Orientation programs introduce students to the variety of Library resources and services

Librarians welcoming students

Librarians welcoming new students at last year’s open house in Regenstein Library.

The library today is much more than a study space. It is an essential resource for academic success. As our new undergraduates come to campus for Orientation Week, the University of Chicago Library is offering several open houses and programs to welcome new students and introduce them to many services and resources available to support their coursework and research. These programs are designed to let new students explore our spaces, meet our expert staff, and be introduced to the extensive print and online collections available to them at the Library.

Welcome to the University of Chicago Library
Saturday, September 21 from 2:00 – 4 p.m.
Regenstein Library, Room 122
New students and their families are invited to take a break at the Library’s welcome reception. Enjoy light refreshments and meet with our librarians, who can provide information about the Library’s many resources and services available to support students’ academic achievement. Visit the Special Collections Research Center’s newest exhibit, plus enter a drawing for an underground tour of Mansueto Library.

RegFest: Explore the UChicago Library
Wednesday, September 25 from 1:00 to 4:00 pm,
Regenstein Library

Get a jump-start on your study skills before your first assignment is due! Drop by Regenstein Library’s open house to explore study spaces, view our collections, and meet staff who can help you. Learn about course readings, printing/scanning, laptop lending, e-resources, and more. Enjoy games, activities, and snacks. Students visiting all locations receive a Library mug.

Crerar Science Library Pre-Reqs
Thursday, September 26 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
John Crerar Library
Are you pre-med or considering a science major? If so, this orientation at Crerar, the science library, is for you! We’ll show you everything you need to know to find articles and data for your classes and projects. Tour our stacks and study areas and learn how to find books. Attendees receive a giveaway!  Snacks provided.

Econ 101: An Introduction to Library Resources
Thursday, September 26 from 2:00 to 3:00 pm
Friday, September 27 from 11:00 am to 12:00 pm

Regenstein Library, Room 122
If you are majoring in economics, you can’t miss this orientation! Learn about all the services the Library can provide to aid in your research, from accessing the major relevant newspapers and journals (think The Economist and The Wall Street Journal) to finding economics articles and papers. Plus get an introduction to some of the best sources for economics data.

Online Library Orientation
guides.lib.uchicago.edu/orientation
Students unable to attend one of the Library’s in-person programs are invited to explore our extensive collections, services, and spaces by visiting our online orientation guide.

In addition to these programs for the College, the Library will also be providing orientations for graduate students. Led by the Library’s subject librarians, these programs are designed for the needs of new MA and PhD students, providing an overview of research collections and tools for their respective fields along with general library information. Graduate students should check with their departments’ orientation schedules for the library orientations for their programs.

People Meet Holiday Vega, new Health and Social Services Librarian

Holiday Vega joined the University of Chicago on August 19th as the Health and Social Services Librarian and she works both at the Crerar Library and the Social Services Administration Library. Holiday has both a Master of Social Work from Tulane University and Master of Library and Information Science from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. She is part of the national Progressive Librarians Guild and manages their book club, and in her time at UH created a student chapter of the PLG and hosted roundtable discussions on open access, diversity and inclusion, homelessness in libraries, and other social justice topics related to librarianship.

Deb Werner, the Director of Library Research in Medical Education, interviewed Holiday about her role here at the University of Chicago and her past experience in libraries.

What were you doing before this position at the University of Chicago?

Holiday Vega, Health and Social Services Librarian

Holiday Vega, Health and Social Services Librarian

I graduated in May 2019 from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa with my second Master’s degree, in Library and Information Science. My first Master’s is in Social Work, and my thesis research for my library degree was on the intersection of public libraries, homelessness, and social services. I helped facilitate the creation of a social work internship program at a public library in Honolulu by building a partnership between public library leadership and the Social Work school at UH. I also completed an internship with the Science and Technology reference department at the Hamilton Library at UH, where I created a new Web of Science subject guide and provided instruction support to nursing students and public health students, as well as interdisciplinary science students on information literacy, EndNote, Zotero, PubMed, and on open access resources.

How will you support students, faculty, and instructors in your role here?

My hope is to collaborate with faculty and students at every level, including collection development decisions. I will provide instruction for social work and psychology students, as well as nurses, on finding evidence based research for best practice, and I will also provide consultations for more in depth research assistance on citation management as well as data management. I’m excited about the opportunities to build partnerships between the University of Chicago and public libraries in the community, which my new supervisor, Deb Werner started through writing a grant for the All of Us program through the National Network of Librarians of Medicine. I’m also passionate about social justice, diversity and inclusion, and open access, and I aspire to contribute to the continuing transformation of the University to be more inclusive and social justice oriented by building more partnerships within the community, and encouraging faculty and students to include their published research in our institutional repository Knowledge@UChicago.

What’s your favorite thing about being a health and social services librarian?

Having graduated from a social work program myself, I love that I am going to have the opportunity to support future social workers with their professional practice and research goals. I look forward to supporting the psychology students and faculty with their innovative research that will change the lives of people around the world. Social work and nursing are also health fields, though social work focuses on mental health, I believe these fields of study cultivate and even require compassion. The research conducted by these professionals will contribute to a growing collection of knowledge which, if openly accessible, can support best practice in the entire field. Research in these areas can help benefit the people served by these professions and lead to better health outcomes and greater quality of life. I’m excited to help support that by educating and empowering current and future professionals to conduct and publish research.

What are you interested in outside of libraries?

I write fiction and have been part of various writing groups for some time. I love cats (I have two!), book clubs, and video games.

What have you been reading, listening to, or watching lately?

Read (nonfiction) Read (fiction)

Listen I loved this episode, but really I enjoy most episodes of this podcast (Call Your Girlfriend).

Watch

People New location for Science Librarians at Crerar

crerar officesCrerar reference librarians are now in their permanent office area in Crerar Library.  They are still on the first floor but on the north side of the building behind the Zar Room and accessible from the door to the right.  Feel free to come by if you have a question with which you need help.  You can also contact us by phone or email with questions or to set up an appointment.   We are always happy to help!

 

 

Feature Story Mining historical glass slides for astronomical data

A collection of 175,000 images of astronomical objects on photographic glass plate slides at Yerkes Observatory offers tremendous potential for both historians of science and astronomers and astrophysicists doing cutting-edge research today. These photographic images, taken over the last 120 years, document historical or periodic events such as novae or comets, as well as providing a basis for studying changes in the night sky. If converted into a usable digital format, they can not only provide more easily accessible glimpses into the scientific heritage of the past but also serve as a treasure trove of valuable information that astronomers can use to make new scientific discoveries.

n astronomical image with handwriting beneath dated Oct. 26, 1901.

A test image from the pilot study on mining astronomical data from historical glass slides.

The University of Chicago Library is partnering with faculty and students in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics to run a pilot study to determine how to scan these slides in a way that will facilitate meaningful scientific inquiry. Significant work has been done in this area by colleagues at Harvard University and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory working with their own 500,000-plate collection, with custom-built equipment. Chicago is now exploring the feasibility of using off-the-shelf digitization technologies by analyzing the level of scientific detail that can be captured and balancing that with the scanning time and resulting data sizes.

Some of the earliest systematic photographic atlases of the sky (more specifically, the region along the Milky Way) were undertaken at Yerkes Observatory and published as paper-print copies of the original negatives. One of these, the Barnard-Calvert atlas was done in 1905, and the other, from 1933, the Ross-Calvert atlas, was a deliberate repeat to track stars changing in position or brightness. An even earlier series of plates of well-known star clusters, galaxies, and nebulae, from 1901 to 1904, was done by George Ritchey with the revolutionary 24-inch telescope that he built in Chicago. All of these individuals—Edward Emerson Barnard, Mary Ross Calvert, Frank Elmore Ross, and George Willis Ritchey—have strong associations with the University of Chicago, specifically Yerkes Observatory, where they all spent portions of their careers and made significant contributions to the field.

