Exhibits They Saw Stars: Art and Astronomy – new web exhibit

SelenographiaAn archived web exhibit of the 2005 Crerar exhibit They Saw Stars: Art and Astronomy is now available.  The physical exhibit was shown in the atrium of Crerar Library from June 2 — November 1, 2005.

Exhibit Description: For centuries humankind has gazed into the heavens with awe and wonder. For some, the night sky has tugged at their imagination and piqued their curiosity, resulting in art inspired by the beauty of the stars and the study of astronomy. This John Crerar Library exhibit highlights works of art and literature influenced by astronomy, either through scientific study, a fascination with the night sky, or as an inspiration for the literary imagination. Both contemporary and historical works are included.

Citizen science workshop for students

citizen science imageAll UChicago students are invited to attend an introductory citizen science workshop on Thursday, April 27 from 12-2 p.m. led by Dr. Laura Trouille of Adler Planetarium and Zooniverse.

Citizen science—engaging the public in research—has proved a creative and capable response to the increasing size of scientific datasets, particularly when coupled with machine learning algorithms and sophisticated task allocation and retirement rules.

During the first hour of the workshop, pizza will be served, and Dr. Trouille will deliver a lecture about citizen science.

In the second hour, snacks will be served, and attendees can start exploring citizen science projects on Zooniverse or start building their own project with the easy to use project builder.

For more information about the workshop, visit the event page, or e-mail the Zar Symposium Committee (zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu).

Register for the workshop.

University to create computer and data science hub in John Crerar Library

Exterior view of the John Crerar Library building renovations

Exterior view of the John Crerar Library building renovations. (Illustration by Jennifer Fifield)

Renovations beginning this spring will provide a vibrant new home in the John Crerar Library building for the Department of Computer Science and the Computation Institute. Included as well are renovated library spaces to provide a range of research services for faculty and students on campus. Combined, these efforts will transform the building into an exciting campus hub for collaboration, instruction, research and support, especially around computing and data science.

The work on the building’s top two floors, which began in March, will create a state-of-the-art academic space including closed and open offices, conference rooms, spaces for experimental research, graduate student offices and a large gathering area for departmental seminars, workshops and distinguished speaker lectures. The design creates an interactive environment to support the collaborative integration of the Department of Computer Science with the Computation Institute and anticipates the changing needs of the department. Windows will be added to the building’s façade on the top floor and skylights to the roof in order to allow natural light into the deep floor plan.

On the first floor, the Computer Science Instructional Laboratory will be expanded to accommodate growing student interest and demand for Computer Science course offerings.

Crerar 1st floor rendering

Renovations to the building’s first floor will add a new services desk and a café. (Illustration by Jennifer Fifield)

“We are building a modern space that invites and fosters collaboration,” said Michael Franklin, the Liew Family Chair of Computer Science. “Computing is increasingly impacting all aspects of our lives, and data science is becoming central to a growing number of disciplines. These new spaces will attract people to build a community around these crucial technologies.”

The first floor will continue to serve users of the John Crerar Library. A new services desk in the lobby will be a gateway to library research services and the collections remaining in the building. A café will be built as part of the renovated lobby to provide an energizing place for informal interactions. These alterations, together with collaborative spaces and teaching/seminar spaces, will make the first floor a focal point for faculty and students across the University interested in learning, experimenting and working with new software, technologies, and programs around data science such as geographic information systems or GIS; collaborating on innovative and emerging programs around data-driven discovery and digital media; and accessing information and research resources.

“The library’s newly renovated spaces will allow us to continue providing excellent services and be a leader in new, innovative programs around data science and data-driven discovery that will support faculty and students across the campus.” said Brenda Johnson, Library Director and University Librarian.

Rendering of Crerar renovations

Renovations in the Crerar Library building will create a state-of-the-art academic space for the Department of Computer Science and the Computation Institute. (Illustration by Jennifer Fifield)

The library collections remaining in Crerar are located in high-density compact shelving on the lower level. Adjacent to the collections, in an area that receives natural light, a newly renovated space for quiet study, as well as group study rooms, will be created as part of the building project. Materials that have been relocated out of the building will continue to be available through the request feature in the Library’s online catalog.

