Labor Day: All libraries closed

In observance of the Labor Day holiday, all campus libraries will be closed on Monday, September 7.

For a full list of library hours, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Library interim hours, August 29 – September 27

Beginning Saturday, August 29, the Library will have reduced building hours at all of its locations for the interim. Please note that on Monday, September 7, all libraries will be closed in observance of Labor Day.  Autumn quarter hours will begin Monday, September 28.

Crerar Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Friday – Saturday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Sunday (August 30, Sept. 6, 13, 20)  8 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Sunday (Sept. 27)  8 a.m. – 1 a.m.

D’Angelo Law Library Circulation
Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday Closed
Sunday (August 30, Sept. 6, 13, 20) Closed
Sunday (Sept. 27) noon – 9 p.m.

Eckhart Library
Monday – Friday noon – 5 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Mansueto Library

Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 7:45 p.m.
Friday 8 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday (August 30, Sept. 6, 13) Closed
Sunday (Sept. 20) noon – 5 p.m.
Sunday (Sept. 27) 10 a.m. – 1 a.m.

Regenstein Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Friday  – Saturday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sunday (August 30, Sept. 6, 13) Closed
Sunday (Sept. 20) noon – 5 p.m.
Sunday (Sept. 27) 10 a.m. – 1 a.m.

Regenstein All-Night Study
Closed until September 29 at 1 a.m.

SSA Library
Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Duke collections can now be borrowed rapidly through BorrowDirect

Duke University Libraries has joined the BorrowDirect partnership, expanding the number of research libraries that provide rapid access to their circulating collections to University of Chicago faculty, students and staff.

BorrowDirect logoBorrowDirect enables UChicago users to search the library catalogs of Brown, University of Chicago, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Duke, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, MIT, University of Pennsylvania, Princeton and Yale, a collection of more than 60 million volumes.  Users can directly request expedited delivery of circulating items.

For more information about how to use BorrowDirect, visit guides.lib.uchicago.edu/borrowdirect.

Redesigned research guides are easier to use and navigate

This weekend, the University of Chicago’s Library Guides were migrated to a new platform that features a number of improvements. Most notably, use of responsive design greatly improves the user’s experience on mobile devices and assistive technology, such as screen readers.

Mobile view of a Library Guide

A Library Guide as seen on a smartphone

The new platform also uses navigation menus on the left side of the screen, rather than the tabs across the top, which should make it easier and more intuitive for users to locate content in the guides.

Our librarians have created guides on a wide variety of academic subjects studied at the University. In addition, Help Guides show you how to locate specific types of material, such as newspapers, and to use Library tools and services, such as interlibrary loan.

Visit our Library Guides page for a complete list of our guides. 

 

People Meet new Science Research Services Librarian Michelle Bass

michelle bassMichelle Bass joined the University of Chicago Library on July 1 as the new Science Research Services Librarian.

Michelle has a MSI from the University of Michigan School of Information and PhD from the University of Wisconsin – Madison School of Education. Michelle held a University Library Associate, Graduate Student Assistantship position at the Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan from August 2013-June 2015.

Barbara Kern interviewed Michelle about her experiences and plans for her work at UChicago.

How do you envision working with faculty and students in your new role here?

One of my main goals in this new position is to serve as a welcoming “concierge” between faculty and students and the information professionals working in the library, particularly when it comes to data information literacy and data management services.   I want to be knowledgeable about the topics and discussions going on across departments and fields of study as they relate to research services and create opportunities for me to share and suggest new technologies and databases, software options, and trends with faculty and students.  I hope to be involved in orientation sessions for new graduate students in all science departments and continue my participation and relationship building with students and faculty throughout the year through my attendance and contributions to monthly seminars and brown-bag lunches across centers and schools.  Getting students interested and invested in the importance of data information literacy and research service best practices will be a main goal complemented by building relationships with faculty who are interested in becoming advocates and partners in sharing a passion, and respect, for research services.

Michelle, what originally got you interested in science libraries?

This is one of those times when I can say “I blame my mother” and mean it as a wonderful compliment.  My mother has worked at medical libraries for nearly forty years.  I knew that there were other kinds of libraries out there in the world beyond my local public library and school’s media center growing up.  However, my interest in science librarianship as a professional option was really cultivated over the past two years through my experiences working at the Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan and networking with many medical and science librarians at national and regional conferences.  

