Feature Story Library summer 2019 graduate student fellowship opportunities

Cover of pamphlet for Abraham Lincoln National Historic Site

Digitized pamphlet from the John Crerar Library collections

The University of Chicago Library is offering three fellowships for UChicago graduate students during the summer. The fellowships are designed to give graduate students opportunities to explore alternative scholarly careers and to build skills and knowledge in new areas of scholarship.

Interested graduate students are encouraged to apply by May 30, 2019, for these posted fellowships.

  • John Crerar Foundation History of Science and Medicine Fellow
    The Fellow will focus on materials from the original John Crerar Library collections that were assembled prior to its merger with the University of Chicago.  This includes history of science and technology, especially late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century materials strong in the areas of engineering, manufacturing and applied arts. Activities may include researching historical and current significance of the collections, creating collection descriptions for use on webpages, and a special project focused on digitizing pamphlet materials from the collections.
  • Library Instruction Support Services Fellow
    This fellowship will provide graduate students with hands-on experience in providing library instruction, as well as developing guides and tools to help students learn about the variety of resources available to them at the Library and beyond. In addition, the fellowship will also offer graduate students an opportunity to learn about academic libraries services and collections that may benefit their own research, along with providing an insight into careers in library and information science.
  • University Archives Fellow
    Archives today are a rapidly expanding field with increasingly broad responsibility for preserving and making accessible unique materials in all formats—traditional paper documents, photographs, and analog recordings, as well as a growing array of digital content: email, databases, digital images, audio and video media, and web sites. This fellow will develop skills and expertise in all these areas while contributing to the programs and services of the University of Chicago Archives.

Summer 2019 fellowships come with a stipend of $4000 and typically involve approximately 200 hours of effort (typically 20 hours per week for a period of 10 weeks).

For more information about individual opportunities and how to apply, visit the Library website or contact Andrea Twiss-Brooks at atbrooks@uchicago.edu.

Rafadi Hakim pointing to digital image

A graduate student examines a digitized image. (Photo by John Zich)

 

College Research Week May 13-17

Student browsing the bookstacks.

Develop important research skills by attending College Research Week programs.

2019 College Research Week will take place from May 13-17 in Regenstein Library. College Research Week is a celebration of undergraduate research and creative inquiry at UChicago. This week-long event will include sessions on research skills, resources, and fellowships; undergraduate researcher and graduate student panels; an Undergraduate Research Poster Showcase, and much more!

College Research Week is brought to you by the College Center for Research & Fellowships and The University of Chicago Library. For more information, visit the College Research Week website.

College Research Week Schedule

Monday, May 13: Research Skills and Resources

Session Schedule:

Location: Regenstein, Room 122

10:00-11:30am: Introduction to Research Proposal Design, led by Sandra Zupan, Assistant Director of Fellowships and Research, CCRF
The goal of this session it to build your academic skills in research design, which can help you engage in undergraduate research. First, you will learn about the process of narrowing your interest to a research topic, followed by developing a research question and a literature review. Second, you will learn about the practicalities of data collection and analysis, ethical research practice and presenting the findings of the research.

11:30am-12:30pm: Undergraduate Research Funding, led by Tracy Nyerges, Assistant Director of Research, CCRF
This session will help you navigate the various undergraduate research funding sources available to College students across the disciplines. Whether you are new to research or an advanced undergraduate researcher, we will discuss research grant programs and options to fund academic year and summer research experiences for students in all majors. This session will also offer guidance and resources to assist you in planning for and preparing applications for undergraduate research grants and funding.

Location: Regenstein TechBar Studio Classroom, Room 160

1:00-2:00pm: Sharing and Archiving your Research with Knowledge@UChicago, led by Nora Mattern, Scholarly Communications Librarian, Library
Join the Library for a discussion on the principles of open access, how you can make your research poster or paper available to others, and why you may want to do so. Knowledge@UChicago is a digital repository where University of Chicago faculty and students can share and archive their scholarly work. Bring a laptop or tablet (or borrow one from the TechBar) and spend hands-on time with Knowledge@UChicago.

2:30-3:30pm: Managing Your Data and Files, led by Elizabeth Foster, Social Sciences Data Librarian, Library
Whether your data are digital photos of archival records or spreadsheets, this session will provide you with practical tips for naming, organizing, documenting, storing and preserving your data. Making a plan for managing your data and digital files can save you time and potential headaches in the long-run. In this workshop, we’ll begin creating data management plans for a current project and talk through challenges and lessons you’ve learned about effective strategies for managing your digital files. This session is given Elizabeth Foster, Social Sciences Data Librarian.

4:00-5:00pm: Getting a Head-Start on Your BA, led by Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach, Library
Are you apprehensive about writing a BA or honors thesis? Don’t worry, there are many resources to support you! Librarian Rebecca Starkey will help you get a head start on your thesis by offering strategies to ease your research and writing. Learn about specialized research tools for your major, methods for locating primary sources at the University and beyond, GIS and data support services, and how to reach the Library experts who can guide you. After the workshop, you’ll be able to take the first steps towards starting this important research project.

Tuesday, May 14: Research Fellowships and Undergraduate Research Scholars

Session Schedule:

Location: Regenstein, Room A-11

10:00-11:00am: International Research through Fulbright, led by Nicholas Morris, Associate Director of Fellowships, CCRF
The Fulbright US Student Program is an opportunity to conduct research, study, or teach English for a year internationally after graduation. Thisinformation session will investigate how you can launch your research interests through a funded, post-graduate grant. In this session, we will review the broad purpose and specific components of the Fulbright Grant, including essays, affiliations, and recommendations. We will identify essential components of previously successful grants and help you envision ways to start approaching the essays.

11:30am-12:30pm: National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships, led by Nichole Fazio, Director, CCRF
The National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (NSF GRFP) program is one of the most robust and well-recognized national fellowships in support of graduate education (STEM and selective Social Science disciplines). This session will introduce students to the basics of the NSF GRFP, with a focus on the application process and what makes for an especially strong application. Students of any class-standing are invited to attend. We strongly encourage 3rd- and 4th-year students intending to submit applications this coming October to attend. 

Undergraduate Researcher Panels:

2:00-3:00pm: Arts & Humanities College Students
Join for this interative panel featuring UChicago undergraduate researchers and creative sholars in the Arts and Humanities. The participating College students will field your questions, talk about their paths and how undergraduate research and creative scholarship has impacted them. This session will be informative to current and future undergraduate researchers and scholars in a variety of Arts and Humanities majors.

3:00-4:00pm: Social Sciences College Students
Join for this interative panel featuring UChicago undergraduate researchers and creative sholars in the Social Sciences. The participating College students will field your questions, talk about their paths and how undergraduate research and creative scholarship has impacted them. This session will be informative to current and future undergraduate researchers and scholars in a variety of Social Sciences majors.

4:00-5:00pm: STEM College Students
Join for this interative panel featuring UChicago undergraduate researchers and creative sholars in STEM. The participating College students will field your questions, talk about their paths and how undergraduate research and creative scholarship has impacted them. This session will be informative to current and future undergraduate researchers and scholars in a variety of STEM majors.

Wednesday, May 15: Research and Your Future

Session Schedule:

Location: Regenstein A-11

11:30am-1:00pm: Graduate Student Panel and Networking Lunch
Join for this interative panel featuring the five current UChicago graduate students listed below from various fields. These graduate students will field your questions, talk about their paths to graduate school and how undergraduate research impacted their journeys. You will also be able to chat with these graduate students further after the panel during lunch. Lunch will be provided so please RSVP for this session

3:30-4:30pm: Navigating the SBS IRB Process, led by Cheri Pettey, Director, Social and Behavioral Sciences IRB
This session will explore the history of the applicable regulations, explain how to determine whether a project constitutes human subjects research requiring review, define the basic review process/requirements, and provide some helpful tips for navigating the process. There will be time for questions and students who have gone through the process are welcome to share their experiences and suggestions.

