exhibition that you expect to particularly surprise your audience?

EDELSTEIN: I think people will find it unexpected and riveting to see the extent to which the subject of World War I appears in fashion illustration. The reason for this is threefold. One, fashion was a very important French industry. Two, fashion was an area where the French felt they could nationalistically distinguish themselves from their enemies. They felt that French fashion was at a great remove from German so-called fashion. Three, the illustrators employed by fashion were, by and large, out of work for the duration of the war, so they turned their attention to finding jobs elsewhere. Many issues of La baïonnette feature satirical cartoons that hinge on the notion of French fashion. We also have individual prints on patriotic themes connected to the war that were done by fashion illustrators.

Modes de printemps

Odette Champion. “Modes de printemps: Berlin-Vienne-Constantinople.” Fantasio. Paris: Félix Juven, [ 1915]. Gift of Neil Harris and
Teri J. Edelstein, The University of Chicago Library.

Some of the items on display in En Guerre and included in the associated catalogue have long been a part of the Library’s collections, but a great many are part of your personal collections or were collected by you and subsequently donated to the Library. How did you become interested in collecting World War I illustrations, and how did the Library help in developing the exhibition?

HARRIS: We didn’t really start with the war. I had been collecting French illustrated books since the 1970s. At a certain point, we realized that the centenary of World War I was approaching and we had more than enough for an exhibition. And the Library has a number of things that have been very important, most significantly La baïonnette, a quite amazing illustrated magazine done during the War. We hope that when people come to the show they will observe that these things survive only because there’s a library that takes care of them.

EDELSTEIN: The Library and the staff of Special Collections have been endlessly supportive. We’re delighted with our work with the Library.

Visit the associated web exhibit at lib.uchicago.edu/e/webexhibits/enguerre

Bringing South Asian cultures to the world

Grants support UChicago Library’s digitization projects

Major grants from the U.S. Department of Education, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the British Library are enabling the University of Chicago Library to expand and enrich digital resources for South Asian studies. UChicago faculty and students benefit from these projects, as do researchers around the world, through our freely available online presentation of books and images. In two instances the projects are partnerships to digitize materials located elsewhere, to make these unique resources available to UChicago researchers and others.

Historic postcards of colonial India

Cotton Cleaning Postcard

Image of cotton cleaning in Bombay from the private postcard collection of Graham Shaw.

The University of Chicago Library has digitized nearly 12,000 historical postcards of colonial India from one of the largest collections in existence. A grant from the U.S. Department of Education in 2009 and 2010 helped to support our project to present the private collection of Mr. Graham Shaw in London. These postcards cover undivided India as well as Nepal and Sri Lanka. Most date from the 1880s to the 1930s. They depict topographical features as well as the people and their culture—from occupations and faiths to modes of transport and humor. The collection’s significance derives from its extensive visual documentation, the varied perspectives it provides for sites over time, the postage stamps, and the correspondence on the back of many cards. A search engine being launched this fall at postcards.uchicago.edu will allow users to search by location and keyword or to browse through the cards by category.

Monolingual and etymological dictionaries

With the support of a two-year, $300,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities that began in July, the University of Chicago Library will be converting and disseminating 12 monolingual and etymological dictionaries from our own collections as electronic resources, extending the coverage of our Digital Dictionaries of South Asia (DDSA, at dsal.uchicago.edu/dictionaries) and significantly supporting humanities research and advanced language learning. Additionally, the 54 dictionaries currently available from DDSA will be enhanced through improved facilities for searching and displaying data on desktop and mobile devices.

The DDSA is already heavily accessed by scholars and lay users, who currently execute 4 million searches per year. This project enhances the value of the website by extending monolingual lexical coverage in eight critical languages: Kannada, Kashmiri, Konkani, Panjabi, Prakrit, Sindhi, Sinhala, and Telugu.

