People Apply for the Library Student Advisory Group

Mansueto Library at sunset

Mansueto Library (Photo by Tom Rossiter)

Applications due October 23, 2016.

The Library Student Advisory Group serves as a formal channel of communication between students and the Library administration. The group assists in making specific recommendations to improve the Library and considers proposals for future changes in services. The Library Student Advisory Group meets two times a quarter and representatives serve two-year terms.

We are looking for student representatives from the College (Class of 2020) and from each of the Graduate Divisions and Professional Schools.

Please complete our online application by October 23, 2016.

For more information about the Library Student Advisory Group, or the application process, please contact:

Rebecca Starkey
Librarian for College Instruction & Outreach


People Meet new Geographic Information Systems Librarian Taylor Hixson

taylor-hixson2Taylor Hixson has joined the University of Chicago Library as the new Resident Librarian for Geographic Information Systems.

Taylor has an M.S. degree in Information Sciences from the University of Tennessee and B.S. in Mass Communications from Middle Tennessee State University.

Barbara Kern interviewed Taylor about her experiences and plans for her work at UChicago.

Q: Taylor, what originally got you interested in GIS?

When I was an undergraduate studying journalism I took a data journalism class, and I remember a class assignment where I had to use Google Fusion tables to map addresses. I was really impressed with how creating a simple, interactive map could add another level to the news and storytelling.

Q:  How have you worked with researchers at the University of Tennessee–Knoxville or elsewhere with GIS?

When I was at UT I was always trying to incorporate more GIS or spatial information into projects I worked on. For example, when I worked on an ecology database project there I ensured all records I worked on were accurately georeferenced in the metadata, and when I was doing a practicum with Department of Energy contractors, I spent a lot of time compiling variations on place names for better database searching.

Additionally, when I was at UT, the university became a partner with the Department of State’s new Diplomacy Lab initiative. Through that I worked on a team with several other students and a faculty member to create a report and an interactive map for State and humanitarian agencies to use.

 Q: You worked for the Department of State as a Virtual Foreign Service Intern on a humanitarian aid mapping project.  Tell us about that.

Working as a VSFS intern was a great experience. I volunteered for a year with other students from across the country on different humanitarian mapping projects for the Officer of the Geographer’s MapGive program. I learned a lot about working collaboratively on geographic information projects and how to help others learn about gateways into GIS through simple citizen mapping projects such as editing OpenStreetMap.

VSFS helped me gain more practical experience and connections without having to spend time abroad or in D.C. I highly recommend that UChicago students in the College or graduate and professional programs consider  participating in VSFS–especially in one of the many mapping and GIS internships.

 Q: How will you work with faculty and students in your role?

I intend to collaborate with students and faculty across the divisions at UChicago. It is my goal to host workshops for faculty and students or to provide classroom instruction to introduce concepts of GIS and resources UChicago has available, whether that is access to online tools, databases, or research centers.

Overall, I want to be a central resource for anyone on campus needing a launch pad for GIS, from those getting started with GIS, who want to find books or learn some introductory tools, to more advanced researchers, who want to create geospatial metadata or have questions about publishing scholarly literature in the top GIS journals.

Q: What are the key challenges or trends in GIS for researchers and librarians?

For librarians, I think a key challenge is always the findability of data. Findability has gotten better with the federal government’s efforts through and metadata standards, but the novice GIS user who starts at Google may be overwhelmed with how to search for data, what data formats to find, and where to find them.

For both researchers and librarians, usability and accessibility of interactive maps on the web is a big challenge. For example, not everyone is making their maps compliant for users with screen readers and other adaptive technology even if the option to incorporate web accessibility is readily available through the mapping application.

I also think that understanding the value and reliability of data collected is another challenge for researchers and librarians to continue to consider.

GIS in the digital humanities is another trend, and one that I do not see going away. It is enabling researchers in the humanities to carve their niche by performing a type of analysis that may have never been done before and changing, challenging, or reinforcing previous research findings.

Q: Are you ready to face a Chicago winter?

