Geography Awareness Week events in library and on campus

The University of Chicago Library, Research Computing Center, UChicagoGRAD, and Humanities Computing invite University of Chicago students, faculty, and staff to attend campus events in celebration of Geography Awareness Week and GIS Day.

Maps and atlases of Special Collections

Date: Monday, November 13 from 1:00-3:00 p.m.
Location: Special Collections Research Center, Regenstein Library, 1100 E 57th St
Description: During this instructional session learn about and view historic maps, atlases, and texts held in the library’s Special Collections Research Center.
Register

GIS careers panel

Date: Wednesday, November 15 from 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Location: Classics 110, 1010 E 59th St
Description: Panelists from CTA, EPA, HERE, & Boston Consulting Group will discuss the use of GIS to enhance their work.  Enjoy GIS Day cake and networking from 4:30-5:00.
Register

Map-a-thon

Date: Thursday, November 16 from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. and 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Location: Biological Sciences Learning Center (room 018) 924 E 57th St
Description: Drop by one of these hands-on sessions to learn basic geospatial skills and techniques by using OpenStreetMap and contributing to a humanitarian mapping project. For more information, watch the “Why map?” video.
Bringing a laptop (no tablets) is recommended, but a limited number of computers are available in the lab.
Register:
11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. session
4:00-6:00 p.m. session

For questions about these events, contact Resident Librarian for GIS Taylor Hixson (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu). Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact Barbara Kern at 773-702-8717 for assistance.

Launching a Center for Digital Scholarship at the Library

The Changing Nature of Scholarship

The advent of digital technology has opened up new horizons that have inspired scholars to transform the nature of their scholarship. From the rapid analysis of a human genome to the sharing of social science data sets to data mining vast quantities of text—scholars are continually developing new digital approaches to creating, analyzing, and sharing their research.

Brenda L. Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian (Photo by John Zich)

While digital scholarship activity among the University of Chicago faculty is growing, this new kind of scholarship comes with a challenge. Researchers must master a dizzying array of computational tools and techniques, they must think about how to manage their data in ways that can be used by other researchers, and they must find solutions for archiving and sharing their data that meet the increasingly stringent requirements of funding agencies. As faculty and students increasingly incorporate computational and algorithmic methods (e.g., text mining, network analysis, GIS and geo-spatial mapping, image analysis, data analysis) into their research process, they are looking for partners to provide the technical and human resources necessary to support their research activities, foster innovation, and facilitate cross-divisional collaboration.

Digital scholarship encompasses all parts of this new life cycle of digital research, from the changing ways in which scholars collect and analyze data to their increased interest in new techniques for preserving and sharing that data. The Library is a natural hub for the exchange of ideas and the home of a great deal of expertise on archiving and sharing information. Accordingly, we are preparing to enhance our offerings and collaborations with faculty in each segment of this life cycle.

Envisioning a Center for Digital Scholarship at the University of Chicago Library

Faculty tell us that “a substantial barrier to the adoption of computational and digital methods at the University of Chicago has been the isolation of faculty members from colleagues who are experimenting with similar techniques. . . . A physical space designated for such inquiry could help bridge this knowledge gap by providing an environment in which to explore the application of these techniques, receive hands-on training through tutorials or workshops, and benefit from informal collaboration with colleagues in other disciplines.”

To meet this need, I am pleased to announce that we are beginning the work of launching a Center for Digital Scholarship at the Library, which will become a new nexus for intellectual energy and growth, providing a space that will support state-of-the-art technologies and services that facilitate the exploration of new methodologies, the analysis of complex data, the visualization of theoretical relationships, and the sharing of research results.

Establishing such a transformative center at the Library will require identifying high priority needs and thinking creatively about how to resource those needs. Thanks to the generosity of Robert, AM’64, and Carolyn Nelson, AM’64, PhD’67, we will soon be able to hire a Director for the Center for Digital Scholarship (CDS) who will develop a strategic vision, begin to build services, and coordinate with existing library staff. Our new CDS Director will jumpstart the process and position us to pursue additional funding to support a full suite of services. I am grateful to the Nelsons for their early support of the Library’s digital scholarship initiatives.