Students working with telescope and glass plate

UChicago students Buduka Ogonor (left), Yingyi Liang (right), and Jorge Sanchez (in back) at Yerkes Observatory take an image using the same glass-plate method being studied in the pilot. (Photo by Richard Kron)

Thanks to support from the Kathleen and Howard Zar Science Library Fund and the College and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, we have engaged a group of seven undergraduate students on the project. In addition to working on the feasibility testing of scanning methods, the students have had a chance to engage with the historical significance of the collections and to get a glimpse into how astronomy was practiced in the past.

An astronomical image with handwriting beneath, dated Sept 19, 1903

A test image from the pilot study on mining astronomical data from historical glass slides.

Since Winter Quarter 2019, Professor Richard Kron has led regular expeditions to Yerkes Observatory. On these trips, Elisabeth Long, Associate University Librarian for Information Technology and Digital Scholarship and Barbara Kern, Director of the Science Libraries, have shared their expertise in digital scholarship and science librarianship with the students, working together with them to understand the collections and identify sample slides for digitization testing. At the same time, the students have been able to learn how to use the historic telescopes at Yerkes to make observations, to utilize the darkrooms to reproduce some of the significant images, and to use modern tools such as nova.astrometry.net to analyze our testbed images and compare them to the data captured in modern sky surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

For the Library, making the data available for research as well as historical memory are top priorities. Dan Meyer, Director, Special Collections, and University Archivist; and Eileen Ielmini, Assistant University Archivist, are helping to identify glass plates that are representative of the University’s cultural history and should be rehoused on campus in the Special Collections Research Center. Sherry Byrne, Preservation Librarian, and Christina Miranda-Izguerra, Digitization Manager in the Library’s Preservation Department are working with them on digitization sampling. The findings of the pilot will be translated into a workable project plan that can be used to seek funding for a larger scale project.  

Refractor telescope under dome

This refractor telescope at Yerkes Observatory was used to make some of the historical images. (Photo by Elisabeth Long)

People The Hanna Holborn Gray Graduate Student Fellowships

The University of Chicago Library is pleased to announce that its graduate student fellowships are now named the Hanna Holborn Gray Graduate Student Fellowships in honor of University of Chicago President Emeritus Gray’s generous support of the fellowship program since its inception. The Gray Fellowships are designed to build graduate students’ skills and knowledge in new areas of scholarship and to give them opportunities to explore alternative scholarly careers.

A Gray Fellow stands in front of a monitor display a photo from her project

Aneesah Ettress, The Hanna Holborn Gray Graduate Student Fellow in Digital Scholarship (Digital Humanities)

“We are delighted that President Emeritus Gray has enabled us to provide new opportunities for graduate students and are deeply honored that she has recognized the important role that the Library can play in expanding students’ academic horizons,” said Library Director and University Librarian Brenda Johnson.  The Hanna Holborn Gray Graduate Student Fellowships awarded during Winter/Spring 2019 and Summer 2019 included opportunities such as working with historical Chicago maps and GIS data, creating metadata for Mesoamerican language materials, archival collection exploration and discovery, and exploring digital scholarship methods.


Applying for Fall Gray Fellowships

Graduate fellow points at map on screen

Cristina Yumi Sakamoto, The Hanna Holborn Gray Graduate Student Fellow in GIS for Historical Chicago Data

Interested University of Chicago graduate students are encouraged to apply by September 15, 2019, for currently posted fellowships. Additional fellowships will be posted as they become available.  Renewal of fellowships for one or more additional quarters is considered on a case by case basis.

There are currently two opportunities available for Fall 2019:

  • The Hanna Holborn Gray Graduate Student Fellowship for GIS Instruction: This fellowship will provide instructional programming focusing on the introduction of spatial literacy and geospatial concepts.  The Fellow will update existing instruction material and create resources in a variety of formats, including demonstrations, workshops, tutorials, and web content.
  • The Hanna Holborn Gray Graduate Student Fellowship in Subject Librarianship: This fellowship matches graduate students with the subject specialist in their area of study to introduce the student to the work of a subject liaison. The graduate student would partner with the subject specialist to design a project that combines the student’s subject expertise with the librarian’s expertise in collection development and liaison services. For Fall 2019, we are seeking a University of Chicago Divinity School graduate student to work with the bibliographer for religion, philosophy, and Jewish studies.

Fall 2019 fellowships come with a stipend of $3300 per academic quarter.  Fellowships typically involve approximately 15 hours of work per week.

For more information about individual opportunities and how to apply, visit the Library website or contact Andrea Twiss-Brooks at atbrooks@uchicago.edu.

A Gray Fellow with archival photos in front of her and a related website behind her

Ariadne Argyros, The Hanna Holborn Gray Graduate Student Fellow in Web Exhibits

 

Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, “High Impact Collaboration: Libraries and Undergraduate Research Partnerships”

The 6th Biennial Kathleen A. Zar Symposium, High Impact Collaboration: Libraries and Undergraduate Research Partnerships, will be held on Friday, September 6, 2019, at the University of Chicago’s Joseph Regenstein Library.

Undergraduate research is a growing focus of higher education, as colleges and universities seek ways to involve students in experimental learning outside the classroom. Research experiences allow students to participate in knowledge creation, develop disciplinary skills, make impactful connections with faculty, and contribute to scholarly conversations. Substantive research opportunities have a lasting impact beyond graduation, inspiring careers and lifelong learning. As campuses identify new ways to support student research, what role can academic libraries play in these efforts? This symposium will explore different ways that librarians, faculty, and administrators can collaborate to help undergraduates engage and succeed in meaningful research experiences during their college years.

Registration and full schedule at: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/conferences/zar-symposium/

The symposium is a biennial event held at the J University of Chicago Libraryand made possible through the support of the Kathleen and Howard Zar Science Library Fund.

Knowledge@UChicago featured research: Code for a simple model of evolution of melt pond coverage on Arctic sea ice

July’s featured research in Knowledge@UChicago, the University of Chicago’s open access digital repository, is code by graduate student Predrag Popović and associate professor Dorian Abbot of the Department of Geological Sciences. The code, made available in 2017, supports their model for understanding the evolution of melt pond, or “pools of melted snow and ice,” coverage on Arctic sea ice. Popović and Abbot report on this model in their 2017 article in the open access journal The Cryosphere and point readers to their code in Knowledge@UChicago.

 

Image of Arctic Ocean taken during Office of Naval Research-sponsored study of the changing sea ice, ocean and atmosphere. (US Navy, Image by John F. Williams)

Journal publishers are increasingly requiring or recommending the open availability of research files associated with an accepted publication. For example, Copernicus Publications, the publisher of The Cryosphere, states that the “the output of research is not only journal articles but also data sets, model code, samples, etc. Only the entire network of interconnected information can guarantee integrity, transparency, reuse, and reproducibility of scientific findings.” As a condition of publishing in The Cryosphere, researchers like Popović and Abbot are “are required to provide a statement on how their underlying research data can be accessed” and are encouraged to make these research materials available in an open access repository. 

Knowledge@UChicago is a service that can help researchers meet requirements or expectations from journals like The Cryosphere, Nature Research, Science, and a growing number of others. Researchers can currently deposit small datasets in Knowledge@UChicago and permanent identifiers (DOIs) will be assigned to these deposits, assisting with discoverability and citation. Later this year, new features, including integration with GitHub, will be rolled out. We encourage our research community to make use of this service and to contact knowledge@lib.uchicago.edu for assistance.


This year, we’re highlighting examples of research shared in Knowledge@UChicago, the University’s open access digital repository. By spotlighting items, we hope to illustrate the variety of research that you can find and that UChicago researchers can make available in the repository. University researchers are invited to log in to Knowledge@UChicago and share articles, book chapters, conference materials, datasets, and other scholarly work.  See more digital scholarship news from the Library, including previous featured research on our news site.  