I already bought a parka and snow boots, so in some ways, yes, but mentally, I’ll probably never be ready.

Site of radiocarbon dating discovery named historic landmark

Photo of Willard Libby

Willard F. Libby, professor of Chemistry at the University of Chicago, receives the 1951 Research Corporation Award for his radiocarbon dating process at a dinner held in the Waldorf Astoria Hotel. [University of Chicago Photographic Archive, [apf1-03870], Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

A ceremony was held in yesterday in historic Kent Chemical Laboratory to commemorate the discovery of radiocarbon dating—an innovative and broadly applied method to measure the age of organic materials.  This year marks the 70th anniversary of University of Chicago professor Willard F. Libby’s first publication (W. F. Libby, “Atmospheric Helium Three and Radiocarbon from Cosmic Radiation,” Phys. Rev. 69, 671-2, DOI: on radiocarbon dating, which appeared in the June 1, 1946 issue of Physical Review.  The work earned Libby the 1960 Nobel Prize in chemistry which recognized his accomplishments in the development of a “method to use carbon-14 for age for determinations in archaeology, geology, geophysics and other branches of science.”

More information about Libby’s discovery can be found at the National Historic Chemical Landmark radiocarbon dating page:

For further reading, the Library has a broad variety of books and other resources dealing with the subject of radiocarbon dating.  The following are a few examples:

Radiocarbon dating / by Willard F. Libby [2d ed.]
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, [1955]

Radiocarbon dating : an archaeological perspective. / by Taylor, R. E. (Royal Ervin) [2nd ed.]
Walnut Creek, California : Left Coast Press, Inc., [2014]

Before civilization: the radiocarbon revolution and prehistoric Europe. / by Renfrew, Colin [1st American ed.]
New York, Knopf, [1973]

Library seeks students to provide input on new website

The University of Chicago Library seeks current students willing to participate in a usability study of the Library’s new website. Sessions will last no more than 60 minutes, and participants will receive an gift card with a value of $10. Sessions will be held at Regenstein Library.

Students using laptops in Ex LibrisIf interested, please contact Emma Boettcher, User Experience Resident Librarian, at Please mention:

  1. Your name.
  2. Your status (undergraduate or graduate) and department or major. If you are an undergraduate, please indicate your year, and whether you have started work on your BA paper.
  3. Three hour-long time slots between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. from October 10 to October 14 that you are available to meet.

Participants must be at least 18 years of age, and may not be current Library employees.

Using Crerar Library during Fall Quarter

Plans are currently under development to modify the use of space within the John Crerar Library. Following renovations, the first and lower floors will be comprised of critical library space with associated research support services and selected collections, public and study spaces, and teaching/seminar spaces. These floors will also serve as a home for innovative programs around data science and data-driven discovery that will support faculty and students across the University. The upper floors of Crerar will provide space for the Department of Computer Science and associated programs.

The John Crerar LibraryPreparations for these renovations are now underway, and access to the upper two floors and the lower level of Crerar Library will be limited at various times during Fall and Winter Quarters.

During these times, the first floor of Crerar Library will remain open and library services will be available. The Computer Science Instructional Laboratory (CSIL) on Crerar’s 1st Floor will remain available to users during this time.

As part of the renovation, selected materials from the collections are being temporarily moved to the Mansueto Library until a suitable long-term location is identified. The movement of materials will continue into the Winter Quarter. Materials that remain in Crerar will be located on the lower level. The moving of collections is taking place Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. and will produce some noise. The lower level stacks area will not be open to users during this time.  Signage in the building will notify users of spaces that are closed.

During this time, if you are unable to locate or access material in the collections that you are interested in, please consult with Crerar staff for assistance.  If the item is temporarily unavailable, Library staff will automatically request a copy for you via Interlibrary Loan. Material that has been relocated to Mansueto can be requested through a link in the Library Catalog just like any other Mansueto material.

In the coming months the University will be completing plans for the John Crerar Library and the Department of Computer Science, and we look forward to sharing those details when they are available.