Early Kannada books

“Preservation and Access for Rare Early Kannada Books” is the most recent digitization project. The British Library’s Endangered Archives Programme has granted £44,950 (approximately $75,700) to save more than 1,650 of the most important early printed publications in the Kannada language, which are held by several public and private collections in south India. This grant also covers a two year period that began in July.

Kannada is an important Dravidian language spoken in south India since the early modern period. The broad spectrum of writings in these publications are invaluable for historians of social, cultural, literary, and intellectual change in this region in the 19th and 20th centuries. Digital page images will be presented via our Digital South Asia Library (dsal.uchicago.edu) and the British Library.

 

elephant battery

Image of an elephant battery from the private postcard collection of Graham Shaw.

The University of Chicago Library’s South Asia collection is widely regarded as the strongest North American university collection about the Indian subcontinent. These digital initiatives expand the resources we are able to offer through international collaborations that open access to rare and unique scholarly resources.

The Library and the University of Chicago Campaign

This fall, the University of Chicago is entering the public phase of The University of Chicago Campaign: Inquiry and Impact, which has a goal of raising $4.5 billion. The priorities of the campaign, the most ambitious in the University’s history, include support for faculty and researchers who are shaping fields of inquiry, distinctive educational opportunities for students at all levels, and innovative programs to enhance the University’s local and global reach and impact.

The University of Chicago Campaign: Inquiry & ImpactThe Library serves as a vital center of inquiry and impact at the University of Chicago, fueling groundbreaking research and a transformative educational experience, while acting as a mecca for scholars from around the world. We are proud to support inquiry and impact across all the disciplines of the University, and we embrace the opportunity to participate in the University’s campaign. Toward that end, we seek to raise $26.5 million in essential funds in four categories that will enable us to build on our strengths and continue our work as a world-class and world-renowned research library.

Distinctive collections: Special Collections and global resources

Among the Library’s most distinctive holdings are its Special Collections of rare books, manuscripts, and archives, as well as world-renowned area studies collections focused on East Asia, Southern Asia, the Middle East, and Slavic and Eastern Europe. Funds are needed to preserve and expand these invaluable collections for future researchers and students. A $2 million Special Collections Opportunity Endowment will enable the purchase of unique items and rare collections that are available for a limited time in a highly competitive marketplace. A $2.5 million Global Resources Collections Opportunity Endowment will allow the Library to seize special opportunities in areas of the world where different acquisition patterns require flexibility. And a $5 million Digital Program Endowment will support the digitization of collections to enable new types of research on campus and around the world.

Expanding areas

The Library strives to anticipate the new needs of faculty and students. As the University establishes and expands its programs in areas such as molecular engineering and the sciences, Jewish studies, and Latin America, the Library seeks to establish expendable and endowed funds to build collections and provide services that support emerging directions in the University’s research agenda. A $2 million Science Collections Fund will bolster the John Crerar Library’s resources, including online literature, databases for discovery, and tools to aid in the discovery, management, visualization, and analysis of information arising from research activities, such as ChemDraw, which allows researchers to draw chemical substances. A $1.5 million Jewish Studies Endowment will expand and enhance the Library’s current Jewish Studies collection to serve the growing needs on campus in this area.

New Library services

The electronic age has created an increasingly complex landscape for everyone from College students to advanced researchers. New teaching techniques and assignments create the need for new study environments. Graduate students, faculty, and visiting researchers have highly specialized research needs that often require in-depth consultation with librarians. A $2 million Instruction and Research Support Program Endowment will enable the Library to teach users how to optimize their use of both emerging and established scholarly resources. A $1 million Study Spaces Fund will support the creation of flexible spaces that are suitable for collaboration and outfitted with the latest technologies.

Strategic opportunities

In order to embrace the promise and the challenges of the future, the Library must be able to respond to opportunities as they arise. New research needs will continue to emerge, and user demand for rapid and innovative access to physical and virtual materials will continue to grow. A $2 million Strategic Opportunities Fund will allow the Library to sustain its strengths and maintain its forward momentum. This fund will provide long-term support to test new ideas through pilot projects, to use technologies of the future; to hire experts for emerging initiatives; and to purchase products and services developed by commercial vendors. A $3 million Strategic Opportunities Collections Endowment will provide the Library flexibility to obtain highly desirable, unique collections across the disciplines when they come onto the market. The fund will also support the University of Chicago Library’s fruitful partnerships with peer institutions in order to increase collection coverage, discoverability, and access.

