The Body in 3D – a tour of the human body 3-5 p.m. April 17

Location: Kathleen A. Zar Room.

image of chestDrop by Crerar Library and watch a 3D video tour of the human body including the brain and other internal organs. Using images captured with contemporary medical scanning technologies this looping film will run every 5-10 minutes.

3D glasses will be provided.

Refreshments will be served.

 

Scopus Training – Biomedical and Physical Sciences: workshop

When: Wednesday, April 9, 2014 12:00–1:00 p.m.
Where: John Crerar Library, Kathleen A. Zar Room
5730 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL
Description: Learn how to use Scopus, an interdisciplinary, bibliographic database from Elsevier that indexes the contents of more than 21,000 publications. Scopus also features cited references and can be searched for articles that cite a specific article. This program will focus on using Scopus for research in the Biomedical and Physical Sciences. The training will be conducted by Rachel McCullough, Regina Heuglas, and Steve Quinlivan from Elsevier. Lunch will be provided by Elsevier.
Register: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1482
Contact: John Crerar Library
773-702-7715
Tag: Training, Staff, Graduate Students, Workshops, Student Events Calendar
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

New Library Catalog offers better electronic resource access for science users

The Library is implementing a new catalog this summer and it is presently available for beta testing at catalog.lib.uchicago.edu. It provides many new features including a better display of electronic access for journals and ebooks.

Electronic access to both journals and books is now displayed in search results:

vufind short display

ejournals display

 

ebooks display

ebooks display

 

The catalog also offers suggested search terms for search queries:

catalog suggestions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional features include the display of the current availability of items on the search results page.

My Account features, such as emailing, saving, and exporting records are still be developed in the new catalog.  Unfortunately, lists created by users of the current Catalog and MyDiscoveries records saved by users of Lens cannot be migrated to the new Library Catalog.  The Library will soon post instructions on how users can export these records, and users will have at least until the end of June to do so.

Please share your comments with us on the feedback form, also available from the Catalog header. We are particularly interested in your feedback regarding visual design and layout, organization of results and records, ease and effectiveness of search construction, and the quality and ranking of results.

A short video introduction to the new catalog is also available as well as more information about the new catalog.

 

 

ORCID – a Registry of Researchers

orcidorcid flower

 So what is ORCID and why should you care?

ORCID (http://www.orcid.org) is an open, non-profit, community-driven effort to create and maintain a registry of unique researcher identifiers and a transparent method of linking research activities and outputs to these identifiers.  When fully implemented by funding agencies, publishers, and universities will be able to unambiguously link researchers and research through the embedding of ORCID identifiers in key workflows, such as research profile maintenance, manuscript submissions, grant applications, and patent applications. 

The ORCID Registry is available free of charge to individuals, who may obtain an ORCID identifier, manage their record of activities, and search for others in the Registry.   The ORCID identifier is a numeric  16 digit code; e.g., my ORCID is 0000-0003-1868-2794. You can also link your ORCID to existing researcher profiles like Researcher ID and ScopusID.  A portion of an ORCID registry page is shown below.  You can see the entire registry page by going to http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1868-2794.

orcid screenshot

 

 

 

For more information on creating your ORCID and linking it to your research activities, check out our Author and Research Identifiers LibGuide. 

 

 

Science on the Screen – Your Inner Fish / Apr 3, 6:30 PM @ Logan Center

Your Inner Fish LogoScience on the Screen presents…

YOUR INNER FISH
Episode One of the new PBS Series

Thursday, April 3, 2014 @ 6:30 p.m.
Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts Performance Hall
915 E 60th St, Chicago, IL

Link to register at https://scienceonthescreen.uchicago.edu/page/your-inner-fish 

Your middle ear comes from the jawbone of a prehistoric fish. Your skin and hair can be traced to a shrew-like mammal that lived around 195 million years ago. As for your bad back–well, you can thank your primate ancestors for that. How did the human body become the complicated, quirky and amazing machine it is today?

Follow the scientific adventure story in Your Inner Fish, a new PBS series premiering April 9 at 10/9C that takes a fresh look at human evolution. Produced by Tangled Bank Studies and Windfall Films, the series is based on the best-selling book of the same name by University of Chicago paleontologist and evolutionary biologist Neil Shubin. Using fossils, embryos and genes, Shubin reveals how our bodies are the legacy of ancient fish, reptiles and primates – the ancestors you never knew were in your family tree. This program will feature the first episode of the three-part science series.

A discussion with Neil Shubin and the Field Museum’s distinguished service curator Lance Grande follows the 60-minute screening.