Library orientations, tours, and welcome programs

The Library offers a number of orientations, tours, and special programs during the first weeks of the quarter, tailored to graduate students in various programs, and College students and their families. Below are some of the upcoming orientation opportunities. Click on a session to view details.

Library Orientations for the College

Library Boot Camp

Librarian teaching a class

Photo by Jason Smith.

The John Crerar Library: Science Information You Want, Resources You Need

Library Reception for New Students and Families

Econ 101: An Introduction to Library Resources

Library Orientations for Graduate Students

Center for Latin American Studies Orientation

 Orientation for Computational Social Sciences

 English Department Orientation

Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences (MAPSS) and Committee on International Relations (CIR) Library Orientation

Romance Languages & Literature Orientation

For programs and departments other than those listed, please contact the appropriate subject specialist.

Feature Story Online Library orientation: Learn the basics from home

Welcome to the University of Chicago! As the heart of campus, the Library offers much more than books. The Library’s work is to provide comprehensive resources and dynamic services to support the research, teaching, and learning needs of the University community. You are invited to explore the Library’s extensive collections, services, and spaces by visiting our website, reviewing our orientation guide or watching online tutorials.

Library website

Over the summer, the University of Chicago Library launched a redesign of the Library’s website. The redesign was informed by University faculty, students, and staff, has improved navigation, and is mobile-friendly.

Learn about the site’s most notable features and improvements by watching a brief video.

After you explore the site, the Library would love to hear your feedback. Please report any issues using our feedback form.  The Library plans to continue refining the site as feedback is received and user experience testing is conducted.

Orientation guide

Librarian helps student

A librarian shows a research guide to a student. (Photo by Jason Smith)

Designed to give a preview of all the Library has to offer, the Library’s orientation guide helps new members of campus navigate the Library’s expansive collections, meet with a librarian, and reserve a study space.

The guide, while comprehensive, is no substitute for the variety of on-campus orientation sessions that the Library offers. Incoming students are invited to participate in tailored Library orientations hosted by librarians. These orientation sessions, combined with the orientation guide, provide new students with a jump-start on resources and services to help them succeed.

A listing of orientation programs can be found on the Library’s Workshop and Events Calendar. If you cannot make an orientation program, get assistance learning about the Library and conducting your research from our Ask a Librarian service, via live chat, email, phone, or in person.

Online tutorials

The University of Chicago Library has a suite of video tutorials to help you learn how to be an effective researcher. Videos cover skills such as searching the Library Catalog, requesting materials from other libraries, and accessing library resources off-campus. The Library’s video tutorials are available 24/7, allowing you to troubleshoot any issues you have day or night.

Watch all of the Library’s current videos on the Library’s YouTube channel. To learn more about the Library’s online learning initiatives, visit the Library website or contact an online learning librarian.

Exhibits Discovering the Beauty and Charm of the Wilderness: Chicago Connections to the National Park Service – new web exhibit

bear and professor

Bear in Wyoming’s Yellowstone National Park fed by George Damon Fuller, professor of Botany at the University of Chicago. From: From the Photographic Archive. Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library. Identifer: apf8-04534

Discovering the Beauty and Charm of the Wilderness -web exhibit

The National Park Service offers a rich variety of landforms, flora, and fauna that have been the subject of many University of Chicago scientific studies.  The parks have also served as inspiration for art, photography and literature. To mark the National Park Service’s 100-year anniversary, we delve into the Library’s archives and rare collections to uncover Chicago connections to the parks.



Exploring the new Library website

See where you can search the Library Catalog; discover a Library expert; locate journals, databases and articles; and consult research guides curated by Library subject specialists in this video exploring the new Library website.

You can also learn more about the new website on the Library News site.  Get assistance navigating the site and conducting your research from our Ask a Librarian service, via live chat, email, phone, or in person, and give us feedback on the new site design as you explore for yourself.

New Science Research Guides

WeImage of scientist have two new science guides to help you gain access to valuable research and disseminate and track your own research.

