U.S. Law

New database trial: Global-Regulation

The Library has arranged a trial through December 15 of Global-Regulation. This e-resource has 1,514,182 laws (including 751,543 laws machine-translated into English) for 71 countries. You can do one global search or search individual country’s laws via the Global-Regulation Law Database Coverage Details page. The page also lists the total number of laws for each country or jurisdiction (including the European Union) and has the scope of coverage map below. You can tell quickly that Global-Regulation is strong for Canada, Australia, and many European countries.

Global-Regulation key

 

Globlal-Regulation globe - coverage

From their About page, Global-Regulation, Inc. is partnered with Amazon, Microsoft, and Google. They say this about their English translations: “Our service is entirely run by computer algorithms. Translations are not human-vetted. There may be inaccuracies in information due to our algorithmic extraction of information. Always consult the official source when making use of legal information.”

The vision of the Canada-based corporation providing Global-Regulation is: “To make all of the world’s laws accessible to users in a way that’s as easy as a Google search.” Let us know if they’re on the right track!

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases now on Hein Online

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases, published by the American Bar Association, has moved to Hein Online. There are eight issues per term. The first seven issues report on oral arguments, and the eighth issue gives a roundup of the term. All published issues are available, back to the 1973 term.

Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases is the best place to find the briefs of the parties, amicus briefs, and oral argument transcripts for cases from the Court’s current term. Click on the case’s docket number in the table of contents to get a list of briefs and transcripts.

preview

 

Consult our Supreme Court research guide for more sources of news and information about the Court.

 

Non-law databases for law students

Legal research is becoming more and more interdisciplinary, including “Law and…”, human rights, international relations, and other law-related topics in other disciplines. Therefore, when you begin your research, you will find yourself seeking non-law databases more often than not.  If you are new to interdisciplinary research at the University, check out D’Angelo Law Library’s Finding Non-Law Journal Articles guide. These include some of the non-law databases more frequently used here at Law.

For journal articles and books from disciplines other than law, start with Articles Plus, which contains articles drawn from hundreds of databases and over 40,000 journals.

While Articles Plus seems all encompassing, it does not include ProQuest databases such as Dissertation Abstracts, ProQuest Newsstand, ABI INFORM, Early English Books Online, and Legislative Insight. Nor Factiva. So make sure to also check these if the information for which you are looking might be located in these other databases.

Articles Plus, because it covers so many disciplines, can generate overbroad search results. Therefore, for research in a particular subject, you should search databases specific to that subject.  This Research Starting Points guide provides an A to Z list of key databases arranged by subject (from African Studies to Women’s Studies). You can also locate useful databases by using topical research guides listed in our Non-Law Subjects (Subject Guides) page. You can also use Database Finder to locate Library databases in a particular subject. You can search by database title or browse by subject.

Another way to access general, non-law databases via Database Finder is to click on the “Articles, Journals & Databases” tab on the D’Angelo Law Library home page, then click on the Databases radio button to search for a database by name, platform, subject, or keyword in its description.

Image of databases search page

Supreme Court Sluggers at D’Angelo Law Library

From the Green Bag, creators of the Supreme Court bobblehead dolls, come the newest Supreme Court collectibles, the Supreme Court slugger “baseball” cards—and ours have been added to the Law Library collection just in time for opening day of baseball season in April. These cards, which are modeled after baseball cards, have a picture of each justice as a baseball player and are complete with their Supreme Court “player” statistics. There are currently 8 cards available, of past and present Justices of the Supreme Court. Each card has a Justice in an appropriate position on the baseball team, and features paintings by John Sargent or Alec Spangler, based on paintings in the collection of the Supreme Court. Instead of RBIs, hits and errors, the statistics include Supreme Court opinions each justice was involved in, both before and during his/her tenure on the Supreme Court, in a number of statistical categories. Each card is accompanied by a pink “Thought Bubble Gum” magnet , completing the baseball card theme.

Photo of Justice Antonin Scalia's baseball card, with thought bubble gum.

Justice Antonin Scalia, Supreme Court Slugger

Details about the statistical methods are included in an article by Law School alum, Ross Davies (JD ’97) and Craig Rust, about the first card for Chief Justice John G. Roberts, “Supreme Court Sluggers: Behind the Numbers” [PDF]. Scans of all available cards with statistics and pictures are available at the Green Bag “Sluggers: Cards & Stats” page.

Currently, the D’Angelo Law Library has 5 cards: Justices Samuel A. Alito, Abe Fortas, James Iredell, John G. Roberts, and Antonin Scalia. The cards are not sold, but made available to subscribers of the Green Bag journal, and are picked up in person by a friend of D’Angelo Law Library. Each card is cataloged separately and they can all be located in the online catalog by searching the series “Supreme Court sluggers.” The cards are stored in a baseball card collectors box in the Law Rare Book Room, along with the Supreme Court bobblehead dolls.

New online resource: National Survey of State Laws

The National Survey of State Laws, by Richard Leiter (7th ed.) is now available as a database on Hein Online. For more than fifty topics, you get a synopsis of every state’s laws, presented as a table, with complete citations. Subjects run from family law to drug laws and minimum wage laws. You can customize the table to show only the states you are interested in, and also see the laws as they stood in 2008 and 2005. The print edition is on order.