People Discovering Chicago’s rare books with Elizabeth Frengel

Elizabeth Frengel holds a rare book

Elizabeth Frengel, curator of rare books (Photo by Eddie Quinones)

In her first year as curator of rare books in the Special Collections Research Center, Elizabeth Frengel has begun discovering the Library’s diverse treasures and identifying opportunities to enhance its holdings. Frengel came to the University of Chicago Library from her position as Head of Research Services at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University. At Chicago, she is responsible for building and caring for the collections, as well as engaging faculty, students, and donors with the Special Collections Research Center’s materials, services, and programs.

With 340,000 rare books in Special Collections, Frengel has examined gems of historical importance and surpassing beauty. While delicately turning the pages of one of her favorites, an 1894 Kelmscott edition of The Tale of King Coustans the Emperor, Frengel notes the elegance of its inner design in contrast to the slightly worn condition of its exterior. Acquired with support from the Joseph and Helen Regenstein Rare Book Fund, this particular volume likely functioned as a press room or proof copy, or a remainder held by the press. “Such extra-textual components of the book can inform scholars’ understanding of the production processes of the press,” Frengel explains. Additionally, the work contains a handwritten note by Charles W. Howell on the front free endpaper stating that this copy survived the infamous fire at the Ballantyne Press in 1899. Such a notation further reveals this volume’s history and role as a complex cultural object rather than simply a textual conduit.

A hand points at an Arctic expedition map

A 16th-century Arctic expedition map bequeathed by Eleonora C. Gordon, M.D. (Photo by Eddie Quinones)

From handwritten notes to book illustrations, Frengel observes that extra-textual elements in the rare books collections often infuse works with layers of meaning and rich research value. For instance, Frengel was thrilled to see the Library become the new home of two exquisitely illustrated items documenting 16th century polar explorations, bequeathed by Eleonora C. Gordon, M.D.: a map and an Arctic expedition log supplemented with stunningly clean and detailed engravings depicting the crew’s adventures with a sweeping sense of dynamism.

Since arriving at Chicago, Frengel has also had the opportunity to work with Graham School student Robert S. Connors, who generously donated to the Library nearly 400 rare volumes from the 15th to the 20th centuries. According to Frengel, “Acquisitions such as this are important to scholars studying the transmission of classical texts through time and across cultures.” She is especially grateful to have received eleven incunable titles from the earliest period of European printing, including a 1475 edition of Augustine’s Confessions.

Frengel plans to continue learning as much as possible about the immense collections of rare books at Chicago. She envisions helping to build collections through acquisitions in areas such as classical texts in the early modern period, including Homer in print; Judaica; 19th-century literature; African Americana; and works that illustrate the history of the material text.

The Library looks forward to more energetic years of intellectual curiosity and thoughtful curation of rare books in the future.

Hands hold open a book with text in red and black

This 1894 Kelmscott edition of “The Tale of King Coustans the Emperor” was saved from the fire at Ballantyne Press in 1899. (Photo by Eddie Quinones)

Marie Tharp: Pioneering Oceanographer – new web exhibit

A pioneer in her field, renowned cartographer Marie Tharp created the first scientific maps of the Atlantic Ocean floor with her partner Bruce Heezen. Her observations showed the topography and geographical landscape of the ocean bottom and were crucial to the development of the theories of plate tectonics and continental drift in the earth sciences. 

A new web exhibit is now available about her work with images of some of her maps, many of which are available in the Library’s map collection.

Exhibit: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/collex/exhibits/marie-tharp-pioneering-oceanographer/

 

 

Feature Story Library summer 2019 graduate student fellowship opportunities

Cover of pamphlet for Abraham Lincoln National Historic Site

Digitized pamphlet from the John Crerar Library collections

The University of Chicago Library is offering three fellowships for UChicago graduate students during the summer. The fellowships are designed to give graduate students opportunities to explore alternative scholarly careers and to build skills and knowledge in new areas of scholarship.

Interested graduate students are encouraged to apply by May 30, 2019, for these posted fellowships.

  • John Crerar Foundation History of Science and Medicine Fellow
    The Fellow will focus on materials from the original John Crerar Library collections that were assembled prior to its merger with the University of Chicago.  This includes history of science and technology, especially late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century materials strong in the areas of engineering, manufacturing and applied arts. Activities may include researching historical and current significance of the collections, creating collection descriptions for use on webpages, and a special project focused on digitizing pamphlet materials from the collections.
  • Library Instruction Support Services Fellow
    This fellowship will provide graduate students with hands-on experience in providing library instruction, as well as developing guides and tools to help students learn about the variety of resources available to them at the Library and beyond. In addition, the fellowship will also offer graduate students an opportunity to learn about academic libraries services and collections that may benefit their own research, along with providing an insight into careers in library and information science.
  • University Archives Fellow
    Archives today are a rapidly expanding field with increasingly broad responsibility for preserving and making accessible unique materials in all formats—traditional paper documents, photographs, and analog recordings, as well as a growing array of digital content: email, databases, digital images, audio and video media, and web sites. This fellow will develop skills and expertise in all these areas while contributing to the programs and services of the University of Chicago Archives.

Summer 2019 fellowships come with a stipend of $4000 and typically involve approximately 200 hours of effort (typically 20 hours per week for a period of 10 weeks).

For more information about individual opportunities and how to apply, visit the Library website or contact Andrea Twiss-Brooks at atbrooks@uchicago.edu.

Rafadi Hakim pointing to digital image

A graduate student examines a digitized image. (Photo by John Zich)

 

College Research Week May 13-17

Student browsing the bookstacks.

Develop important research skills by attending College Research Week programs.

2019 College Research Week will take place from May 13-17 in Regenstein Library. College Research Week is a celebration of undergraduate research and creative inquiry at UChicago. This week-long event will include sessions on research skills, resources, and fellowships; undergraduate researcher and graduate student panels; an Undergraduate Research Poster Showcase, and much more!

College Research Week is brought to you by the College Center for Research & Fellowships and The University of Chicago Library. For more information, visit the College Research Week website.

College Research Week Schedule

Monday, May 13: Research Skills and Resources

Session Schedule:

Location: Regenstein, Room 122

10:00-11:30am: Introduction to Research Proposal Design, led by Sandra Zupan, Assistant Director of Fellowships and Research, CCRF
The goal of this session it to build your academic skills in research design, which can help you engage in undergraduate research. First, you will learn about the process of narrowing your interest to a research topic, followed by developing a research question and a literature review. Second, you will learn about the practicalities of data collection and analysis, ethical research practice and presenting the findings of the research.

11:30am-12:30pm: Undergraduate Research Funding, led by Tracy Nyerges, Assistant Director of Research, CCRF
This session will help you navigate the various undergraduate research funding sources available to College students across the disciplines. Whether you are new to research or an advanced undergraduate researcher, we will discuss research grant programs and options to fund academic year and summer research experiences for students in all majors. This session will also offer guidance and resources to assist you in planning for and preparing applications for undergraduate research grants and funding.

Location: Regenstein TechBar Studio Classroom, Room 160

1:00-2:00pm: Sharing and Archiving your Research with Knowledge@UChicago, led by Nora Mattern, Scholarly Communications Librarian, Library
Join the Library for a discussion on the principles of open access, how you can make your research poster or paper available to others, and why you may want to do so. Knowledge@UChicago is a digital repository where University of Chicago faculty and students can share and archive their scholarly work. Bring a laptop or tablet (or borrow one from the TechBar) and spend hands-on time with Knowledge@UChicago.

2:30-3:30pm: Managing Your Data and Files, led by Elizabeth Foster, Social Sciences Data Librarian, Library
Whether your data are digital photos of archival records or spreadsheets, this session will provide you with practical tips for naming, organizing, documenting, storing and preserving your data. Making a plan for managing your data and digital files can save you time and potential headaches in the long-run. In this workshop, we’ll begin creating data management plans for a current project and talk through challenges and lessons you’ve learned about effective strategies for managing your digital files. This session is given Elizabeth Foster, Social Sciences Data Librarian.