 

For specific information on these and other campaign giving opportunities and to learn more about the Library’s role in The University of Chicago Campaign: Inquiry and Impact, please contact Yasmin Omer, Director of Development for the Library at 773-834-3744 or at yasminomer@uchicago.edu.

Enabling worldwide discovery of rare books: A gift from Roger and Julie Baskes

Enhancing online catalog records for rare books is a high priority for the University of Chicago Library in the University’s capital campaign. Detailed cataloging is an essential tool for researchers to discover handwritten annotations, special bindings or illustrations, and other features of individual copies of rare books. The Library has long recognized the scholarly value of this work, but without additional funding the project could take as long as 20 years to complete.

Julie and Roger Baskes

Julie and Roger Baskes

Prominent Chicago cultural philanthropists Roger and Julie Baskes stepped forward this spring as the right donors for this endeavor. In his seven years on the Library’s Visiting Committee, Mr. Baskes said, he was impressed by “the Library’s extraordinary commitment to keeping its collections physically and instantly accessible, at the very center of the campus” through the construction of the Mansueto Library. An avid and knowledgeable book collector, Mr. Baskes has also nurtured a long affiliation with Chicago’s Newberry Library, serving as a trustee and previously as chairman of the board. Over the last 30 years, he has cultivated a one-of-a-kind personal collection of rare and historical books with maps.

In doing so, Mr. Baskes explained, “I became aware of the extraordinary collections of rare books at the world’s great research libraries, especially as the catalogs of these libraries began to be accessible online, and discovered that the University of Chicago Library is one of the world’s most important repositories of rare books. Julie and I also understand that however rare, beautiful, or extensive such materials may be, their value to scholars is entirely dependent upon their accessibility.”

Baskes Bookplate

The electronic bookplate for gifts from the Roger Baskes Collection.

With that in mind, Mr. and Mrs. Baskes made a $250,000 commitment to support the cataloging project. “Twenty-first century readers and students of rare books and manuscripts, whether part of the University of Chicago community or from other parts of the world, will come to the Library after they have learned from its online catalog that there exist materials important to their research,” Mr. Baskes said. “We believe that little would add to the value of the Library’s remarkable Special Collections more than the enhancement and editing of its catalog, and we are honored to support it.”

Along with their monetary support, Mr. and Mrs. Baskes are also donating rare and historical books with maps that they have collected. So far the Library has received approximately 100 titles ranging from the 18th century to the late 20th. In addition to American, English, and French books with maps, the gifts include books in Japanese, Armenian, and Ottoman Turkish. When they are cataloged, the associated online records will bear a custom electronic bookplate (pictured) and will be readily retrievable by searching the catalog for the donor name.

“We have long understood the importance of improving access to our rare book collections by providing more detailed and accurate catalog records,” said Alice Schreyer, Interim Library Director and Associate University Librarian for Area Studies and Special Collections. “Roger and Julie’s gift will make the unique features of our collections known to a wide range of scholars who would otherwise not discover them.”

In recognition of their gift, a group study space in the Special Collections Research Center will be named the “Julie and Roger Baskes Group Study.” Students, faculty, and visiting scholars use this room to work collaboratively with rare and historical materials.

2014-15 Library Society Speaker Series

Rosanna Warren

Rosanna Warren

Save the date for these Library Society lectures:

  • Wednesday, November 12, 2014
    Neil Harris, Preston and Sterling Morton Professor of History and Art History Emeritus, The University of Chicago, and Dr. Teri Edelstein
  • Wednesday, March 11, 2015
    Rosanna Warren, Hanna Holborn Gray Distinguished Professor, Committee on Social Thought, The University of Chicago
  • Wednesday, May 20, 2015
    Andrew Abbott, Gustavus F. and Ann M. Swift Distinguished Service Professor, The University of Chicago

All lectures will be held in Regenstein Library Room 122 in the evening and are open to the public with registration. To register and for updates including topics and times, visit lib.uchicago.edu/e/alumnifriends/libsoc.