Feature Story Essential Skills Graduate Workshop Series

Librarian teaching a class

Photo by Jason Smith.

Graduate students!  Are you on campus during Spring Break?  Use the break in classes to gain essential skills for academic and professional success. The University of Chicago Library and IT Services are offering a series of workshops designed for graduate students March 24- 28. 

All programs will be held in Regenstein Library.  There is no fee for training, but space is limited and registration is required.   Sign up today!

All About EndNote
Thursday, March 27 from 11:00 – Noon in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
Learn about the popular desktop citation management software, EndNote. In this class, you will learn to how to use EndNote, including how to create and manage libraries, import references from online databases, and create formatted bibliographies and citations in Microsoft Word.

BrowZine
Thursday, March 27 from 2:30-3:30 p.m.  in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160  – Register Now
Do you own an iPad or Android?  Then the BrowZine app might be a great tool for you!  BrowZine assists users by presenting open access and Library-subscribed journals on a common newsstand.  The result is an easy and familiar way to browse, read and monitor scholarly journals across the disciplines or to have a convenient list of favorite journals titles at your fingertips.  Join us in the workshop to learn how to install and use this app.

EndNote or Zotero?  Selecting the Best Citation Manager
Monday, March 24 from 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
Citation managers are powerful, time-saving tools that help you manage your research. They can also help you format your papers in MS Word by creating bibliographies, citations, and footnotes automatically in the style you choose, such as APA or Chicago.  This workshop will compare how EndNote and Zotero – two popular citation managers – allow you to save, share, and cite information. In order to provide a side-by-side comparison of tools, the format of this workshop is demonstration rather than hands-on training.

Excel 2010: Skills for the Workplace
Friday, March 28 from 1:00-2:30 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160 Register Now
Do you need to know the basics of Excel 2010 for an internship, job interview, or for a class? During this 90 minute demonstration session, you will learn the Excel 2010 basics plus tips to make your work in Excel more efficient. We’ll create a workbook that uses the autofill handle, conditional formatting, relative and absolute references, automatic formatting, and create a chart to represent data. Please feel free to bring your laptop with Excel 2010 installed to follow along. There will be a few laptops available to borrow if you do not have a laptop and would like to follow along.

Excel 2010: Tools to Organize Data
Friday, March 28 from 3:00-4:30 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160 Register Now
Do you need to organize and summarize data sets in Excel? This 90 minute session will demonstrate how to navigate data sets, create pivot tables, use conditional formatting, and take advantage of useful data ribbon features including goal seek and data validation. After this class you should have a full set of tools to use with your own data. Please note, this class is for people who are familiar with Excel 2010. Please feel free to bring your laptop with Excel 2010 installed to follow along. There maybe a few laptops available to borrow if you do not have a laptop and would like to follow along.

Following the Citation Trail
Monday, March 24 from 10:30-11:30 a.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
Thursday, March 27 from 1:00-2:00 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
This workshop will discuss methods for building your bibliography with special emphasis on citation linking: tracking resources that cite a specific article, book or essay.

Getting Started with STATA
Monday, March 24 from 12:30-2:00 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
Tuesday, March 25 from 1:00-2:30 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
This 90-minute workshop will give you the tools to become a STATA pro. The workshop will start with an explanation of when to use STATA over other stats programs and a walk through the interface. Then, the bulk of the workshop time will be spent learning basic commands and processes. A “do file” will be provided for easy access to the commands as well as a handout for keeping track of all of them. The last part of the workshop will bring it all together, moving beyond the basics, blending the commands to create regressions and graphics. Be prepared for a fast paced class, some familiarity with Statistics or programming is helpful, but not necessary. (Also, if you want to attend, but do not have STATA on your computer, take a look at commander.uchicago.edu. If you need help setting it up, come to the Techbar at least 15 min. early and the staff can help.) 

I Want My NYT! Full-Text News Databases
Friday, March 28 from 10:00-10:30 a.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
Did you know that you can access current newspapers online through the Library’s subscriptions? In this program, you’ll learn about Library databases like ProQuest Newsstand, LexisNexis, Factiva, and Eureka that provide access to hundreds of U.S. and international newspapers.

Introduction to EndNote (Online Version)
Wednesday, March 26 from 1:00-2:00 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
EndNote offers an online version of its popular citation manager that is available to the University of Chicago community through the Library.  The online version offers the key features of the popular EndNote software, but with added enhancements of cloud storage, syncing, and the ability to easily share and collaborate.  Come to this workshop and see if EndNote’s online version it works for you.