4:00-5:00pm: Getting a Head-Start on Your BA, led by Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach, Library
Are you apprehensive about writing a BA or honors thesis? Don’t worry, there are many resources to support you! Librarian Rebecca Starkey will help you get a head start on your thesis by offering strategies to ease your research and writing. Learn about specialized research tools for your major, methods for locating primary sources at the University and beyond, GIS and data support services, and how to reach the Library experts who can guide you. After the workshop, you’ll be able to take the first steps towards starting this important research project.

Tuesday, May 14: Research Fellowships and Undergraduate Research Scholars

Session Schedule:

Location: Regenstein, Room A-11

10:00-11:00am: International Research through Fulbright, led by Nicholas Morris, Associate Director of Fellowships, CCRF
The Fulbright US Student Program is an opportunity to conduct research, study, or teach English for a year internationally after graduation. Thisinformation session will investigate how you can launch your research interests through a funded, post-graduate grant. In this session, we will review the broad purpose and specific components of the Fulbright Grant, including essays, affiliations, and recommendations. We will identify essential components of previously successful grants and help you envision ways to start approaching the essays.

11:30am-12:30pm: National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships, led by Nichole Fazio, Director, CCRF
The National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (NSF GRFP) program is one of the most robust and well-recognized national fellowships in support of graduate education (STEM and selective Social Science disciplines). This session will introduce students to the basics of the NSF GRFP, with a focus on the application process and what makes for an especially strong application. Students of any class-standing are invited to attend. We strongly encourage 3rd- and 4th-year students intending to submit applications this coming October to attend. 

Undergraduate Researcher Panels:

2:00-3:00pm: Arts & Humanities College Students
Join for this interative panel featuring UChicago undergraduate researchers and creative sholars in the Arts and Humanities. The participating College students will field your questions, talk about their paths and how undergraduate research and creative scholarship has impacted them. This session will be informative to current and future undergraduate researchers and scholars in a variety of Arts and Humanities majors.

3:00-4:00pm: Social Sciences College Students
Join for this interative panel featuring UChicago undergraduate researchers and creative sholars in the Social Sciences. The participating College students will field your questions, talk about their paths and how undergraduate research and creative scholarship has impacted them. This session will be informative to current and future undergraduate researchers and scholars in a variety of Social Sciences majors.

4:00-5:00pm: STEM College Students
Join for this interative panel featuring UChicago undergraduate researchers and creative sholars in STEM. The participating College students will field your questions, talk about their paths and how undergraduate research and creative scholarship has impacted them. This session will be informative to current and future undergraduate researchers and scholars in a variety of STEM majors.

Wednesday, May 15: Research and Your Future

Session Schedule:

Location: Regenstein A-11

11:30am-1:00pm: Graduate Student Panel and Networking Lunch
Join for this interative panel featuring the five current UChicago graduate students listed below from various fields. These graduate students will field your questions, talk about their paths to graduate school and how undergraduate research impacted their journeys. You will also be able to chat with these graduate students further after the panel during lunch. Lunch will be provided so please RSVP for this session

3:30-4:30pm: Navigating the SBS IRB Process, led by Cheri Pettey, Director, Social and Behavioral Sciences IRB
This session will explore the history of the applicable regulations, explain how to determine whether a project constitutes human subjects research requiring review, define the basic review process/requirements, and provide some helpful tips for navigating the process. There will be time for questions and students who have gone through the process are welcome to share their experiences and suggestions.

Thursday, May 16: Research Mentoring and Toolbox Building

Session Schedule:

Location: Regenstein TechBar Studio Classroom, Room 160

10:00-11:00am: Creating a Digital Portfolio to Share and Present your Research and Creative Scholarship, led by Stacie Williams, Director, Center for Digital Scholarship, Library
Digital portfolios or a personal website can help you to showcase your research, communicate your interests, and develop a professional network. In this session, we’ll explore what makes for an effective digital portfolio and consider decisions when crafting an online identity. This discussion will be followed by a tutorial on using WordPress to create a digital site.

Location: Regenstein A-11

11:30-1:00pm: Research Mentor/Student Pairs and Networking Lunch [lunch provided]
Join us for a lunch-time conversation with student and research mentors across the disciplines to learn more about their work. Students will discuss how they connected with their mentors’ project and together they will talk about the process of undertaking their research together. You will also have the opportunity to hear from faculty and scholars across the university community who pursued unconventional career pathways as a result of their research efforts. 

1:30-3:00pm: Research Proposal Writing, led by Sandra Zupan, Assistant Director of Fellowships and Research, CCRF
The goal of this session is to help you produce a persuasive research proposal, which can be used for successful UChicago and external grants, national fellowships and graduate school applications. First, you will learn about the structure and characteristics of persuasive proposals, as well as common areas of weaknesses in research proposals. Second, you will learn how to develop paragraphs, organize text and write in a clear, detailed, precise manner.

3:30-4:30pm: GRD101: Preparing for the Graduate School Application Process, led by Nichole Fazio, DPhil, Director, CCRF: This information session is designed for current undergraduates considering graduate school as a part of an academic and professional trajectory.  Whether you are certain that you will pursue graduate education or are just beginning to consider the possibility, this session will introduce you to a) the general process of investigating options, b) the application timeline, c) common application components, and d) attempt to demystify the application and admission process. This is a general session and open to all disciplines and years.  Note: this will not cover pre-professional application processes specifically (eg medical or law school), although some of the application components like personal statements, letters of recommendation and CVs will be discussed as universal components to all application processes. 

Friday, May 17: Undergraduate Research Support & Showcase and Reception

Session Schedule:

Location: Regenstein TechBar Studio, Room 160

10:00-11:30am: Zotero Drop-In Support
Drop by the TechBar for one-on-one training and support for Zotero, a free citation manager that allows you to organize, annotate, and cite your sources automatically in standard styles (MLA, Chicago, APA, etc.).

Location: Regenstein 122

Research Poster Showcase and Reception

2:00-2:30pm: Opening Remarks
Professor Peggy Mason, Department of Neurobiology
2:30-3:30pm: Poster Showcase
3:30-4:30pm: Reception 

 

Symposium for Teaching with Technology

When: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 8:00 a.m.4:00 p.m.
Where: Regenstein Library, Room 122A-B
1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL
Description: The UChicago Symposium for Teaching with Technology is an event that brings together faculty, instructors, lecturers, learning designers, academic technologists, and students to share and showcase a wide variety of innovative and effective uses of technology in teaching and learning. Faculty and instructors will give presentations on their use of educational technology, with staff and students serving in a supporting role. The Symposium is open to all UChicago faculty, instructors, staff, graduate student lecturers, and teaching assistants.
Register: https://teachwithtech.uchicago.edu#rsvp
Contact: Academic Technologies
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Notes: Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact the event sponsor for assistance.

Notable Women in Medical History

To celebrate Women’s History Month, the National Library of Medicine is profiling 12 women who were pioneers in the field of health and medicine. They are written in first person, as though the women medical pioneers had access to today’s news. How many can you identify?

Can you spot the University of Chicago alumna?  The Library holds both her Master’s thesis and her PhD dissertation.

If  you need another challenge, check out the notable women in health and medicine who were profiled in 2018 and see how many you can answer correctly!

Giving Day 2019

Your support makes it happen!

This April, we invite you to join the University of Chicago community as we honor the past while building the future through  Giving Day 2019.

Giving Day is a 24-hour show of united support for the University’s students, faculty, and world-changing research from noon to noon (CDT) April 9-10, 2019. This collective approach to philanthropy is a fitting way to support the University of Chicago Library, which serves as a vibrant and dynamic hub for the entire university community.