Introduction to Library Research – SSA: workshop

When: Monday, November 10, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: School of Social Service Administration, Room E-I 
969 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: Workshop for SSA students on Library Databases: how to find the most appropriate databases for your research and how to take advantage of all the bells and whistles built into them. Plus, time for questions and answers about any Library matters you would like to discuss. 
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1562
Contact: Paul Belloni
Social Service Administration Librarian
Bibliographer for Psychology, Education, & Social Service Administration
Tag: WorkshopsTraining
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Introduction to EndNote (Online Version): workshop

When: Wednesday, November 5, noon – 1 p.m.
Thursday, November 6, noon – 1 p.m.
Tuesday, November 11, noon – 1 p.m.
Where: Crerar Library, Computer Classroom (November 5)

TECHB@R Regenstein Library, Room 160 (November 6 & 11)

Description: EndNote offers an online version of its popular citation manager that is available to the University of Chicago community freely through the Library. The online version offers the key features of the popular EndNote software, but with added enhancements of cloud storage, syncing, and the ability to easily share and collaborate. Come to this workshop and see if EndNote’s online version works for you.
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1339
Contact: John Crerar Library
773-702-7715

Joseph Regenstein Library
773-702-4685

Tag: WorkshopsTrainingGraduate Students
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

From Gnostics to U-Boats: The Work of Robert McQueen Grant (1917-2014)

Exhibit Location: The Joseph Regenstein Library, Fourth Floor.

Exhibit Dates: October 20, 2014 – December 13, 2014

Grant in his retirement

Grant in his retirement

Grant as a young man

Grant as a young man in his office in Swift Hall.

 

Robert McQueen Grant was the most prolific and influential American historian of ancient Christianity of his generation. His research helped establish New Testament Studies as an historical endeavor that must take into account the full context of the Hellenistic world. His research interests were broad. He published multiple books on Gnosticism, an introduction to the New Testament that was later translated into French and an encyclopedia of the use of animals in early Christian literature. At the same time, he was an international authority on U-Boats in World War I. Robert McQueen Gant began teaching at the Divinity School in 1953. He passed away at his home in Hyde Park on June 10, 2014 at the age of 96. This exhibit displays paradigmatic works from his career, showcasing Grant’s breadth and depth as a scholar.

Feature Story Brenda Johnson named Library Director and University Librarian

Brenda L. Johnson, an internationally respected leader in the field of library science, has been appointed Library Director and University Librarian, Provost Eric Isaacs announced Oct. 16. Her five-year term begins Jan. 1, 2015.

“The Library plays a key role in the life of faculty and students at the University of Chicago,” Isaacs said. “Brenda’s expertise in supporting both physical collections and the proliferation of digital resources, along with her history of collaboration and innovative thinking, make her an outstanding leader for this important enterprise.”

Brenda Johnson

Brenda Johnson

Johnson currently serves as Ruth Lilly Dean of University Libraries at Indiana University, Bloomington—a position she has held since 2010. She succeeds Judith Nadler, who retired in June after nearly five decades of service to UChicago.

Before coming to Indiana University, Johnson was University Librarian at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She spent more than 20 years at the University of Michigan, where she served as Associate University Librarian for Public Services, a position with responsibility over that institution’s 19 libraries.

She is active in the national and international library community through service and leadership on a variety of executive boards and committees, such as the board of governors of HathiTrust, the board of directors of CLOCKSS (a digital repository for web-based scholarly publications), the Committee on Institutional Cooperation Library Directors Group, the board of directors of Kuali OLE (Open Library Environment), and the Association of Research Libraries’ Scholarly Communications Steering Committee.