Introduction to Using Special Collections
Tuesday, March 25 from 3:00-4:00 p.m. in the Special Collections Research Center, Regenstein Library – Register Now
Learn about the rare book and archival collections housed in the library and how to incorporate these materials in your research and teaching. This session will cover the fundamentals of requesting and using rare and archival materials as well as hands-on time with the collections and a special focus on innovative strategies to enhance teaching.  

Introduction to Zotero
Tuesday, March 25 from 11:30-12:30 p.m in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160Register Now
Zotero is a free citation manager that allows you to save citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in standard citation styles, including MLA, Chicago and APA. This hands-on workshop will introduce some of the key functions of Zotero such as: installing Zotero, adding citations to your Zotero library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Microsoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents.

Search Alerts and RSS
Wednesday, March 26 from 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160  - Register Now
How do you stay current in your field? Do you review the latest issues of core journals? Do you regularly visit society and association websites? Do you search databases for the latest information on your area of research? Do you follow key authors in your field? Would it be helpful if all of this information came to you, instead of you finding it? With alerts and RSS feeds, you can automate various modes of information gathering and save valuable time.

Using the UChicago Wiki
Tuesday, March 25 from 10:00 -11:00 a.m. in the TECHB@R, Regenstein 160 – Register Now
What are Wikis and how do you use them effectively? This 60 minute workshop will introduce you to the UChicago Wiki as a tool for collaboration. By the end of the workshop you will be able to create and customize wiki spaces, add and edit pages, and invite other users to work together.Please bring your laptop with internet access for some hands-on experience. Free laptop lending for students, staff and faculty is available (on a first come, first served basis) at the TECHB@R.

 

There is no fee for training, but space is limited and registration is required.   All programs will be held in Regenstein Library. 

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact Rebecca Starkey at rstarkey@uchicago.edu or 773-702-4484.

Imaging/Imagining the Human Body in Anatomical Representation

Imaging Imagining exhibition - 3 images of handsThree-venue exhibition at the University of Chicago examines anatomical representation from artistic and scientific perspectives throughout history

March 25–June 20, 2014

A multi-venue exhibition curated by two physicians at the University of Chicago explores the history of anatomical representation and the evolving relationship between the arts and medical science. On view from March 25–June 20, Imaging/Imagining the Human Body in Anatomical Representation is jointly presented in three parts by the Special Collections Research Center (The Body as Text), Smart Museum of Art (The Body as Art), and The John Crerar Library (The Body as Data) in collaboration with the UChicago Arts|Science Initiative. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

The exhibition includes over 60 works in a variety of media—drawings, rare manuscripts, sculptures, engravings, and radiographic images—dating from the Renaissance to today. It features both imaginative depictions of the human figure made by artists as well as scientific images of the body, and traces the interplay of artistic and medical imaging throughout history.

“In popular perception, the artist depicts the human figure for aesthetic or expressive purposes, while scientific images of the body lay claim to objective representation,” write the curators, Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Mindy Schwartz, MD, Professor of Medicine, at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine. “In fact, the story of anatomical representation is far more complex.”

As Imaging/Imagining reveals, early anatomical illustrations required close collaboration between anatomists and artists, illustrators, and engravers. These images reflected scientific conventions but were also weighted with aesthetic, social, political, and religious meaning. As anatomical images became more medicalized, the disciplines diverged. Following the advent of the X-ray at the turn of the twentieth century, the divide widened as new imaging technologies allowed medical practitioners to visualize the body as never before. At the same time, modernism and abstraction radically transformed artistic practice, which had for centuries emphasized the centrality of the well-drawn figure. Today, modern medical imaging continues to inform artists’ perceptions of the body while still relying in part on the subjective hand of an expert to manipulate and reinterpret layers of data into a visual form.

“A project like Imaging/Imagining transcends traditional disciplinary boundaries in a way that enriches our understanding,” said Julie Marie Lemon, Program Director and Curator of the Arts|Science Initiative in the Office of the Provost at the University of Chicago. “The exhibition is an example of the sort of sustained dialogue the Arts|Science Initative seeks to foster between artistic and scientific forms of inquiry within the University and beyond.”

The exhibition’s themes will be explored in greater depth through several public programs, notably the talk on Thursday, April 17 at 5 pm, “Seeing Into and Seeing Through: The Promise and Peril of Imaging” by Dr. Richard B. Gunderman, Professor of Radiology, Pediatrics, Medical Education, Philosophy, Liberal Arts, and Philanthropy, and Vice Chair of Radiology at Indiana University.

Exhibition Sections

Imaging/Imagining runs concurrently across three venues, each with a dedicated section that contributes to the larger themes of the exhibition.