Giving Day, April 9-10, 2019 - Move UChicago ForwardWith 11.6 million electronic and print volumes spanning centuries of learning in the sciences, humanities, arts, and beyond, the University of Chicago Library stands as one of North America’s largest and most distinguished academic research libraries.

Beyond the depth and breadth of its holdings, the Library continuously builds on its vision to foster inquiry through tailored services and expert librarians. From the state-of-the-art conservation and digitization laboratories of the Joe and Rika Mansueto Library to the exquisite exhibition space highlighting works from the Special Collections Research Center, the University of Chicago Library is an intellectual epicenter for the innovative work of students, faculty, and researchers in an evolving academic environment.

To meet the ever-increasing need for data-driven services, the Library has expanded infrastructure for patrons seeking new ways to obtain, visualize, and analyze data. We are developing our Center for Digital Scholarship, honing key skills among our librarians, and advancing pivotal initiatives in the fields of geospatial analysis and data science.

Your support will enable the Library to continue serving as a vibrant hub for the University community, advancing the objectives of students and faculty across campus.

To make a contribution to the University of Chicago Library during Giving Day, please make a gift through our website by 12:00 p.m. on April 10.

You can make a difference for the Library today!

Register today for the Library’s Spring Quarter workshops

The University of Chicago Library is offering a variety of workshops and programs during Spring Quarter highlighting tools, resources, and services available to you to support your work. Learn about GIS, data management, using Zotero and EndNote, and more. Space is limited, so register for sessions today!

DISSERTATION PROCEDURES FOR STUDENTS
April 2, Noon – 1:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
April 17, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Are you a Ph.D. student planning to graduate in Spring 2019? Come to this information session about the procedures for submitting your dissertation using a web-based interface, the ETD Administrator. We will review formatting requirements and discuss open access for dissertations via the institutional repository, Knowledge@UChicago.

DISSERTATION DRAFT REVIEW INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS
April 10, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Are you a Ph.D. student planning to submit your dissertation soon? Do you want to know if you are on the right track with formatting your dissertation? Dissertation Office staff offer an optional draft review service during the first few weeks of each quarter. Come to this information session to learn more about draft reviews and the basic requirements for formatting your dissertation. Bring your questions and bring your laptop.

USING ZOTERO FOR YOUR BA RESEARCH
April 8, Noon – 1:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
April 25, Noon – 1:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Are you writing a BA or honors thesis next year? Before you start your research, learn how you can organize and cite the many sources you’ll be using for this extensive project. Learn about Zotero, a free research tool that can transform how you write your research papers. Use Zotero to organize your documents, gather citation information in a single click, and create footnotes or bibliographies automatically in styles such as Chicago, MLA, and APA.

GIS and Maps Librarian and students with map of Chicago on monitor

GIS and Maps Librarian Cecilia Smith (center) discusses mapping tools and resources with (from left) students Paul Gilbert, II, College ’20, and Emil Sohlberg, College ’20. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

MANAGING YOUR DIGITAL DATA & RESEARCH FILES
April 9, Noon – 1:00 p.m. Crerar Library Computer Classroom Register
This session will provide you with practical tips for naming, organizing, documenting, storing and preserving your research data. Making a plan for managing your data and digital files can save you time and potential headaches in the long-run. In this session, we’ll consider requirements from funding agencies such as the NSF and NIH and publishers for data sharing. We’ll talk through challenges you’ve faced and lessons you’ve learned about effective strategies for managing your digital files. We’ll overview tools for managing research data and materials, including electronic lab notebooks and the Open Science Framework.

INTRODUCTION TO ICPSR
April 10, 11:00 a.m. – Noon, TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
This workshop will teach you how to get started with ICPSR (the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research). ICPSR is one of the largest social sciences data archives in the world. During the session, participants will learn how to create an account, browse and search for data, and download datasets. The session will also cover best practices for finding and evaluating datasets. Please bring a laptop to the session; one can be borrowed at the TechBar.

INTRODUCTION TO ENDNOTE
April 11, Noon – 1:00 p.m. Crerar Computer Classroom Register
EndNote is a research management tool used to keep track of citations, PDFs and other documents, and create formatted bibliographies as you write your paper. In this workshop, learn how to use the desktop version of EndNote. Topics covered include: creating and managing citation libraries, importing citations from online databases and other sources, importing and managing PDFs and creating bibliographies.

WORKING WITH SPATIAL DATA
April 11, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. GIS Hub, Crerar Library Register
Come learn the core concepts of working with spatial data, including: spatial thinking for research, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), spatial data formats, finding spatial data, tools & software, spatial analysis & geoprocessing, Spatial Data Management, and geospatial resources.

OPEN ACCESS, SELF-ARCHIVING AND KNOWLEDGE@UCHICAGO
April 16, 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Join the Library for a discussion on the principles of open access, the individual and societal benefits of open research, and authors’ rights and self-archiving. We will consider strategies for expanding access to our scholarship and spend hands-on time with Knowledge@UChicago, the University’s open access digital repository for scholarly work. Bring a laptop to get started sharing and preserving your research!

NAVIGATING QGIS
April 25, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. GIS Hub, Crerar Library Register
This workshop will introduce you to digital mapping and geoprocessing using QGIS. You will learn about QGIS software navigation, fundamentals for spatial data visualization and manipulation, and how to create a map. No prior experience is expected.

DATA MANAGEMENT 101
April 24, 11:00 a.m. – Noon, TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Data management plans are researchers’ written strategies outlining how they will collect and take care of their data during the life of a project and what approaches they will take for sharing and preserving their data at the end of a project. This session will introduce the basic components of a data management plan, funder requirements related to data management planning, and DMPTool, a free online tool that guides researchers through the creation of a plan.

NAVIGATING ARCGIS ONLINE
April 26, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. GIS Hub, Crerar Library Register
Need to make a web map? Find some spatial data? Come learn how to use ArcGIS Online in this hand-on workshop. No experience is needed – we’ll start with logging in and finish by creating you’re first web map.

INTRODUCTION TO ZOTERO (WEBINAR)
May 9, Noon – 1:00 p.m. Online Register
Learn how to use Zotero, a free citation manager that allows you to save and organize citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create customized bibliographies in popular citation styles (MLA, Chicago and APA).

April 12 deadline for the Crerar Writing Prize for College students

Are you an undergraduate interested in science, medicine, and/or technology? Have you written a scientific research paper of note that would be of interest to a general audience? Consider submitting a paper for the John Crerar Foundation Writing Prize.

The annual John Crerar Foundation Science Writing Prize for College Students honors the memory of John Crerar – industrialist and philanthropist whose estate established the John Crerar Library.

This competitive award for excellence and clarity in science writing acknowledges the ability of a University of Chicago College student to produce a paper, on a scientific topic, which is thorough in its arguments but accessible to a broad readership.

Science Writing Prize organizers will present a topic on which students may submit a paper. The chosen topic will be related to the physical and biomedical sciences. We encourage and welcome submissions from all perspectives.

An important component of the paper will be the bibliography, which must include citations from a variety of sources and may be presented in a bibliographic style of the student’s choosing.

First Prize is $1500
Second Prize is $500
Third Prize is $300

Deadline: APRIL 12, 2019

New center fuses media arts, data, and design

A rendering of people workign together in the MADD Center

A rendering of the Media Arts, Data and Design Center, a new collaborative space in the John Crerar Library at the University of Chicago. (Illustration courtesy of Payette Architects )

Partnership across UChicago explores intersection of technology, creativity, and research

The boundaries between art, design, science, and technology are disappearing in a digital world. Today, artists use algorithms, scientists rely on visualization and designers are often focused on helping people navigate new technologies.

At the University of Chicago, the disciplines come together at the Media Arts, Data, and Design (MADD) Center, creating a new collaborative space for experimentation, discovery and impact. The MADD Center will support work by faculty, other academic appointees, students, staff, and community partners through cutting-edge technologies. The 20,000-square-foot center in the John Crerar Library opens February 25.