Thursday, May 16: Research Mentoring and Toolbox Building

Session Schedule:

Location: Regenstein TechBar Studio Classroom, Room 160

10:00-11:00am: Creating a Digital Portfolio to Share and Present your Research and Creative Scholarship, led by Stacie Williams, Director, Center for Digital Scholarship, Library
Digital portfolios or a personal website can help you to showcase your research, communicate your interests, and develop a professional network. In this session, we’ll explore what makes for an effective digital portfolio and consider decisions when crafting an online identity. This discussion will be followed by a tutorial on using WordPress to create a digital site.

Location: Regenstein A-11

11:30-1:00pm: Research Mentor/Student Pairs and Networking Lunch [lunch provided]
Join us for a lunch-time conversation with student and research mentors across the disciplines to learn more about their work. Students will discuss how they connected with their mentors’ project and together they will talk about the process of undertaking their research together. You will also have the opportunity to hear from faculty and scholars across the university community who pursued unconventional career pathways as a result of their research efforts. 

1:30-3:00pm: Research Proposal Writing, led by Sandra Zupan, Assistant Director of Fellowships and Research, CCRF
The goal of this session is to help you produce a persuasive research proposal, which can be used for successful UChicago and external grants, national fellowships and graduate school applications. First, you will learn about the structure and characteristics of persuasive proposals, as well as common areas of weaknesses in research proposals. Second, you will learn how to develop paragraphs, organize text and write in a clear, detailed, precise manner.

3:30-4:30pm: GRD101: Preparing for the Graduate School Application Process, led by Nichole Fazio, DPhil, Director, CCRF: This information session is designed for current undergraduates considering graduate school as a part of an academic and professional trajectory.  Whether you are certain that you will pursue graduate education or are just beginning to consider the possibility, this session will introduce you to a) the general process of investigating options, b) the application timeline, c) common application components, and d) attempt to demystify the application and admission process. This is a general session and open to all disciplines and years.  Note: this will not cover pre-professional application processes specifically (eg medical or law school), although some of the application components like personal statements, letters of recommendation and CVs will be discussed as universal components to all application processes. 

Friday, May 17: Undergraduate Research Support & Showcase and Reception

Session Schedule:

Location: Regenstein TechBar Studio, Room 160

10:00-11:30am: Zotero Drop-In Support
Drop by the TechBar for one-on-one training and support for Zotero, a free citation manager that allows you to organize, annotate, and cite your sources automatically in standard styles (MLA, Chicago, APA, etc.).

Location: Regenstein 122

Research Poster Showcase and Reception

2:00-2:30pm: Opening Remarks
Professor Peggy Mason, Department of Neurobiology
2:30-3:30pm: Poster Showcase
3:30-4:30pm: Reception 

 

Symposium for Teaching with Technology

When: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 8:00 a.m.4:00 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: The UChicago Symposium for Teaching with Technology is an event that brings together faculty, instructors, lecturers, learning designers, academic technologists, and students to share and showcase a wide variety of innovative and effective uses of technology in teaching and learning. Faculty and instructors will give presentations on their use of educational technology, with staff and students serving in a supporting role. The Symposium is open to all UChicago faculty, instructors, staff, graduate student lecturers, and teaching assistants.
Register: https://teachwithtech.uchicago.edu#rsvp
Contact: Academic Technologies
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Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.

Notable Women in Medical History

To celebrate Women’s History Month, the National Library of Medicine is profiling 12 women who were pioneers in the field of health and medicine. They are written in first person, as though the women medical pioneers had access to today’s news. How many can you identify?

Can you spot the University of Chicago alumna?  The Library holds both her Master’s thesis and her PhD dissertation.

If  you need another challenge, check out the notable women in health and medicine who were profiled in 2018 and see how many you can answer correctly!

Giving Day 2019

Your support makes it happen!

This April, we invite you to join the University of Chicago community as we honor the past while building the future through  Giving Day 2019.

Giving Day is a 24-hour show of united support for the University’s students, faculty, and world-changing research from noon to noon (CDT) April 9-10, 2019. This collective approach to philanthropy is a fitting way to support the University of Chicago Library, which serves as a vibrant and dynamic hub for the entire university community.

Giving Day, April 9-10, 2019 - Move UChicago ForwardWith 11.6 million electronic and print volumes spanning centuries of learning in the sciences, humanities, arts, and beyond, the University of Chicago Library stands as one of North America’s largest and most distinguished academic research libraries.

Beyond the depth and breadth of its holdings, the Library continuously builds on its vision to foster inquiry through tailored services and expert librarians. From the state-of-the-art conservation and digitization laboratories of the Joe and Rika Mansueto Library to the exquisite exhibition space highlighting works from the Special Collections Research Center, the University of Chicago Library is an intellectual epicenter for the innovative work of students, faculty, and researchers in an evolving academic environment.

To meet the ever-increasing need for data-driven services, the Library has expanded infrastructure for patrons seeking new ways to obtain, visualize, and analyze data. We are developing our Center for Digital Scholarship, honing key skills among our librarians, and advancing pivotal initiatives in the fields of geospatial analysis and data science.

Your support will enable the Library to continue serving as a vibrant hub for the University community, advancing the objectives of students and faculty across campus.

To make a contribution to the University of Chicago Library during Giving Day, please make a gift through our website by 12:00 p.m. on April 10.

You can make a difference for the Library today!

Register today for the Library’s Spring Quarter workshops

The University of Chicago Library is offering a variety of workshops and programs during Spring Quarter highlighting tools, resources, and services available to you to support your work. Learn about GIS, data management, using Zotero and EndNote, and more. Space is limited, so register for sessions today!

DISSERTATION PROCEDURES FOR STUDENTS
April 2, Noon – 1:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
April 17, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Are you a Ph.D. student planning to graduate in Spring 2019? Come to this information session about the procedures for submitting your dissertation using a web-based interface, the ETD Administrator. We will review formatting requirements and discuss open access for dissertations via the institutional repository, Knowledge@UChicago.

DISSERTATION DRAFT REVIEW INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS
April 10, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Are you a Ph.D. student planning to submit your dissertation soon? Do you want to know if you are on the right track with formatting your dissertation? Dissertation Office staff offer an optional draft review service during the first few weeks of each quarter. Come to this information session to learn more about draft reviews and the basic requirements for formatting your dissertation. Bring your questions and bring your laptop.

USING ZOTERO FOR YOUR BA RESEARCH
April 8, Noon – 1:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
April 25, Noon – 1:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Are you writing a BA or honors thesis next year? Before you start your research, learn how you can organize and cite the many sources you’ll be using for this extensive project. Learn about Zotero, a free research tool that can transform how you write your research papers. Use Zotero to organize your documents, gather citation information in a single click, and create footnotes or bibliographies automatically in styles such as Chicago, MLA, and APA.

GIS and Maps Librarian and students with map of Chicago on monitor

GIS and Maps Librarian Cecilia Smith (center) discusses mapping tools and resources with (from left) students Paul Gilbert, II, College ’20, and Emil Sohlberg, College ’20. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

MANAGING YOUR DIGITAL DATA & RESEARCH FILES
April 9, Noon – 1:00 p.m. Crerar Library Computer Classroom Register
This session will provide you with practical tips for naming, organizing, documenting, storing and preserving your research data. Making a plan for managing your data and digital files can save you time and potential headaches in the long-run. In this session, we’ll consider requirements from funding agencies such as the NSF and NIH and publishers for data sharing. We’ll talk through challenges you’ve faced and lessons you’ve learned about effective strategies for managing your digital files. We’ll overview tools for managing research data and materials, including electronic lab notebooks and the Open Science Framework.

INTRODUCTION TO ICPSR
April 10, 11:00 a.m. – Noon, TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
This workshop will teach you how to get started with ICPSR (the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research). ICPSR is one of the largest social sciences data archives in the world. During the session, participants will learn how to create an account, browse and search for data, and download datasets. The session will also cover best practices for finding and evaluating datasets. Please bring a laptop to the session; one can be borrowed at the TechBar.