Imaging/Imagining: The Body as Text

March 25–June 20, 2014
Special Collections Research Center, Joseph Regenstein Library, The University of Chicago, 1100 E. 57th Street
Monday–Friday, 9 am–4:45 pm; Saturdays, 9 am–12:45 pm (when University of Chicago classes are in session); closed Sunday

The Body as Text explores the history of anatomical representation from the Renaissance to the turn of the twentieth century. It features illustrated anatomic texts, like Vesalius’s De humani corporis fabrica and Henry Gray’s Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical, that map the body’s complex systems and functions, as well as prints, paintings, sculptures, drawings, and radiographs. The objects on view are drawn from the holdings of the Special Collections Research Center and the Smart Museum of Art.

Together, the works prompt viewers not only to examine the intent of the image makers and the intended function of the image but also to explore our contemporary understanding of the human body in the context of a broad history of anatomical representation and scientific progress.

The Body as Text is curated by Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Mindy Schwartz, MD, Professor of Medicine, at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine, in collaboration with Catherine Uecker, Rare Books Librarian, Special Collections.

Imaging/Imagining: The Body as Art

March 25–June 22, 2014
Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, 5550 S. Greenwood Avenue
Tuesday–Sunday, 10 am–5 pm; Thursday until 8 pm; closed Monday

The Body as Art gathers images of the body from a range of historical periods and considers the extent to which they conform to established representational conventions or seem instead to reflect the artist’s own observations or expressive goals. It features works drawn from the Smart’s collection and the holding of the Special Collections Research Center. Highlights include figurative etchings; sculpture by Edgar Degas, Henry Moore, and Jacques Lipchitz; a cubist portrait by Jean Metzinger; prints by Otto Dix; and a sketchbook of watercolor drawings by Ivan Albright.

This section of the exhibition asks visitors to consider the enduring role of figure drawing in academic art study; the relation between artistic and scientific abstraction; the depiction of bodily suffering in wartime; and what art and medicine have to offer each other in the pursuit of accuracy, humanity, and empathy, when it comes to representing the body.

The Body as Art is curated by Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Mindy Schwartz, MD, Professor of Medicine, at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine, in collaboration with Anne Leonard, Smart Museum Curator and Associate Director of Academic Initiatives.

The Body as Art is made possible by Smart Museum’s Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Endowment.

Imaging/Imagining: The Body as Data

March 25–June 20, 2014
The John Crerar Library, The University of Chicago, 5730 S. Ellis Avenue
Monday—Saturday, 9 am–4:30 pm; closed Sunday

The Body as Data examines the data revolution of modern medical imaging that has transformed anatomical representation and how we view the body. This data revolution occurred when the basic concepts behind x-ray technology combined with the capabilities of computers. The result is imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans that produce vast amounts of data which is then processed into modern anatomical representations.

These images often claim scientific neutrality and are viewed with a clinical gaze, yet they are more than objective and unaltered pictures of the body. They represent the body broken apart into bits of data that are then manipulated to produce a myriad of visually interpretable images. These images have in turn informed artists’ perceptions of the body and further pushed the boundaries of how we view the human form.

The Body as Data is curated by Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Mindy Schwartz, MD, Professor of Medicine, at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine in collaboration with Stephen Thomas, MD, Assistant Professor of Radiology, and Adam Schwertner, fourth year medical student at the Pritzker School of Medicine, The University of Chicago.

Related Programs

Family Day: Ultrasounds, Exquisite Corpses

Saturday, April 5, 1–4 pm
Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, 5550 S. Greenwood Avenue

Drop by the Smart for an afternoon of family-friendly art activities. Combine ultrasounds with the ultimate Surrealist parlor game to make exquisite corpse drawings from ultrasound images of your internal structures. The ultrasound machine will be operated by Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine and co-curator of the exhibition Imaging/Imagining.*

Free. All materials provided. Activities are best for kids ages 4–12, accompanied by an adult.

*The purpose of the ultrasound demonstration at the Smart’s Family Day is educational only. The ultrasound machine is not being used for any medical or diagnostic purpose.

The Body in 3D

Thursday, April 17, 3–5 pm
The John Crerar Library, The University of Chicago, 5730 S. Ellis Avenue, Kathleen A. Zar Room

Drop by Crerar Library and watch a 3D video tour of the human body including the brain and other internal organs. Using images captured with contemporary medical scanning technologies this looping film will run every 5-10 minutes. 3D glasses will be provided.