The Department of Computer Science currently resides in the Ryerson Physical Laboratory building, and the Computation Institute is located in the Searle Chemistry Laboratory building. The scope of computing research and collaboration across campus has outgrown both spaces. The new Crerar project will help fulfill the University’s ambition of expanding and enhancing the Computer Science Department and creating opportunities for new and creative ways to engage and foster collaboration across different fields of research.

“We’ve planned this adaptive reuse project so that the entire campus can benefit from the changes at the Crerar Library,” said Executive Vice Provost Sian Beilock. “The renovation will help create inviting spaces and new opportunities for accessing and understanding information that bring students, faculty and staff together.”

A University of Chicago news release

Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, “Open Data: Science, Health, Community”

The 5th Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, Open Data: Science, Health, Community, will be held on Friday, April 28, 2017, at the University of Chicago’s John Crerar Library.

Open data is data that can be freely used, re-used and redistributed.   Some examples of open data resources include the Human Genome Project, the United Nations UNdata, and the City of Chicago data portal.  Open data can spur business innovation, help patients and families make better decisions about their health, or accelerate the pace of scientific discovery.

This symposium will provide participants–researchers and librarians–with an understanding of what open data is, how it gets created and shared, and examples of how open data might contribute to progress in our communities.

Registration and full schedule at: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/conferences/zar-symposium/

The symposium is a biennial event held at the John Crerar Library of the University of Chicago and made possible through the support of the Kathleen and Howard Zar Science Library Fund.

Zar GIS & Story Maps Prize for College Students

The Kathleen A. Zar GIS & Story Maps Prize for College students is now accepting submissions. First prize is $1500. Second prize is $500. Third prize is $300.

The deadline for submission is April 20, 2017.The Kathleen A. Zar GIS & Story Maps Prize

The prize acknowledges the ability of a University of Chicago student in the College to utilize GIS and spatial thinking to develop a digital narrative using Esri’s Story Maps applications. The prize organizers welcome submissions that provide spatial insights or narratives from all subjects and perspectives.

Visit the Zar GIS & Story Maps page for more information about submitting an entry. For questions about getting started with GIS and Story Maps, e-mail Resident Librarian for GIS Taylor Hixson (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu).

Crerar’s 2nd and 3rd floors close for renovations

Starting Monday, March 20, the 2nd and 3rd floors of Crerar Library will be inaccessible to Library users due to the start of renovations. Group study rooms will be unavailable, and study areas will be limited to the 1st floor and Crerar lounge. Both of these areas are collaborative zones. Quiet study at Crerar will resume when construction of a new lower level study space is completed.

Books and journals in Crerar are located on the lower level in compact shelving, with a selected reference and unbound journal collection on the 1st floor.  Additional science books and journals are located in the Mansueto Library.  Please check the Library Catalog for more information about specific items.

If you have any questions about finding material in the collection or the renovations, please contact Crerar Circulation or Director of the Science Libraries Barbara Kern (bkern@uchicago.edu).

Spatial Data & GIS Workshops

This spring Resident Librarian for GIS Taylor Hixson is hosting three introductory workshops about spatial data and geographic information systems (GIS).

Spatial Data Literacy

Date: Thursday, March 30 @ 4-5 p.m.
Register

This introductory workshop will cover what makes something spatial data, spatial data files that are compatible with geographic information systems (GIS), and best practices for keeping GIS projects organized.

Introduction to ArcGIS Online

Date: Thursday, April 6 @ 4-5:30 p.m.
Register

This hands-on workshop will give a basic introduction to the ArcGIS Online platform, including adding data to a map and creating web apps. If you’ve wanted to learn how to make an interactive map but don’t know how to code, don’t miss this workshop!

Finding Spatial Data

Date: Thursday, April 13 @ 4-5 p.m.
Register

Thousands of resources exist online for finding spatial data, but finding the right resource can be a challenge. This workshop will focus on techniques for finding spatial data, the top free and open resources online, and resources available through UChicago.