The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is a part of the National Library of Medicine.  You might be familiar with the biomedical literature database, PubMed, but did you know that NCBI supports 40 other databases with biomedical and genomic information? The NCBI Resources guide has been populated with general  information about navigating NCBI resources and information about features and data sources you can find in specific databases, such as Gene and Protein.

In the Research Impact guide you’ll find an introduction to the concept, tools which measure research impact, including Scopus and Web of Science, and a description of different metrics.  These include author metrics like the h-index as well as journal level metrics like the journal impact factor.

Crerar circulation hours during summer interim

In addition to shortened building hours, the Crerar circulation desk will change for the summer interim. We will be closed Sunday, June 12, and open from 8:30 am to 5 pm Monday, June 13, through Friday, June 17, and 9 am to 5 pm Saturday, June 18. Summer quarter circulation hours start Sunday, June 19, from Noon to 5 pm.

See for a full listing of library hours.

Library summer interim hours, June 11- 19

Beginning Saturday, June 11, the Library will have reduced building hours at all of its locations for the summer interim. Summer quarter hours will begin Monday, June 20.

Crerar Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Friday – Sunday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

D’Angelo Law Library Circulation
Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Eckhart Library
Monday – Friday noon – 5 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Mansueto Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 7:45 p.m.
Friday 8 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday noon – 4:45 p.m.

Regenstein Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Friday  – Saturday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sunday noon – 5 p.m.

Regenstein All-Night Study
Closed until September 27 at 1 a.m.

SSA Library
Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see

New Library website launches July 5

Update: The Library will be launching the new website described below starting at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 5. Site visitors should expect service interruptions throughout the evening, and, because the changes will take time to propagate over the internet, some users may be unable to reach the site through July 6.

Access to resources outside of the main Library website should continue uninterrupted during this time. These include:

Thank you for your patience as we roll out these changes.


The University of Chicago Library will launch a new website over the summer.  The new site’s improved navigation and mobile-friendly design will provide faculty and students with ready access to curated, scholarly information and research expertise.

Changes to the design and structure of the new Library website are being made in response to the needs and feedback of UChicago faculty, students, and staff. The new site will be optimized for both desktop and mobile use, with a modern look and feel. It is being made easier to browse and navigate by

  • providing streamlined access to search tools for articles, journals, and databases;
  • providing more consistent navigation across the top of the site’s pages;
  • reorganizing information into categories developed directly from user input;
  • making it easier to find information about distinctive collections, exhibitions, study spaces, hours, and locations; and
  • connecting related collections, tools, and experts, making it easier for users to take advantage of the wealth of information and services offered by the Library.

In addition, Library news will be presented in a more engaging way on the site, and pages will be optimized for discovery via Google or other search engines.

The current Library Catalog, launched in 2014, is not being redesigned as a part of this project.

The new Library website will first go live in mid-summer and will be further refined in the weeks leading up to fall orientation.  During this period, if you have any difficulty finding the information you are looking for, librarians will be happy to assist you via our Ask a Librarian service.

The University of Chicago Library website serves as a gateway to UChicago collections and licensed resources; the online Ask a Librarian service, including live chat; Library staff with expertise in a wide range of subjects; research guides in numerous fields; and videos and guides explaining how to conduct research using library resources.

Summer research tips

Whether you are on campus or away from Chicago, the University of Chicago Library provides many resources and services available to help support your research during the summer.

Access to Online Resources
The Library’s electronic resources (including ebooks and ejournals) may be accessed no matter where you are located this summer. Learn how to connect to our online resources from off-campus.

Finding the Best Research Tools
Library Guides, many created by subject librarians, provide guidance on how to locate the best resources for a particular field or major. The Library also provides help guides on finding specific types of sources, such as newspapers or data.

Scan and Deliver
Do you need to read an article or essay in a book that is not available online? Use our Scan and Deliver service to request a copy be sent to you via e-mail.

Photo of a Librarian

Librarians are available during the summer to help you–in person or remotely via our Ask a Librarian service. Photo by Jason Smith.