“Design, as a field, now encompasses the sum of human interactions with the devices, environments, and communities that shape daily life,” said David J. Levin, Senior Advisor to the Provost for Arts. “The MADD Center gives the University of Chicago a space to address these radical changes, assess their wide-ranging consequences, and comprehend the ways that perception, sensation, and experience are being transformed.”

At the MADD Center, there are opportunities to create, study, and learn about critical technologies driving both culture and science, including video games, virtual and augmented reality, data visualization, and digital fabrication. The MADD Center brings together the College, Division of Humanities, Division of Physical Sciences, UChicago Arts and the UChicago Library.

The MADD Center will host five resource labs:

  • An expanded Computer Science Instructional Labs, providing hardware and software for training and education;
  • The Hack Arts Lab, an open-access digital fabrication, prototyping, and visualization facility;
  • The new Weston Game Lab, offering expanded resources for the study, play, and development of analog, electronic, virtual and online games;
  • The Research Computing Center Visualization Lab in the Crerar Library’s Kathleen A. Zar Room, providing new data visualization technology; and,
  • The UChicago Library’s new GIS Hub, enabling geospatial research and learning activities by providing access to geographical information systems software and hardware and an expert GIS and maps librarian who offers consultations and training.

At the MADD Center, classroom and studio spaces support the teaching of Media Arts and Design and Media Aesthetics in the College, electronic music in partnership with CHIME Studios in the Department of Music, and virtual reality and other media courses as part of the new Media Arts and Design minor in Cinema and Media Studies.  In addition, the MADD Center will provide new opportunities for further collaboration with the Logan Center for the Arts, the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, and many others.

“I am excited about the new opportunities students and faculty in the College and the Humanities will have to work with colleagues in computer science and other areas as we continue to develop new courses in Media Arts and Design and support the many interests of our students and faculty in this area,” said Christopher Wild, Deputy Dean of the College and Humanities Division.

Collaboration Across Creative Forms

The open floorplan and close proximity of MADD Center labs is designed to create opportunities for crossovers and collaboration. Students designing a new board game can create prototypes on the 3D printers at the Hack Arts Lab, while researchers working with the GIS Hub might reveal new insights by visualizing their data on Research Computing Center resources. The MADD Center is located near the new Department of Computer Science offices and laboratories, a science librarians’ research and teaching suite, and the Library’s collections and study spaces at a renovated Crerar Library, creating new, interdisciplinary opportunities across divisions.

“As our world becomes increasingly digital, designers and artists need to become more engaged with technology and technologists need to become more fluent with design, media and the arts,” said Michael J. Franklin, Liew Family Chair of Computer Science. “By co-locating a critical mass of tech-savvy students and faculty with diverse skills and interests across these varied domains, we will facilitate robust dialogue and collaboration as our disciplines continue to co-evolve.”

People working in the Weston Game Lab

The Weston Game Lab will provide a vibrant new space at UChicago for the research and design of games. (Illustration courtesy of Payette Architects)

Gaming, UChicago-Style

The MADD Center is envisioned as a place for a group of students dissecting the structure of a classic Nintendo game, or sketching out the visual design for a new card game that teaches high school students about teen pregnancy. A cornerstone of the new center, the Weston Game Lab will provide a vibrant new space at UChicago for the research and design of the world’s fastest growing cultural and aesthetic form: games.

The Weston Game Lab is supported by a gift from Dr. Shellwyn Weston and Bradford Weston, JD’77. Within the Lab, students, faculty, and staff will collaborate on the research and development of games that produce social impact or experiment with form. Participants will also be able to research the history of games from technical and theoretical perspectives with the Library’s collection of video games and the Logan Center’s collection of consoles, attend workshops that afford new development skills, and organize collaborative groups for game-based experiments.

“Video games in recent years have become an immensely popular medium and multi-billion dollar industry,” said Patrick Jagoda, Associate Professor of English and Cinema & Media Studies and director of the Weston Game Lab. “For cultural, psychological, and sociopolitical reasons, we need rigorous academic study, across both humanistic and social scientific disciplines. I’m interested in growing a culture of thoughtful, ethical, and experimental game design for ends other than entertainment that includes interdisciplinary teams of faculty, staff, and students. I think the University of Chicago can really shine in this space.”

Love Data Week workshops explore data in everyday life, Feb. 11-14

The University of Chicago Library is offering workshops and programs in honor of Love Data Week, February 11-14. An annual global event that highlights data-related topics and trends, Love Data Week’s theme this year is “data in everyday life,” with a special focus on open data and data justice. UChicago students, faculty and staff are invited to join us for workshops, events, and a chance to learn more about data services at the University of Chicago Library. Unable to attend the events? Visit our Love Data Week guide.

Love Data Week, Feb. 11-14, Ongoing events at the Reg and Crerar LibraryIntroduction to Census Data
February 11, 11:00 a.m. – noon
Regenstein Library Room 523
Register: https://rooms.lib.uchicago.edu/event/4920072
The Census Bureau collects and disseminates demographic and socioeconomic data for the United States. Join us to learn about core data surveys, hear about upcoming changes that will be introduced in the 2020 Census, and find how to locate and download census data using ICPSR and Social Explorer.

Citizen Science Snack Break
February 12, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
TechBar, Regenstein Library Room 160
Citizen science is a movement that encourages the general public to participate in data collection for scientific research. Join us for a fun citizen science activity and a snack. No registration required.

Data Privacy Tips and Tricks
February 13, 11:00 a.m. – noon.
Regenstein Library Room 523
Register: https://rooms.lib.uchicago.edu/event/4921164
Data breaches and online tracking scandals are now common occurrences. Are you interested in protecting your personal data but don’t know where to start? Join us for an overview of easy-to-use tools that can help safeguard your privacy.

A Date with Data
February 13, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Regenstein Library Room 122
Do you love data? Join us for cake, button making, demonstrations of open data resources and projects, and a chance to learn about data services offered at the University of Chicago Library. Enter the Census Data Knowledge Challenge for a chance to win a gift card! No registration required.

Open Geospatial Data
February 14, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Crerar Library, Computer Classroom
Explore open data sources for your mapping, visualization, and research projects in this session. We’ll review free data sources ranging from the local to the global. We will also cover available resources for supporting your geospatial projects. No registration required.

Laptop and phone chargers now available at Eckhart

Laptop and phone chargers are now available for checkout at Eckhart Library.  If your device is running low, feel free to ask for one at our circulation desk.  Chargers available include ones for Macbooks, PCs, Androids, IPhones and IPads.  Each can be checked out for two hours at a time.

A full list of the chargers available is here: https://bit.ly/2RgBtoT

We also have calculators and headphones available for checkout at our circulation desk.

Register today for the Library’s Winter Quarter workshops

The University of Chicago Library is offering a variety of workshops and programs during Winter Quarter highlighting tools, resources, and services available to you to support your work. Learn about academic publishing, GIS, data resources, citation management, copyright and more. Space is limited, so register for sessions today!

Center for Digital Scholarship Programs

Open Access, Self-Archiving, and Knowledge@UChicago
January 16, 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Join the Library for a discussion on the principles of open access, the individual and societal benefits of open research, and authors’ rights and self-archiving. We will consider strategies for expanding access to our scholarship and spend hands-on time with Knowledge@UChicago, the University’s open access digital repository for scholarly work. Bring a laptop to get started sharing and preserving your research!

Creating Digital Collections with Omeka
January 22, 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
This workshop will introduce participants to Omeka.net, a web-based tool that can be used to organize, describe, tell stories with, and share digital collections. Through hands-on exercises, we will navigate and explore the capabilities of Omeka.net. We encourage you to bring your own digital materials to play with during the session and to learn how you might curate them with Omeka!