What are some of the highlights of your time as a Graduate Student Assistantship at the Taubman Health Sciences Library, University of Michigan?

Traditional health sciences library-focused highlights included instruction sessions with students in their first through fourth years of medical school and the opportunity to work with the Associate Dean of Medical Student Education to craft many of these sessions.  I was the information professional lead on a systematic review on the effects of bullying on LGBTQ students and worked with a Public Health and School of Information professor on creating a data management plan for an extensive scoping review of consumer health informatics literature.  I was also encouraged and able to take continuing education and professional development courses including PubMed for Trainers and Expert Searching.  As a member of the social committee, I was a co-organizer of the Donut Madness bracket challenge during the NCAA March Madness tournament and am proud that this delicious event is now an annual tradition at Taubman Health Sciences Library.

What are the key challenges or trends that you see in libraries today?

A key challenge facing academic libraries today is expanding the concept of what defines a library.  For me, a library is defined by the people who work in them and the skills and information they make accessible in addition to the materials they hold within their walls.  Importantly, they are not confined by the walls of their physical library spaces but rather move and travel with the services and knowledge shared by information professionals representing their library as institutions wherever they go.  With respect to the librarianship profession, I think a major opportunity is presenting itself as a generation of librarians prepare for retirement.  The curriculum of my mother’s master in library science degree and my own share few, if any, similarities beyond the fact that they are both American Library Association accredited.  It is up to both incoming professionals and long-standing pillars of the profession to proactively connect with one another to ensure institutional and professional knowledge is shared and cultivated to help rising leaders respond to the challenges ahead.

What do you like best about Chicago (the city) so far?

While Chicago definitely falls under the “big city” category, I have found that the distinct neighborhoods within the city make it much more manageable and inviting.  I decided to live in Hyde Park to be able to walk to work, and I have truly enjoyed getting to know my new neighborhood.  I’ve always lived in the suburbs and had to drive to shops and grocery stores; now, Treasure Island is a 7 minute walk and Hyde Park Produce is 15.  The Museum of Science and Industry is 2 blocks away and I’m a short(ish) bus or train ride away from the Art Institute of Chicago and the Shedd Aquarium.  So, a few weeks in, I have to say that getting to know the Hyde Park neighborhood has been the best part about Chicago, so far.

UChicago faculty and students are encouraged to contact Michelle with questions or requests for assistance with science research, teaching and learning. You can reach Michelle at mbbass@uchicago.edu or 773-702-8774.

All About Endnote (Desktop Version), Tuesday, July 28, 12-1 PM

Endnote imageLocation: Crerar Library Computer Classroom.

Learn how to use the bibliographic software EndNote.  Topics covered include creating and managing libraries, importing references from online databases, importing and managing PDFs and creating formatted bibliographies and citations in Microsoft Word. Registration is required.  Register for this section.

Alert Fri., July 3 & Sat., July 4: all libraries closed

All campus libraries will be closed on Friday, July 3, a University holiday, and Saturday, July 4, Independence Day.  Regular summer hours will resume on Sunday, July 5.

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Library summer quarter hours, June 22 – Aug. 28

Beginning Monday, June 22, the Library will operate on summer quarter building hours at all of its locations. Summer quarter hours will end on August 28.

Crerar Library
Sunday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 1 a.m.
Friday – Saturday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

D’Angelo Law Library Circulation
Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Eckhart Library
Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

Mansueto Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 9:45 p.m.
Friday 8 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Sunday noon – 9:45 p.m.

Regenstein Library
Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Friday  – Saturday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sunday noon – 10 p.m.

Regenstein All-Night Study
Closed until September 28 at 1 a.m.

SSA Library
Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday Closed

For a complete list of hours for all locations and departments, see hours.lib.uchicago.edu.

Spring quarter loans to quarterly borrowers automatically extended to October 2

Items checked out by current quarterly borrowers with privileges in good standing and due June 26 have been automatically renewed by the Library for summer quarter. As of June 15, all such items have a new due date of October 2, 2015. No action by borrowers is necessary.