Crerar Lower Level Map

The workshops will be held on the lower level of Crerar Library. The entrance to the lower level is on the left-hand side of the vestibule, the area before the library gates. The classroom is behind the staircase.

E-mail Taylor (taylorhixson@uchicago.edu) with any questions about the workshops. If you are not able to attend the workshops but are interested in learning more about GIS and spatial data, check out the GIS Research Guide for helpful resources.

Crerar Library Extended Hours March 10th and 11th

Ahead of Winter quarter finals week, Crerar Library will be open extended hours during the University’s reading period, Friday and Saturday March 10th and 11th. On both days the hours will be 8am – 12am. Service desk hours will remain the same. For hours on other dates or at other libraries, visit http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu/.

New app lets users check out Library materials with their phones

The University of Chicago Library has launched a new mobile app, Checkout UChicago, that lets users check out Library materials using their phones or tablets.

Checkout UChicago allows students, faculty members, staff, and others with borrowing privileges at the University of Chicago Library to scan an item’s barcode with their phone and instantly check it out to their Library account.

Checkout UChicago app on a phone in the bookstacks

A phone displaying the Checkout UChicago start screen

Students with lockers and faculty members with studies in Regenstein will be able to check out materials and store them without having to bring them to Circulation.

Users who want to leave the Library with their items can use the self-service Deactivation Station at the Circulation desk in Regenstein. At other campus libraries, users can bring items to Circulation staff for deactivation.

Download the app

Checkout UChicago is available for download for both iOS and Android devices.

Gift for new users

The first 100 UChicago students and faculty members to check out a book with this app will receive a $3 credit to their UChicago Card in Maroon Dollars.  They will receive an email notifying them when the credit has been applied.

Library staff, including student staff, are not eligible for this promotion.

Science Writing Prize for College Students

science writing prizeThe Science Writing Prize for College Students is accepting submissions for 2017. First prize is $1500. Second prize is $500. Third prize is $300.

Deadline for submission is April 10, 2017.

This competitive award for excellence and clarity in science writing acknowledges the ability of a University of Chicago College student to produce a paper, on a scientific topic, which is thorough in its arguments but accessible to a broad readership.

For more information please visit: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/crerar/about-crerar-library/crerar-prize/

Call for proposals – Zar Symposium 2017

Open Data: Science, Health, Community
5th Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium
April 28, 2017
The John Crerar Library
The University of Chicago

Web Page: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/conferences/zar-symposium/
Email: zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu
#zarsymposium
@CrerarLibrary

Call for proposals

The organizers of the 5th biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, Open Data: Science, Health, Community, to be held Friday, April 28, invite proposals for presentations that provide insight into open data projects and initiatives, whether established or newly created, which have an impact on science, health, or community.  The focus may be, but is not limited to, opportunities for libraries and information professionals to contribute to or play an active role in projects or initiatives.

The organizers are interested in presentations that provide examples of collaborative efforts between institutions, groups, or individuals, with a focus on practical, real use cases of using open data.  Proposals selected for full oral presentations will be eligible for travel stipend.

Proposals should be submitted online at: http://bit.do/zar2017. Proposals must include a title, author(s), and abstract (maximum 600 words).  Presentations will be 30-45 minutes. The deadline for submission is Wednesday, March 8th.

Please consider the following questions when preparing proposals:

* How has your institution or community engaged with open data?
* If you led an open data project or initiative, how and why was it initiated, and what were the results?
* What are the opportunities and challenges of using or collecting open data?
* How are responsibilities determined and distributed?
* What kinds of tools and techniques may be used?

The symposium organizers will also consider interactive alternatives to a traditional oral presentations.

The intended audience of the symposium includes all who are involved or interested in open data, with a focus on, but not limited to, academic institutions.

About the Symposium:

Open data is data that can be freely used, re-used and redistributed.   Some examples of open data resources include the Human Genome Project, the United Nations UNdata, and the City of Chicago data portal.  Open data can spur business innovation, help patients and families make better decisions about their health, or accelerate the pace of scientific discovery.  This symposium will provide participants with an understanding of what open data is, how it gets created and shared, and examples of how open data might contribute to progress in our communities.