Reciprocal Borrowing Agreements
The Library has reciprocal borrowing agreements with several academic libraries which allow UChicago students and faculty to borrow books directly from their collections. These include libraries in Borrow Direct Plus, as well as several Chicago-area institutions, including Northwestern.

Visiting Other Libraries
If you need to visit libraries and archives outside our reciprocal agreements, view our guide to doing research at other libraries before your visit. You’ll find tips on how to access different institutions, and strategies for identifying relevant collections.

Learn About Citation Managers
Summer is an ideal time to learn how citation managers can ease your research process.  Use citation managers such as Zotero or EndNote to organize your research and create footnotes and bibliographies automatically for your paper.  View our online tutorial for Zotero or guides to learn more about these tools.

Ask a Librarian/Reference Services
Librarians are on hand throughout the summer to help you with your research. Contact them directly via our Ask a Librarian service.  Or, if you are staying in Chicago, this may be a good time to schedule a consultation with a librarian who can suggest sources and research strategies for your project.

Graduating? Services and Tools to Support Your Research
Alumni can continue to visit and use our campus libraries if they live in the Chicago area. The Library and Alumni Association provide off-campus access to select research databases for alumni. For additional resources, the Library has a guide listing free online research tools that are available to anyone.

Memorial Day: Eckhart and SSA libraries closed, other campus libraries remain open

On Monday, May 30, Eckhart and SSA libraries will be closed for the Memorial Day holiday.

Crerar, D’Angelo Law, Mansueto, and Regenstein libraries will be open during their regular building hours. The All-Night Study Space on the 1st Floor of Regenstein will also remain open.

All About Endnote (Desktop Version), Monday, May 9, 4-5 PM

When: Monday, May 9, 2016 4:005:00 p.m.
Where: Crerar Library, Computer Classroom
5730 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL
Description: EndNote is a research management tool used to manage citations, PDFs, and create formatted bibliographies as you write your paper. In this workshop, learn how to use the desktop version of EndNote. Topics covered include: creating and managing citation libraries, importing citations from online databases and other sources, importing and managing PDFs and creating bibliographies. Registration is required.

Contact: John Crerar Library
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Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Physical Sciences Data Repositories

Guide to Data Repositories

The Library has put together a guide to data repositories  which includes a Physical Sciences Data Repositories guide  Please feel free to suggest any additional repositories you are using to store your data or to find new data sets.  We are also interested in your knowledge about discipline specific metadata schema and would appreciate hearing from you about the schema you use most often in your research.


Kudos: Kudos is a free service for researchers to increase readership and the impact of your research.  With the creation of your Kudos account and linking your author identifiers, like ORCID, you’ll be able to share your work and retrieve multiple metrics relating to your publications including page views, citations, full text downloads, and social media metrics (alternative (alt) metrics). You can sign up for your free account by visiting the site

Why manage your data?

Access Your Favorite Journal Articles Using Browzine

BrowZine logo

Try BrowZine for the iPad during February

If you haven’t yet tried BrowZine yet, today would be a good day to check it out.  BrowZine is a service that allows you to browse, read and follow thousands of the library’s scholarly journals.  The Library has recently expanded its BrowZine subscription to include web access from your desktop computer as well as Android mobile devices, in addition to the original iOS mobile device apps. You can keep track of your favorite journals and discover new developments in your field wherever you are.

To learn more or to go ahead and start using BrowZine today, simply visit or download the app from the Apple App Store, Google Play Store or Amazon App Store.  There is also a BrowZine LibGuide with more information, an introductory video, and links to download the apps.

With BrowZine, you can:

– Browse and read journals: Browse journals by subject, easily review tables of contents, and download full articles

– Use the durable linking capability of to easily link to specific “shelves” in BrowZine from your courseware to help guide students to complete assignments, such as familiarizing themselves with journals in their field and writing a summary article or research paper about the material they find.

In the mobile app, you can create a personal experience as well:

– Create your own bookshelf: Add journals to your personal bookshelf and be notified when new articles are published

– Save and export articles: Save articles for off-line reading or export to services such as DropBox, Mendeley, RefWorks, Zotero, Papers and more

UpToDate access issues

We have been experiencing some access issues with UpToDate (UTD) and working closely with the vendor to fix them.  We apologize for this inconvenience.  Here is a summary of the circumstances under which UTD does, and does not, work.