INTRODUCTION TO ENDNOTE
April 11, Noon – 1:00 p.m. Crerar Computer Classroom Register
EndNote is a research management tool used to keep track of citations, PDFs and other documents, and create formatted bibliographies as you write your paper. In this workshop, learn how to use the desktop version of EndNote. Topics covered include: creating and managing citation libraries, importing citations from online databases and other sources, importing and managing PDFs and creating bibliographies.

WORKING WITH SPATIAL DATA
April 11, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. GIS Hub, Crerar Library Register
Come learn the core concepts of working with spatial data, including: spatial thinking for research, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), spatial data formats, finding spatial data, tools & software, spatial analysis & geoprocessing, Spatial Data Management, and geospatial resources.

OPEN ACCESS, SELF-ARCHIVING AND KNOWLEDGE@UCHICAGO
April 16, 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Join the Library for a discussion on the principles of open access, the individual and societal benefits of open research, and authors’ rights and self-archiving. We will consider strategies for expanding access to our scholarship and spend hands-on time with Knowledge@UChicago, the University’s open access digital repository for scholarly work. Bring a laptop to get started sharing and preserving your research!

NAVIGATING QGIS
April 25, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. GIS Hub, Crerar Library Register
This workshop will introduce you to digital mapping and geoprocessing using QGIS. You will learn about QGIS software navigation, fundamentals for spatial data visualization and manipulation, and how to create a map. No prior experience is expected.

DATA MANAGEMENT 101
April 24, 11:00 a.m. – Noon, TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Data management plans are researchers’ written strategies outlining how they will collect and take care of their data during the life of a project and what approaches they will take for sharing and preserving their data at the end of a project. This session will introduce the basic components of a data management plan, funder requirements related to data management planning, and DMPTool, a free online tool that guides researchers through the creation of a plan.

NAVIGATING ARCGIS ONLINE
April 26, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. GIS Hub, Crerar Library Register
Need to make a web map? Find some spatial data? Come learn how to use ArcGIS Online in this hand-on workshop. No experience is needed – we’ll start with logging in and finish by creating you’re first web map.

INTRODUCTION TO ZOTERO (WEBINAR)
May 9, Noon – 1:00 p.m. Online Register
Learn how to use Zotero, a free citation manager that allows you to save and organize citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in popular citation styles (MLA, Chicago and APA).

April 12 deadline for the Crerar Writing Prize for College students

Are you an undergraduate interested in science, medicine, and/or technology? Have you written a scientific research paper of note that would be of interest to a general audience? Consider submitting a paper for the John Crerar Foundation Writing Prize.

The annual John Crerar Foundation Science Writing Prize for College Students honors the memory of John Crerar – industrialist and philanthropist whose estate established the John Crerar Library.

This competitive award for excellence and clarity in science writing acknowledges the ability of a University of Chicago College student to produce a paper, on a scientific topic, which is thorough in its arguments but accessible to a broad readership.

Science Writing Prize organizers will present a topic on which students may submit a paper. The chosen topic will be related to the physical and biomedical sciences. We encourage and welcome submissions from all perspectives.

An important component of the paper will be the bibliography, which must include citations from a variety of sources and may be presented in a bibliographic style of the student’s choosing.

First Prize is $1500
Second Prize is $500
Third Prize is $300

Deadline: APRIL 12, 2019

New center fuses media arts, data, and design

A rendering of people workign together in the MADD Center

A rendering of the Media Arts, Data and Design Center, a new collaborative space in the John Crerar Library at the University of Chicago. (Illustration courtesy of Payette Architects )

Partnership across UChicago explores intersection of technology, creativity, and research

The boundaries between art, design, science, and technology are disappearing in a digital world. Today, artists use algorithms, scientists rely on visualization and designers are often focused on helping people navigate new technologies.

At the University of Chicago, the disciplines come together at the Media Arts, Data, and Design (MADD) Center, creating a new collaborative space for experimentation, discovery and impact. The MADD Center will support work by faculty, other academic appointees, students, staff, and community partners through cutting-edge technologies. The 20,000-square-foot center in the John Crerar Library opens February 25.

“Design, as a field, now encompasses the sum of human interactions with the devices, environments, and communities that shape daily life,” said David J. Levin, Senior Advisor to the Provost for Arts. “The MADD Center gives the University of Chicago a space to address these radical changes, assess their wide-ranging consequences, and comprehend the ways that perception, sensation, and experience are being transformed.”

At the MADD Center, there are opportunities to create, study, and learn about critical technologies driving both culture and science, including video games, virtual and augmented reality, data visualization, and digital fabrication. The MADD Center brings together the College, Division of Humanities, Division of Physical Sciences, UChicago Arts and the UChicago Library.

The MADD Center will host five resource labs:

  • An expanded Computer Science Instructional Labs, providing hardware and software for training and education;
  • The Hack Arts Lab, an open-access digital fabrication, prototyping, and visualization facility;
  • The new Weston Game Lab, offering expanded resources for the study, play, and development of analog, electronic, virtual and online games;
  • The Research Computing Center Visualization Lab in the Crerar Library’s Kathleen A. Zar Room, providing new data visualization technology; and,
  • The UChicago Library’s new GIS Hub, enabling geospatial research and learning activities by providing access to geographical information systems software and hardware and an expert GIS and maps librarian who offers consultations and training.

At the MADD Center, classroom and studio spaces support the teaching of Media Arts and Design and Media Aesthetics in the College, electronic music in partnership with CHIME Studios in the Department of Music, and virtual reality and other media courses as part of the new Media Arts and Design minor in Cinema and Media Studies.  In addition, the MADD Center will provide new opportunities for further collaboration with the Logan Center for the Arts, the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, and many others.

“I am excited about the new opportunities students and faculty in the College and the Humanities will have to work with colleagues in computer science and other areas as we continue to develop new courses in Media Arts and Design and support the many interests of our students and faculty in this area,” said Christopher Wild, Deputy Dean of the College and Humanities Division.

Collaboration Across Creative Forms

The open floorplan and close proximity of MADD Center labs is designed to create opportunities for crossovers and collaboration. Students designing a new board game can create prototypes on the 3D printers at the Hack Arts Lab, while researchers working with the GIS Hub might reveal new insights by visualizing their data on Research Computing Center resources. The MADD Center is located near the new Department of Computer Science offices and laboratories, a science librarians’ research and teaching suite, and the Library’s collections and study spaces at a renovated Crerar Library, creating new, interdisciplinary opportunities across divisions.

“As our world becomes increasingly digital, designers and artists need to become more engaged with technology and technologists need to become more fluent with design, media and the arts,” said Michael J. Franklin, Liew Family Chair of Computer Science. “By co-locating a critical mass of tech-savvy students and faculty with diverse skills and interests across these varied domains, we will facilitate robust dialogue and collaboration as our disciplines continue to co-evolve.”

People working in the Weston Game Lab

The Weston Game Lab will provide a vibrant new space at UChicago for the research and design of games. (Illustration courtesy of Payette Architects)

Gaming, UChicago-Style

The MADD Center is envisioned as a place for a group of students dissecting the structure of a classic Nintendo game, or sketching out the visual design for a new card game that teaches high school students about teen pregnancy. A cornerstone of the new center, the Weston Game Lab will provide a vibrant new space at UChicago for the research and design of the world’s fastest growing cultural and aesthetic form: games.

The Weston Game Lab is supported by a gift from Dr. Shellwyn Weston and Bradford Weston, JD’77. Within the Lab, students, faculty, and staff will collaborate on the research and development of games that produce social impact or experiment with form. Participants will also be able to research the history of games from technical and theoretical perspectives with the Library’s collection of video games and the Logan Center’s collection of consoles, attend workshops that afford new development skills, and organize collaborative groups for game-based experiments.