Lecture: “Seeing Into and Seeing Through: The Promise and Peril of Imaging”

Thursday, April 17, 5 pm
Regenstein Library, The University of Chicago, 1100 E. 57th Street, room 122

Dr. Richard B. Gunderman, author of X-Ray Vision: The Evolution of Medical Imaging and its Human Significance, will explore the exhibition’s themes in a free public lecture. Dr. Gunderman is Professor of Radiology, Pediatrics, Medical Education, Philosophy, Liberal Arts, and Philanthropy, and Vice Chair of Radiology at Indiana University.

Free. Seating will be available on a first come, first served basis.

How to Draw Hands

Thursday, April 17, 5:30–7:30 pm
Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, 5550 S. Greenwood Avenue

The human hand is notoriously hard to draw. Learn some tricks and techniques during a fun and supportive sketching session.

Free. All materials provided. Open to adults of all skill levels.

Drawing the Body with the Body

Thursday, May 15, 5:30–7:30 pm
Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, 5550 S. Greenwood Avenue

Enjoy a performance by Mordine & Co. Dance Theater and take part in a gesture drawing and sketching program. The dance, choreographed by Shirley Mordine, is inspired by works on view in Imaging/Imagining. Performing Artists: Simone Baechle, Danielle Gilmore, Joseph Hutto, Emily Lukasewski, Michael O’Neil, and Melissa Pillarella.

Free. All materials provided. Open to adults of all skill levels.

About

Imaging/Imagining is curated by Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Mindy Schwartz, MD, Professor of Medicine, at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Medicine. It is presented by the Special Collections Research Center, Smart Museum of Art, and The John Crerar Library in collaboration with the UChicago Arts|Science Initiative. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

Images (from left to right): Detail from Henry Gray’s Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical, 1858, Rare Book Collection, The University of Chicago Library.

Walker Evans, Untitled (Two hands), n.d., printed by the Chicago Albumen Works in 1980, Gelatin silver print. Smart Museum of Art, The University of Chicago, Gift of Arnold H. Crane, 1980.107.

X-ray of a hand holding a feather duster from Walter König’s 14 Photographien mit Röntgen-Strahlen, 1896. John Crerar Collection of Rare Books in the History of Science and Medicine, The University of Chicago Library.

Media Images

Download high-resolution images on Dropbox.

Media Contacts

C.J. Lind, Associate Director, Communications, Smart Museum of Art, 773.702.0176, cjlind@uchicago.edu

Rachel A. Rosenberg, Director of Communications, The University of Chicago Library, 773.834.1519, ra-rosenberg@uchicago.edu

Extended Library hours March 14 – 16

To support students preparing for finals, Crerar, Mansueto and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours Friday, March 14 and Saturday, March 15.

Mansueto will be open all weekend until 12:45 a.m.; Crerar and Regenstein will be open until 1:00 a.m.

The Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will be open 24 hours until the end of finals on Friday, March 21.

For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Cancelled – Scopus database training, Mar. 14 @11:30 am

This workshop has been cancelled.

Scopus Training for the Biomedical and Physical Sciences
Friday, March 14th at 11:30 in the Kathleen A. Zar Room, Crerar Library. 

Representatives of Elsevier’s Scopus database will be on campus providing training in using the Scopus database.  Scopus, the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature, features  tools to track, analyze and visualize research. Scopus includes research output in the fields of science, technology, medicine, social sciences and arts and humanities. Coverage of the database is global. 

Lunch will be provided by Elsevier.  Register here.

Updated March 11, 2014.

Data: Collecting, Using, Managing – Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, Apr. 25

http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/crerar/zar/

“Data: Collecting, Using, Managing”
3rd Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium
April 25, 2014
The John Crerar Library
The University of Chicago

Data is captured by computers and instruments on a continual basis, flooding researchers in images, video, audio, logs, simulations, and more. This data is crucial to research, teaching and learning at academic institutions around the world. Understanding the impact of data on researchers, libraries and institutions as a whole is critical to achieving long-term data preservation, appropriate sharing among communities, and enabling transformative new science. This symposium will provide participants with an understanding of how data is used in real world applications, as well as examples of collaborative efforts between institutions, groups or individuals specific to collection, use, access, preservation and overall management of data.

Schedule and registration information is available at: http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/crerar/zar/

Intro to OpenMP workshop, Feb. 28, 1-4 pm

Date/Time: 2/27/2014, 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Crerar Library Computer Classroom

This workshop will give a brief introduction to shared-memory parallel programming using the OpenMP standard. It is designed to give people with little to no parallel programming experience knowledge of basic parallel programming topics, examples of applying OpenMP to existing problems, and strategies for avoiding common errors and pitfalls. The tutorial will begin with an introduction to the concept of parallel programming and a discussion of how to identify problems that may benefit from parallelization. This will be followed by an introduction to the OpenMP API, with an emphasis on parallelizing existing serial codes. Examples in both C and Fortran will be provided.