UpToDate does not currently work:

  • On a computer/laptop when using a non-proxied link (i.e. not a Library link to UTD).
  • On a mobile device via the UpToDate website, whether using a proxied link or signing in with a personal account.
  • The Log In / Register link (i.e. the personal account) does not currently work on a computer/laptop or a mobile device.

UpToDate does currently work:

  • On a computer/laptop using the Library’s proxied link: the prominent message “Your clinical information system is not properly configured to integrate with UpToDate” and use the search box as usual.
  • On a mobile device via the UTD app.  If you do not already have the app, you cannot install it until the personal account feature is functional.

NOTE: The Library’s proxied link also works remotely; you will be prompted to sign in with a CNetID or UCHADID when not at the medical center or when off-campus.


Current Exhibits Shared Past, Shared Future: The Marine Biological Laboratory and the University of Chicago

Exhibit Location: The John Crerar Library, Atriumwhitman and MBL investigators

Exhibit Dates: April 19 – October 31, 2016

The recent affiliation between UChicago and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) is the latest chapter in the long, intertwined history of the two institutions. Charles Otis Whitman, the first director of the MBL, also established biology at the University. Frank Lillie, Zoology chair, became the second director and remained president of the MBL corporation until 1942. Today, as the institutions draw closer, we highlight and celebrate our shared history.
Crerar exhibits website.

Hone your IT, media, and productivity skills with

University of Chicago researchers have access to, a leading provider of online courses covering business, media, and technology.  Researchers can choose from over 4,000 courses, all of which are broken up into short, easy to use videos.  Business courses cover LyndaLinkedin_blackeverything from leadership and marketing to product management, while media courses cover specific software such as Adobe Photoshop and Adobe InDesign, as well as general techniques for graphic design, video editing and more.  Technology courses cover a full range of software and skills, including Java, R, SPSS, data analysis and cyber security.  Course levels range from introductory to advanced and instructors are vetted industry experts.

In addition to courses, has created guides using a collection of short videos, articles and checklists, that provide a step by step process for starting a business and becoming a manager.  The Starting a Business guide covers everything from evaluating yourself and your business idea to establishing operations.’s Weekly Series feature guarantees that content stays fresh.  The most recent video in the Marketing Tips weekly series discusses representing the keyword funnel through SEO.

Questions about how to leverage this powerful tool? Ask us on Twitter, Facebook, or through our reference services.

All About Endnote (Desktop Version), Thursday, April 21st, 12-1 PM

Location: Crerar Library Computer Classroom.

Endnote imageEndnote is a citation management tool.  With it you can keep track of your citations and pdfs and create formatted bibliographies as you write your paper.  In this workshop learn how to use the desktop version of EndNote.  Topics covered include creating and managing citation libraries, importing citations from online databases and other sources, importing and managing PDFs and creating footnotes and bibliographies. Registration is required.  Register for this section.

Managing Research Documents: workshop, Monday April 11 4-5PM

Location: Crerar Library Computer Classroom

Organizing and keeping track of research documents, whether pdfs, notes, images or other pieces of information, can be time consuming and difficult. Let us help you! This workshop will cover effective naming techniques for documents, citation and pdf management, note taking tools, alerts and feeds, and journal management apps. Registration required.

Crerar’s Systematic Review Service

Are you thinking of writing a systematic review?  Biomedical Librarians at Crerar can assist you and your team with various aspects of the review, such as:

  • Help formulate the research question
  • Conduct searches in multiple databases
  • Write search strategy portion of methods section

Take a look at our web page to determine the level of service that is right for your team:  Contact to schedule an appointment.

Eckhart Library closed March 21-22

Eckhart Library will be closed Monday, March 21st and Tuesday, March 22nd due to a ceiling repair project.  We will reopen Wednesday, March 23rd at 12 PM.