“Video games in recent years have become an immensely popular medium and multi-billion dollar industry,” said Patrick Jagoda, Associate Professor of English and Cinema & Media Studies and director of the Weston Game Lab. “For cultural, psychological, and sociopolitical reasons, we need rigorous academic study, across both humanistic and social scientific disciplines. I’m interested in growing a culture of thoughtful, ethical, and experimental game design for ends other than entertainment that includes interdisciplinary teams of faculty, staff, and students. I think the University of Chicago can really shine in this space.”

Love Data Week workshops explore data in everyday life, Feb. 11-14

The University of Chicago Library is offering workshops and programs in honor of Love Data Week, February 11-14. An annual global event that highlights data-related topics and trends, Love Data Week’s theme this year is “data in everyday life,” with a special focus on open data and data justice. UChicago students, faculty and staff are invited to join us for workshops, events, and a chance to learn more about data services at the University of Chicago Library. Unable to attend the events? Visit our Love Data Week guide.

Love Data Week, Feb. 11-14, Ongoing events at the Reg and Crerar LibraryIntroduction to Census Data
February 11, 11:00 a.m. – noon
Regenstein Library Room 523
Register: https://rooms.lib.uchicago.edu/event/4920072
The Census Bureau collects and disseminates demographic and socioeconomic data for the United States. Join us to learn about core data surveys, hear about upcoming changes that will be introduced in the 2020 Census, and find how to locate and download census data using ICPSR and Social Explorer.

Citizen Science Snack Break
February 12, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
TechBar, Regenstein Library Room 160
Citizen science is a movement that encourages the general public to participate in data collection for scientific research. Join us for a fun citizen science activity and a snack. No registration required.

Data Privacy Tips and Tricks
February 13, 11:00 a.m. – noon.
Regenstein Library Room 523
Register: https://rooms.lib.uchicago.edu/event/4921164
Data breaches and online tracking scandals are now common occurrences. Are you interested in protecting your personal data but don’t know where to start? Join us for an overview of easy-to-use tools that can help safeguard your privacy.

A Date with Data
February 13, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Regenstein Library Room 122
Do you love data? Join us for cake, button making, demonstrations of open data resources and projects, and a chance to learn about data services offered at the University of Chicago Library. Enter the Census Data Knowledge Challenge for a chance to win a gift card! No registration required.

Open Geospatial Data
February 14, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Crerar Library, Computer Classroom
Explore open data sources for your mapping, visualization, and research projects in this session. We’ll review free data sources ranging from the local to the global. We will also cover available resources for supporting your geospatial projects. No registration required.

Laptop and phone chargers now available at Eckhart

Laptop and phone chargers are now available for checkout at Eckhart Library.  If your device is running low, feel free to ask for one at our circulation desk.  Chargers available include ones for Macbooks, PCs, Androids, IPhones and IPads.  Each can be checked out for two hours at a time.

A full list of the chargers available is here: https://bit.ly/2RgBtoT

We also have calculators and headphones available for checkout at our circulation desk.

Register today for the Library’s Winter Quarter workshops

The University of Chicago Library is offering a variety of workshops and programs during Winter Quarter highlighting tools, resources, and services available to you to support your work. Learn about academic publishing, GIS, data resources, citation management, copyright and more. Space is limited, so register for sessions today!

Center for Digital Scholarship Programs

Open Access, Self-Archiving, and Knowledge@UChicago
January 16, 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Join the Library for a discussion on the principles of open access, the individual and societal benefits of open research, and authors’ rights and self-archiving. We will consider strategies for expanding access to our scholarship and spend hands-on time with Knowledge@UChicago, the University’s open access digital repository for scholarly work. Bring a laptop to get started sharing and preserving your research!

Creating Digital Collections with Omeka
January 22, 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
This workshop will introduce participants to Omeka.net, a web-based tool that can be used to organize, describe, tell stories with, and share digital collections. Through hands-on exercises, we will navigate and explore the capabilities of Omeka.net. We encourage you to bring your own digital materials to play with during the session and to learn how you might curate them with Omeka!

Librarian Elisabeth Long (left) discusses a data management plan with Professor Stefano Allesina. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

Data Management 101
January 23, 11:00 a.m. – Noon, Regenstein Library 523 Register
Data management plans are researchers’ written strategies outlining how they will collect and take care of their data during the life of a project and what approaches they will take for sharing and preserving their data at the end of a project. This session will introduce the basic components of a data management plan, funder requirements related to data management planning, and DMPTool, a free online tool that guides researchers through the creation of a plan.

Working with Spatial Data
January 23, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Map Collection, Regenstein Library 370 Register
Come learn the core concepts of working with spatial data, including: spatial thinking for research, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), spatial data formats, finding spatial data, tools & software, spatial analysis & geoprocessing, Spatial Data Management, and geospatial resources.

Version Control with GIT
January 30, 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. Regenstein Library 523 Register
This class teaches about what Git is and how to use it, including an overview of GitHub and GitLab. What are the advantages of using it, and drawbacks to other ways of collaborative development? Laptops recommended for hands-on exercises.

Navigating ARCGIS Online
January 31, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Map Collection, Regenstein Library 370 Register
Need to make a web map? Find some spatial data? Come learn how to use ArcGIS Online in this hand-on workshop. No experience is needed – we’ll start with logging in and finish by creating you’re first web map. Please bring a laptop to participate in the workshop.

Introduction to ICPSR
February 6, 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. Regenstein Library 523 Register
This workshop will teach you how to get started with ICPSR (the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research). ICPSR is one of the largest social sciences data archives in the world. During the session, participants will learn how to create an account, browse and search for data, and download datasets. The session will also cover best practices for finding and evaluating datasets. Please bring a laptop to the session; one can be borrowed at the TechBar.

Navigating Social Explorer
February 6, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Map Collection, Regenstein Library 370 Register
Social Explorer is a platform for creating interactive maps that explore data from the U.S. Census and the American Community Survey. This session will introduce U.S. demographic data, producing interactive web maps, and how to download data for further analysis. Please bring a laptop to participate in the workshop.

Using the UChicago Map Collection
February 12, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Map Collection, Regenstein Library 370 Register
The University of Chicago Library is home to one of the largest map collections in North America, with over 475,000 sheets, in addition to aerial photos, atlases, and reference materials. This session will introduce you to the Map Collection, review how to find and access the maps, and highlight collections of particular interest to researchers.

Introduction to Copyright, Fair Use, and Permissions
February 28, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m.  TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
In academia, we frequently encounter copyright issues in research and teaching and this session will equip participants with tools and a foundation for navigating them. In this session, we will explore the length of copyright terms, probe fair use through case studies, and identify when and how to approach securing permissions for reuse of a copyrighted work. Led by Dan Meyer, Director of the Special Collections Research Center and Nora Mattern, Scholarly Communications Librarian.

Scholarly Communication Drop-In Hours
Mondays, 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160
Faculty, students, and staff are invited to drop by the Tech Bar collaborative space to consult with issues related to copyright, data management, and open access. Come talk tools and practices to work through questions like: Do I need to get permission to use this photo in my publication? How can I make sense of (and find) my data in years to come? How can I increase the visibility and impact of my work?

EndNote and Zotero Training  

Introduction to EndNote: Document Organizer and Bibliography Builder
January 16, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Crerar Library, Computer Classroom Register
EndNote is a research management tool used to keep track of citations, PDFs and other documents, and create formatted bibliographies as you write your paper. In this workshop, learn how to use the desktop version of EndNote. Topics covered include: creating and managing citation libraries, importing citations from online databases and other sources, importing and managing PDFs and creating bibliographies.

Librarian Rebecca Starkey with 3 students working on laptops.

Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach (standing), works with students to enhance their research skills. (Photo by Jason Smith)

Introduction to Zotero
January 18, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Register
January 28, Noon – 1:00 p.m. Register
January 31, Noon – 1:00 p.m Register
February 8, Noon – 1:00 p.m. Register
February 20, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Register
March 26, 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Register
TechBar, Regenstein Library 160
Learn how to use Zotero, a free citation manager that allows you to save and organize citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create bibliographies in popular citation styles (MLA, Chicago and APA).

Dissertation Support

Dissertation Draft Review Information for Students
January 15, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Are you a Ph.D. student planning to submit your dissertation soon? Do you want to know if you are on the right track with formatting your dissertation? Dissertation Office staff offer an optional draft review service during the first few weeks of each quarter. Come to this information session to learn more about draft reviews and the basic requirements for formatting your dissertation. Bring your questions and bring your laptop.

Dissertation Procedures for Students
January 22, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Register
January 23, Noon – 1:00 p.m. Register
TechBar, Regenstein Library 160
Are you a Ph.D. student planning to graduate in Winter 2019? Come to this information session about the procedures for submitting your dissertation using a web-based interface, the ETD Administrator. We will review formatting requirements and discuss open access for dissertations via the institutional repository, Knowledge@UChicago.

Love Data Week (February 11-15)

GIS and Maps Librarian and students with map of Chicago on monitor

GIS and Maps Librarian Cecilia Smith (center) discusses mapping tools and resources with (from left) students Paul Gilbert, II, College ’20, and Emil Sohlberg, College ’20. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

Introduction to Census Data
February 11, 11:00 a.m. – Noon. Regenstein Library 523 Register
The Census Bureau collects and disseminates demographic and socioeconomic data for the United States. Join us to learn about core data surveys, hear about upcoming changes that will be introduced in the 2020 Census, and find how to locate and download census data using ICPSR and Social Explorer.

Citizen Science Snack Break
February 12, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.  TechBar, Regenstein Library 160
Citizen science is a movement that encourages the general public to participate in data collection for scientific research. Join us for a fun citizen science activity and a snack. No registration required.

Data Privacy Tips and Tricks
February 13, 11:00 a.m. – Noon. Regenstein Library 523 Register
Data breaches and online tracking scandals are now common occurrences. Are you interested in protecting your personal data but don’t know where to start? Join us for an overview of easy-to-use tools that can help safeguard your privacy.

A Date with Data
February 13, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Regenstein Library 122
Do you love data? Join us for cake, button making, demonstrations of open data resources and projects, and a chance to learn about data services offered at the University of Chicago Library. Enter the Census Data Knowledge Challenge for a chance to win a gift card! No registration required.

Open Geospatial Data
February 14, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Crerar Library, Computer Classroom
Explore open data sources for your mapping, visualization, and research projects in this session. We’ll review free data sources ranging from the local to the global. We will also cover available resources for supporting your geospatial projects. No registration required.

March 8 deadline to apply for a Brooker Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting

Three people view case of books

Anna Wood (left) and Clare Kemmerer (right) view selections from their collections with Mr. Brooker (center). Photo by Klehr + Churchill

Second- and fourth-year College students at the University of Chicago with a theme-focused book collection are invited to apply for the T. Kimball Brooker Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting. The University of Chicago Library is pleased to sponsor this prize, which was established by Mr. Brooker, PhD’96, to foster a love of the book and to encourage book collecting among undergraduates. Applications are due on March 8, 2019.

Prizes include $1,000 for a second-year student and $2,000 for a fourth-year student.

Applicants for the prize are not expected to have collections that are large, valuable in monetary terms, or complete. Rather, the competition emphasizes thoughtfulness and intent in building a collection around the collector’s interests. Collections may focus on a topic, the work of one or more authors, or physical features such as illustrations and bindings. In addition to books, collections of musical scores and printed maps may be entered into the prize competition.

Past winners have collections focused on subjects that range from mathematical treatises to feminist zines, from cover art to Latin American poetry. A selection of books from prize recipients’ collections is highlighted in the annual Brooker Prize Web Exhibit.

Learn more about the Prize and how to apply at www.lib.uchicago.edu/brooker.

Books on display

Books that were part of winning Brooker Prize collections in 2018. Photo by Klehr + Churchill

People Apply now for 7 new graduate student fellowships at UChicago Library

The University of Chicago Library is offering seven fellowships as part of a new program for UChicago graduate students. The fellowships are designed to give graduate students opportunities to explore alternative scholarly careers and to build skills and knowledge in new areas of scholarship.

Interested graduate students are encouraged to apply by January 15, 2019, for currently posted fellowships. Additional fellowships will be posted as they become available.

Graduate student points to image on screen

A graduate student examines an image that will be added to the Digital South Asia Library. (Photo by John Zich)

Winter Quarter 2019 fellowships include:

  • Digital Scholarship Fellowship (Digital Archival Collections): The fellow will conduct background and biographical research, evaluate and select specific items for scholarly importance, write descriptions and contextual material for items in the collections, and create a digital scholarship project around one or more of the existing digital archival collections.
  • Digital Scholarship Fellowship (Digital Humanities): The fellow will collaborate with Library staff and faculty in the Humanities to develop resources and workshops, and to identify other strategies to support the new MA program and undergraduate concentration in Digital Studies of Language, Culture, and History. The fellow will learn about and use textual and visual corpora, digital humanities platforms and research methods, and analytic techniques.
  • GIS Fellowship for Historical Chicago Data: The fellow will conduct an environmental scan to identify existing geospatial data of Chicago in the 19th and 20th centuries. Based on the scan, the fellow will georeference important sheet map collections before digitizing data layers and creating metadata. These data layers will be made available via the Big Ten Academic Alliance Geoportal and locally at the university. The fellow will develop content that contextualizes the digitized data within existing resources.
  • Library Research Support Services Fellowship: This fellowship will provide graduate students with hands-on experience supporting researchers in an academic library through in-person and virtual reference services.
  • Metadata Fellowship for the Digital Media Archive (DMA): This fellow will be responsible for enhancing the metadata for the Mesoamerican holdings within the University of Chicago’s Digital Media Archive (DMA).
  • University Archives Fellow: Archives today are a rapidly expanding field with increasingly broad responsibility for preserving and making accessible unique materials in all formats—traditional paper documents, photographs, and analog recordings, as well as a growing array of digital content: email, databases, digital images, audio and video media, and web sites. This fellow will develop skills and expertise in all these areas while contributing to the programs and services of the University of Chicago Archives.
  • Web Exhibits Fellowship: This fellow will use existing digital resources from the Library Digital Repository to develop web exhibits, highlighting significant items from large digitized collections, and providing contextual information about the items and their collections and creators. The fellow will develop skills in conducting original archival research, and in presenting the results of their research to a broad audience in clear, concise, visually-engaging ways.

Winter 2019 fellowships come with a stipend of $3300 per academic quarter.  Fellowships typically involve approximately 15 hours of work per week.

For more information about individual opportunities and how to apply, visit the Library website or contact Andrea Twiss-Brooks at atbrooks@uchicago.edu.

Exhibits Feature Story The Fetus in Utero: From Mystery to Social Media

Exhibition Dates: January 2–April 12, 2019
Location: Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

Diagram of fetus in utero

Du Coudray uses diagrams of the fetus in utero to help midwives-in-training see both the anatomical and emotional factors at play during pregnancy. Detail from Du Coudray, Abrégé de l’art des accouchements dans lequel on donne les préceptes nécessaires pour le mettre heureusement en pratique, 1777. RG93.L45 Rare. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Once restricted to the privacy of the doctor’s office, ultrasound images of the fetus are now immediately recognizable in the public arena through advertisements and social media, where posts tagged “baby’s first pic” are commonplace. Such depictions of the fetus in utero have become iconic and are arguably the most easily recognized medical image. How and why did this happen?