Prerequisites: * Familiarity with C, C++, or Fortran

Register
https://training.uchicago.edu/registered/register_course.cfm?section_id=8760

Don’t miss Your Inner Fish on PBS

YourInnerFishPBSThe 3-part PBS series, Your Inner Fish, based on Neil Shubin’s book of the same name, premiers April 9.  From PBS: “How did your body become the complicated, quirky, amazing machine it is today? University of Chicago anatomist Neil Shubin uncovers the answers in this new look at human evolution. Using fossils, embryos and genes, he reveals how our bodies are the legacy of ancient fish, reptiles and primates — the ancestors you never knew were in your family tree.”

Find out more at http://www.pbs.org/your-inner-fish/home/.

Scopus compatibility issues with IE11

Scopus is experiencing compatibility issues with the latest version of Internet Explorer, IE11.  Until the issue is resolved, either use another browser or, in IE, go to Tools | Compatibility View Settings and add two websites: scopus.com & uchicago.edu.

UChicago Magazine makes ‘a pint of gruel for invalids’ with Crerar cookbook

Cooking with Crerar: Child gruelty
University of Chicago Magazine – February 12, 2014

Feature Story Beta test the new Library Catalog

The Library strongly encourages members of the University of Chicago community to participate in a beta test of the new Library Catalog at catalog.lib.uchicago.edu. The end of vendor support for the current Library Catalog and Lens, both slated for this summer, requires the implementation of a new catalog.

New Catalog Beta homepage

The new Library Catalog homepage

The design goals for the new Library Catalog were drawn from an extensive series of interviews with UChicago faculty and students, conducted to ensure that the new tool will meet the needs of researchers. The new Catalog design retains all of the functionality that patrons identified as valuable in the existing systems and adds new features requested during interviews.

Notable features in the beta release

The new UChicago Library Catalog features a simple, clean visual design and a variety of search options:

  • searches can be limited by format, language, and other criteria;
  • “Begins With” browsing allows quick retrieval of known titles or authors;
  • materials can be viewed in call number order;
  • “power searching” options such as Boolean operators and nested search terms allow for precise recall of catalog records.

New features in this Catalog requested by users include display of the current availability of items on the search results page, as well as easier access to ebooks and ejournals.

Still in development

This beta version of the Catalog is not complete.  Features still under development include

  • My Account features, such as emailing, saving, and exporting records;
  • optimization of the Catalog for use on mobile devices;
  • inclusion of expanded Library content, such as the Library website, archival finding aids, and digital collections.

This functionality will be added over the coming months. The beta period will also give the Library the opportunity to identify and fix data and display problems before the Catalog goes into full production later this year.

Exporting user data

Unfortunately, lists created by users of the current Catalog and MyDiscoveries records saved by users of Lens cannot be migrated to the new Library Catalog.  The Library will soon post instructions on how users can export these records, and users will have at least until the end of June to do so.

Share your comments

To begin beta testing the new Catalog, simply go to catalog.lib.uchicago.edu and begin a search, or click the Help button on any Catalog page for more information.  Please share your comments with us on the feedback form, also available from the Catalog header. We are particularly interested in your feedback regarding visual design and layout, organization of results and records, ease and effectiveness of search construction, and the quality and ranking of results.

The new University of Chicago Library Catalog is a customized version of the VuFind software platform, an open-source search tool originally developed at Villanova University. Research libraries and collections currently using VuFind include the University of Michigan Library, the HathiTrust, and the National Libraries of Australia, Finland, and Ireland.

LWW journals now available through BrowZine

LippiBrowZine bookshelfncott Williams and Wilkins (LWW) journals that the Library subscribes to are now available on BrowZine. Enjoy browsing, reading, saving and sharing articles with BrowZine on your iPad.

For information about getting start with BrowZine, read this post.

 

EndNote Web or Zotero? Selecting the Best Citation Manager, Wednesday, February 19, 12-1 PM

Location: Crerar Library Computer Classroom

Citation managers are powerful, time-saving tools that help you manage your research. They can also help you format your papers in MS Word by creating bibliographies, citations, and footnotes automatically in the style you choose, such as APA or Chicago.

This class will compare how EndNote Web and Zotero — two popular citation managers — allow you to save, share, and cite information.  It will provide a side-by-side comparison of tools.  This workshop will be held in a computer classroom with the citation tools installed.

Register for this workshop.