Librarian Elisabeth Long (left) discusses a data management plan with Professor Stefano Allesina. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

Data Management 101
January 23, 11:00 a.m. – Noon, Regenstein Library 523 Register
Data management plans are researchers’ written strategies outlining how they will collect and take care of their data during the life of a project and what approaches they will take for sharing and preserving their data at the end of a project. This session will introduce the basic components of a data management plan, funder requirements related to data management planning, and DMPTool, a free online tool that guides researchers through the creation of a plan.

Working with Spatial Data
January 23, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Map Collection, Regenstein Library 370 Register
Come learn the core concepts of working with spatial data, including: spatial thinking for research, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), spatial data formats, finding spatial data, tools & software, spatial analysis & geoprocessing, Spatial Data Management, and geospatial resources.

Version Control with GIT
January 30, 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. Regenstein Library 523 Register
This class teaches about what Git is and how to use it, including an overview of GitHub and GitLab. What are the advantages of using it, and drawbacks to other ways of collaborative development? Laptops recommended for hands-on exercises.

Navigating ARCGIS Online
January 31, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Map Collection, Regenstein Library 370 Register
Need to make a web map? Find some spatial data? Come learn how to use ArcGIS Online in this hand-on workshop. No experience is needed – we’ll start with logging in and finish by creating you’re first web map. Please bring a laptop to participate in the workshop.

Introduction to ICPSR
February 6, 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. Regenstein Library 523 Register
This workshop will teach you how to get started with ICPSR (the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research). ICPSR is one of the largest social sciences data archives in the world. During the session, participants will learn how to create an account, browse and search for data, and download datasets. The session will also cover best practices for finding and evaluating datasets. Please bring a laptop to the session; one can be borrowed at the TechBar.

Navigating Social Explorer
February 6, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Map Collection, Regenstein Library 370 Register
Social Explorer is a platform for creating interactive maps that explore data from the U.S. Census and the American Community Survey. This session will introduce U.S. demographic data, producing interactive web maps, and how to download data for further analysis. Please bring a laptop to participate in the workshop.

Using the UChicago Map Collection
February 12, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Map Collection, Regenstein Library 370 Register
The University of Chicago Library is home to one of the largest map collections in North America, with over 475,000 sheets, in addition to aerial photos, atlases, and reference materials. This session will introduce you to the Map Collection, review how to find and access the maps, and highlight collections of particular interest to researchers.

Introduction to Copyright, Fair Use, and Permissions
February 28, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m.  TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
In academia, we frequently encounter copyright issues in research and teaching and this session will equip participants with tools and a foundation for navigating them. In this session, we will explore the length of copyright terms, probe fair use through case studies, and identify when and how to approach securing permissions for reuse of a copyrighted work. Led by Dan Meyer, Director of the Special Collections Research Center and Nora Mattern, Scholarly Communications Librarian.

Scholarly Communication Drop-In Hours
Mondays, 2:00 – 5:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160
Faculty, students, and staff are invited to drop by the Tech Bar collaborative space to consult with issues related to copyright, data management, and open access. Come talk tools and practices to work through questions like: Do I need to get permission to use this photo in my publication? How can I make sense of (and find) my data in years to come? How can I increase the visibility and impact of my work?

EndNote and Zotero Training  

Introduction to EndNote: Document Organizer and Bibliography Builder
January 16, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Crerar Library, Computer Classroom Register
EndNote is a research management tool used to keep track of citations, PDFs and other documents, and create formatted bibliographies as you write your paper. In this workshop, learn how to use the desktop version of EndNote. Topics covered include: creating and managing citation libraries, importing citations from online databases and other sources, importing and managing PDFs and creating bibliographies.

Librarian Rebecca Starkey with 3 students working on laptops.

Rebecca Starkey, Librarian for College Instruction and Outreach (standing), works with students to enhance their research skills. (Photo by Jason Smith)

Introduction to Zotero
January 18, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Register
January 28, Noon – 1:00 p.m. Register
January 31, Noon – 1:00 p.m Register
February 8, Noon – 1:00 p.m. Register
February 20, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Register
March 26, 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Register
TechBar, Regenstein Library 160
Learn how to use Zotero, a free citation manager that allows you to save and organize citation information while searching and browsing the Web. With a single click, Zotero saves citations and enables you to create bibliographies in popular citation styles (MLA, Chicago and APA).

Dissertation Support

Dissertation Draft Review Information for Students
January 15, 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. TechBar, Regenstein Library 160 Register
Are you a Ph.D. student planning to submit your dissertation soon? Do you want to know if you are on the right track with formatting your dissertation? Dissertation Office staff offer an optional draft review service during the first few weeks of each quarter. Come to this information session to learn more about draft reviews and the basic requirements for formatting your dissertation. Bring your questions and bring your laptop.

Dissertation Procedures for Students
January 22, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Register
January 23, Noon – 1:00 p.m. Register
TechBar, Regenstein Library 160
Are you a Ph.D. student planning to graduate in Winter 2019? Come to this information session about the procedures for submitting your dissertation using a web-based interface, the ETD Administrator. We will review formatting requirements and discuss open access for dissertations via the institutional repository, Knowledge@UChicago.

Love Data Week (February 11-15)

GIS and Maps Librarian and students with map of Chicago on monitor

GIS and Maps Librarian Cecilia Smith (center) discusses mapping tools and resources with (from left) students Paul Gilbert, II, College ’20, and Emil Sohlberg, College ’20. (Photo by Joel Wintermantle)

Introduction to Census Data
February 11, 11:00 a.m. – Noon. Regenstein Library 523 Register
The Census Bureau collects and disseminates demographic and socioeconomic data for the United States. Join us to learn about core data surveys, hear about upcoming changes that will be introduced in the 2020 Census, and find how to locate and download census data using ICPSR and Social Explorer.

Citizen Science Snack Break
February 12, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.  TechBar, Regenstein Library 160
Citizen science is a movement that encourages the general public to participate in data collection for scientific research. Join us for a fun citizen science activity and a snack. No registration required.

Data Privacy Tips and Tricks
February 13, 11:00 a.m. – Noon. Regenstein Library 523 Register
Data breaches and online tracking scandals are now common occurrences. Are you interested in protecting your personal data but don’t know where to start? Join us for an overview of easy-to-use tools that can help safeguard your privacy.

A Date with Data
February 13, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Regenstein Library 122
Do you love data? Join us for cake, button making, demonstrations of open data resources and projects, and a chance to learn about data services offered at the University of Chicago Library. Enter the Census Data Knowledge Challenge for a chance to win a gift card! No registration required.

Open Geospatial Data
February 14, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Crerar Library, Computer Classroom
Explore open data sources for your mapping, visualization, and research projects in this session. We’ll review free data sources ranging from the local to the global. We will also cover available resources for supporting your geospatial projects. No registration required.

March 8 deadline to apply for a Brooker Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting

Three people view case of books

Anna Wood (left) and Clare Kemmerer (right) view selections from their collections with Mr. Brooker (center). Photo by Klehr + Churchill

Second- and fourth-year College students at the University of Chicago with a theme-focused book collection are invited to apply for the T. Kimball Brooker Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting. The University of Chicago Library is pleased to sponsor this prize, which was established by Mr. Brooker, PhD’96, to foster a love of the book and to encourage book collecting among undergraduates. Applications are due on March 8, 2019.

Prizes include $1,000 for a second-year student and $2,000 for a fourth-year student.

Applicants for the prize are not expected to have collections that are large, valuable in monetary terms, or complete. Rather, the competition emphasizes thoughtfulness and intent in building a collection around the collector’s interests. Collections may focus on a topic, the work of one or more authors, or physical features such as illustrations and bindings. In addition to books, collections of musical scores and printed maps may be entered into the prize competition.

Past winners have collections focused on subjects that range from mathematical treatises to feminist zines, from cover art to Latin American poetry. A selection of books from prize recipients’ collections is highlighted in the annual Brooker Prize Web Exhibit.