To answer this question, viewers are invited to embark on a 500-year visual journey, from Renaissance woodcuts to modern medical images. Along the way, they will encounter three major shifts in graphic representation. First, from 1450 to 1700, the fetus transformed from divine mystery to a topic deemed worthy of study. Second, from 1700 to 1965, the fetus achieved status as a medicalized subject whose visual ‘home’ was the obstetrical textbook. Third, from 1965 to the present, the fetus has achieved status in popular culture while maintaining its traditional medical role.

Through this rich visual culture, images of the fetus in utero have been used in the service of education, research, political agendas, patient-empowered medicine, and finally, entertainment. The images on view offer historical insights and a sweeping look at how the visual culture of the fetus in utero developed.

Hours: Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m., and, when University of Chicago classes are in session, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Curators

Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, The University of Chicago; and Margaret Carlyle, Postdoctoral Researcher and Instructor, Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge, The University of Chicago

Life-size female manikin with fetus

This life-size female manikin served as a pedagogical tool for turn-of-the-20th-century medical students. Pilz anatomical manikin [female], [19–?]. New York: American Thermo-Ware Co. ffQM25.P545 19— RCASR. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Related Events

Curators’ Tours

Friday, January 4, 4:30–5 pm
Wednesday, January 23, 1:30–2 pm
Friday, February 8, 4-4:30 pm

1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

Free 30-minute tours by the curators. Please meet in the front lobby of the Regenstein Library at the start time.

Opening Event

Thursday, January 24, 5–7 p.m.
5737 South University Avenue, Chicago, IL
This wine-and-cheese opening reception is hosted by the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge (SIFK).
RSVP required

Use of Images and Media Contact

Images from the exhibition included on this page are available for download to members of the media and are reserved for editorial use in connection with University of Chicago Library exhibitions, programs, or related news. For more information and images, contact Rachel Rosenberg at ra-rosenberg@uchicago.edu or 773-834-1519.

Issues of ‘Medicine on the Midway’ available on UChicago Campus Publications

Medicine on the Midway, Vol. 1, No. 1, December 1944 (previously titled Bulletin of the Medical Alumni Association, University of Chicago)

Issues of Medicine on the Midway from 1944 to 1981 have been digitized and are now available on The University of Chicago Campus Publications website. Formerly titled Bulletin of the Medical Alumni Association, this periodical was published by the School of Medicine at the University of Chicago.

University of Chicago Campus Publications is a digital collection of publications documenting the history of the University of Chicago and the work of its faculty, students, and alumni; read more about its launch.

New issues of Medicine on the Midway are available at UChicago Medicine.

Riccardo Levi-Setti, physicist and paleontologist

Levi Setti

Levi-Setti with some of his trilobites: https://bit.ly/2DRi4sK

Riccardo Levi-Setti, emeritus professor, died earlier this month.  He began his career as a physicist but also went on to research and publish in paleontology.  Born into a Jewish family in Italy, he survived the Holocaust in hiding.  He earned a PhD in physics in 1947 and started his career at the University of Chicago in 1956 as a researcher in particle physics.  He later developed an interest in the extinct sea creatures trilobites and published multiple books on the subject.

 

 

 

 

His books in physics include:

Elementary Particles, Chicago: University of Chicago Press [1965]. Crerar: QC721.L561

Strongly Interacting Particles, Chicago: University of Chicago Press [1973].  Mansueto: QC793.3.H5L6

 

Some of his books in paleontology:

Trilobites: a Photographic Atlas, Chicago: University of Chicago Press [1975]. Crerar: QE821.L65

Trilobites, Chicago: University of Chicago Press c1993.  Crerar: QE821.L460 1993.

More of his books in the Library: https://catalog.lib.uchicago.edu/vufind/Search/Results?type=AuthorBrowse&lookfor=%22Levi-Setti,%20Riccardo%22

His papers are also held in the Library’s Archival Collections: http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/8448151

University of Chicago News obituary

Setti-Levi in the university’s Cyclotron pit. https://bit.ly/2SbRjlV

Learn about turkeys with Library research guide

Image of a wild turkey (male)

First American West: The Ohio River Valley, 1750-1820 Library of Congress, American Memory. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award99/icuhtml//fawhome.html

In celebration of Thanksgiving, the University of Chicago Library once again brings you its research guide to turkeys.  From turkey recipes to turkey economics to turkey history, the guide highlights a rich range of resources that will help you bring good food and informed conversation to your holiday table.

Find more University of Chicago Library research guides.

 

Celebrate GIS Day at the Library

Join us in celebrating GIS Day on Wednesday, November 14:

GIS Day at the Library
2-4 p.m.
Wednesday, November 14, 2018
All events held in Regenstein Library

Browse maps and atlases from Special Collections
Special Collections Research Center classroom

Discover CARTO and ArcGIS tools
RCC Walk-in Lab, Room 216

Bring your laptop and participate in a Map-a-thon using OpenStreetMap
Map Collection, Room 370

All UChicago faculty, students and staff are welcome. Stay for a short time or for the whole event.  No previous GIS experience is needed. Light snacks will be provided.

New guide to papers of physicist Lalitha Chandrasekhar

The Lalitha Chandrasekhar Papers are now open for research. Lalitha Chandrasekhar (1910-2013) was married to Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist and longtime University of Chicago professor Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. She was born in Madras, India and spent much of her childhood there. The Chandrasekhars moved to Williams Bay, Wisconsin in late 1936 when Subrahmanyan accepted a position at the University of Chicago’s Yerkes Observatory. They remained there until 1964, when they moved to Chicago. The Lalitha Chandrasekhar Papers document her life in Williams Bay and Chicago and her travels, mostly in India, the United States, and Europe.

Lalitha Chandrasekhar, in glasses. Photograph is unlabeled, but she is likely with her sisters Shantha, Kanthamani, and Radha. Chandrasekhar, Lalitha. Papers, Box 184, scrapbook, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

A letter acknowledging Lalitha Chandrasekhar’s contributions to the Democratic Party of Wisconsin. She was an active supporter of progressive causes for her entire life. Chandrasekhar, Lalitha. Papers, Box 45, Folder 2, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

The first page of the Chandrasekhar’s guest book, which was signed by visitors to their home from 1938 until Chandra’s death in 1995. It includes signatures from many notable twentieth century scientists. Chandrasekhar, Lalitha. Papers, Box 206, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

Expanding services for faculty in a changing environment

Brenda L. Johnson

Brenda L. Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian (Photo by John Zich)

Today’s scholarly environment presents an increasing array of challenges and opportunities for faculty and graduate students. New funding agency requirements call on researchers to present advance plans for openly sharing and preserving their data.  Researchers are seeking ways to obtain data in new formats, to visualize information in new ways, and to rescue and share data for new purposes.  Across disciplines, researchers are constantly challenged to find and adopt new tools and techniques. The Library is meeting this challenge by launching new initiatives, developing cutting-edge skills among our librarians, and bringing on new staff members who can assist researchers in this changing scholarly environment.

Stacie Williams

Stacie Williams, Center for Digital Scholarship Director

The Library’s new Center for Digital Scholarship (CDS) will be an umbrella for many of these services, facilitating the analysis of complex data, the visualization of theoretical relationships, the preservation of core research, and the sharing of research results. Stacie Williams, who joined the Library in August as the inaugural CDS Director, brings experience working with researchers in her previous position managing the Freedman Center for Digital Scholarship at Case Western Reserve University. Williams is working with subject librarians and faculty to identify priorities for establishing new spaces, technical infrastructure, and services that meet research and teaching needs.  Following are some of the key areas in which initiatives are already underway.

Data preservation and sharing

Nora Mattern

Nora Mattern, Scholarly Communications Librarian

The Library is expanding Knowledge@UChicago, the University’s digital institutional research repository, to better support the needs of data preservation. Led by new Scholarly Communications Librarian Nora Mattern, the Library is migrating Knowledge@UChicago to a new platform that was initially developed at CERN to support high energy physics. The new Knowledge@UChicago will launch in January and will provide funder-compliant solutions for researchers to share and preserve their code, data, and research results.  Mattern also provides consultations on good data management practices, writing data management plans, and copyright.