Zar Symposium on Data – Call for Proposals

http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/crerar/zar/

“Data: Collecting, Using, Managing”
3rd Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium
April 25, 2014
The John Crerar Library
The University of Chicago

Data is captured by computers and instruments on a continual basis, flooding researchers in images, video, audio, logs, simulations, and more. This data is crucial to research, teaching and learning at academic institutions around the world. Understanding the impact of data on researchers, libraries and institutions as a whole is critical to achieving long-term data preservation, appropriate sharing among communities, and enabling transformative new science. This symposium will provide participants with an understanding of how data is used in real world applications, as well as examples of collaborative efforts between institutions, groups or individuals specific to collection, use, access, preservation and overall management of data.

Call for Proposals

The organizers of the 3rd biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, Data: Collecting, Using, Managing, to be held Friday, April 25, invite proposals for presentations that draw on your experience working with data in a collaborative environment.

Contributed presentations will provide examples of collaborative efforts between institutions, groups or individuals, with a focus on one or more of the following areas: collection, use, access, preservation and overall management of data. Practical, real use cases will be highlighted. Proposals selected for full oral presentations will be eligible for as travel stipend.

Proposals should be submitted to Barbara Kern via email at bkern@uchicago.edu. Please use “Zar Symposium” in the subject line. Proposals must include a title, author(s), and abstract (maximum 600 words). Presentations will be 30-45 minutes. The deadline for submission is February 21.

Please consider the following questions when preparing proposals:

* How was the data collaboration initiated, and why?

* What are the opportunities and challenges of the data collaboration?

* How are responsibilities determined and distributed?

* What kinds of tools and techniques may be used to facilitate the data collaboration? We are especially interested in a focus on remote partnerships.

The symposium organizers will also consider interactive alternatives to a traditional oral presentations.

The intended audience of the symposium includes all who are involved or interested in data management, with a focus on, but not limited to, academic institutions.

Registration Information: http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/crerar/zar/kaz2014registration.html

The Science Writing Prize for College Students accepting submissions for 2014

The annual John Crerar Foundation Science Writing Prize for College Students honors the memory of John Crerar, an industrialist and philanthropist whose estate established the John Crerar Library.

First prize $1500. Second prize $500.

Submission deadline is April 22, 2014.

More information is available at: http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/crerar/crerar-prize/

Exhibits Charles Otis Whitman: His Science, His Special Birds and the Marine Biological Laboratory – new web exhibit

drawing of passenger pigeon

Drawing from Posthumous Works of Charles Otis Whitman

A web version is now available of the current Crerar Library exhibit: Charles Otis Whitman:  His Science, His Special Birds and the Marine Biological Laboratory.  The physical exhibit is showing in the atrium of Crerar Library and will run until March 21st.

Exhibit Description: Charles Whitman was a pioneer in the study of animal behavior, and one of his main research interests was the passenger pigeon. He developed the field of ethology, the objective study of animal behavior in natural conditions, and created connections between the University of Chicago and the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole where he served as president, a connection that continues today. Commemorating the hundredth anniversary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon, this exhibit examines Whitman’s legacy at the University of Chicago and beyond.

This exhibit was curated by Frances Vandervoort

Mapping the Unseen Science Film Showcase, Feb 12, 5:30-9 PM

mapping-the-unseen-smallHow do we measure or observe the world just outside our reach? In this program, presented by Imagine Science Films, a spectrum of scientist-filmmakers investigate our near, and perhaps not-so-near, surroundings. An Adler Planetarium program visits the upper atmosphere (and edge of space). A grandson considers the laws of thermodynamics in an empty house. Abstract phenomena and complicated communications systems are visualized via animation and computer modeling. Each film, or set of films, will be followed by discussion of the themes between scientists and filmmakers.

LOCATION:  International House, Assembly Hall
DATE AND TIME:  Opening reception, 5:30PM / Films & discussions, 6-8PM
Closing reception with filmmakers & scientists, 8-9PM
ADMISSION:  Free and open to the public; RSVP requested
MORE INFORMATION AND RSVP

Program Details:

This Has Been to Space
by Clayton Brown and Monica Ross
Speakers: Clayton Brown & Monica Ross, 137 Films; David Miller, Assistant Professor of Physics, UChicago

Worlds: The Kepler Planet Candidates by Alex Parker
Forms by Quayola & Memo Akten
Abbau by Masahiro Ohsuka
Motive Power 3: Absolute Zero by Mike Gibisser
Speaker: Mike Gibisser, Artist/Filmmaker

Leo on Bioluminesence by Kate Webbink
Fossil Carrion Feeders by Federico Pardo
The Birds and the Trees by Kate Webbink
Speakers: Kate Webbink, Media Producer and Shannon Hackett, Associate Curator, Field Museum