We are now beginning a search for this Director and look forward to having this position filled in the coming months. As the Center develops over time, we expect that we will be able to facilitate a wide range of activities. Possibilities fall into three categories.

  • Scholarly Exploration and Collaboration. A combination of intellectual programming (symposia to host international scholars, tutorials, brown-bag presentations, workshops, faculty lectures), services (project consultation, data archiving), and technology (scanning equipment, workstations equipped with GIS and other specialized software) will make the Center a hub that brings faculty, students, and scholars together in ways that spark interactions and facilitate cross-divisional collaborations.­
  • Graduate and Undergraduate Training.  Faculty turn to the Library as a partner to supplement classroom instruction with workshops, targeted training, and onsite training by embedded librarians who can teach the skills necessary for students to succeed. In addition to supporting initiatives across campus to develop courses and programs that integrate new computational methods and theories into a wide range of disciplines, the Library has partnered with UChicagoGrad to provide fundamental digital scholarship skills needed by graduate students to become the next generation of leaders in academia, industry, nonprofits, and government.
  • OCHRE database screenshot

    The OCHRE database allows users to view photographs of artifacts (here, Ras Shamra tablets) alongside associated machine-readable data such as descriptions, epigraphs, interpretive information, transliterations, and translations.

    Project Incubation and Execution. The Center for Digital Scholarship will provide services, such as project consultations, data acquisition and conversion, workshops in tools and techniques, and core technical infrastructure.  Researchers would benefit from guidance on strategies for organizing and executing digital project work and from assistance by staff with the experience and networks that can facilitate project components that are new to the researcher. Examples of such projects are the Library’s collaboration with Chicago Booth’s Richard Hornbeck on the location and digitization of 19th-century manufacturing data and with the Oriental Institute’s David Schloen on the OCHRE database system.

I look forward to being joined by the new Director of the Center for Digital Scholarship, who will collaborate with colleagues within the Library and across campus to develop a vision for the Center and plan for the rollout of services critical to digital research and teaching projects of many kinds.

 

Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Billings Hospital

Building exterior and signage for Billings Hospital

Exterior view of the Albert Merritt Billings Hospital, part of the University of Chicago Hospitals complex.
University of Chicago Photographic Archive, [apf7-02257], Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

The University of Chicago History of Medicine Project (UCHOMP) is marking the 90th Anniversary of the opening of Billings Hospital, the predecessor of UChicago Medicine with some special events in the Joseph Regenstein Library.  Join us on Friday, October 27, 2017 at 2pm – 4:30pm for an open house in the Special Collections Research Center featuring “Treasures of Medicine in Chicago.”  The open house will be followed by a lecture given by Mindy A. Schwartz, M.D. “Happy Birthday Billings Hospital- The Library Connection:  A Tale of 3 Billings.”  The lecture will take place from 5pm – 6pm in Regenstein Library Room 122.  The events are open to all University of Chicago faculty, staff and students and to the general public.

Open Access Week

The week of October 23-29 is International Open Access Week, an annual celebration to raise awareness of the issue of access to published scholarly research.

Open Access logo

Open Access

What is Open Access?

Open access is access to published scholarly research that is free of most copyright and licensing restrictions and free of charge to any reader anywhere.  Learn more at our guide to open access.

How you can participate in Open Access Initiatives?

  • Publish in an Open Access publication so that everyone immediately and always has free access to your work.  Check the Directory of Open Access Journals to find high quality, open access, peer-reviewed journals.
  • Make your work available in an open repository.  The Library also now offers a digital repository for faculty, staff and students to deposit their scholarly articles and (at this time) small dataset to share. Visit knowledge.uchicago.edu for more information about our repository.
  • Use open access journals for your research. All journals published by the Public Library of Science are open access, as are all the publication of the Open Library of the Humanities.