Learn more about the Prize and how to apply at www.lib.uchicago.edu/brooker.

Books on display

Books that were part of winning Brooker Prize collections in 2018. Photo by Klehr + Churchill

People Apply now for 7 new graduate student fellowships at UChicago Library

The University of Chicago Library is offering seven fellowships as part of a new program for UChicago graduate students. The fellowships are designed to give graduate students opportunities to explore alternative scholarly careers and to build skills and knowledge in new areas of scholarship.

Interested graduate students are encouraged to apply by January 15, 2019, for currently posted fellowships. Additional fellowships will be posted as they become available.

Graduate student points to image on screen

A graduate student examines an image that will be added to the Digital South Asia Library. (Photo by John Zich)

Winter Quarter 2019 fellowships include:

  • Digital Scholarship Fellowship (Digital Archival Collections): The fellow will conduct background and biographical research, evaluate and select specific items for scholarly importance, write descriptions and contextual material for items in the collections, and create a digital scholarship project around one or more of the existing digital archival collections.
  • Digital Scholarship Fellowship (Digital Humanities): The fellow will collaborate with Library staff and faculty in the Humanities to develop resources and workshops, and to identify other strategies to support the new MA program and undergraduate concentration in Digital Studies of Language, Culture, and History. The fellow will learn about and use textual and visual corpora, digital humanities platforms and research methods, and analytic techniques.
  • GIS Fellowship for Historical Chicago Data: The fellow will conduct an environmental scan to identify existing geospatial data of Chicago in the 19th and 20th centuries. Based on the scan, the fellow will georeference important sheet map collections before digitizing data layers and creating metadata. These data layers will be made available via the Big Ten Academic Alliance Geoportal and locally at the university. The fellow will develop content that contextualizes the digitized data within existing resources.
  • Library Research Support Services Fellowship: This fellowship will provide graduate students with hands-on experience supporting researchers in an academic library through in-person and virtual reference services.
  • Metadata Fellowship for the Digital Media Archive (DMA): This fellow will be responsible for enhancing the metadata for the Mesoamerican holdings within the University of Chicago’s Digital Media Archive (DMA).
  • University Archives Fellow: Archives today are a rapidly expanding field with increasingly broad responsibility for preserving and making accessible unique materials in all formats—traditional paper documents, photographs, and analog recordings, as well as a growing array of digital content: email, databases, digital images, audio and video media, and web sites. This fellow will develop skills and expertise in all these areas while contributing to the programs and services of the University of Chicago Archives.
  • Web Exhibits Fellowship: This fellow will use existing digital resources from the Library Digital Repository to develop web exhibits, highlighting significant items from large digitized collections, and providing contextual information about the items and their collections and creators. The fellow will develop skills in conducting original archival research, and in presenting the results of their research to a broad audience in clear, concise, visually-engaging ways.

Winter 2019 fellowships come with a stipend of $3300 per academic quarter.  Fellowships typically involve approximately 15 hours of work per week.

For more information about individual opportunities and how to apply, visit the Library website or contact Andrea Twiss-Brooks at atbrooks@uchicago.edu.

Exhibits Feature Story The Fetus in Utero: From Mystery to Social Media

Exhibition Dates: January 2–April 12, 2019
Location: Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery, 1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

Diagram of fetus in utero

Du Coudray uses diagrams of the fetus in utero to help midwives-in-training see both the anatomical and emotional factors at play during pregnancy. Detail from Du Coudray, Abrégé de l’art des accouchements dans lequel on donne les préceptes nécessaires pour le mettre heureusement en pratique, 1777. RG93.L45 Rare. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Once restricted to the privacy of the doctor’s office, ultrasound images of the fetus are now immediately recognizable in the public arena through advertisements and social media, where posts tagged “baby’s first pic” are commonplace. Such depictions of the fetus in utero have become iconic and are arguably the most easily recognized medical image. How and why did this happen?

To answer this question, viewers are invited to embark on a 500-year visual journey, from Renaissance woodcuts to modern medical images. Along the way, they will encounter three major shifts in graphic representation. First, from 1450 to 1700, the fetus transformed from divine mystery to a topic deemed worthy of study. Second, from 1700 to 1965, the fetus achieved status as a medicalized subject whose visual ‘home’ was the obstetrical textbook. Third, from 1965 to the present, the fetus has achieved status in popular culture while maintaining its traditional medical role.

Through this rich visual culture, images of the fetus in utero have been used in the service of education, research, political agendas, patient-empowered medicine, and finally, entertainment. The images on view offer historical insights and a sweeping look at how the visual culture of the fetus in utero developed.

Hours: Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. – 4:45 p.m., and, when University of Chicago classes are in session, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 9 a.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Curators

Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, The University of Chicago; and Margaret Carlyle, Postdoctoral Researcher and Instructor, Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge, The University of Chicago

Life-size female manikin with fetus

This life-size female manikin served as a pedagogical tool for turn-of-the-20th-century medical students. Pilz anatomical manikin [female], [19–?]. New York: American Thermo-Ware Co. ffQM25.P545 19— RCASR. Special Collections Research Center, The University of Chicago Library.

Related Events

Curators’ Tours

Friday, January 4, 4:30–5 pm
Wednesday, January 23, 1:30–2 pm
Friday, February 8, 4-4:30 pm

1100 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL

Free 30-minute tours by the curators. Please meet in the front lobby of the Regenstein Library at the start time.

Opening Event

Thursday, January 24, 5–7 p.m.
5737 South University Avenue, Chicago, IL
This wine-and-cheese opening reception is hosted by the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge (SIFK).
RSVP required

Use of Images and Media Contact

Images from the exhibition included on this page are available for download to members of the media and are reserved for editorial use in connection with University of Chicago Library exhibitions, programs, or related news. For more information and images, contact Rachel Rosenberg at ra-rosenberg@uchicago.edu or 773-834-1519.

Issues of ‘Medicine on the Midway’ available on UChicago Campus Publications

Medicine on the Midway, Vol. 1, No. 1, December 1944 (previously titled Bulletin of the Medical Alumni Association, University of Chicago)

Issues of Medicine on the Midway from 1944 to 1981 have been digitized and are now available on The University of Chicago Campus Publications website. Formerly titled Bulletin of the Medical Alumni Association, this periodical was published by the School of Medicine at the University of Chicago.

University of Chicago Campus Publications is a digital collection of publications documenting the history of the University of Chicago and the work of its faculty, students, and alumni; read more about its launch.

New issues of Medicine on the Midway are available at UChicago Medicine.

Riccardo Levi-Setti, physicist and paleontologist

Levi Setti

Levi-Setti with some of his trilobites: https://bit.ly/2DRi4sK

Riccardo Levi-Setti, emeritus professor, died earlier this month.  He began his career as a physicist but also went on to research and publish in paleontology.  Born into a Jewish family in Italy, he survived the Holocaust in hiding.  He earned a PhD in physics in 1947 and started his career at the University of Chicago in 1956 as a researcher in particle physics.  He later developed an interest in the extinct sea creatures trilobites and published multiple books on the subject.

 

 

 

 

His books in physics include:

Elementary Particles, Chicago: University of Chicago Press [1965]. Crerar: QC721.L561

Strongly Interacting Particles, Chicago: University of Chicago Press [1973].  Mansueto: QC793.3.H5L6

 

Some of his books in paleontology:

Trilobites: a Photographic Atlas, Chicago: University of Chicago Press [1975]. Crerar: QE821.L65

Trilobites, Chicago: University of Chicago Press c1993.  Crerar: QE821.L460 1993.

More of his books in the Library: https://catalog.lib.uchicago.edu/vufind/Search/Results?type=AuthorBrowse&lookfor=%22Levi-Setti,%20Riccardo%22

His papers are also held in the Library’s Archival Collections: http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/8448151

University of Chicago News obituary

Setti-Levi in the university’s Cyclotron pit. https://bit.ly/2SbRjlV