For more information, contact the symposium organizers at: zarsymposium@lib.uchicago.edu

 

Join us for Love Your Data week, Feb. 12-17

The Library is celebrating international Love Your Data week, February 12-17. The purpose of the Love Your Data (LYD) campaign is to raise awareness and build a community to engage on topics related to research data management, sharing, preservation, reuse, and library-based research data services. We will share practical tips, resources, and stories to help researchers at any stage in their career use good data practices.

Learn more about loving your data with events held at the John Crerar Library and on social media.

Monday, February 13: Defining Data Quality

In 2015, the popular WBEZ podcast This American Life published a message retracting an episode. The episode featured an article published in Science, a highly respected peer-reviewed journal, about the success of canvassing. However, the data in the article was falsified.

How, as researchers, can we recognize good research and bad research? The most elemental way to verify a scholar’s claim is to analyze their data. In day 1 of Love Your Data week, we’ll be sharing resources to help you define good data and spot bad data. Follow Crerar Library on Twitter (@Crerar Library) for resources and case studies in defining good data.

You can also read David Brockman’s (Stanford) claim that the original article contained fake data, or listen to This American Life’s recap of the original story and updates featuring researchers replicating the canvassing experiment.

Tuesday, February 14: Documenting, Describing, Defining

Good data documentation is important for so many reasons. Most notably, though, it makes analysis and write-up stages of your project easier and less stressful and improves the integrity of your scholarly research. On Tuesday, you can learn the basics of data documentation by attending our library workshop in the Crerar Computer Classroom from 4 to 5 p.m., or by following Crerar Library Twitter (@CrerarLibrary) for resources and horror stories on data organization gone wrong.

You can also learn more about documenting, describing, and defining by visiting the Library’s guides on Author and Research Identifiers and Data Management.

Wednesday, February 15: Good Data

When data is good, it is findable, accessible, interoperable, and re-usable (FAIR). For example, this dataset is still around and usable more than 50 years after the data were collected and more than 40 years after it was last used in a publication. Today, we’re asking you to share your favorite data set with us. How and why is it good for your project?

Try out the FAIR Principles to describe and share examples of good data for your discipline. Tell us on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram (#loveyourdata)!

Thursday, February 16: Finding the Right Data

In a 2004 Science Daily News article, the National Science Foundation used the phrase “here there be data” to highlight the exploratory nature of traversing the “untamed” scientific data landscape. The use of that phrase harkens to older maps of the world where unexplored territories or areas on maps bore the warning “here, there be monsters” to alert explorers to the dangers of the unknown. While the research data landscape is (slightly) less foreboding, there’s still an adventurous quality to looking for research data. Learn the best ways to find data using library resources by attending our second library workshop in the Crerar Computer Classroom from 12:30 to 1 p.m. or by following Crerar Library on Twitter (@CrerarLibrary) to hear about our librarians’ favorite data sources.

Additionally, we invite you to explore the Library’s guide on Finding Data with library resources.

Friday, February 17: Rescuing Unloved Data

In 2015, The Atlantic published a story of a journalist, who, after being named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for a 34-part news series, lost his publication to the Internet. Digital data loss can happen instantly. However, thanks to #datarefuge and Internet Archive, websites and legacy data are being preserved.

Securing legacy data takes time, resources and expertise but is well worth the effort as old data can enable new research and the loss of data could impede future research. The library provides resources to help the campus community secure data via our institutional repository: Knowledge@UChicago. Contact us to learn more.

 

Help the Library improve services for College students by taking survey

Update: March 3 is the final day to take this survey.Complete our undergraduate survey by March 3

The University of Chicago Library is conducting a survey of currently enrolled undergraduates. The survey explores many facets of students’ experience at the University, with specific focus on the ways the Library’s collections, services, spaces, and staff contribute to students’ higher education and career goals.

Previous surveys conducted by the Library resulted in the implementation of the Library’s Scan and Deliver service, as well as the creation of new group study spaces in Regenstein Library. Results gathered from the Library’s last survey of undergraduates, conducted in February 2011, are available online.