People Deadline extended to apply for the Library Student Advisory Group

Student studying in Mansueto Library

Mansueto Library (Photo by Tom Rossiter)

The University of Chicago Library is looking for student representatives from the following schools and divisions to serve on the Library Student Advisory Group:

  • College (Class of 2021 Only)
  • Biological Sciences Division
  • Chicago Booth School of Business
  • Harris School of Public Policy Studies
  • Institute for Molecular Engineering
  • Physical Sciences Division
  • Pritzker School of Medicine
  • School of Social Service Administration
  • Social Sciences Division

The Library Student Advisory Group (LSAG) serves as a formal channel of communication between students and the Library administration. The LSAG discusses matters related to all six campus libraries, including its collections, spaces, and services, along with the present and future needs of the student community. The Library Student Advisory Group meets two times a quarter and representatives serve two-year terms.

Interested students should complete the online application by Friday, October 20.

For more information about the Library Student Advisory Group, or the application process, please contact:

Rebecca Starkey
Librarian for College Instruction & Outreach
Gender Studies and Library Science
rstarkey@uchicago.edu

Webinar: Create, Link, and Share Your Bibliography – PubMed Tools and ORCID Identifiers for Authors

In this 30-minute webinar, NCBI staff will discuss author disambiguation and the advantages of using an ORCID ID–a free, unique identifier that will remain constant, even if your name changes.  Also learn how to find your citations in PubMed, create a bibliography, and share your publication list with others.

Date & time: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 11:00 PM – 11:30 PM CDT

Register

After the live presentation, the webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. Learn about future NCBI webinars on the Webinars and Courses page.

Current Exhibits Well Equipped: Library Technology from Days Past

library worker with photoduplication equipment

From the Photographic Archive (URL: http://photoarchive.lib.uchicago.edu/), Identifier: apf1-02019.

September 18, 2017 – June 7, 2018
Location: Crerar Library First Floor

Over the years Crerar Library has used the newest equipment and technologies to make books, journals and other information accessible to patrons.  These tools have evolved through the years.  A library card system has been replaced with online catalog with significant collections available electronically.   Early techniques for photocopying and microfilming materials have been eclipsed by digital scanning services.  Displayed are objects and photos of some of these earlier technologies used by the Library.

A Web version of this  exhibit is also available: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/collex/exhibits/well-equipped-library-technology-days-past/

Free ebook on the Cassini mission and Saturn

To celebrate the conclusion of the Cassini spacecraft’s mission to Saturn, IOP Publishing is making its ebook on the topic, The Ringed Planet: Cassini’s Voyage of Discovery at Saturn, free now through Oct. 15, 2017.

Download your free copy here!

Saturn and its rings

Saturn and its rings; image taken by Cassini.  Image Credit: NASA/JPL/SSI.

Welcome to the Library: orientation for new students

Librarian helps student

A librarian shows a research guide to a student. November 30, 2011. (Photo by Jason Smith)

Welcome to the University of Chicago! As the heart of campus, the Library offers much more than books and a place to study. The Library’s work is to provide comprehensive resources and dynamic services to support the research, teaching, and learning needs of the University community.

Below are just a few ways you can learn about the University of Chicago Library, its resources, and services before classes begin.

Orientation Guide

Designed to give a preview of all the Library has to offer, the Library’s orientation guide helps new members of campus navigate the Library.

In-Person Orientation Programs

Our orientation guide and online tours are no substitute for the variety of on-campus orientation sessions that the Library offers.

Undergraduates

Library Boot Camp
Wednesday, September 20 at 11:30 am, 1:30 pm, and 3:30 pm
Thursday, September 21 at 2:30 pm, and 4:00 pm
Joseph Regenstein Library, A Level
Get in shape for college research by attending our 60-minute Library Boot Camp. Strengthen your research skills by learning about search tools and Library services before your first assignment is due. We’ll cover the basics: how to find books and course readings, printing, study spaces, laptop lending, and more. Students who complete Boot Camp will receive their own Library mug!

Science Research: An Introduction to the John Crerar Library
John Crerar Library
Wednesday, September 20 at 11:30 am
Thursday, September 21 and Friday, September 22 at 10:00 am
Are you pre-med or considering a science major? If so, this session at Crerar, the sciences library, is for you! Learn how to find and access articles in e-journals and databases for classes and research projects. During this 60-minute session, you’ll also receive a building tour and learn how to access print materials. Attendees receive a special Crerar giveaway!