Genesis by Malevo
Secrets of the Dark Universe: Simulating the Sky on Blue Jean/Q
Blood Flow: Multiscale Modeling by Argonne Leadership Computing Facility & Brown University
Speakers: Joseph Insley, Argonne; Salman Habib and Katrina Heitmann, UChicago/Argonne

Humanexus by Katy Börner and Ying-Fang Shen
Speaker: Katy Börner, Indiana University

With:
Bob Hirson (Moderator), Program Director, Technology and Learning, American Association for the Advancement of Science

With generous support from Education and Human Resources, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Imagine Science Films; International House at UChicago Global Voices Program;UChicago Art│Science Initiative; and UChicago Office of the Vice President for Research and for National Laboratories.

Advanced registration requested to help gauge attendance. Persons with disabilities who may need assistance should contact the Office of Programs & External Relations in advance of the program at 773-753-2274.

Exhibits Lecture and Reception for Exhibit: Charles Otis Whitman: His Science, His Special Birds, and the Marine Biological Laboratory

drawing of passenger pigeon

Drawing from Posthumous Works of Charles Otis Whitman

Next Monday, February 3 at 4:30 p.m. Crerar Library is hosting a lecture and reception for our exhibit: Charles Otis Whitman:  His Science, His Special Birds and the Marine Biological Laboratory. Charles Whitman was a University of Chicago professor and a a pioneer in the study of animal behavior.  One of his main research interests was the passenger pigeon.

Joel Greenberg, author of A Feathered River Across the Sky:  the Passenger Pigeon’s Flight to Extinction, will be speaking.

To RSVP visit: www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/crerar/exhibits/

Lecture: Visualizing and Measuring Social Data, Jan. 29 at 3:00pm

Visualizing and Measuring Social Data
Matt Taddy
Associate Professor, Econometrics and Statistics, University of Chicago Booth School

Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 3:00pm-4:30 pm
Kathleen A. Zar Room, John Crerar Library

Biography:
Matt Taddy is an associate professor of econometrics and Statistics and Neubauer Family Faculty Fellow at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. His research is focused on statistical methodology and data mining, driven by applications in business and engineering. He developed and teaches the MBA ‘Data Mining’ course at Chicago Booth.

Taddy works on building robust solutions for large scale data analysis problems. This involves dimension reduction techniques for massive datasets and development of models for inference on the output of these algorithms. Applications are ongoing in consumer database mining, digital marketing, analysis and optimization of computer simulators, and in text mining for analysis of social media, financial news, and political speech. He has collaborated both with small start-ups and with large research agencies including NASA Ames, Lawrence Livermore, Sandia, and Los Alamos National Laboratories.

Taddy earned his PhD in applied Math and Statistics in 2008 from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as a BA in Philosophy and Mathematics and in Mathematical Statistics from McGill University. He joined the University of Chicago Booth faculty in 2008 

Abstract:
This presentation will explore ‘Big Data’ problems: inference from unstructured data that is too large to analyze, or even store, on a single computer. In social science, this will typically involve some amount of text analysis, even if just to extract variables of interest from the original data. An example application could involve the internet browsing history for a number of individuals, their physical location, a corpus of text associated with these individuals (both from the web pages they visit, and text generated on social media), and, say, purchases by these individuals. Or, we may wish to understand the relationship between a number of economic or political variables and the co-movement of topics, terms, and tone in the news and on social media. 

In such text mining applications there is an interplay between two visualization strategies: plotting predictions and factors that summarize the information you have mined from the text, and looking at the role played by individual phrases or words in the model driving this summarization. Getting these two modes of visualization to work together is key to communicating and understanding results. In this talk, Dr. Taddy will cover the basic idea of how the statistical models behind the analysis work, and use this to understand what one might want to be plotting. The main goal is then to illustrate how the two modes of visualization work together. This will be shown through example applications including financial news, political speech, and social media. 

*Cookies and Refreshments will be served*

EndNote Workshop – Tuesday, Feb. 4th, noon-1:00pm

endnotex7

Location: Crerar Library Computer Classroom

Register here.

Learn about the desktop citation management software, EndNote. Topics covered include creating and managing libraries, importing references from online databases, importing and managing PDFs and creating formatted bibliographies and citations in Microsoft Word.

Registration is required.

MLK Day, Monday, Jan. 20: D’Angelo Law, Eckhart, and SSA closed, other campus libraries remain open

On Monday, January 20, D’Angelo Law, Eckhart, and SSA libraries will be closed in observance of the Martin Luther King Day holiday.

Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein libraries will be open during their regular building hours. The All-Night Study Space on the 1st Floor of Regenstein will also remain open.