The automatic renewal is being performed because the functionality to manually renew items is currently unavailable in the Catalog.

Users may view a list of all items out, including current due dates, via My Account.

For assistance, please contact Circulation or visit a Library circulation desk.

John Crerar Foundation Science Writing Prize winners announced

John Crerar Foundation Science Writing Prize for College Students

Congratulations to Xavier Zahnle, Stephanie Bi, and Haozhe Shan, the winners of the 2015 John Crerar Foundation Science Writing Prize for College Students.

1st place winning paper
A Glimpse Into Our Future’s Past: Plastic Debris In the Stratigraphic Record by Xavier Zahnle

2nd place winning paper
Migrant Mysteries: An Elucidation of the Hispanic Health Paradox by Stephanie Bi

3rd place winning paper
Social Rejection and Health by Haozhe Shan

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American Chemical Society journals optimized for smartphones and tablets

acs2go-70x70ACS2Go is ACS Publications’ new mobile platform that offers readers enhanced features and an improved reading experience optimized for tablets and smartphones. ACS2Go can also be easily paired with our University of Chicago Library subscriptions to access full text articles both on and off campus.

To pair your device and use ACS2Go, simple visit pubs.acs.org on your smartphone while authenticated on the campus wireless network (e.g., uchicago or uchicago-secure). The pairing is good for up to 4 months, allowing you to read and download content while off campus.  The pairing is refreshed each time you access ACS2Go while on the campus wireless network.  Alternatively, you can also get an access code from a campus computer by visiting pubs.acs.org/action/mobileDevicePairingLogin and logging in with your ACS ID. The access code authentication also expires after the same 4 month period.

With ACS2Go you will be able to:

  • Browse journals and read full text articles
  • Download articles to your mobile device for offline reading
  • Select journals and articles as favorites for quick reference from your home screen
  • Search journals by keyword, author or title
  • View and search references and related links
  • Share articles and links via email

To provide feedback or for technical assistance, please visit help.acs.org or contact ACS Publications at support@services.acs.org.

The Studio in the Field: Exhibit Reception and Film Screening

The Studio in the Field: Techniques of Early Wildlife Photography. Reception and Film Screening Reception and Screening: May 27th, 5:00-5:30 pm in the John Crerar Library's Kathleen A. Zar Room.

Reception and Screening, May 27th, 5:00-5:30 pm

Location: The John Crerar Library, Kathleen A. Zar Room.
Time: May 27th, 5:00-7:30 pm.

In conjunction with its current exhibit, The Studio in the Field: Techniques in Early Wildlife Photography, the John Crerar Library will be hosting a reception and film screening on May 27th, from 5:00 pm-7:30 pm. A guest lecture and introduction to the exhibit and films will be provided by Carl Fuldner, Department of Art History.

Refreshments to be served.

RSVP by emailing Jennifer Hart or Sarah Fesmire. (more…)

Workshop: Collaboration Tools for Researchers

Crerar Library Computer Classroom, May 19th, 12-1pm

A wide range of tools to help you collaborate with other researchers are available these days. This workshop will cover options for sharing different kinds of work including citation and pdfs, document files, images and presentations.  It will also cover collaborative software options  available for editing documents, managing group projects and virtual meetings. Register.

Data Data Everywhere: Introduction to Data Management

Crerar Library: Kathleen A. Zar Room, May 13th, 4-5pm

You are collecting it, but are you managing it? If you were asked to provide data from research done last year, would you be able to find it? What about two years ago? Join us for this session where you will learn more about the basics of data management for your research. We will discuss best practices for file naming and structure, metadata, storage and back ups, as well as provide an overview of funding agency requirements. Register

Alert Library Catalog & BorrowDirect offline, 6 a.m. – 8 a.m. Wed., 4/29

The Library Catalog and BorrowDirect will be unavailable between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. on Wednesday, April 29 due to scheduled systems maintenance.

The Library Catalog will allow searches, but holdings and item availability information will not be displayed, nor will service links associated with holdings and items. My Account will also be unavailable.

Direct searches of the BorrowDirect catalog will also be unavailable while maintenance is underway.

UBorrow will remain accessible during this time.