The Library is also partnering with the Energy Policy Institute at Chicago (EPIC) to host a Council on Library and Information Resources Postdoctoral Fellow in Energy Economics Data Curation, Ana Trisovic. Trisovic is focusing on the particular challenges EPIC faculty face in collecting and preserving energy data, which is often available only from private industry or difficult-to-use government websites. She will be building a clearinghouse for EPIC’s data to facilitate discovery and reuse, as well as developing solutions for preserving and sharing the code that researchers use to analyze their data. Trisovic will use the skills she gained earning a PhD in Computer Science and her experience developing similar preservation solutions at CERN, applying them to the field of energy economics.

Data acquisition and use

Kristin Martin

Kristin Martin, Director of Technical Services

The challenge of acquiring data for research is shared by many disciplines. For example, the Library subscribes to thousands of electronic books and journals, but researchers interested in data mining these texts cannot easily do so using the vendor’s PDFs, which are intended for individual reading. Kristin Martin, the Library’s Director of Technical Services, excels at working with publishers to provide alternative access that is optimized for data mining.  The Library’s subject specialists can work with faculty across the disciplines and with Martin to seek such alternative access.

Elizabeth Foster

Elizabeth Foster, Social Sciences Data Librarian

Elizabeth Foster, the Library’s new Social Sciences Data Librarian, can take this one step further, not only helping researchers find and acquire relevant data, but also helping them transform that data, for example, by formatting it to match the requirements of a particular tool.  Foster will offer workshops and will be developing data analysis consultation services, with a focus on using R and Stata.

Geospatial analysis

Cecilia Smith

Cecilia Smith, GIS and Maps Librarian

Faculty in many disciplines are exploring the ways spatial and temporal analysis and visualization can be used to gain new insights into their data. Cecilia Smith, the Library’s new GIS and Maps Librarian, can consult on the use of GIS information and geospatial tools to analyze and visualize trends in data from mapping the shifts in the border of the Roman Empire over time, to plotting the incidence of traffic accidents in relation to red light cameras, to mapping the impact of environmental factors on health outcomes, and more.  Read “Opening a GIS Hub at Crerar Library” for more information.

At-risk data and data rescue

Sarah G. Wenzel

Sarah G. Wenzel, Bibliographer for the Literatures of Europe and the Americas

Researchers interested in documenting historical trends are often stymied when early data are in analog formats not conducive to data analysis.  Heritage data–such as weather data and astronomical observations–are often the only evidence remaining of ephemeral or disappearing phenomena.  The Library is currently partnering with the Humanities Division to ensure that the UChicago Digital Media Archive’s linguistic and ethnomusicology recordings made by former faculty are converted from fragile magnetic tape to a digital form that can be used by researchers today. We are also working with the Ivy Plus Libraries on a web archiving project. Sarah G. Wenzel, Bibliographer for the Literatures of Europe and the Americas, co-developed a proposal with a colleague at Columbia University to create a digital archive of comics and artists’ websites.  Currently, more than 150 websites are being actively archived by this project and can be found at archive-it.org/collections/10181.

The expert and talented staff members of the Library are committed to expanding services that meet faculty needs in this changing environment. We look forward to working with you and encourage you to visit our Center for Digital Scholarship web page and to contact your subject specialist, Stacie Williams, or Elisabeth Long, Associate University Librarian for Information Technology and Digital Scholarship, to discuss your research needs.

Feature Story Scientific reproducibility, data management, and inspiration

“Science moves forward by corroboration–when researchers verify others’ results,” the journal Nature states in its July special edition on Challenges in Irreproducible Research.  “There is a growing alarm about results that cannot be reproduced. . . . Journals, scientists, institutions and funders all have a part in tackling reproducibility.”

Stefano Allesina discusses a data management plan with Elisabeth Long, who points sto the plan on screen.

Librarian Elisabeth Long (left) discusses a data management plan with Professor Stefano Allesina. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

Science faculty across the disciplines are increasingly taking up the challenge to publish their research in ways that are more easily reproduced, and librarians are collaborating with these researchers to ensure that rigorously collected data, metadata, and algorithms are preserved and made accessible to the research community.

“Many of these efforts revolve around teaching, planning, and practicing excellent data management throughout the research life cycle, from grant writing to publication,” said Elisabeth Long, Associate University Librarian for Information Technology and Digital Scholarship.  “The University of Chicago Library is offering a growing set of data management research and teaching services that help UChicago scientists win grants and produce and publish reproducible results that will shape the future of their fields.”

Teaching good data management from the beginning

The UChicago Biological Sciences Division recently played a leading part in improving graduate education in its discipline by developing a National Science Foundation-funded course called Responsible, Rigorous, and Reproducible Conduct of Research: R3CR.  All UChicago first-year BSD graduate students are required to take the course, learning how to use current methods in computational biology in an ethical and reproducible way.  Elisabeth Long has partnered with the course’s creators, Professors Victoria Prince, Stefano Allesina, and Stephanie Palmer, to provide a class session that introduces students to the principles of data management in the lab setting.

“Biology produces a lot of data, and we have seen the kind of mistakes that people can make that are terrifying,” Professor Allesina said. “Elisabeth talked a lot about how you make sure that you’re keeping your data safe throughout your thesis research: how you should name your files, where you should save your files, how you make sure they are saved for posterity, and where there are institutional repositories or online repositories where you can publish your data.”

The Library is partnering with researchers across campus to develop practices and tools that can facilitate the kind of recordkeeping and data curation that is currently demanded of scientists.  Librarians are offering workshops and training sessions that prepare University of Chicago students to graduate with exceptional data management and preservation skills.

Electronic lab notebooks and data management plans

This Autumn Quarter, the Library’s new Center for Digital Scholarship begins offering drop-in consultation hours and customized one-on-one sessions to work with faculty on their data management plans, choosing between the University’s Knowledge@UChicago research repository and disciplinary archives for preserving and sharing research outputs.

The Center will also offer advice on selecting and using research management tools such as electronic lab notebooks and the Open Science Framework.  Research management tools provide platforms where faculty can centralize all their research activities, enabling easy file management, version control, protocol sharing, analysis activities, email, and other interactions between members of a lab. “One challenge confronting researchers is choosing from among the many existing systems,” Long said. “The Center for Digital Scholarship’s consultation services can pair librarians with individual faculty members, or bring sessions to your labs to explore the best solution for your particular research scenario.”

When the data don’t stand alone

Complex research workflows that present particular challenges for reproducibility often occur in fields where data are processed multiple times before final analysis. “In such cases, preserving the data alone is insufficient to support reproducibility,” Long explained. “The computational code for processing the data must also be preserved along with its relation to the data at various stages of processing.”

Marco Govoni, a researcher at the Institute of Molecular Engineering and Argonne National Laboratory, has been developing a tool for mapping and documenting these relationships.  Qresp: Curation and Exploration of Reproducible Scientific Papers (at qresp.org) guides the researchers through the process of documenting the relationship between the datasets, scripts, tools, and notebooks that were used in the creation of a scientific paper. Librarians are working with Govoni to explore ways in which the Library could support his work and potentially integrate it with the Library’s new institutional repository platform.

Data and inspiration

In consulting with librarians, faculty sometimes discover unexpected sources of data, inspiring new research projects.  When Long was talking to the R3CR class about data management and how they will submit their dissertations to ProQuest, a national dissertation repository, Professor Allesina began to consider the value its metadata could provide for the study of careers in science.  “There’s a lot of interest in trying to see if we can improve the situation in the sciences by increasing representations, for example, of women or minorities,” Allesina explained, “but one thing that we lack is some sort of longitudinal analysis, because once PhD students are out the door, it’s very difficult to find them again.”