The survey was distributed by email on February 7. Undergraduates, please check your email for a message from the University of Chicago Library with your individualized link to the survey.

For more information or to report problems with the survey, please contact the project team by email at ithaka@lib.uchicago.edu.

Exhibits Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic and Medicine

Illustration of an alchemy workshopJanuary 23 – March 4, 2017
Location: Crerar Library First Floor

The magic in J. K. Rowling’s series of Harry Potter novels is partially based on Renaissance traditions that played an important role in the development of Western science, including alchemy, astrology, and natural philosophy.  This traveling exhibit, Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine explores the intersection of these worlds, featuring highlights from the collections of the History of Medicine Division at the National Library of Medicine.

 

Watch Dr. Mindy Schwartz describe an 1887 surgical kit in Special Collections

Dr. Mindy A. Schwartz, Professor of Medicine and Associate Program Director for Internal Medicine at the University of Chicago, went live on Facebook to talk about a surgical kit in the Special Collections Research Center. The kit, once owned by Dr. Thomas Burrows in 1887, is one of Dr. Schwartz’s favorite items to use when she teaches classes on the history of medicine.

Stay tuned for more videos of UChicago faculty discussing their favorite items in the Special Collections Research Center.

Dr. Mindy Schwartz discusses one of her favorite objects in Special Collections: an 1887 surgical kit.

Posted by University of Chicago Special Collections Research Center on Friday, January 20, 2017

Visible Body now available

Visible Body image of skull

Visible Body is a suite of 5 anatomy applications with interactive 3D models and animations:

  • Human Anatomy Atlas
  • Muscle Premium
  • Skeleton Premium
  • Heart & Circulatory Premium
  • Physiology Animations

It is available online and via mobile apps for iOS and Android devices.  App download instructions are here: http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/medicine/mobile

 

Exhibits Shared Past, Shared Future: The Marine Biological Laboratory and the University of Chicago – new web exhibit

Shared Past, Shared Future – web exhibit

whitman and MBL investigatorsThe recent affiliation between UChicago and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) is the latest chapter in the long, intertwined history of the two institutions. Charles Otis Whitman, the first director of the MBL, also established biology at the University. Frank Lillie, Zoology chair, became the second director and remained president of the MBL corporation until 1942. Today, as the institutions draw closer, we highlight and celebrate our shared history.

Top 100 articles of 2016 according to Altmetric

Altmetric has released its list of the top 100 articles of 2016, and the #1 article was written by a former UChicago faculty member (and soon-to-be former POTUS): Altmetric donut

Obama B. United States Health Care Reform: Progress to Date and Next Steps. JAMA. 2016;316(5):525-532. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.9797

The list is based on each article’s Attention Score, which is calculated by the conversations about the article that occur in places like news outlets, blogs, Twitter, Facebook and more.  The article above had a score of 8063; it is the number inside an Altmetric “donut” pictured here.

Read more about various research metrics on the Research Impact guide: http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/researchimpact

New Human Genome Resources site now available

The new Human Genome Resources site offers access to visualization and analysis tools available for the human genome, as well as other relevant tools like BLAST, the NCBI remapping service and databases that provide human molecular data. The resources are sorted into categories like Find, View, Download and Learn, making it easier to find what you need.

With the new site, you can:

In addition, the portal includes an extensive listing of learning resources that may help you have a better understanding of the wealth of information associated with the human genome.

Abstracts for 35th International Geological Congress available online

half-banner

The 35th International Geological Congress (IGC) took place 27 Aug – 4 Sep 2016 in Cape Town, South Africa.  Abstracts of the scientific program are available online on the American Geological Institute (AGI) website.  Other information about the IGC, including field trip descriptions and reports is available on the main conference website.

The 36th IGC will take place in New Delhi, India in 2020.

Library resources on sandhill cranes

Group of sandhill cranes taking flight

Sandhill cranes at Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Dale Garrison/USFWS

Flocks of sandhill cranes passed over Chicago yesterday during their fall migration, filling the air with their raspy, raucous calls. As  some of the largest birds in North America and with some of the widest wingspans of all the birds on the North American continent their migration is particularly striking. To learn more about sandhill cranes, check out some of the resources available from the web and in the Library.