ECON 101: An Introduction to Library Resources
Joseph Regenstein Library, Room 122
Friday, September 22 at 11:00 am
If you are majoring in economics, this is a can’t miss orientation. Learn about all the services the Library can provide to aid in your research, from accessing the major relevant newspapers and journals (think The Economist and The Wall Street Journal) to finding economics articles and papers. Get an introduction to some of the best sources for economics data.

Graduate Students

Orientation programs for masters and doctoral students are arranged through your department or program, and are hosted by the subject librarian for that discipline. The Library’s Workshop and Events Calendar lists many of these programs, but if you do not see yours listed, please feel free to contact the Library via our Ask a Librarian service.

Virtual and Self-Guided Tours

Learn about the Joseph Regenstein Library through our short virtual tour.

Go behind-the-scenes of the Joe & Rika Mansueto Library in 360° with a video from the University of Chicago.

Want to explore the Library at your own pace? Download our Self-Guided Tour of the Regenstein and Mansueto Libraries.

Eclipse 2017

solar eclipse

Corona of the sun. Photograph taken on the Lick Observatory expedition to Chile to record the total solar eclipse of April 16, 1893.

 

The solar eclipse this Monday in Chicago will be a partial eclipse.   Starting at 11:54 AM, it will be at its peak just before 1:20 PM, at which point the the moon will cover 86.6 percent of the sun.

University of Chicago and Solar Eclipses

University of Chicago astronomers have made many expeditions over the years to view solar eclipses in the United States and all over the world.  View images from some of these expeditions in the Library’s Archival Photofiles.

Books on Solar Eclipses at the Library

Totality by Mark Littmann and Fred Espenak: A complete guide to eclipses past, present and future

In the Shadow of the Moon: the Science, Magic and Mystery of Solar Eclipses by Anthony Aveni:  This book provides an exploration of the scientific and cultural significance of solar eclipses.

Eclipse:  Journeys to the Dark Side of the Moon by Frank Close: In this book, popular scientist Frank Close explains why eclipses happen and talks about their role in history, literature and myth.

Total Addiction to the Life of An Eclipse Chaser by Kate Russo. For many seeing a total solar eclipse is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. This book profiles people who dedicate their lives to chasing eclipses.

Expert Websites

Adler Planetarium Eclipse Site:  Includes information on local viewing options.

Nasa’s Eclipse Site

American Astronomical Association Eclipse Site

 

 

 

Online tutorials in the sciences and medicine

Looking to do some online training over the summer?  Check out one of these options:

Global population data available

The LandScan 2015 Global Population Database is now available. Download the data directly from the library catalog by clicking the Full text online link.
Screenshot of LandScan 2015 Population Database

East View, the data publisher, provides this information about the updated database:

  • Adjusted population totals and distributions for Syria, Iraq and Ukraine to account for refugee and internally displaced persons movements as of June 2016
  • Results from Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s LandScan HD data, (developed at 3 arc-seconds) for certain national and regional areas
  • Output from Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s “Settlement Mapper Tool” (which rapidly delineates and characterizes settlements using high-resolution imagery)
  • Refined urban built-up areas
  • Thousands of additional smaller villages and populated places
  • Improved spatial precision and population distribution values

The library also has the LandScan 2007 Global Population Database.

For assistance or questions about accessing this or other spatial data through the University of Chicago Library, contact Resident Librarian for GIS Taylor Hixson (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu). More information about the library’s support for spatial data and GIS is available in the library’s research guide.

ALA conference attendees invited to visit UChicago Library

ALA Annual2017 conference logoAttendees of the American Library Association 2017 Annual Conference and Exhibition in Chicago are welcome to visit the University of Chicago’s campus libraries during the conference, June 22-27.  Informational handouts will be available at the Regenstein Library Ask a Librarian desk and the Mansueto Library Circulation desk.