Other handy sources of 50-state law summaries include the Subject Compilation of State Laws, which lists statute surveys that appear in law journals and legal treatises; Westlaw 50 State Statute Surveys, and LexisNexis 50 State Surveys: Statutes and Regulations.

Historic database on Chicago Police misconduct launched

The groundbreaking Citizens Police Data Project, launched yesterday by the Invisible Institute and the Law School’s Civil Rights and Police Accountability Clinic, is a searchable database that contains more than 56,000 complaints filed against more than 8,500 Chicago police officers between 2001 and September of this year. There are gaps in that 14-year period, but the database has every allegation of misconduct made against an officer between March 2011 and this September.

This data set is based on requests made under the Freedom of Information Act which became public information in 2014, when the Clinic won the landmark Illinois appellate case Kalven v. City of Chicago, 7 N.E.3d 741 (Ill. App. Ct. 2014). The database offers a variety of tools for sorting, filtering, and mapping the data. Each record contains information about the complaint and its outcome; the accused officer, including the officer’s name, race, age, gender, and unit of assignment; demographic information on the complainant, including race, age, and gender; and geographic information on where the incident occurred.

For related information on the topic, see the D’Angelo Law Library’s Civil Rights and Police Accountability research guide.

TRIAL: American Immigration Lawyers Association’s AILALink

We have a month-long trial to AILALink: http://ailalink.aila.org/.  Access is via campus IP address (not available off-campus via the proxy server).

AILALink includes primary law materials (immigration statutes, regulations, court and administrative decisions, memos, cables, minutes), government manuals, forms, AILA periodicals, and books such as Kurzban’s Immigration Law SourcebookEssentials of Immigration Law, Navigating the Fundamentals of Immigration Law, AILA’s Asylum Primer, Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) Practice Manual, Representing Clients in Immigration Court, and the Consular Practice Handbook.

Try it and let us know what you think!

 

 

New e-resource: IFAR’s art law and cultural property databases

If you are interested in art law research, the D’Angelo Law Library now provides e-access to the International Foundation for Art Research (IFAR)’s Art Law & Cultural Property databases. IFAR describes them as follows:

International Cultural Property/Ownership & Export Legislation (ICPOEL)

This section contains legislation governing the export and ownership of cultural property from dozens of countries. The legislation is presented in both summary form and as complete text; the latter in the original language and in translation. Selected historical legislation is also included, as, while superseded or amended, it can be useful for researchers looking for statutes applicable at the time of the acquisition, export or import of an art object. Links connect foreign legislation to relevant U.S. case law. There are also links to relevant international conventions and bilateral agreements.

Case Law & Statutes (CLS)

This section contains an extensive body of primarily U.S. case law, including both litigated cases and, notably, hard-to-find, out-of-court settlements. The material is organized under eight topics: World War II-Era/Holocaust Related Art Loss; Cultural Property (Antiquities) Disputes Over Non-United States Property; United States Cultural Property; Art Theft (other than World War II and cultural property looting); Other Ownership Title Disputes/Claims Including Conversion and Breach of Contract; Art Fraud, Attribution, Authenticity, Forgery, Libel, and Defamatory Statements; Valuation/Appraisal; and Copyright, Moral Rights and Other Issues.

Under each topic, relevant cases are summarized (where possible, with images of the art objects in question). There are also links to relevant U.S. statutes, foreign legislation and a glossary.

Cholera in Haiti: The United Nations, public health, and the law

Cholera in Haiti

Cholera in Haiti

Since October 2010 when UN peacekeepers contaminated Haiti’s principal river with cholera-infected human waste, the disease has killed over 8,300 and sickened more than 650,000.”

On February 26, 2014, at noon, there will be a panel discussion at the Biological Sciences Learning Center on “Cholera in Haiti: Intersection of Public Health and Global Humanitarian Intervention.”  Then at 4:30, in Room III, of the Law School, a panel including Brian Citro of the International Human Rights Clinic, Brian Concannon of the Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti (IJDH), and Dr. Paul Pierre of Partners in Health (PIH), will discuss “Law in a Time of Cholera: The Failure of the United Nations in Haiti.” 

Background documents, including the IJDH claims against the UN (November 3, 2011 Petition for Relief filed with the Bureaux des Avocats Internationaux (BAI)) and October 9, 2013 lawsuit filed against the UN (Georges et al v. United Nations et al., Docket # 1:13-cv-07146-JPO, SDNY), are available at the “Cholera Litigation” section of the Institute’s website. Both panels are sponsored by the University of Chicago Human Rights Program’s Health and Human Rights Initiative, with the support of the Richard and Ann Pozen Fund.

Happy Repeal Day!

Bock Beer

A Karl Llewellyn favorite beer

Rejoice, wine and beer lovers!  On this day, December 5, in 1933, Congress ended the nation’s dry spell.  Senate Joint Resolution 211 proposing a 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution to repeal the 18th Amendment, was enacted, thus setting a nation of drinkers free from Prohibition.  And making the Law School Wine Mess possible!

Selected Resources on Beer and Wine Law