Celebrating Earth Day

The first Earth Day celebration, which took place 45 years ago, marked a turning point in American environmental consciousness. The environment’s inextricable tie to public health became increasingly evident throughout the 1960’s, and several events throughout the decade— including the the 1962 publication of Rachel Carson’s Silent Springthe 1969 Santa Barbara Oil Spill, and the 1969 People’s Park protests at Berkeley—prompted U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson and several activists and labor organizations to raise funds for a nationwide day of awareness¹. Since the first celebration in 1970, Earth Day has grown into a worldwide celebration and day of awareness. By its 30th anniversary, over 180 nations and 500 million people participated in Earth Day celebrations¹.

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Workshop: Managing Your Research Documents

Crerar Library: Kathleen A. Zar Room, April 27th, 12-1pm

Organizing and keeping track of research documents, whether pdfs, notes, images or other pieces of information, can be time consuming and difficult. Let us help you! This workshop will cover effective naming techniques for documents, citation and pdf management, note taking tools, alerts and feeds, and journal management apps. Register

IEEE Authorship Lunch: How to Publish with IEEE

This lunch session will give an overview of how to become an IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers) author. A representative from IEEE will discuss tips on how to select an appropriate IEEE periodical or conference, organize a manuscript, and work through peer review; how successful IEEE authors structure quality work to improve their chances of being accepted; and common mistakes and ethical lapses that will prevent your manuscript from being accepted. They will also discuss how IEEE Xplore Digital Library can help when writing technical papers, including how to stay up-to-date on the latest research using saved search alerts and set up personal project folders to organize your research. Lunch will be provided.  Registration required

Workshop: Your Copyrights: Understanding author rights in scholarly publishing, Friday April 17, 12-1PM

Location: Crerar Library, Kathleen A. Zar Room

The world of scholarly publishing is changing and copyright issues are often at the center of it. You may be hearing some terms that are new and wonder how they affect you. Join us for a session to learn more about open access, Creative Commons, copyright transfer agreements, public deposit, and how your funding agency may have new requirements for you soon. Register here.

Workshop Series – Managing Your Research

Crerar Library is offering a workshop series on issues related to managing research such as copyright, data management, document organization and collaboration tools.  More information about each workshop and registration links are below.  All workshops are opened to faculty, students and staff.

Your Copyrights:  Understanding author rights in scholarly publishing

Crerar Library: Kathleen A. Zar Room, April 17th, 12-1pm

The world of scholarly publishing is changing and copyright issues are often at the center of it. You may be hearing some terms that are new and wonder how they affect you. Join us for a session to learn more about open access, Creative Commons, copyright transfer agreements, public deposit, and how your funding agency may have new requirements for you soon. Register

Managing Research Documents

Crerar Library: Kathleen A. Zar Room, April 27th, 12-1pm

Organizing and keeping track of research documents, whether pdfs, notes, images or other pieces of information, can be time consuming and difficult. Let us help you! This workshop will cover effective naming techniques for documents, citation and pdf management, note taking tools, alerts and feeds, and journal management apps. Register

Data Data Everywhere:  Introduction to Data Management

Crerar Library: Kathleen A. Zar Room, May 13th, 4-5pm

You are collecting it, but are you managing it? If you were asked to provide data from research done last year, would you be able to find it? What about two years ago? Join us for this session where you will learn more about the basics of data management for your research. We will discuss best practices for file naming and structure, metadata, storage and back ups, as well as provide an overview of funding agency requirements. Register

Collaboration Tools for Researchers

Crerar Library: Kathleen A. Zar Room, May 19th, 12-1pm

A wide range of tools to help you collaborate and communicate with other researchers are available these days. This workshop will cover options for sharing different kinds of work including citation and pdf sharing software, file and image sharing systems, and presentation sharing software. Register

 

Introduction to Zotero: workshop

When: Thursday, April 16, 2015 12:001:00 p.m.
Where: Crerar Library, Computer Classroom
5730 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL
Description:

Zotero is a free citation manager that allows you to save citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in standard citation styles, including MLA, Chicago and APA. This workshop will introduce some of the key functions of Zotero such as: installing Zotero, adding citations to your Zotero library, organizing and managing your citations, creating a bibliography, and using the Microsoft Word plug-in to easily insert citations from Zotero into your documents.