Johnson has become a nationally and internationally recognized voice on topics such as the rapid pace of change in information discovery and dissemination, the development of multi-institution “collective collections,” and research and learning environments, as well as the need for library transformation that fosters scholarly engagement and support. Her recent international speaking engagements have taken her to London, Shanghai, Kyushu and Yokohama, Japan.

“The University of Chicago Library is a unique and influential institution among academic libraries,” Johnson said. “I am truly honored by the opportunity to lead it through a time of transformation for all libraries, and eager to collaborate with faculty, students and staff to ensure its vitality in the years to come.”

Diane Lauderdale, professor of Health Studies, is chair of the Library’s faculty board and chaired the search committee that recommended Johnson for the position of Library Director.

“Brenda Johnson is an experienced library director and well-respected leader in the international academic library community,” Lauderdale said. “She will bring to the University of Chicago a deep understanding of collections, public and technical services and new technologies. We have an outstanding collection and staff here, but like all university libraries, face challenging decisions in the next few years about our physical and digital collections. The search committee felt confident that Brenda had the experience, insight and vision to lead our library to an even higher level of excellence.”

At a time of change for libraries nationwide, the University of Chicago Library has flourished as a center of intellectual inquiry recognized throughout academia and a dynamic learning environment for UChicago students. With its 11.9 million volumes, noted collections in a broad range of fields, including global resources and commitment to keeping its collection on campus, the Library has become a destination for scholars and a model for other institutions worldwide.  

The Joseph Regenstein Library and the adjoining Joe and Rika Mansueto Library are located in the heart of the Hyde Park campus—a testament to the Library’s continued importance to scholarly and campus life at the University, Isaacs said.

The Mansueto Library is the most recent addition to the library system. Mansueto houses cutting-edge facilities for book preservation and digitization, as well as a high-density underground storage system with the capacity to hold 3.5 million volume equivalents. The library was designed to fulfill scholars’ needs for easy access to print resources at a time when many other research universities are moving their collections to off-site storage.

The library is named in honor of Joe Mansueto, AB’78, MBA’80, and Rika Yoshida, AB’91, who gave a $25 million gift to the University in 2008. Architect Helmut Jahn designed the facility’s iconic glass dome, which encloses a light-filled reading room and an underground storage system that descends 50 feet below ground.

Alice Schreyer, Associate University Librarian for Area Studies and Special Collections, has been leading the Library on an interim basis since Nadler’s retirement. She will continue in that role until Johnson’s arrival.

A University of Chicago news release

Access to books during second phase of B Level flooring replacement

Beginning in November, the Library will commence the final phase of a project to replace cracked and worn floor tile throughout the Regenstein B Level bookstacks. This phase replaces floor tile in the main aisles; flooring in the compact shelving book aisles was completed over the summer. Work will take place between 6 a.m. and 3 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and will involve noise and dust at times, as well as limiting access to some aisles.

The work has been planned to cause as little disruption as possible, but some main aisles will be inaccessible for two to three days at a time during all building hours. Most book aisles will remain accessible throughout the project, and alternative routes to reach book aisles will be posted whenever possible. A small number of book aisles will be inaccessible at times, but no individual book aisle will be inaccessible for more than two working days.

To request a book from an inaccessible book aisle, visit the 1st Floor Circulation Desk. Staff will page material as soon as the aisle re-opens; you will receive a notice as soon as the item is available for pickup at Circulation.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your patience while this important work is completed. For updated information about this project, visit lib.uchicago.edu/e/reg/using/floorplans.

Updated 10/06/14 to reflect that the final phase of the project will begin in November rather than October.