Please bring your conference badge to gain admittance.  For a listing of library hours, visit hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

 

My Library Account improvements

The Library has released a new version of My Library Account (formerly My Account), offering enhancements and new features:

  • Displays have been improved, especially on mobile devices.
  • Checked out items are sorted by due date, so items due soon appear at the top of the list.
  • Checked out items can also be sorted by title, author, call number, loan type, etc.
  • Alerts appear for recalled items, items due soon, overdue items, etc.
  • Interlibrary loan, course reserves, and short term loans display information about their loan period and whether they are eligible for renewal.
  • Faculty can view which items on their accounts were checked out by proxy borrowers.
  • Requested items more clearly display whether they are available for pickup.
  • Quick links have been added to other Library accounts (Interlibrary Loan, Special Collections, Course Reserves).

See My Library Account Help for more information.

The new Checked out Items screen; items due soon appear at the top of the list.

The new Checked out Items screen; items due soon appear at the top of the list.

Memorial Day 2017: Eckhart, SSA closed, other libraries remain open

On Monday, May 29, Eckhart and SSA will be closed for the Memorial Day holiday. D’Angelo Law will be open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Crerar, Mansueto, and Regenstein will be open during their regular building hours, as will the All-Night Study Space on the 1st Floor of Regenstein.

People Diane Dallis joins UChicago as Associate University Librarian for Research and Learning

Diane Dallis joined the University of Chicago Library on May 10 as Associate University Librarian for Research and Learning.  Diane was most recently the Associate Dean for Library Academic Services at Indiana University and will bring to Chicago extensive experience in transforming reference services, building new programs and spaces that support research and learning, and creative use of assessment to evaluate the effectiveness of operations and to understand the role the library plays in faculty and student success.

Diane Dallis

Diane Dallis, Associate University Librarian for Research and Learning

At Indiana University Ms. Dallis worked closely with the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning, the University Information Technology Services, the Associate Vice Provost for Research in Arts & Humanities, and the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education to collaboratively develop new programs including support for new research technologies, scholarly publishing, and research and learning skills.  Ms. Dallis oversaw the development of a Learning Commons that provided students a more learner-centered environment with access to the tools, systems, and support needed to turn information into knowledge. Ms. Dallis also led the creation of a Scholars’ Commons that supports cutting edge research by providing easy access to experts and technology for every stage of a researcher’s scholarship from curiosity to discovery to publication, including consultation services in areas such as GIS, text mining, visualization, intellectual property, data management, digitization, metadata, and project management.

At the University of Chicago Library, Ms. Dallis oversees Humanities, Social Sciences, Area Studies, Special Collections, East Asia, and the Sciences, ensuring a coherent and responsive information and service environment for the highly interdisciplinary research and teaching needs of the campus.  Ms. Dallis will bring to the position both her experience at Indiana University, and her strong record of national leadership in the field, including serving as chair of the Public Services Big Heads group and the Big Ten Academic Alliance Public Services Discussion Group.

Zar GIS & Story Maps Prize winners announced

This week three College students were awarded prizes for their submissions to the Kathleen A. Zar GIS & Story Maps Prize. The Prize acknowledges the ability of a University of Chicago College student to utilize GIS and spatial thinking to develop a digital narrative using Esri’s Story Maps applications.

First prize:

Let Our Impact Grow from More to More,” by Juliet Eldred
Screen capture of the Story Map "Let our impact grow from more to more."

Second prize:

Mapping Tennessee’s Railroad Past,” by Julie Wu
Screen capture of the first slide for the Story Map "Mapping Tennessee's Railroad Past"

Third prize:

DioDio,” by Elle Hill
Screen capture of Story Map "DioDio" first slide

For questions about the prize, selection process, or GIS in the library, contact Resident Librarian for GIS Taylor Hixson (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu).

Study carrels on first floor of Crerar

Some study carrels have been relocated from the upper floors of the Crerar Library to the first floor to provide additional study space.

Crerar Library 1st floor study carrels

Exhibits They Saw Stars: Art and Astronomy – new web exhibit

SelenographiaAn archived web exhibit of the 2005 Crerar exhibit They Saw Stars: Art and Astronomy is now available.  The physical exhibit was shown in the atrium of Crerar Library from June 2 — November 1, 2005.