Birds of North America / http://www.birds-of-north-america.net/cranes.html

The Sandhill Cranes / Lawrence Walkinshaw, 1949

Sandhill and whooping cranes : ancient voices over America’s wetlands / Paul A. Johnsgard, 2011
Print version also available

Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge comprehensive conservation plan / U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, 2006

Among the thousands of sandhill cranes seen over Chicago yesterday, observers also reported seeing a few whooping cranes, an endangered species.  Efforts are underway to re-establish a migratory flock of these birds.

Publishers require ORCID iDs for submitting authors

ORCID logoWiley, the Royal Society of Chemistry, and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) have each signed ORCID’s Open Letter and announced their new requirement of an ORCID iD for all submitting authors as part of the manuscript submission process.

An ORCID id (Open Researcher and Contributor iD), is a persistent, unique, numeric identifier for individual researchers and creators. It distinguishes individual researchers with the same (or very similar) name and supports automated linkages between a researcher and their research activities. A researcher’s ORCID record, which includes their ORCiD identifier, holds non-sensitive information such as name, organization, and research activities.

Learn more about ORCID and how to create your
own ORCID iD at http://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/ORCID

Map Collection extends hours, GIS assistance

The Regenstein Library Map Collection has extended its hours Monday through Thursday: now opening at 10 a.m.

In addition to regular Map Collection use, between 10 a.m. and 12 p.m. Monday through Thursday during the academic quarter, GIS Resident Librarian Taylor Hixson will offer walk-in GIS assistance to patrons.

Taylor can assist walk-in patrons by:

  • identifying spatial data resources
  • helping organize, format, and join spatial datasets
  • finding journal articles, books, and other research about GIS
  • providing basic instruction for desktop GIS and web mapping tools
  • consulting with patrons about planning and managing spatial data research
  • linking patrons with advanced spatial analysis and computing centers at the university

Taylor is also available for scheduled GIS consultations in Crerar Library. To schedule a GIS consultation, e-mail her at taylorhixson@uchicago.edu.

The Map Collection is located on the third floor of Regenstein Library, and during the academic quarters its hours of operation are Monday-Thursday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday 12 -5 p.m.  Hours during interims are Monday-Friday 12-5 p.m.

Extended Library hours Dec. 2–4

Mansueto Library at sunsetTo support students preparing for finals, Crerar, Mansueto and Regenstein will extend weekend building hours during reading period and finals week.

Mansueto will be open Friday, December 2 and Saturday, December 3 until 11:45 p.m. Crerar and Regenstein will be open these days until midnight.

The Regenstein 1st floor all-night study space will be open 24 hours from Monday, November 28 until the end of finals on Friday, December 9.

For a full list of library hours, see http://hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

New: MathSciNet on Ebscohost Platform

mathscinetThe Ebscohost platform now offers a search interface for MathSciNet.  This new interface offers some features not available on the AMS platform, particularly a more flexible search. However, some elements available on the AMS platform are lacking.  Below is a comparison of some key differences:

Simple Search

Ebscohost also a simple search box as the default search.  This search is easier to use for students less familiar with field searching and more familiar with Google.  Use the advanced search to access fields for more precise searching.

Author Search

The Ebscohost interface offers a more flexible author search than the AMS version.  Commas delineating first and last name are not necessary on the Ebscohost platform, nor is the last name first name order necessary.  The Ebscohost platform will also search for an author affiliation in the author search field.  E.g. a search for the name “Brandeis” include authors from that university.

Math Subject Classification Search (MSC)

Instead of using subject word tagging for content, MathSciNet has a unique Mathematics Subject Classification (MSC) which uses a number-letter-number code to classify subjects.  The AMS interface will search the first part of the code or the first and second together.  But Ebscohost has not adopted this search method and instead appears to search the code as a string anywhere in the MSC, returning significantly different results.

For more information, consult this in depth study of the differences between the two interfaces.