Apply for the Library Student Advisory Group

The Library is currently seeking representatives for the Library Student Advisory Group (LSAG) from the following Divisions and Schools:

  • The College (1st or 2nd year students)
  • Biological Sciences Division
  • Chicago Booth School of Business
  • Harris School of Public Policy
  • Law School
  • Pritzker School of Medicine
  • School of Social Service Administration

The Library Student Advisory Group serves as a formal channel of communication between students and the Library administration.  The LSAG discusses the collections and services provided through all of the University’s campus libraries — Crerar, D’Angelo, Eckhart, Mansueto, Regenstein, and SSA — and the present and future needs of the student community.  The Group assists in making specific recommendations to improve the Library and considers proposals for future changes in services.  Finally, members of the LSAG discuss how the Library can raise awareness of its offerings among students, and how students can communicate their wishes, needs, and concerns to the Library.

If you are interested in serving, please complete the online application by October 13, 2014.  If you would like additional information about the Library Student Advisory Group or would like to apply via e-mail, please contact Rebecca Starkey
at rstarkey@uchicago.edu.

Library offers new Catalog workshops

Would you like to learn more about the new Library Catalog? The University of Chicago Library is holding several 30-minute workshops outlining its many features.

Library Catalog: Basics
Get up to speed on searching the new Library Catalog. You’ll learn how to:

  • Search for specific books, ebooks, DVDs & more
  • Find a journal from a citation
  • Search for sources on a topic

Library Catalog: Advanced
Learn advanced searching techniques for the Catalog, including:

  • Searching in non-Roman scripts
  • Using Advanced Keyword Search and applying search limits
  • Constructing searches with Boolean operators and wildcards
  • Searching for exact terms and phrases
  • Indexing, relevance ranking, and boosting of search terms
  • Uniform titles, analytics, and other details in Catalog records

All programs are held in the TECHB@R in Regenstein Library, Room 160. Space is limited, and registration is strongly encouraged. Register for Library Catalog: Basics or Library Catalog: Advanced.

October 6

  • Basics: 5:30 – 6:00 PM
  • Advanced: 6:00 – 6:30 PM

October 10

  • Basics: 10:30 – 11:00 AM
  • Advanced: 11:00 – 11:30 AM

October 13

  • Basics: 3:00 – 3:30 PM
  • Advanced: 3:30 – 4:00 PM

October 14

  • Basics: 1:00 – 1:30 PM
  • Advanced: 1:30 – 2:00 PM

October 15

  • Basics: Noon – 12:30 PM
  • Advanced: 12:30 – 1:00 PM

Questions about this program can be directed to Rebecca Starkey at rstarkey@uchicago.edu or 773-702-4484.

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. Information on Assistive Listening Devices.

College students: get ready for Library research

Now that you’ve attended the Aims of Education address, it is time to put those goals into practice. The Library is offering several orientation programs to help you get started using our collections and services for your classes and assignments.

Library Boot CampGet in shape for College research by attending the Library Boot Camp on the A-Level of Regenstein Library on Wednesday and Thursday (September 24 and 25) at 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Library Boot Camp will provide you with a fast-paced overview of key library services and research tools essential to success in your first quarter of classes.  Along with toning your Library skills, you’ll get a Library mug at the end—perfect for visiting the Ex Libris Café when classes start.

Don’t get lost in the bookstacks! Tour Regenstein Library From Top to Bottom on Friday and prepare to navigate the largest library on campus. The tour will cover all the key points of interest. Plus our librarians will also show you how to work the mysterious moving shelving on the B-Level. Tours start in the Regenstein Lobby at 10:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m., 2:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m.

Photo of Jenny Hart Giving a Library Tour

A Crerar orientation tour with Jenny Hart, Bibliographer for Computer Science, Mathematics, and Statistics. Photo by Jason Smith.

Are you a Pre-Med or majoring in the sciences? Science Research: An Introduction to the John Crerar Library is an orientation program that highlights services for the biological and physical sciences, and focuses on using journal literature (very important for science research). Programs will be held at Crerar Library on Thursday at 10:00 a.m and 1:00 p.m., along with Friday at 10:00 a.m.

Can’t make an orientation event? The Library will be on hand at the Student Activities and Resources Fair on October 3rd. Visit our table to meet some of our librarians, ask questions, and pick up some Library giveaways, like our Library pins—collect them all!