Exhibit Description: For centuries humankind has gazed into the heavens with awe and wonder. For some, the night sky has tugged at their imagination and piqued their curiosity, resulting in art inspired by the beauty of the stars and the study of astronomy. This John Crerar Library exhibit highlights works of art and literature influenced by astronomy, either through scientific study, a fascination with the night sky, or as an inspiration for the literary imagination. Both contemporary and historical works are included.

Citizen science workshop for students

citizen science imageAll UChicago students are invited to attend an introductory citizen science workshop on Thursday, April 27 from 12-2 p.m. led by Dr. Laura Trouille of Adler Planetarium and Zooniverse.

Citizen science—engaging the public in research—has proved a creative and capable response to the increasing size of scientific datasets, particularly when coupled with machine learning algorithms and sophisticated task allocation and retirement rules.

During the first hour of the workshop, pizza will be served, and Dr. Trouille will deliver a lecture about citizen science.

In the second hour, snacks will be served, and attendees can start exploring citizen science projects on Zooniverse or start building their own project with the easy to use project builder.

For more information about the workshop, visit the event page, or e-mail the Zar Symposium Committee (zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu).

Register for the workshop.

University to create computer and data science hub in John Crerar Library

Exterior view of the John Crerar Library building renovations

Exterior view of the John Crerar Library building renovations. (Illustration by Jennifer Fifield)

Renovations beginning this spring will provide a vibrant new home in the John Crerar Library building for the Department of Computer Science and the Computation Institute. Included as well are renovated library spaces to provide a range of research services for faculty and students on campus. Combined, these efforts will transform the building into an exciting campus hub for collaboration, instruction, research and support, especially around computing and data science.

The work on the building’s top two floors, which began in March, will create a state-of-the-art academic space including closed and open offices, conference rooms, spaces for experimental research, graduate student offices and a large gathering area for departmental seminars, workshops and distinguished speaker lectures. The design creates an interactive environment to support the collaborative integration of the Department of Computer Science with the Computation Institute and anticipates the changing needs of the department. Windows will be added to the building’s façade on the top floor and skylights to the roof in order to allow natural light into the deep floor plan.

On the first floor, the Computer Science Instructional Laboratory will be expanded to accommodate growing student interest and demand for Computer Science course offerings.

Crerar 1st floor rendering

Renovations to the building’s first floor will add a new services desk and a café. (Illustration by Jennifer Fifield)

“We are building a modern space that invites and fosters collaboration,” said Michael Franklin, the Liew Family Chair of Computer Science. “Computing is increasingly impacting all aspects of our lives, and data science is becoming central to a growing number of disciplines. These new spaces will attract people to build a community around these crucial technologies.”

The first floor will continue to serve users of the John Crerar Library. A new services desk in the lobby will be a gateway to library research services and the collections remaining in the building. A café will be built as part of the renovated lobby to provide an energizing place for informal interactions. These alterations, together with collaborative spaces and teaching/seminar spaces, will make the first floor a focal point for faculty and students across the University interested in learning, experimenting and working with new software, technologies, and programs around data science such as geographic information systems or GIS; collaborating on innovative and emerging programs around data-driven discovery and digital media; and accessing information and research resources.

“The library’s newly renovated spaces will allow us to continue providing excellent services and be a leader in new, innovative programs around data science and data-driven discovery that will support faculty and students across the campus.” said Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian.

Rendering of Crerar renovations

Renovations in the Crerar Library building will create a state-of-the-art academic space for the Department of Computer Science and the Computation Institute. (Illustration by Jennifer Fifield)

The library collections remaining in Crerar are located in high-density compact shelving on the lower level. Adjacent to the collections, in an area that receives natural light, a newly renovated space for quiet study, as well as group study rooms, will be created as part of the building project. Materials that have been relocated out of the building will continue to be available through the request feature in the Library’s online catalog.

The Department of Computer Science currently resides in the Ryerson Physical Laboratory building, and the Computation Institute is located in the Searle Chemistry Laboratory building. The scope of computing research and collaboration across campus has outgrown both spaces. The new Crerar project will help fulfill the University’s ambition of expanding and enhancing the Computer Science Department and creating opportunities for new and creative ways to engage and foster collaboration across different fields of research.