Librarian Nora Mattern, Professor Stefano Allesina, and a sketch of a computational pipeline. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

At Allesina’s request, Long put him in touch with the Library’s Director of Technical Services, Kristin Martin, who worked with ProQuest to obtain the name, institution, and year of graduation for dissertation authors from the U.S. and Canada from 1993 to 2015.  He is now planning to combine that metadata with publication data from Scopus to track the length and locations of scientists’ careers in academia.

Such a study raises specific reproducibility challenges.  In working on a grant proposal to the National Science Foundation to support this research, Allesina turned to Nora Mattern, Scholarly Communications Librarian, and Debra Werner, Director of Library Research in Medical Education, for advice on how to integrate proprietary data owned by ProQuest and Scopus into the data management plan.  “How much can you share with other scientists?” Allesina asked.  “Can you share some summary statistics of the data?  Can you share de-identified data? If you imagine that someone wants to repeat my analysis of PhD students, will they have sufficient data?” Mattern and Werner helped him to structure the data management plan and to consider the legal implications.

When Allesina came to the United States from Italy, he was surprised at the role he found librarians taking in the digital age.  “Here librarians are thinking forward,” he said.  “Nowadays we have this mass of information. How do we navigate that? How do we organize it? How do we make it searchable? I am always amazed that people can be so helpful. I was dreaming of this data about PhDs, and I talked to Elisabeth, and she said ‘let me look into that.’ After a few weeks, I got gigabytes of data.”

His advice to colleagues: “Run it by a librarian before giving up.”

To consult with a librarian on data management and scientific reproducibility, talk to your Library subject specialist or email data-help@lib.uchicago.edu.

 

Opening a GIS Hub at Crerar Library

Location is important. Tracking the movement of contagious disease helps contain its spread. Demographic geography influences access to financial and retail services. Virtualized medieval cities provide opportunities to explore the contexts of historical events. Each of these phenomena can be studied with GIS.

GIS and Maps Librarian and students with map of Chicago on monitor

GIS and Maps Librarian Cecilia Smith (center) discusses mapping tools and resources with (from left) students Paul Gilbert, II, College ’20, and Emil Sohlberg, College ’20. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

Geographic information systems, or GIS, is used to analyze locational information across disciplines such as public health, environmental science, sociology, economics, policy, history, and many more. Faculty and students are increasingly integrating GIS into their research, and opportunities to learn the technology are growing at the University of Chicago.

Thanks to a generous gift from the Kathleen and Howard Zar Science Library Fund and support from the Library Council, the University of Chicago Library is developing a GIS Hub at the John Crerar Library to enable geospatial research and learning activities on campus. The Hub will be located in Crerar’s Kathleen A. Zar Room, named in honor of the late director of the science libraries. Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian, sees the new Hub as critical to supporting research on campus. “The GIS Hub at the Library will provide faculty, students and staff from every discipline at UChicago with access to important technology and resources and, very importantly, the ability to consult with a GIS Librarian with expert knowledge,” she said.

Eight workstations in the Hub will offer GIS software, including QGIS, GeoDa, and ArcGIS. Large, high-resolution monitors will allow detailed visualization work. The GIS Hub will facilitate individual and collaborative work. Instructional technology will also provide a venue for geospatial workshops and demonstrations.

As the new GIS and Maps Librarian, I will support faculty and students through consultations on gathering and exploring geospatial data, spatial literacy, and visualizing geographic information.  I will also offer workshops on working with GIS data and getting started with the software. At Chicago, I will build on my recent experience as a Clinical Assistant Professor and the Geospatial Librarian at Texas A&M University Libraries, where I collaborated on research projects with faculty from geography, sociology, anthropology, history, urban planning, and ecosystem science. The Early Modern Shipwreck project at modernshipwrecks.com is a good example of one of my collaborations with faculty where I provided geospatial expertise.

The GIS Hub opens to the campus community in Fall 2018, located with the new Media Arts, Data, and Design Center on the first floor of the newly renovated Crerar Library. The Media Arts, Data and Design Center will open in early Winter Quarter.  This co-location is an exciting opportunity for faculty and students to access technological and maker resources for interdisciplinary research and learning.

For questions regarding GIS resources at the Library, please contact me at ceciliasmith@uchicago.edu.

Librarians collaborate with faculty to help students gain vital research skills

In an era of social media, disinformation, and fake news, helping students learn how to evaluate information is more important than ever. While the University’s Core Curriculum teaches undergraduates to critically examine texts, survey responses indicate that students also need help learning to identify, assess, and use sources beyond the syllabus. Librarians are available to work with faculty to design tailored assignments and resources that teach research skills that meet course-specific objectives.

Survey results indicate the value of Library instruction

Librarian Rebecca Starkey with 3 students working on laptops.

Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach (standing), works with students to enhance their research skills. (Photo by Jason Smith)

In 2017, the Library conducted a survey of undergraduates in order to learn more about their experiences at UChicago. Results demonstrated that students expect to have opportunities to conduct original research while at the University and believe that the research skills developed at UChicago will be essential for their future careers. Once here, however, respondents were uncertain who on campus had responsibility for helping them develop the skills needed to successfully find and use information.

Fortunately, survey responses clearly indicated that Library instruction positively affects students’ perceptions of their research skills. While only 38% of survey respondents reported having attended a library program or orientation, those who received this instruction consistently gave higher ratings to their abilities to evaluate academic sources, make ethical use of information, and form evidence-based conclusions than did those who had not received such training. Respondents who had participated in Library programs were also less likely to start their research with general search engines and nearly twice as likely to begin at the Library’s website.

Librarians create course-specific resources for faculty

University of Chicago librarians have experience collaborating with faculty and instructors to design programs, assignments, or course-specific resources that help students meet learning objectives while improving their research skills. Below are some examples of ways the Library can help:

  • Humanities students are asked to locate a review article about an art exhibition, theater performance, or film. A librarian teaches students how to locate review articles, highlighting the differences between academic sources with those in newspapers and magazines. The class also learns how to critically evaluate arts blogs and websites.
  • For a public policy class studying immigrant communities in Chicago, a librarian teaches students how to find U.S. Census data for neighborhoods.
  • For a psychology course focusing on adolescent mental health, librarians create an online guide to help students locate studies on the impact of anti-bullying programs on teenage suicide.

If you are interested in exploring options for your course, contact Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction & Outreach at rstarkey@uchicago.edu.

Exhibits “Library Adventures in a Digital Age,” a history of medicine pop-up display

Library Adventures in a Digital Age

Join Dr. Mindy Schwartz, Professor of Medicine and Associate Program Director for Internal Medicine at the University of Chicago, in the Special Collections Research Center for a special pop-up display of rare medical history collections.

Library Adventures in a Digital Age:
Chicago Connections
Friday, October 26, 1:00 – 4:30 p.m.
Special Collections Research Center
Regenstein Library, 1st floor

View a selection of books and objects from our collections that enhance our understanding of the history of science and medicine, and learn how they can be used for research and teaching. A resource guide will be available.

For more information about the event, contact the Special Collections Research Center.

People Apply for the Library Student Advisory Group

Mansueto and Regenstein

Mansueto and Regenstein libraries (photo by Tom Rossiter)

The Library Student Advisory Group serves as a formal channel of communication between students and the Library administration. The group discusses matters related to all six campus libraries, including collections, spaces, and services, along with issues relating to the present and future needs of the student community.

The Library Student Advisory Group meets once a quarter and representatives serve for two-year terms with an option to renew.

We are looking for student representatives from the following schools and divisions:

  • College (Class of 2022)
  • Biological Sciences Division
  • Booth School of Business
  • Harris School of Public Policy Studies
  • Physical Sciences Division
  • Pritzker School of Medicine
  • Social Sciences Division
  • School of Social Service Administration.

Please complete our online application by October 26, 2018.

For more information about the Library Student Advisory Group, or the application process, please contact:

Rebecca Starkey
Librarian for College Instruction & Outreach
773-702-4484
rstarkey@uchicago.edu