Participants are encouraged to bring their personal computers so that they may download and interact with the program.

To register, click on the link below.

https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1010

Contact: John Crerar Library
773-702-7715
More info: https://training.uchicago.edu/course_detail.cfm?course_id=1010
Tag: Workshops, Training, Graduate Students, Staff
Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. For events on the Student Events Calendar, please contact ORCSA at (773) 702-8787.
Information on Assistive Listening Device

Life Cycle of Scientific Publishing Workshop – Thursday, April 30

Join us at the Crerar Library on Thursday, April 30 as experts provide insights on the scientific publication life cycle. Hear from a managing journal editor about the nuts and bolts of the publishing. Learn what editors do and what they expect from authors. Gain insight as to what to expect as an author and what it takes to be a good peer-reviewer. Finally, discover how to manage your online researcher identity and methods to promote your work.

This workshop is designed for graduate students, post-docs, advanced undergraduates, and others interested in the inner workings of the publication process.

Date: Thursday, April 30
Time: 1:00-5:00pm
Location: Zar Room, 1st Floor, Crerar Library
Fee: $20.00 (waived for current UChicago students, postdocs, and housestaff)
Schedule and Registration: http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/crerar/zar/kaz2015workshop.html

This workshop is held in conjunction with the 4th Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, “The Changing Ecosystem of Scholarly Communication,” held on Friday, May 1 at the Crerar Library.

Conducting a Systematic Review?

Librarians are available to assist with your systematic review searches. Contact biomed@lib.uchicago.edu to setup an appointment. The initial meeting is dedicated to discussing your timeline, your research question, and the librarian’s role.  Below are a few of the services we can provide:

Consultations

  • Help formulate the research question
  • Advise on database selection
  • Train on use of database platforms
  • Train on use of citation management tools
  • Train on obtaining full-text of published papers

Searching

  • Identify keywords and controlled vocabulary terms
  • Develop formal, comprehensive search strategies
  • Translate strategies for each database
  • Conduct searches in multiple databases
  • Export results to citation management tool, including de-duplication
  • Document and save search strategies

Protocol Development and Methodology

  • Write methods section on search strategy and its execution
  • Assist with Protocol development
    • Discuss inclusion/exclusion criteria
    • Assist with finding inclusion/exclusion forms and other resources on developing  protocols
  • Advise on reporting standards: PRISMA Guidelines, Checklist, & Flow Chart

Adventures in Analysis of Large Biomedical Datasets, Apr. 16 at 3PM

rcc-graphicThursday, April 16, 2015 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
 John Crerar Library, Kathleen A. Zar Room, 5730 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL

Andrey Rzhetsky, Professor in the Department of Genetic Medicine & Human Genetics at the University of Chicago, and a Senior Fellow of the Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology & Computation Institute. His research is focused on computational analysis of complex human phenotypes in context of changes and perturbations of underlying molecular networks.

Focusing on autism, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, this talk will touch the following questions:  How can understanding of genetics and epidemiology of disease be advanced through modeling and computational analysis of very large and heterogeneous datasets?  What are the bottlenecks in analysis of complex human maladies?  How can we model and compute over multiple data types to narrow hypotheses about genetic causes of disease?  How can collaborations across multiple fields of science bring translational results to initially purely academic studies?

Contact: Research Computing Center 773-795-2667

Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance. 

Current Exhibits The Studio in the Field: Techniques of Early Wildlife Photography

wildlife image

W.E. Carlin, A Young Buck. From L.H Bailey, ed., Nature Portraits: Studies with Pen and Camera of Our Wild Birds, Animals, Fish and Insects, New York: Doubleday, Page & Co., 1902

Exhibit Location: The John Crerar Library, Atrium

Exhibit Dates: April 6 – September 15, 2015

During the 1890s, technical advances made it practical to photograph birds and other animals in their natural environments for the first time. But faced with the unpredictable realities of photographing in the field, early practitioners struggled to make worthwhile images from the standpoints of art or natural history. The Studio in the Field traces the development of wildlife photography as a popular cultural pursuit, focusing on the innovative techniques and strategies devised to craft pictures that would appear convincingly natural to nineteenth-century audiences.

Crerar exhibits website.