“We’ve planned this adaptive reuse project so that the entire campus can benefit from the changes at the Crerar Library,” said Executive Vice Provost Sian Beilock. “The renovation will help create inviting spaces and new opportunities for accessing and understanding information that bring students, faculty and staff together.”

A University of Chicago news release

Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, “Open Data: Science, Health, Community”

The 5th Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, Open Data: Science, Health, Community, will be held on Friday, April 28, 2017, at the University of Chicago’s John Crerar Library.

Open data is data that can be freely used, re-used and redistributed.   Some examples of open data resources include the Human Genome Project, the United Nations UNdata, and the City of Chicago data portal.  Open data can spur business innovation, help patients and families make better decisions about their health, or accelerate the pace of scientific discovery.

This symposium will provide participants–researchers and librarians–with an understanding of what open data is, how it gets created and shared, and examples of how open data might contribute to progress in our communities.

Registration and full schedule at: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/conferences/zar-symposium/

The symposium is a biennial event held at the John Crerar Library of the University of Chicago and made possible through the support of the Kathleen and Howard Zar Science Library Fund.

Zar GIS & Story Maps Prize for College Students

The Kathleen A. Zar GIS & Story Maps Prize for College students is now accepting submissions. First prize is $1500. Second prize is $500. Third prize is $300.

The deadline for submission is April 20, 2017.The Kathleen A. Zar GIS & Story Maps Prize

The prize acknowledges the ability of a University of Chicago student in the College to utilize GIS and spatial thinking to develop a digital narrative using Esri’s Story Maps applications. The prize organizers welcome submissions that provide spatial insights or narratives from all subjects and perspectives.

Visit the Zar GIS & Story Maps page for more information about submitting an entry. For questions about getting started with GIS and Story Maps, e-mail Resident Librarian for GIS Taylor Hixson (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu).

Crerar’s 2nd and 3rd floors close for renovations

Starting Monday, March 20, the 2nd and 3rd floors of Crerar Library will be inaccessible to Library users due to the start of renovations. Group study rooms will be unavailable, and study areas will be limited to the 1st floor and Crerar lounge. Both of these areas are collaborative zones. Quiet study at Crerar will resume when construction of a new lower level study space is completed.

Books and journals in Crerar are located on the lower level in compact shelving, with a selected reference and unbound journal collection on the 1st floor.  Additional science books and journals are located in the Mansueto Library.  Please check the Library Catalog for more information about specific items.

If you have any questions about finding material in the collection or the renovations, please contact Crerar Circulation or Director of the Science Libraries Barbara Kern (bkern@uchicago.edu).

Spatial Data & GIS Workshops

This spring Resident Librarian for GIS Taylor Hixson is hosting three introductory workshops about spatial data and geographic information systems (GIS).

Spatial Data Literacy

Date: Thursday, March 30 @ 4-5 p.m.
Register

This introductory workshop will cover what makes something spatial data, spatial data files that are compatible with geographic information systems (GIS), and best practices for keeping GIS projects organized.

Introduction to ArcGIS Online

Date: Thursday, April 6 @ 4-5:30 p.m.
Register

This hands-on workshop will give a basic introduction to the ArcGIS Online platform, including adding data to a map and creating web apps. If you’ve wanted to learn how to make an interactive map but don’t know how to code, don’t miss this workshop!

Finding Spatial Data

Date: Thursday, April 13 @ 4-5 p.m.
Register

Thousands of resources exist online for finding spatial data, but finding the right resource can be a challenge. This workshop will focus on techniques for finding spatial data, the top free and open resources online, and resources available through UChicago.

Crerar Lower Level Map

The workshops will be held on the lower level of Crerar Library. The entrance to the lower level is on the left-hand side of the vestibule, the area before the library gates. The classroom is behind the staircase.

E-mail Taylor (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu) with any questions about the workshops. If you are not able to attend the workshops but are interested in learning more about GIS and spatial data, check out the GIS Research Guide for helpful resources.